Do you have adblock enabled?
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(BBC)   I got in one little flight and my mum got scared, she said you're moving at Mach-1 thru a void with no air   (bbc.co.uk) divider line 111
    More: Followup, skydiver, data recorder  
•       •       •

12707 clicks; posted to Main » on 15 Oct 2012 at 9:30 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



111 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread
 
2012-10-15 09:26:01 AM  
I think I watched a different feed than everyone else. In the one I watched he kept freezing up and looking like he was on the edge of curling up and asking for a teddy and the kindly old man on the radio kept having to coax him to move. Did anyone else watch that one?
 
2012-10-15 09:29:27 AM  
Now this is the story all about how
My life got flipped, turned upside down
And I'd like to take a minute just sit right there
I'll tell you how I became the king of the stratosphere  
 
In west Salzburg I was born and raised
Jumping off stuff is where I spent most of my days
Chilling out, maxing, relaxing all cool
Until they got fed up and kicked me out of my school
 
I was one of those guys who was up to no good
BASE jumping off everything in the neighborhood
From the Petronas Towers in Kuala Lumpur
And across the English Channel as part of my tour  
 
Then one day Red Bull rolled up on me and said Yo
We know that that ain't as high as you can go
So I got some training in altitude high-speed falls
And a wheelbarrow to haul around my big brass balls  
 
They took me up 24 miles off the ground
Where even the horizon was blue and round
Did Mach 1 before I landed here
And now I'm the king of the stratosphere
 
2012-10-15 09:32:11 AM  
If there's no air, then there's no sound, and hence, it is not Mach 1.
 
2012-10-15 09:32:31 AM  

unlikely: I think I watched a different feed than everyone else. In the one I watched he kept freezing up and looking like he was on the edge of curling up and asking for a teddy and the kindly old man on the radio kept having to coax him to move. Did anyone else watch that one?


I was assuming he was having problems hearing or something, which is why he wasn't responding so fast.
 
2012-10-15 09:33:40 AM  
Well, I don't know if he had Big Willie Style, but he probably had big something close to that.
 
2012-10-15 09:34:51 AM  
Funny, I didn't even realize, having watched that yesterday live, the guy talking on the ground was Kittinger.
 
2012-10-15 09:36:09 AM  
I hope he can dodge that baseball on the way down. You know, the one from when the subby HIT THAT HEADLINE OUT OF THE MOTHERfarkING PARK.
 
2012-10-15 09:36:36 AM  
Bravo, subs

/you too langston
 
2012-10-15 09:40:20 AM  

h2oincfs: If there's no air, then there's no sound, and hence, it is not Mach 1.


Actually the opposite iirc, the denser the material, the faster the speed of sound, so it's possible he was going several times the speed of sound in the atmosphere he was in. But I'm pretty sure for these purposes they're mostly talking about the speed of sound at STP, which we all know is 212 mph, or 100 centigrade.
 
2012-10-15 09:41:17 AM  
This headline pleases me.
 
2012-10-15 09:41:53 AM  

topcon: unlikely: I think I watched a different feed than everyone else. In the one I watched he kept freezing up and looking like he was on the edge of curling up and asking for a teddy and the kindly old man on the radio kept having to coax him to move. Did anyone else watch that one?

I was assuming he was having problems hearing or something, which is why he wasn't responding so fast.


Yeah. It seemed to be communication problems. Either he wasn't hearing the ground or the ground wasn't hearing him.

(I suspect the latter, as at one point he gives an annoyed thumbs up after being asked to confirm something for the third time.
 
2012-10-15 09:43:30 AM  
Bravo Subby!
 
2012-10-15 09:43:55 AM  
i.imgur.com
 
2012-10-15 09:45:47 AM  
Wow, jumping into that immensity makes humans like simultaneously tiny and big in heart.

And I don't even like jumping out second story windows.
 
2012-10-15 09:47:34 AM  
Big Brass ones.
 
2012-10-15 09:47:41 AM  

ZackDanger: (I suspect the latter, as at one point he gives an annoyed thumbs up after being asked to confirm something for the third time.


To release the hose from the capsule. He'd been having some trouble with the previous checklist item, though, and only disconnected the hose (and thumbs upped) once he'd completed that.
 
2012-10-15 09:47:47 AM  
Welcome back to Earf.
 
2012-10-15 09:48:21 AM  

Langston: Now this is the story all about how
My life got flipped, turned upside down
And I'd like to take a minute just sit right there
I'll tell you how I became the king of the stratosphere  
 
In west Salzburg I was born and raised
Jumping off stuff is where I spent most of my days
Chilling out, maxing, relaxing all cool
Until they got fed up and kicked me out of my school
 
I was one of those guys who was up to no good
BASE jumping off everything in the neighborhood
From the Petronas Towers in Kuala Lumpur
And across the English Channel as part of my tour  
 
Then one day Red Bull rolled up on me and said Yo
We know that that ain't as high as you can go
So I got some training in altitude high-speed falls
And a wheelbarrow to haul around my big brass balls  
 
They took me up 24 miles off the ground
Where even the horizon was blue and round
Did Mach 1 before I landed here
And now I'm the king of the stratosphere

 
2012-10-15 09:48:58 AM  

h2oincfs: If there's no air, then there's no sound, and hence, it is not Mach 1.


1) There was air. He was in the middle of the stratosphere.

2) The speed of sound at STP is around 760 mph IIRC. He hit 834.
 
2012-10-15 09:49:17 AM  
golfclap.gif

damn file size was too big
 
2012-10-15 09:50:35 AM  

topcon: Funny, I didn't even realize, having watched that yesterday live, the guy talking on the ground was Kittinger.


Ugh. That's so incredibly awesome. I wish I had realized that while I was watching.

I would have paid more attention to his expressions and emotions.

So awesome.
 
2012-10-15 09:50:50 AM  

Langston: Now this is the story all about how
My life got flipped, turned upside down
And I'd like to take a minute just sit right there
I'll tell you how I became the king of the stratosphere  
 
In west Salzburg I was born and raised
Jumping off stuff is where I spent most of my days
Chilling out, maxing, relaxing all cool
Until they got fed up and kicked me out of my school
 
I was one of those guys who was up to no good
BASE jumping off everything in the neighborhood
From the Petronas Towers in Kuala Lumpur
And across the English Channel as part of my tour  
 
Then one day Red Bull rolled up on me and said Yo
We know that that ain't as high as you can go
So I got some training in altitude high-speed falls
And a wheelbarrow to haul around my big brass balls  
 
They took me up 24 miles off the ground
Where even the horizon was blue and round
Did Mach 1 before I landed here
And now I'm the king of the stratosphere


[Golfclap]
 
2012-10-15 09:54:08 AM  

h2oincfs: If there's no air, then there's no sound, and hence, it is not Mach 1.


If there was "no air" then the balloon wouldn't have been risen that high, either. He jumped out "in" the atmosphere and legitimately broke Mach 1 at altitude.
 
2012-10-15 09:55:53 AM  

unlikely: I think I watched a different feed than everyone else. In the one I watched he kept freezing up and looking like he was on the edge of curling up and asking for a teddy and the kindly old man on the radio kept having to coax him to move. Did anyone else watch that one?


Communications issues, and the fact that his helmet visor heater malfunctioned before he even jumped. Not sure if there was a HUD inside that helmet, but being able to see where you are in relation to the ground is a good thing--as was evidence by the fact that at one point he was tumbling and had to get back under control.

No, dude has certified balls of reinforced titanium. In a similar position I'd be asking why the fark I should jump out of a perfectly good space capsule, then require a fifth of Jack Daniels, R. Lee Ermey in my ear, and promise that Salma Hayek was waiting in bed for me when I landed to get me to jump.
 
2012-10-15 09:56:02 AM  

unlikely: I think I watched a different feed than everyone else. In the one I watched he kept freezing up and looking like he was on the edge of curling up and asking for a teddy and the kindly old man on the radio kept having to coax him to move. Did anyone else watch that one?


I got the same impression. Could've been communication issues, but watching, I really thought he was nervous as hell. And who could blame him? Hell, that just make the guy seem more human and less psychotic.
 
2012-10-15 09:56:30 AM  

Matrix Flavored Wasabi: h2oincfs: If there's no air, then there's no sound, and hence, it is not Mach 1.

1) There was air. He was in the middle of the stratosphere.

2) The speed of sound at STP is around 760 mph IIRC. He hit 834.


761 mph to be exact.

My fluid dynamics classes are long behind me, but I seem to remember that the speed of sound also changes with air pressure, therefore going 834mph at 100,000 ft may still not be over mach 1. I'd have to dig through class notes (or Google) to be sure.
 
GBB
2012-10-15 09:58:24 AM  
Next up: BASE jumping off the ISS.

/the S stands for satellite, right?
 
2012-10-15 10:02:55 AM  

GBB: Next up: BASE jumping off the ISS.

/the S stands for satellite, right?


I'd assume Building, Antennae, Span and Earth doesn't include things not attached to the ground.
So you'll have to wait for a space elevator to get that achievement.

/Now 32,000 miles would be one hell of a fall...
/And just cause no ones said it: Nice headline, Subs.
 
2012-10-15 10:06:51 AM  
He said he thought about aborting because of his visor fogging up. How would he abort? Did he have a bb gun to shot a hole in the balloon or something?

For that matter, what happens to the capsule once he jumped?
 
2012-10-15 10:07:38 AM  

Flab: My fluid dynamics classes are long behind me, but I seem to remember that the speed of sound also changes with air pressure, therefore going 834mph at 100,000 ft may still not be over mach 1. I'd have to dig through class notes (or Google) to be sure.


Pressure and temperature of the medium. 332m/s at sea level and 0C, +1m/s per C.
 
2012-10-15 10:08:05 AM  
farm1.staticflickr.com
 
2012-10-15 10:08:09 AM  
i50.tinypic.com
 
2012-10-15 10:09:48 AM  

ManRay: He said he thought about aborting because of his visor fogging up. How would he abort? Did he have a bb gun to shot a hole in the balloon or something?


Valves at the top of the balloon. And presumably they'll bring it down (either gradually or all at once) when they're over nothing in particular.
 
2012-10-15 10:10:14 AM  
There's not enough air up there to smell anyone later.
 
2012-10-15 10:11:53 AM  

Langston: Now this is the story all about how
My life got flipped, turned upside down
And I'd like to take a minute just sit right there
I'll tell you how I became the king of the stratosphere  
 
In west Salzburg I was born and raised
Jumping off stuff is where I spent most of my days
Chilling out, maxing, relaxing all cool
Until they got fed up and kicked me out of my school
 
I was one of those guys who was up to no good
BASE jumping off everything in the neighborhood
From the Petronas Towers in Kuala Lumpur
And across the English Channel as part of my tour  
 
Then one day Red Bull rolled up on me and said Yo
We know that that ain't as high as you can go
So I got some training in altitude high-speed falls
And a wheelbarrow to haul around my big brass balls  
 
They took me up 24 miles off the ground
Where even the horizon was blue and round
Did Mach 1 before I landed here
And now I'm the king of the stratosphere


ic2.pbase.com
 
2012-10-15 10:17:08 AM  

ManRay: For that matter, what happens to the capsule once he jumped?


It disconnects from the balloon and parachutes down.
 
2012-10-15 10:18:07 AM  
I would do this anytime at all. Any. time. Just call me. 2 am - fine. In the dark - fine
Would be such a head rush
 
2012-10-15 10:18:32 AM  

unlikely: I think I watched a different feed than everyone else. In the one I watched he kept freezing up and looking like he was on the edge of curling up and asking for a teddy and the kindly old man on the radio kept having to coax him to move. Did anyone else watch that one?


0/10

Retired US Air Force Col Joe Kittinger has more sack than the combined fark user base.

Baumgartner just earned his pair - no question.
 
2012-10-15 10:18:59 AM  
That must have been the greatest view outside of the ISS. Must have been a boring trip up though hope he brought a book.
 
2012-10-15 10:23:54 AM  
This is Ghostrider requesting fly-by.
 
2012-10-15 10:25:11 AM  

theorellior: There's not enough air up there to smell anyone later.


Hal Clement posthumously begs to differ.
 
2012-10-15 10:25:37 AM  
Headline of the motherfarking year right here.
 
2012-10-15 10:29:13 AM  
If there is no air when he breaks the sound barrier, does anyone hear it?
 
2012-10-15 10:31:36 AM  
Now if he can only do it this way:

efficientawesomeness.com
 
2012-10-15 10:32:16 AM  
A friend said that his sack is so big that it could be used as an emergency chute, I have to agree. Felix has some major cojonies(sp). (Spellcheck didn't help...)
I could see the balloon from my house and with binoculars I could see sunlight glint off the capsule occasionally.
A local radio station had a live feed and it was amazing to watch, and rewatch.
 
2012-10-15 10:34:25 AM  

j0e_average: unlikely: I think I watched a different feed than everyone else. In the one I watched he kept freezing up and looking like he was on the edge of curling up and asking for a teddy and the kindly old man on the radio kept having to coax him to move. Did anyone else watch that one?

0/10

Retired US Air Force Col Joe Kittinger has more sack than the combined fark user base.

Baumgartner just earned his pair - no question.


Baumgartner: Maybe I should abort, my helmet is fogged up.

Kittinger: I gotta jump out of this thing, my suit is leaking and my hand has swollen up to roughly twice it's normal size.

/true story.
 
2012-10-15 10:35:26 AM  

ManRay: He said he thought about aborting because of his visor fogging up. How would he abort? Did he have a bb gun to shot a hole in the balloon or something?

For that matter, what happens to the capsule once he jumped?


It had it's own parachute.
 
2012-10-15 10:38:51 AM  

Langston: Now this is the story all about how
My life got flipped, turned upside down
And I'd like to take a minute just sit right there
I'll tell you how I became the king of the stratosphere  
 
In west Salzburg I was born and raised
Jumping off stuff is where I spent most of my days
Chilling out, maxing, relaxing all cool
Until they got fed up and kicked me out of my school
 
I was one of those guys who was up to no good
BASE jumping off everything in the neighborhood
From the Petronas Towers in Kuala Lumpur
And across the English Channel as part of my tour  
 
Then one day Red Bull rolled up on me and said Yo
We know that that ain't as high as you can go
So I got some training in altitude high-speed falls
And a wheelbarrow to haul around my big brass balls  
 
They took me up 24 miles off the ground
Where even the horizon was blue and round
Did Mach 1 before I landed here
And now I'm the king of the stratosphere


Everything about this thread is a win. The headline. This comment. Everything.
 
2012-10-15 10:40:20 AM  

Langston: Now this is the story all about how
My life got flipped, turned upside down
And I'd like to take a minute just sit right there
I'll tell you how I became the king of the stratosphere  
 
In west Salzburg I was born and raised
Jumping off stuff is where I spent most of my days
Chilling out, maxing, relaxing all cool
Until they got fed up and kicked me out of my school
 
I was one of those guys who was up to no good
BASE jumping off everything in the neighborhood
From the Petronas Towers in Kuala Lumpur
And across the English Channel as part of my tour  
 
Then one day Red Bull rolled up on me and said Yo
We know that that ain't as high as you can go
So I got some training in altitude high-speed falls
And a wheelbarrow to haul around my big brass balls  
 
They took me up 24 miles off the ground
Where even the horizon was blue and round
Did Mach 1 before I landed here
And now I'm the king of the stratosphere


outstanding
 
2012-10-15 10:42:09 AM  

h2oincfs: If there's no air, then there's no sound, and hence, it is not Mach 1.


wow - i did not remember that from physics at all
i was assuming the mach numbers were constants - obviously that's not the case.

theremoreyouknow.jpg
 
2012-10-15 10:44:37 AM  
fark this guy and everyone with their party balloons, were running out of helium and we need it for MRIs and other important things.
 
2012-10-15 10:45:13 AM  
Felix should be easy to spot now.

dcist.com
dcist.com
 
2012-10-15 10:45:51 AM  
At least he didn't go in over the Sea of Japan .
 
2012-10-15 10:45:54 AM  
I don't get why this is such a big deal. didn't someone already jump from the stratosphere like 40 years ago?
 
2012-10-15 10:47:48 AM  

ManRay: He said he thought about aborting because of his visor fogging up. How would he abort? Did he have a bb gun to shot a hole in the balloon or something?

For that matter, what happens to the capsule once he jumped?


The capsule was remotely separated from the balloon after he jumped, and came down on its own parachute. If something had gone wrong before he jumped, he would have come down with the capsule.

/saw the whole thing yesterday
//thought he was a dead man when he was tumbling
///Baumgartner has balls of adamantium
 
2012-10-15 10:47:59 AM  
Know who else was Austrian?
 
2012-10-15 10:49:07 AM  
While it is neat to watch, I really never understood the awe everyone is showing this guy.

He didn't design any of the equipment. Hell, if NASA pulled up to my house right now with a space suit and told me that in a nearby parking lot they had a balloon getting filled up with helium and they needed someone to jump out of their capsule at 130k feet, I would totally do it. All Baumgartner did was sit there watching a readout and talking to people on the ground. When he was told to, he open the door and jumped out. No different than any other skydive except the outfit and length of freefall. A failure is really no different a result between falling 125k feet or 2k feet.
 
2012-10-15 10:53:12 AM  

madgonad: While it is neat to watch, I really never understood the awe everyone is showing this guy.

He didn't design any of the equipment. Hell, if NASA pulled up to my house right now with a space suit and told me that in a nearby parking lot they had a balloon getting filled up with helium and they needed someone to jump out of their capsule at 130k feet, I would totally do it. All Baumgartner did was sit there watching a readout and talking to people on the ground. When he was told to, he open the door and jumped out. No different than any other skydive except the outfit and length of freefall. A failure is really no different a result between falling 125k feet or 2k feet.


You can probably make the same argument with John Glenn, the first American to orbit the Earth. All they did was strap him into a capsule and rocket him to space. He was there pretty much for the ride.
 
2012-10-15 10:56:28 AM  

BeesNuts: Kittinger: I gotta jump out of this thing, my suit is leaking and my hand has swollen up to roughly twice it's normal size.

/true story.


{{citation needed}} search engines won't give no love.
 
2012-10-15 10:56:34 AM  

stuffer: fark this guy and everyone with their party balloons, were running out of helium and we need it for MRIs and other important things.


All the more reason to get cracking on nuclear fusion. Then we will have all the party balloons and MRIs we could want.
 
2012-10-15 10:57:04 AM  

Pathman: h2oincfs: If there's no air, then there's no sound, and hence, it is not Mach 1.

wow - i did not remember that from physics at all
i was assuming the mach numbers were constants - obviously that's not the case.

theremoreyouknow.jpg


You didn't learn anything. Almost nothing in h2oincfs's post was accurate. Mach 1 is 768mph at sea level and it slowly drops as elevation increases up to 10k meters. I think it is around 610mph at that elevation. As you go higher the speed of sound starts going up, getting back up to 740mph at 50k meters. Felix jumped at under 40k meters. The speed of sound is impacted by both temperature and pressure. And no, it is not quite a vacuum at 30-40k meters - pretty darn close though. It would kill you pretty quickly.
 
2012-10-15 10:59:04 AM  

madgonad: While it is neat to watch, I really never understood the awe everyone is showing this guy.

He didn't design any of the equipment. Hell, if NASA pulled up to my house right now with a space suit and told me that in a nearby parking lot they had a balloon getting filled up with helium and they needed someone to jump out of their capsule at 130k feet, I would totally do it. All Baumgartner did was sit there watching a readout and talking to people on the ground. When he was told to, he open the door and jumped out. No different than any other skydive except the outfit and length of freefall. A failure is really no different a result between falling 125k feet or 2k feet.


Recovering from a rapid tumble at 100k feet with a fogged helmet and nearly no atmosphere to use for drag is a pretty spectacular feat.
 
2012-10-15 10:59:34 AM  

Flab: Matrix Flavored Wasabi: h2oincfs: If there's no air, then there's no sound, and hence, it is not Mach 1.

1) There was air. He was in the middle of the stratosphere.

2) The speed of sound at STP is around 760 mph IIRC. He hit 834.

761 mph to be exact.

My fluid dynamics classes are long behind me, but I seem to remember that the speed of sound also changes with air pressure, therefore going 834mph at 100,000 ft may still not be over mach 1. I'd have to dig through class notes (or Google) to be sure.


Speed of sound at 120k ft is actually lower. 710 mph. he easily exceeded it.
 
2012-10-15 10:59:55 AM  

stuffer: fark this guy and everyone with their party balloons, were running out of helium and we need it for MRIs and other important things.


Actually we are not running out of helium, the problem is we don't have enough plants up and running to process the helium we need.

Like a lot of stuff it is cheaper in some regards to process not in the US and what happens is we lost the capacity we once had.
 
2012-10-15 11:01:57 AM  

PsyLord: madgonad: While it is neat to watch, I really never understood the awe everyone is showing this guy.

He didn't design any of the equipment. Hell, if NASA pulled up to my house right now with a space suit and told me that in a nearby parking lot they had a balloon getting filled up with helium and they needed someone to jump out of their capsule at 130k feet, I would totally do it. All Baumgartner did was sit there watching a readout and talking to people on the ground. When he was told to, he open the door and jumped out. No different than any other skydive except the outfit and length of freefall. A failure is really no different a result between falling 125k feet or 2k feet.

You can probably make the same argument with John Glenn, the first American to orbit the Earth. All they did was strap him into a capsule and rocket him to space. He was there pretty much for the ride.


that's why they used monkeys and dogs first.
 
2012-10-15 11:02:00 AM  
This just in: Balloons can't rise above the atmosphere. Unless they're filled with something that weighs significantly less than the vacuum of space, which would be quite the advancement. I think we'd have heard about that one.
 
2012-10-15 11:02:12 AM  

THX 1138: Know who else was Austrian?


www.millionaireplayboy.com
 
2012-10-15 11:02:18 AM  

xtalman: stuffer: fark this guy and everyone with their party balloons, were running out of helium and we need it for MRIs and other important things.

Actually we are not running out of helium, the problem is we don't have enough plants up and running to process the helium we need.

Like a lot of stuff it is cheaper in some regards to process not in the US and what happens is we lost the capacity we once had.


We'll just have to start using hydrogen for balloons. What's the worst that can happen?

/famous last words
 
2012-10-15 11:03:34 AM  

Toy_Cop: I don't get why this is such a big deal. didn't someone already jump from the stratosphere like 40 years ago?


Joseph Kittinger jumped from 102,800 feet (31km) in 1960. Baumgartner just did it from 128,100 ft (39km).

Kittinger was actually CapCom for Baumgartners attempt.
 
2012-10-15 11:05:09 AM  

PsyLord: madgonad: While it is neat to watch, I really never understood the awe everyone is showing this guy.

He didn't design any of the equipment. Hell, if NASA pulled up to my house right now with a space suit and told me that in a nearby parking lot they had a balloon getting filled up with helium and they needed someone to jump out of their capsule at 130k feet, I would totally do it. All Baumgartner did was sit there watching a readout and talking to people on the ground. When he was told to, he open the door and jumped out. No different than any other skydive except the outfit and length of freefall. A failure is really no different a result between falling 125k feet or 2k feet.

You can probably make the same argument with John Glenn, the first American to orbit the Earth. All they did was strap him into a capsule and rocket him to space. He was there pretty much for the ride.


Not quite. Astronauts did do quite a bit of control work, but I guess they didn't have to early on since chimps and dogs were their predecessors. I think my point was that there was almost no experience necessary for the jump. Nothing to adjust. Just sit and wait for the order to jump. Not really that different from the jumps I've done. I'm not even sure if he pulled his own chute - it was probably automatic too. I would even suggest that Felix getting into a spin was caused by trying to go as fast as possible (face first) versus Kittenger who went back-first in a seated position. I would have gone flat, face down, for the view - I wouldn't have pointed down and risked a tumble.
 
2012-10-15 11:05:13 AM  

Belias: This just in: Balloons can't rise above the atmosphere. Unless they're filled with something that weighs significantly less than the vacuum of space, which would be quite the advancement. I think we'd have heard about that one.


but when the atmosphere runs out you're in space and there isn't gravity in space so you aren't really floating because of the balloon anymore, but becasue you were already moving that direction you keep going up because of the conservation of momentum. that's science!

... sort of.
 
2012-10-15 11:06:28 AM  

madgonad: Pathman: h2oincfs: If there's no air, then there's no sound, and hence, it is not Mach 1.

wow - i did not remember that from physics at all
i was assuming the mach numbers were constants - obviously that's not the case.

theremoreyouknow.jpg

You didn't learn anything. Almost nothing in h2oincfs's post was accurate. Mach 1 is 768mph at sea level and it slowly drops as elevation increases up to 10k meters. I think it is around 610mph at that elevation. As you go higher the speed of sound starts going up, getting back up to 740mph at 50k meters. Felix jumped at under 40k meters. The speed of sound is impacted by both temperature and pressure. And no, it is not quite a vacuum at 30-40k meters - pretty darn close though. It would kill you pretty quickly.


I just don't even know what to believe anymore
 
2012-10-15 11:08:16 AM  
 
2012-10-15 11:11:09 AM  

TehBoognish: wikipedia


Ah, I tried it like a real quote that's my problem. Thanks.
 
2012-10-15 11:11:19 AM  

Hyppy: Recovering from a rapid tumble at 100k feet with a fogged helmet and nearly no atmosphere to use for drag is a pretty spectacular feat.


He caused that himself - going headfirst, which is the least stable position. He should have just stepped and dropped like Kittenger instead of jumping head-first like a Red Bull marketing loon. It really didn't matter. Once more air got involved Felix slowed down and stabilized. I would even say that his efforts for a faster descent caused the early tumble which robbed him of the stable experience of falling at that speed and altitude.
 
2012-10-15 11:14:24 AM  

madgonad: No different than any other skydive except the outfit and length of freefall. A failure is really no different a result between falling 125k feet or 2k feet.


Not exactly. As mentioned in one of the post-jump interviews, the bulkiness of the suit prevents "feeling the wind." He had to use intuition (and probably had more than a bit of luck) to pull out of that multi-axis spin. It's not something that just any jumper with some practice and the right gear would have survived.

(Also, we now have some more firsthand experience at how wearing a pressure suit that thick interacts with the jumper's ability to control. SCIENCE).
 
2012-10-15 11:14:51 AM  

GBB: Next up: BASE jumping off the ISS.

/the S stands for satellite, right?


Would that require a booster pack to enter the gravity well? Because that might would be tye awesome thing anyone has ever done outside of rescuing an entire orphanage of blind kids AND their seeing eye puppies.

Oh, and nice headline subs.
 
2012-10-15 11:15:45 AM  

madgonad: Hyppy: Recovering from a rapid tumble at 100k feet with a fogged helmet and nearly no atmosphere to use for drag is a pretty spectacular feat.

He caused that himself - going headfirst, which is the least stable position. He should have just stepped and dropped like Kittenger instead of jumping head-first like a Red Bull marketing loon. It really didn't matter. Once more air got involved Felix slowed down and stabilized. I would even say that his efforts for a faster descent caused the early tumble which robbed him of the stable experience of falling at that speed and altitude.


Most of the reason for the jump was scientific research, including what happens when a person breaks the sound barrier during reentry. Sure, he could have towed a drogue like Kittinger too, but that would defeat the entire purpose.
 
2012-10-15 11:18:21 AM  
versus Kittenger who went back-first in a seated position.

Really?

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2012-10-15 11:21:18 AM  
What's the BFD? He fell. A long way. Big whoop.
 
2012-10-15 11:31:41 AM  

GBB: Next up: BASE jumping off the ISS.

/the S stands for satellite, right?


Wouldn't you just burn up during re-entry?
 
2012-10-15 11:31:57 AM  

Honest Bender: What's the BFD? He fell. A long way. Big whoop.


Seriously. MY fall would have been MUCH more dramatic, what with the little girl screams and pee showers.


They should never have put that girls school so close to the landing zone, and let me drink all that Red Bull.
 
2012-10-15 11:47:45 AM  

unlikely: I think I watched a different feed than everyone else. In the one I watched he kept freezing up and looking like he was on the edge of curling up and asking for a teddy and the kindly old man on the radio kept having to coax him to move. Did anyone else watch that one?


Maybe he panicked. From the New York Times article:

""It was harder than I expected," said Mr. Baumgartner, a 43-year-old former Austrian paratrooper. "Trust me, when you stand up there on top of the world, you become so humble. It's not about breaking records any more. It's not about getting scientific data. It's all about coming home.""

"Although he had no trouble jumping off buildings and bridges, and soaring across the English Channel in a carbon-fiber wing, he found himself suffering panic attacks when forced to spend hours inside the pressurized suit and helmet. At one point in 2010, rather than take an endurance test in it, he went to an airport and fled the United States. With the help of a sports psychologist and other specialists, he learned techniques for dealing with the claustrophobia."

"One of the techniques Mr. Baumgartner developed was to stay busy throughout the ascent. He conversed steadily with Mr. Kittinger, a former fighter pilot whose deep voice exuded the right stuff as he confidently went through a 40-item checklist rehearsing every move that Mr. Baumgartner would make when it came time to leave the capsule."
 
2012-10-15 11:49:39 AM  

roughridersfan: versus Kittenger who went back-first in a seated position.

Really?

[upload.wikimedia.org image 220x279]



Yes, actually. That photo was taken just prior to rotating to back first seated position which is the most stable because of the body's aerodynamics.

some info...

Kittinger was wearing a regular pressure suit with "winter coveralls" for protection. That is nuts. It must've been pretty damn uncomfortable and fairly unsafe. It's no wonder it took another 50 years before anyone tried it again.
 
2012-10-15 11:55:53 AM  

topcon: Funny, I didn't even realize, having watched that yesterday live, the guy talking on the ground was Kittinger.


3.bp.blogspot.com

Yahhh, dat vas me
 
2012-10-15 12:04:23 PM  

madgonad: Hyppy: Recovering from a rapid tumble at 100k feet with a fogged helmet and nearly no atmosphere to use for drag is a pretty spectacular feat.

He caused that himself - going headfirst, which is the least stable position. He should have just stepped and dropped like Kittenger instead of jumping head-first like a Red Bull marketing loon. It really didn't matter. Once more air got involved Felix slowed down and stabilized. I would even say that his efforts for a faster descent caused the early tumble which robbed him of the stable experience of falling at that speed and altitude.


You're clearly unfamiliar with a lot of details on this jump. First, Felix did in fact assist with the design of a lot of the equipment he used, particularly the jump rigs.

Second, the headfirst (delta position) jump was planned. It's a very stable position, and the only one in which he could've released the drogue chute safely. It'd be very risky to deploy the drogue on his back.
 
2012-10-15 12:06:15 PM  

TheDirtyNacho: roughridersfan: versus Kittenger who went back-first in a seated position.

Really?

[upload.wikimedia.org image 220x279]


Yes, actually. That photo was taken just prior to rotating to back first seated position which is the most stable because of the body's aerodynamics.

some info...

Kittinger was wearing a regular pressure suit with "winter coveralls" for protection. That is nuts. It must've been pretty damn uncomfortable and fairly unsafe. It's no wonder it took another 50 years before anyone tried it again.


Thank you for that information. Nice to learn a little more about it.

After stepping off "the highest step in the world," he fell on his right side for about eight seconds, then rolled over on his back to watch the silvery balloon against a black sky. 

That would have been a view that changed a bit quickly.
 
2012-10-15 12:08:03 PM  

carterjw: Flab: Matrix Flavored Wasabi: h2oincfs: If there's no air, then there's no sound, and hence, it is not Mach 1.

1) There was air. He was in the middle of the stratosphere.

2) The speed of sound at STP is around 760 mph IIRC. He hit 834.

761 mph to be exact.

My fluid dynamics classes are long behind me, but I seem to remember that the speed of sound also changes with air pressure, therefore going 834mph at 100,000 ft may still not be over mach 1. I'd have to dig through class notes (or Google) to be sure.

Speed of sound at 120k ft is actually lower. 710 mph. he easily exceeded it.


Children, children! I wrote the headline because it fitted the flow of the lyrics.... I knew there was air, but I just did not care. Was ignorant of Mach 1; and now know I was wrong. Fresh Prince was the goal, facts in part, but not whole. So please S-T-F-U, Langston - all kudos to

/subby
 
2012-10-15 12:20:44 PM  

Hyppy: madgonad: Hyppy: Recovering from a rapid tumble at 100k feet with a fogged helmet and nearly no atmosphere to use for drag is a pretty spectacular feat.

He caused that himself - going headfirst, which is the least stable position. He should have just stepped and dropped like Kittenger instead of jumping head-first like a Red Bull marketing loon. It really didn't matter. Once more air got involved Felix slowed down and stabilized. I would even say that his efforts for a faster descent caused the early tumble which robbed him of the stable experience of falling at that speed and altitude.

Most of the reason for the jump was scientific research, including what happens when a person breaks the sound barrier during reentry. Sure, he could have towed a drogue like Kittinger too, but that would defeat the entire purpose.



The suit is the really impressive part. Pressurized space suits have been normally very bulky and difficult to maneuver in when fully pressurized. Felix's suit from David C. Clark is a big step forward in creating a trim, easy to manuever suit. This has all kinds of applications in future space exploration, and also high altitude bailouts.

The space shuttle, for example, had a bailout option but only around 30k feet. Above that at the pressure suits they wore during ascent/descent were not maneuverable enough to exit the craft, nor rated for high speed skydiving. Those suits were really only to allow them to fly the space shuttle back to earth with a loss of cabin pressure.
 
2012-10-15 12:33:24 PM  
You do realize that you could push your mom off that billion dollar capsule, while wearing a billion dollar suit and she would live, right?

I like how the article says he had to use all his vast experience to stop tumbling, lmfao.

Lick it up kiddies, slurp up whatever offal the corporations have served up for you today.
 
2012-10-15 12:34:04 PM  
For all the moobs trying to correct h2oincfs, how about you actually a) read what he said, and b) read the headline of which he's referring.

*IF* there is no medium, there is no sound, therefore no "Mach".

The headline specifically states "a void with no air."

He wasn't referring to the article, or even the subject at-hand. He was correcting the headline, in proper Fark fashion. Now I'm accusing all of you of having no reading comprehension, in proper Fark fashion.

/smug self-satisfied slashies, in proper Fark fashion
//can't slash just one
 
2012-10-15 12:37:16 PM  

PsyLord: GBB: Next up: BASE jumping off the ISS.

/the S stands for satellite, right?

Wouldn't you just burn up during re-entry?


If you fell strait down from ISS altitude?
You'd probably hit mach 3 and oven hot temperatures for five minutes. I could see a suit designed to survive that.

Problem is the ISS is moving at somewhere around 25k miles per hour.
So if you jumped from the stations orbit and decelerated for reentry, you'd impact the atmosphere at shuttle speeds and sit in blast furnace temperatures for ten to fifteen minutes.

It would take one hell of a suit design to even stand a chance.
 
2012-10-15 12:51:39 PM  

way south: PsyLord: GBB: Next up: BASE jumping off the ISS.

/the S stands for satellite, right?

Wouldn't you just burn up during re-entry?

If you fell strait down from ISS altitude?
You'd probably hit mach 3 and oven hot temperatures for five minutes. I could see a suit designed to survive that.

Problem is the ISS is moving at somewhere around 25k miles per hour.
So if you jumped from the stations orbit and decelerated for reentry, you'd impact the atmosphere at shuttle speeds and sit in blast furnace temperatures for ten to fifteen minutes.

It would take one hell of a suit design to even stand a chance.



We're a long way from orbital skydiving. You'd need some fast acting retro rockets to slow down enough to not burn up. Not sure about the g-forces involved in that though.
 
2012-10-15 12:59:37 PM  

way south: PsyLord: GBB: Next up: BASE jumping off the ISS.

/the S stands for satellite, right?

Wouldn't you just burn up during re-entry?

If you fell strait down from ISS altitude?
You'd probably hit mach 3 and oven hot temperatures for five minutes. I could see a suit designed to survive that.

Problem is the ISS is moving at somewhere around 25k miles per hour.
So if you jumped from the stations orbit and decelerated for reentry, you'd impact the atmosphere at shuttle speeds and sit in blast furnace temperatures for ten to fifteen minutes.

It would take one hell of a suit design to even stand a chance.


What such a suit might look like:

www.anoushehansari.com
 
2012-10-15 01:12:01 PM  

Captain_Ballbeard: You do realize that you could push your mom off that billion dollar capsule, while wearing a billion dollar suit and she would live, right?

I like how the article says he had to use all his vast experience to stop tumbling, lmfao.

Lick it up kiddies, slurp up whatever offal the corporations have served up for you today.


She'd be alive right until the time she loses consciousness and dies from the centripetal force of tumbling. She may be lucky enough that the CYPRES may save her depending on her position when the reserve deploys.

Have you ever seen an AFF Level 1 skydiving jump? There's a reason why it takes 2 instructors to hold on to the student. They're generally not experienced enough to prevent tumbling. And that's at under 20k feet.
 
2012-10-15 01:29:40 PM  

madgonad: PsyLord: madgonad: While it is neat to watch, I really never understood the awe everyone is showing this guy.

He didn't design any of the equipment. Hell, if NASA pulled up to my house right now with a space suit and told me that in a nearby parking lot they had a balloon getting filled up with helium and they needed someone to jump out of their capsule at 130k feet, I would totally do it. All Baumgartner did was sit there watching a readout and talking to people on the ground. When he was told to, he open the door and jumped out. No different than any other skydive except the outfit and length of freefall. A failure is really no different a result between falling 125k feet or 2k feet.

You can probably make the same argument with John Glenn, the first American to orbit the Earth. All they did was strap him into a capsule and rocket him to space. He was there pretty much for the ride.

Not quite. Astronauts did do quite a bit of control work, but I guess they didn't have to early on since chimps and dogs were their predecessors. I think my point was that there was almost no experience necessary for the jump. Nothing to adjust. Just sit and wait for the order to jump. Not really that different from the jumps I've done. I'm not even sure if he pulled his own chute - it was probably automatic too. I would even suggest that Felix getting into a spin was caused by trying to go as fast as possible (face first) versus Kittenger who went back-first in a seated position. I would have gone flat, face down, for the view - I wouldn't have pointed down and risked a tumble.


It's my understanding that the reason for the tumbling was that from where he jumped there wasn't enough atmosphere to give him any control. Nearly Impossible to right yourself with nothing to push against. When he landed he said the spin from the tumble was so severe he almost blacked out, thts the sort of endurance most skydivers dont have, the sort normally reaerved for fighter pilots. Also I read somewhere that he did pull the chute himself. There was an automatic backup option if he were incapacitated, but I think that would have invalidated some of the records he broke. In fact the reason he didn't get the record for longest (time) free fall was because he pulled his chute a bit early on a guess because he couldn't see his altimeter due to the visor heater malfunction.
 
2012-10-15 01:33:00 PM  

Matrix Flavored Wasabi: h2oincfs: If there's no air, then there's no sound, and hence, it is not Mach 1.

1) There was air. He was in the middle of the stratosphere.

2) The speed of sound at STP is around 760 mph IIRC. He hit 834.


STP doesn't matter. There are major, discrete flow changes at the local Mach number.
 
2012-10-15 01:36:05 PM  

meta1hed: Matrix Flavored Wasabi: h2oincfs: If there's no air, then there's no sound, and hence, it is not Mach 1.

1) There was air. He was in the middle of the stratosphere.

2) The speed of sound at STP is around 760 mph IIRC. He hit 834.

STP doesn't matter. There are major, discrete flow changes at the local Mach number.


You know what...sound travels slower with an increase in altitude, so it's possible that his Mach number was HIGHER that if it were calculated at sea-level.
 
2012-10-15 01:49:20 PM  

meta1hed: meta1hed: Matrix Flavored Wasabi: h2oincfs: If there's no air, then there's no sound, and hence, it is not Mach 1.

1) There was air. He was in the middle of the stratosphere.

2) The speed of sound at STP is around 760 mph IIRC. He hit 834.

STP doesn't matter. There are major, discrete flow changes at the local Mach number.

You know what...sound travels slower with an increase in altitude, so it's possible that his Mach number was HIGHER that if it were calculated at sea-level.


Yeah, denser medium = higher sound barrier, so STP is the highest theoretical speed of sound and he broke that by quite a bit.
 
2012-10-15 01:59:31 PM  
It takes more than just breaking the sound barrier to make this more than a "15 minutes of fame" story:

#1 Kittinger already did it 52 years ago.

#2 Other developments in space exploration have kinda eclipsed this sort of thing.

/bye, Felix
 
2012-10-15 02:57:53 PM  

rico567: It takes more than just breaking the sound barrier to make this more than a "15 minutes of fame" story:

#1 Kittinger already did it 52 years ago.

#2 Other developments in space exploration have kinda eclipsed this sort of thing.

/bye, Felix


Bet these guys wish they had the data/knowledge from this event...
 
2012-10-15 02:58:47 PM  
It's amazing how well voids with no air can lift weather balloons
 
2012-10-15 02:59:04 PM  
media.thestate.com
 
2012-10-15 02:59:52 PM  

Fark Rye For Many Whores: BeesNuts: Kittinger: I gotta jump out of this thing, my suit is leaking and my hand has swollen up to roughly twice it's normal size.

/true story.

{{citation needed}} search engines won't give no love.


Protected against the subzero temperatures by layers of clothes and a pressure suit--he experienced air temperatures as low as minus 94 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 70 degrees Celsius)--and loaded down with gear that almost doubled his weight, he climbed to his maximum altitude in one hour and 31 minutes even though at 43,000 feet (13,106 meters) he began experiencing severe pain in his right hand caused by a failure in his pressure glove and could have scrubbed the mission. He remained at peak altitude for about 12 minutes; then he stepped out of his gondola into the darkness of space.

Another fun fact. Less than a year before his record setting jump in 1960, Kittinger was nearly killed when his drogue 'chute got tangled around his neck and sent him into a flat spin. Rotating at a rate of over 120 rpm, he blacked out because the centripetal force was pulling the blood right out of his brain. He survived only because his automatic back-up parachute worked swimmingly.

And then he did it again. From higher up.
 
2012-10-15 03:03:45 PM  

fat boy: At least he didn't go in over the Sea of Japan .


There were no survivors.
/wahhhhhhhhhh
 
2012-10-15 03:05:33 PM  

Amos Quito: THX 1138: Know who else was Austrian?

[www.millionaireplayboy.com image 400x250]


upload.wikimedia.org
 
2012-10-15 06:55:04 PM  
cdn.uproxx.com
/Approves this thread
 
2012-10-15 07:07:26 PM  

h2oincfs: If there's no air, then there's no sound, and hence, it is not Mach 1.


There obviously *is* air, otherwise the balloon wouldn't float.
4.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-10-15 07:29:48 PM  
Chuck Norris gave Felix a nod and welcomed him to the bad-ass club.
 
2012-10-16 05:30:10 AM  

BeesNuts: Fark Rye For Many Whores: BeesNuts: Kittinger: I gotta jump out of this thing, my suit is leaking and my hand has swollen up to roughly twice it's normal size.

/true story.

{{citation needed}} search engines won't give no love.

Protected against the subzero temperatures by layers of clothes and a pressure suit--he experienced air temperatures as low as minus 94 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 70 degrees Celsius)--and loaded down with gear that almost doubled his weight, he climbed to his maximum altitude in one hour and 31 minutes even though at 43,000 feet (13,106 meters) he began experiencing severe pain in his right hand caused by a failure in his pressure glove and could have scrubbed the mission. He remained at peak altitude for about 12 minutes; then he stepped out of his gondola into the darkness of space.

Another fun fact. Less than a year before his record setting jump in 1960, Kittinger was nearly killed when his drogue 'chute got tangled around his neck and sent him into a flat spin. Rotating at a rate of over 120 rpm, he blacked out because the centripetal force was pulling the blood right out of his brain. He survived only because his automatic back-up parachute worked swimmingly.

And then he did it again. From higher up.


Seems to me that jumping was Kittinger's best (and possibly only real) choice at that stage. It's a bit like when an Everest climber starts showing signs of cerebral oedema and you need to get them down to a lower altitude ASAP.

eg If there was a safe toboggan route down from the summit of Everest (or even an elevator constructed inside the mountain) then anyone who had just summited and was feeling the onset of altitude sickness could just jump onto it and glissade down to a safer altitude.

I'm not saying that Kittenger wasn't ballsy as all hell, but I don't really see how he had any other genuine choice besides jumping. What would staying with the balloon as it slowly descended have gained him? Am I missing something here?

Also, the article states that "However, the FAI rules, state that to claim an official ballooning record, a balloonist must also bring the envelope down and therefore the Austrian's altitude will forever remain just an unofficial mark." It doesn't actually say what the "envelope" is. Is it the balloon itself?
 
2012-10-16 06:10:16 PM  

Trapper439: BeesNuts: Fark Rye For Many Whores: BeesNuts: Kittinger: I gotta jump out of this thing, my suit is leaking and my hand has swollen up to roughly twice it's normal size.

/true story.

{{citation needed}} search engines won't give no love.

Protected against the subzero temperatures by layers of clothes and a pressure suit--he experienced air temperatures as low as minus 94 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 70 degrees Celsius)--and loaded down with gear that almost doubled his weight, he climbed to his maximum altitude in one hour and 31 minutes even though at 43,000 feet (13,106 meters) he began experiencing severe pain in his right hand caused by a failure in his pressure glove and could have scrubbed the mission. He remained at peak altitude for about 12 minutes; then he stepped out of his gondola into the darkness of space.

Another fun fact. Less than a year before his record setting jump in 1960, Kittinger was nearly killed when his drogue 'chute got tangled around his neck and sent him into a flat spin. Rotating at a rate of over 120 rpm, he blacked out because the centripetal force was pulling the blood right out of his brain. He survived only because his automatic back-up parachute worked swimmingly.

And then he did it again. From higher up.

Seems to me that jumping was Kittinger's best (and possibly only real) choice at that stage. It's a bit like when an Everest climber starts showing signs of cerebral oedema and you need to get them down to a lower altitude ASAP.

eg If there was a safe toboggan route down from the summit of Everest (or even an elevator constructed inside the mountain) then anyone who had just summited and was feeling the onset of altitude sickness could just jump onto it and glissade down to a safer altitude.

I'm not saying that Kittenger wasn't ballsy as all hell, but I don't really see how he had any other genuine choice besides jumping. What would staying with the balloon as it slowly descended have gained him? Am I missing something here ...


He experienced the problem at 43,000 feet. Roughly 40% of his eventual apex. Had he scrubbed the mission at that point he would have avoided approximately an 45 minutes of ascent time -during which conditions became even less pleasant- followed by his 12 minute dwell at peak height and his 13 minute 45 second descent.

Just sayin'.
 
Displayed 111 of 111 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
Advertisement
On Twitter






In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report