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(BBC)   I got in one little flight and my mum got scared, she said you're moving at Mach-1 thru a void with no air   (bbc.co.uk) divider line 111
    More: Followup, skydiver, data recorder  
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12693 clicks; posted to Main » on 15 Oct 2012 at 9:30 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-15 02:57:53 PM  

rico567: It takes more than just breaking the sound barrier to make this more than a "15 minutes of fame" story:

#1 Kittinger already did it 52 years ago.

#2 Other developments in space exploration have kinda eclipsed this sort of thing.

/bye, Felix


Bet these guys wish they had the data/knowledge from this event...
 
2012-10-15 02:58:47 PM  
It's amazing how well voids with no air can lift weather balloons
 
2012-10-15 02:59:04 PM  
media.thestate.com
 
2012-10-15 02:59:52 PM  

Fark Rye For Many Whores: BeesNuts: Kittinger: I gotta jump out of this thing, my suit is leaking and my hand has swollen up to roughly twice it's normal size.

/true story.

{{citation needed}} search engines won't give no love.


Protected against the subzero temperatures by layers of clothes and a pressure suit--he experienced air temperatures as low as minus 94 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 70 degrees Celsius)--and loaded down with gear that almost doubled his weight, he climbed to his maximum altitude in one hour and 31 minutes even though at 43,000 feet (13,106 meters) he began experiencing severe pain in his right hand caused by a failure in his pressure glove and could have scrubbed the mission. He remained at peak altitude for about 12 minutes; then he stepped out of his gondola into the darkness of space.

Another fun fact. Less than a year before his record setting jump in 1960, Kittinger was nearly killed when his drogue 'chute got tangled around his neck and sent him into a flat spin. Rotating at a rate of over 120 rpm, he blacked out because the centripetal force was pulling the blood right out of his brain. He survived only because his automatic back-up parachute worked swimmingly.

And then he did it again. From higher up.
 
2012-10-15 03:03:45 PM  

fat boy: At least he didn't go in over the Sea of Japan .


There were no survivors.
/wahhhhhhhhhh
 
2012-10-15 03:05:33 PM  

Amos Quito: THX 1138: Know who else was Austrian?

[www.millionaireplayboy.com image 400x250]


upload.wikimedia.org
 
2012-10-15 06:55:04 PM  
cdn.uproxx.com
/Approves this thread
 
2012-10-15 07:07:26 PM  

h2oincfs: If there's no air, then there's no sound, and hence, it is not Mach 1.


There obviously *is* air, otherwise the balloon wouldn't float.
4.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-10-15 07:29:48 PM  
Chuck Norris gave Felix a nod and welcomed him to the bad-ass club.
 
2012-10-16 05:30:10 AM  

BeesNuts: Fark Rye For Many Whores: BeesNuts: Kittinger: I gotta jump out of this thing, my suit is leaking and my hand has swollen up to roughly twice it's normal size.

/true story.

{{citation needed}} search engines won't give no love.

Protected against the subzero temperatures by layers of clothes and a pressure suit--he experienced air temperatures as low as minus 94 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 70 degrees Celsius)--and loaded down with gear that almost doubled his weight, he climbed to his maximum altitude in one hour and 31 minutes even though at 43,000 feet (13,106 meters) he began experiencing severe pain in his right hand caused by a failure in his pressure glove and could have scrubbed the mission. He remained at peak altitude for about 12 minutes; then he stepped out of his gondola into the darkness of space.

Another fun fact. Less than a year before his record setting jump in 1960, Kittinger was nearly killed when his drogue 'chute got tangled around his neck and sent him into a flat spin. Rotating at a rate of over 120 rpm, he blacked out because the centripetal force was pulling the blood right out of his brain. He survived only because his automatic back-up parachute worked swimmingly.

And then he did it again. From higher up.


Seems to me that jumping was Kittinger's best (and possibly only real) choice at that stage. It's a bit like when an Everest climber starts showing signs of cerebral oedema and you need to get them down to a lower altitude ASAP.

eg If there was a safe toboggan route down from the summit of Everest (or even an elevator constructed inside the mountain) then anyone who had just summited and was feeling the onset of altitude sickness could just jump onto it and glissade down to a safer altitude.

I'm not saying that Kittenger wasn't ballsy as all hell, but I don't really see how he had any other genuine choice besides jumping. What would staying with the balloon as it slowly descended have gained him? Am I missing something here?

Also, the article states that "However, the FAI rules, state that to claim an official ballooning record, a balloonist must also bring the envelope down and therefore the Austrian's altitude will forever remain just an unofficial mark." It doesn't actually say what the "envelope" is. Is it the balloon itself?
 
2012-10-16 06:10:16 PM  

Trapper439: BeesNuts: Fark Rye For Many Whores: BeesNuts: Kittinger: I gotta jump out of this thing, my suit is leaking and my hand has swollen up to roughly twice it's normal size.

/true story.

{{citation needed}} search engines won't give no love.

Protected against the subzero temperatures by layers of clothes and a pressure suit--he experienced air temperatures as low as minus 94 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 70 degrees Celsius)--and loaded down with gear that almost doubled his weight, he climbed to his maximum altitude in one hour and 31 minutes even though at 43,000 feet (13,106 meters) he began experiencing severe pain in his right hand caused by a failure in his pressure glove and could have scrubbed the mission. He remained at peak altitude for about 12 minutes; then he stepped out of his gondola into the darkness of space.

Another fun fact. Less than a year before his record setting jump in 1960, Kittinger was nearly killed when his drogue 'chute got tangled around his neck and sent him into a flat spin. Rotating at a rate of over 120 rpm, he blacked out because the centripetal force was pulling the blood right out of his brain. He survived only because his automatic back-up parachute worked swimmingly.

And then he did it again. From higher up.

Seems to me that jumping was Kittinger's best (and possibly only real) choice at that stage. It's a bit like when an Everest climber starts showing signs of cerebral oedema and you need to get them down to a lower altitude ASAP.

eg If there was a safe toboggan route down from the summit of Everest (or even an elevator constructed inside the mountain) then anyone who had just summited and was feeling the onset of altitude sickness could just jump onto it and glissade down to a safer altitude.

I'm not saying that Kittenger wasn't ballsy as all hell, but I don't really see how he had any other genuine choice besides jumping. What would staying with the balloon as it slowly descended have gained him? Am I missing something here ...


He experienced the problem at 43,000 feet. Roughly 40% of his eventual apex. Had he scrubbed the mission at that point he would have avoided approximately an 45 minutes of ascent time -during which conditions became even less pleasant- followed by his 12 minute dwell at peak height and his 13 minute 45 second descent.

Just sayin'.
 
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