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(MIT Technology Review)   Not news: Hospitals are full of nasty viruses. Fark: Computer viruses, that is   (technologyreview.com) divider line 24
    More: Scary, virus, medical devices, security patches, Conficker, National Instruments, Technology Review, Windows, anti-virus software  
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1242 clicks; posted to Geek » on 18 Oct 2012 at 11:36 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-18 08:49:20 AM
God damn it, subbs

You had a valid story to use the Ironic tag and you go for this?
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2012-10-18 10:09:20 AM
the malware problem at hospitals is clearly rising nationwide, says Kevin Fu, a leading expert on medical-device security

Kevin Fu was previously in the news for discovering how to hack into pacemakers. As we all become increasingly cyborg, he's somebody you don't want to antagonize.
 
2012-10-18 11:58:08 AM
FFFFFUUUUUUUU
 
2012-10-18 12:01:07 PM
I hope they didn't include the machine that goes BING.
 
2012-10-18 12:27:55 PM
That's what happens when you don't encrypt your floppy.
 
2012-10-18 12:43:02 PM
Was at a chamber of commerce breakfast at a local hospital yesterday, and the host opened up with several MRSA jokes in front of the hospital administrator.

Good times.
 
2012-10-18 12:48:23 PM

cman: God damn it, subbs

You had a valid story to use the Ironic tag and you go for this?


Came here to post this.

/by which I mean I finished my masturbation session early to type this message
 
2012-10-18 12:49:32 PM
Most health care workers are woefully ignorant of anything IT related, and will instinctively panic as soon as you ask them to do something even as simple as cutting and pasting from a keyboard. They will instinctively cry out "Well I'm not a computer person!" if you try to explain why something happens; to which I reply "Computers have been in hospitals for 20 years. You have no excuse for not knowing how to use them."

Trying to teach them about cyber-security is pointless, and it's better to simply lock down their machines so the only thing they can access are the programs they need to use for their jobs.
 
2012-10-18 01:01:20 PM

pjbreeze: I hope they didn't include the machine that goes BING.


Now it plays "La Cucaracha".
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2012-10-18 01:20:59 PM
Most health care workers are woefully ignorant of anything IT related, and will instinctively panic as soon as you ask them to do something even as simple as cutting and pasting from a keyboard.

When I worked in the field in the 1990s customers had a dangerous mix of carelessness and cleverness.

They discovered a feature we didn't know our product had. The data acquisition module could be unplugged, moved into a patient's room, and plugged into the computer later. We bought that part from another company. We just assumed it had to stay connected. The customer just assumed (correctly) it was meant to be hauled around.

The hospital network, on the other hand, was a mess, fragile and insecure.
 
2012-10-18 04:23:08 PM

AcneVulgaris: pjbreeze: I hope they didn't include the machine that goes BING.

Now it plays "La Cucaracha".


i.ytimg.com
Its more of a "hush hush, what what?!"
 
2012-10-18 04:59:31 PM
When I see articles like this, I need to remember to:

1. Step back a minute.
2. Breathe slowly.
3. Count to 10.
4. Say in a calm and measured voice, "DISCONNECT THOSE M*****F****** SYSTEMS FROM THE M*****F****** INTERNET YOU M*****F****** MORONS!"

TFA: The computer systems at fault in the monitors were replaced several months ago by the manufacturer, Philips; the new systems, based on Windows XP, have better protections and the problem has been solved, Olson said in a subsequent interview.

The OS on those systems was so old that it was recently upgraded to an OS which has not only been out for over ten years, it will be EOLed in two more. If these guys were in charge of the Air Force, they'd be currently upgrading our P-51 fleet to F-4s.

I don't know how much the regulations are actually to blame or if they're just a scapegoat, but this is also why you don't want the government prescribing technical solutions. The rapid pace of change in the IT world far surpasses the ability of a government agency (let alone a legislature) to keep current. You put in broad requirements and then step back. Let NIST figure out the technical stuff and point people to that.
 
2012-10-18 06:03:21 PM
Remote controlled death panels.

The wave of the future.
 
2012-10-18 06:38:47 PM
Since we're supposed to be "doing our work" and not browsing Fark, our computers have IE6 on them. That's it. No option to upgrade or even download a different browser. Im seriously on Fark using IE6 right now. I hate my life.
 
2012-10-18 07:30:12 PM
The computers I have at work still run WinXP. IE5 and have no form of antivirus at all. We run a program that is connected to our sister health facilities via the internet and is monitored by corporate as we are a private health facility. I see my co-workers bring in their flash drives from God knows where and plug them in to look at videos or sneakily do some university assignment work. Then you have the staff who youtube, facebook and visit all kinds of websites.

This comes to no surprise to me. I write up my progress notes and gtfo.
 
2012-10-18 07:44:27 PM
I was at a tech conference at a university a couple of years ago. There was an anecdote about computer security and hospitals. Apparently, their school of medicine's teaching hospital had their computers go down for an extended period of time. It turned out that some mysterious person had repurposed an unlabled data cable. The person responsible had no idea he was the cause of the computers going down, mostly because it took them hours to figure out that that cable was missing. THE cable. The one that apparently every other cable depended on.

It was unlabeled because they figured it was cheaper to have security through obscurity than to physically secure The Cable. What got me was that they were admitting that it took their troubleshooters several hours to track down the fact that The Cable was missing and the cause of their computers giving one another the silent treatment. At a semi-public tech conference. Granted, mostly it was alumni who already understand how screwed up the system is, and I'm sure they had mitigated the risks going foward. But it pointed out just how crazy it is that everyone pushes greater and greater computerization and protection of this and that without doing a sanity check on what the system's actual weaknesses are.
 
2012-10-18 08:03:14 PM
Fark. WTF are the device manufactures using Windows anyway? Why don't they use a mission-critical real time OS like QNX?

I'm no Windows hater, it's a great desktop OS. It's a good server OS for many things.

Embedded apps, though? Holy crap. What are people thinking? Whatever happened to using the right tool for the right job?
 
2012-10-18 08:07:02 PM

BolloxReader: I was at a tech conference at a university a couple of years ago. There was an anecdote about computer security and hospitals. Apparently, their school of medicine's teaching hospital had their computers go down for an extended period of time. It turned out that some mysterious person had repurposed an unlabled data cable. The person responsible had no idea he was the cause of the computers going down, mostly because it took them hours to figure out that that cable was missing. THE cable. The one that apparently every other cable depended on.

It was unlabeled because they figured it was cheaper to have security through obscurity than to physically secure The Cable. What got me was that they were admitting that it took their troubleshooters several hours to track down the fact that The Cable was missing and the cause of their computers giving one another the silent treatment. At a semi-public tech conference. Granted, mostly it was alumni who already understand how screwed up the system is, and I'm sure they had mitigated the risks going foward. But it pointed out just how crazy it is that everyone pushes greater and greater computerization and protection of this and that without doing a sanity check on what the system's actual weaknesses are.


"Nothing is foolproof to a sufficiently talented fool", the only sanity check for that should be upon whatever idiot decided that randomly removing a cat5 cable from between two devices they don't understand would be a wise plan of action. I always hope that such prudent judgement would be the norm in environments like hospitals but the technological ignorance continues to astound me instead.
 
2012-10-18 08:19:17 PM
Since when did embedded systems run Windows? There's no point...
 
2012-10-18 09:29:52 PM

BretMavrik: When I see articles like this, I need to remember to:

1. Step back a minute.
2. Breathe slowly.
3. Count to 10.
4. Say in a calm and measured voice, "DISCONNECT THOSE M*****F****** SYSTEMS FROM THE M*****F****** INTERNET YOU M*****F****** MORONS!"

TFA: The computer systems at fault in the monitors were replaced several months ago by the manufacturer, Philips; the new systems, based on Windows XP, have better protections and the problem has been solved, Olson said in a subsequent interview.

The OS on those systems was so old that it was recently upgraded to an OS which has not only been out for over ten years, it will be EOLed in two more. If these guys were in charge of the Air Force, they'd be currently upgrading our P-51 fleet to F-4s.

I don't know how much the regulations are actually to blame or if they're just a scapegoat, but this is also why you don't want the government prescribing technical solutions. The rapid pace of change in the IT world far surpasses the ability of a government agency (let alone a legislature) to keep current. You put in broad requirements and then step back. Let NIST figure out the technical stuff and point people to that.


Because the private hospitals we have right now have a stellar record of keeping computers updated.
 
2012-10-19 01:55:18 AM
our #1 virus problem is people surfing and getting one of those -you have 10billion viruses and trojans on your computer- it infects the profile. typically we are able to remove the latest virus in less than 5 minutes. older ones are caught by our AV software.

The most annoying one is people trying to figure out the passwords on our firewalls. hostname A password A hostname A password B.

6 wrong attempts causes it to lock out for 30 minutes. We have 10 honeypot systems that intentionally have open ports to get hackers to go after them. One of them has had 15 bots trying to crack it since July. I figure sometime after my great great great great great great grandchildren retire the apps will figure out a valid username and password.. government hospital, so yeah, we'd probably still have that model of computer.
 
2012-10-19 05:47:21 AM

madgordy: The most annoying one is people trying to figure out the passwords on our firewalls. hostname A password A hostname A password B.

6 wrong attempts causes it to lock out for 30 minutes. We have 10 honeypot systems that intentionally have open ports to get hackers to go after them. One of them has had 15 bots trying to crack it since July. I figure sometime after my great great great great great great grandchildren retire the apps will figure out a valid username and password.. government hospital, so yeah, we'd probably still have that model of computer.


How are people who don't already know the password getting close enough to your firewall's login to try them? Why are they on the same vlan as your regular network or god forbid open ports to the internet? I'm curious about the honeypots as well though, why bother? They just make you appear to be a juicier target then normal and cause annoying traffic, unless you're also participating in tracking them backward through their 7 boxxies to attempt to prosecute them or maybe just study them to see which variant of script-kiddie-du-jour they're employing there's not really much point in luring a script in to poke away endlessly at it.
 
2012-10-19 07:42:11 AM
I work in a hospital, and I gotta say, our network security is deplorable. Unfortunately, it's never going to improve because the building's IT department is apparently run by a little dude with SEVERE short person syndrome.

They swapped out all the desktop machines in my department without any warning whatsoever, so I had to go retrieve all my settings and documents before they blanked the drive. Nothing like having a balding 5'2" guy thrust his chest out at you and try to berate you because you dare suggest using a non-approved thumbdrive in HIS computers. I wanted to pat him on the head; the nerd alpha-male posturing was ADORABLE.

But yeah, internal security is a mess. The nannywall certainly catches any world of warcraft-related wikis.. Not too good about blocking the spyware-laden flash game sites.
 
2012-10-21 06:49:52 AM
My hospital's IT people demand we use IE6. I put Chrome on a computer and I was "nearly written up" as he put it.
 
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