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(Reuters)   This will end well: Nissan is introducing a "steer by wire" so you can crash while trying to reboot your car   (reuters.com) divider line 125
    More: Stupid, Cuban Missile Crisis, cold-war, Air France Flight 447, Infiniti, car companies, reboot, wires, engine control unit  
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6990 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Oct 2012 at 4:20 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-17 02:40:42 PM  
Most apirplanes made today are "fly by wire" so this isn't new technology, but what concerns me is the statment: "Drivers can also man oeuvre cars more easily as the system cuts out what it deems as unnecessary feedback from the tires to the driver." I wonder what sort of feedback they will cut out. We all use the feedback from the road and tires to help us steer through traffic.
 
vpb [TotalFark]
2012-10-17 02:53:21 PM  
Is there an app for that?
 
2012-10-17 03:05:28 PM  
Land Rover has been doing this since 01
 
2012-10-17 04:10:35 PM  
Did they put it in the Deltawing?
 
2012-10-17 04:21:58 PM  
I'm only interested in drive by wire if the computer is doing the driving.
 
2012-10-17 04:22:20 PM  
Don't VW's have this as well?
 
2012-10-17 04:23:26 PM  

minoridiot: Most apirplanes made today are "fly by wire" so this isn't new technology, but what concerns me is the statment: "Drivers can also man oeuvre cars more easily as the system cuts out what it deems as unnecessary feedback from the tires to the driver." I wonder what sort of feedback they will cut out. We all use the feedback from the road and tires to help us steer through traffic.


The concern isn't really the new technology it's when it needs to be implemented on a minimum budget/maximum profit scale.
 
2012-10-17 04:23:48 PM  

minoridiot: Most apirplanes made today are "fly by wire" so this isn't new technology, but what concerns me is the statment: "Drivers can also man oeuvre cars more easily as the system cuts out what it deems as unnecessary feedback from the tires to the driver." I wonder what sort of feedback they will cut out. We all use the feedback from the road and tires to help us steer through traffic.


i.imgur.com
 
2012-10-17 04:24:17 PM  
Four engineers are driving down the road when the engine starts running rough. They start arguing about the cause.
The ChE says "We've got a fuel problem; we need to drain the tank and refill it".
The ME says "No, the wheels are unbalanced; we need to get a front-end alignment and a wheel balance"
The EE says "You're both wrong; the ignition controls are messed up, we need to get the timing circuit checked"
The Software Engineer says "How about we just pull over, turn it off, and restart it?"

/thanks, I'm here all week
//try the veal
 
2012-10-17 04:24:24 PM  
In unrelated news, all roadside walls will be painted Microsoft Blue.
 
2012-10-17 04:25:49 PM  
My Nissan just blew a cylinder, so I am not getting a kick.
 
2012-10-17 04:26:10 PM  
Sounds like it should allow quite a few interesting improvements going forward, but also a bit worrying. Not like the car isn't almost totally run by a computer anyway even now though.
 
2012-10-17 04:26:54 PM  
Considering theres still alot of people who can't figure out the cruise control, this will not end up well.
 
2012-10-17 04:27:09 PM  

blatz514: My Nissan just blew a cylinder, so I am not getting a kick.


It was just Ice Cream, I SWEAR!!!
 
2012-10-17 04:27:59 PM  
My Acura is drive by wire. It's an 05.

Everything works great until have battery problems.
 
2012-10-17 04:28:14 PM  
minoridiot
Most apirplanes made today are "fly by wire" so this isn't new technology, but what concerns me is the statment: "Drivers can also man oeuvre cars more easily as the system cuts out what it deems as unnecessary feedback from the tires to the driver." I wonder what sort of feedback they will cut out. We all use the feedback from the road and tires to help us steer through traffic.


I thought Toyota Camrys already had technology.
 
2012-10-17 04:29:13 PM  
Another way of putting the steering wheel where ever you want to:

www.strangecosmos.com
 
2012-10-17 04:29:46 PM  
I thought Toyota Camrys already had [that] technology.

/One line and I blow it.
 
2012-10-17 04:30:58 PM  
Pffft. Pontiac was toying around with that back in '87.

images.hemmings.com
 
2012-10-17 04:31:21 PM  
"Under the new system, the driver's intentions are transmitted more quickly to the wheels because of the quick speed of electronic signals"

Because people are always complaining about how long it takes rotational input to travel from one end of a steering shaft to the other?
 
2012-10-17 04:32:36 PM  
[sarcasm]
It will be nice when cars no longer give feedback through the steering wheel. One less variable to worry about processing.
[/sarcasm]
 
2012-10-17 04:32:38 PM  
This... is not new. It is a necessary step for self driving cars though. It will be easier to get electronically controlled wheels to do what the computer wants once cars have autopilot mode.

I like getting road feedback though...
 
2012-10-17 04:37:15 PM  
FTA: "...we would be able to place the steering wheel wherever we like, such as in the back seat..."

ok, where's the 'car of the future' from the old cartoons with the mother-in-law in a capsule in the back?

Soon, I'll be able to drive my car from my desk! I can send it to run my errands!
/Exxxxxcellnet...
 
2012-10-17 04:43:38 PM  
Doesn't Google already have a car you can run through your search engine?
 
2012-10-17 04:44:19 PM  
I'm not too worried about this. Wouldn't buy a 1st generation drive by wire system though, but the 2nd generation on might be helpful. I suspect a lot of people will fly off the road going around corners because their wheel isn't responding like an old analog wheel used to. You know how it is, that tighter feel it gets as you go around a corner, the tighter it is, the more likely you are to fly off the road..one reason driving in video games is so hard. You can't tell when you're about to slip except by the gauges and on screen action.
 
2012-10-17 04:44:48 PM  
My understanding is that in the next few years the US government will require electric steering as part of the stability control.
 
2012-10-17 04:45:37 PM  
I can only imagine this working like that wireless steering wheel I had on my Nintendo 64. When the battery got low or the connection dropped, you found out about it by plowing into a wall. When I have steering problems in an older vehicle, I find out about it by turning being difficult or though mechanical feedback. Even when the power completely fails, I can still use "armstrong steering" to safely get to a good place to fix it.

On that note, most new cars don't give enough steering feedback as it is. I don't understand why anyone would want zero. Do you not care what the surface you're driving on? Even if I can't see the ice or loose gravel on the road, I sure find out about it through my steering wheel.

Besides all that, what's the point? It's not like conventional power steering is any less fuel efficient than steering by wire. It's just one more thing to break, and when it does, you have no backup system.

Keep that crap out of my car.
 
2012-10-17 04:45:40 PM  
This will end *so* well.
 
2012-10-17 04:45:43 PM  

Bleyo: This... is not new. It is a necessary step for self driving cars though. It will be easier to get electronically controlled wheels to do what the computer wants once cars have autopilot mode.

I like getting road feedback though...


I've seen some interesting experiments with steering wheel haptics - putting vibration motors and such in the wheel that could give the driver various cues, for example, if they are oversteering or another vehicle is in their blind spot.

Shouldn't be too hard to replace the road feel with something more useful. Also, the road feel is mostly feedback about wheel position - this would have to turn the steering via a motor anyway to keep it all in sync. If anything, you'll regain some feel in a performance car, and adjust it to your taste.
 
2012-10-17 04:47:04 PM  
It will be really entertaining when the electrical system craps out and the car just wanders off the road. I can also imagine that will be good times at the local Goodyear shop to try and fix
 
2012-10-17 04:47:06 PM  
I don't believe any cars have ever had steer by wire. You may be confusing it with electronic power steering (electric power steering pump) or drive by wire (electronically controlled throttle).
 
2012-10-17 04:48:20 PM  

Bleyo: I like getting road feedback though...


If the point is to help disconnect the driver from the driving process then there's no need for feedback.
...or a steering wheel, for that matter. A joystick should more than cover the job.

/Freeing up alot of legroom.
/granted, they could simulate feedback. It probably wouldn't satisfy more drivers tho.
 
2012-10-17 04:48:43 PM  
If it's good enough to help crash an Air France airliner into the Atlantic, it's good enough to help crash granny into a farmers market.
 
2012-10-17 04:48:56 PM  
Toyota has drive-by-wire
 
2012-10-17 04:50:03 PM  

minoridiot: Most apirplanes made today are "fly by wire" so this isn't new technology, but what concerns me is the statment: "Drivers can also man oeuvre cars more easily as the system cuts out what it deems as unnecessary feedback from the tires to the driver." I wonder what sort of feedback they will cut out. We all use the feedback from the road and tires to help us steer through traffic.


We already have stuff like that for steering on ice, etc. Those of us who actually learned how to drive on ice (I was taught in the middle of a blizzard in Colorado by a former demolition derby driver) refuse to drive with those systems :)
 
2012-10-17 04:50:33 PM  
I love the skeptics and naysayers. Their ancestors were saying all the same things about those newfangled gasoline powered contraptions never replacing the horse and buggy.
 
2012-10-17 04:53:37 PM  
Power steering is overrated. Unless you have a quite heavy car, manual steering can be an advantage - except for turning around in a very tight spot. Both my '68 Plymouth Valiant and my Datsun 280Z have manual steering, and honestly, I think that the sensitive feedback I get from having direct mechanical contact with the tires, and therefore the road, allows for much more precise driving, especially at high speeds. But, then, I'm an old car geek who doesn't even like automatic transmission, so I'm sure someone who views cars as nothing more than a conveyance from A-to-B would love the idea of a car with automatic...everything. Self-driving and drive-by-wire are pretty cool from a tech standpoint, but...I prefer to keep it simple.
 
2012-10-17 04:54:51 PM  
Need for Speed was doing just the opposite with this by adding Force Feedback to joysticks so you could feel the simulated roads.

So now real life is trying to get closer to video games by taking OUT the feedback so you don't feel the roads.

/dnrtfa
 
2012-10-17 04:56:53 PM  
This application
STEER BY WIRE 2.03
will be shut down. If problem persists, contact the vendor.

RRRRRRRRRRRR Crash!
 
2012-10-17 04:58:17 PM  
Hasn't this been in use for a while already? Doesn't Nissan use it?
 
2012-10-17 04:59:34 PM  
Meh. My 2004 Saturn ION is DBW
 
2012-10-17 05:00:19 PM  
Based on my personal on-road experience most of you suck so bad at teh driving in general that I welcome an idiot buffer between you and the wheels. Let the car do the work since most of you don't have the coordination to master Velcro-fastened shoes.
 
2012-10-17 05:00:54 PM  
Steer barb wire.

www.offthegridnews.com
 
2012-10-17 05:01:23 PM  
TFA: Under the new system, the driver's intentions are transmitted more quickly to the wheels because of the quick speed of electronic signals, Asai said.

Color me skeptical that electronic signals move appreciably faster than the physical information of the movement of a rigid body. Obviously they're unlikely to be appreciably slower, either; I merely question the concept of the difference being anything other than negligible. Steer-by-wire is a solution in search of a problem.
 
2012-10-17 05:02:40 PM  

FrancoFile: Four engineers are driving down the road when the engine starts running rough. They start arguing about the cause.
The ChE says "We've got a fuel problem; we need to drain the tank and refill it".
The ME says "No, the wheels are unbalanced; we need to get a front-end alignment and a wheel balance"
The EE says "You're both wrong; the ignition controls are messed up, we need to get the timing circuit checked"
The Software Engineer says "How about we just pull over, turn it off, and restart it?"

/thanks, I'm here all week
//try the veal


My previous car had a problem with the auto transaxle where it would get into a mode where it would keep abruptly shifting up/down between 1st and 2nd with a jerk. Pulling over and restarting the car would fix this for a while, then it would do it again a month later. Of course, it would never do this when the mechanic took it for a test drive, although he suspected a glitch in the electronic controller.

Finally it died completely. It spent a couple of days with the dealer trying to figure the mystery out. Finally, they gave up and just swapped out the whole thing and put in a brand-new replacement, and sent the bad one back to the factory for analysis.

Didn't cost me a cent. Ford paid for the tow and a rental for the 5 days.
 
2012-10-17 05:04:52 PM  

Current Resident: Pffft. Pontiac was toying around with that back in '87.

[images.hemmings.com image 700x478]


That's, er, interesting. Did that car have a name?
 
2012-10-17 05:10:11 PM  

AlanSmithee: That's, er, interesting. Did that car have a name?


Yep, Pursuit Concept
 
2012-10-17 05:10:22 PM  
Scarebus, now coming to a highway near you!
 
2012-10-17 05:10:22 PM  

Current Resident: Pffft. Pontiac was toying around with that back in '87.


Dear god that would be awesome to see on the road during the first real snow storm.

/ the first SAAB had those front wheel wells, was awesome for aerodynamics
// driving in the snow would cause ice pack along the sides until you couldn't steer anymore
/// Yes SAAB's were actually designed by airplane designers back then
//// less than 1/3rd the design team had a driver's license when they designed the prototype
 
2012-10-17 05:10:50 PM  
I like the by-wire idea when everything's working right.

I don't like the idea of a car that, if the battery's dead, I can't turn the front wheels.
 
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