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(The Hollywood Reporter)   Daughter of Superman co-creator writes letter to fans explaining how she deserves the rights to a character she had nothing to do with creating instead of the big corporation that had nothing to do with creating the character   (hollywoodreporter.com ) divider line
    More: Interesting, Warner Brothers, Superman, Action Comics  
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2571 clicks; posted to Geek » on 14 Oct 2012 at 12:43 PM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-14 12:07:22 PM  
DC bought the rights to Superman from Siegel and Shuster and paid them off on two separate occasions, and gave them a pension for the last 20 or so years of their lives, all the while making Superman into the character it is now.

In fact, almost everything memorable about Superman came from writers and editors DC hired to work on the character, not Siegel and Shuster.

Of course, for a character that's pushing 80, it really should be in public domain by now instead of having vultures fight over the corpse.
 
2012-10-14 12:49:45 PM  
Superman sucks
 
2012-10-14 12:52:35 PM  
Yeah, DC farked S&S for a good long while; but this is long-irrelevant business.
 
2012-10-14 12:53:17 PM  
DC, Warner bros, or this woman and her family should have any rights to superman at all. It's crazy that copyright would still be covering something created by an individual 74 years ago. This would stop being a problem if we went back to reasonable copyright lengths.
 
2012-10-14 12:53:52 PM  
Is she hot? If she isn't then no dice.
 
2012-10-14 12:57:45 PM  
DRTFA, but in general, copy should have a fixed limit that can not be extended once the author is dead. Got a 20 year copyright and you die 10 years in? Your heirs only get it for the remaining 10 years.

Copyrights should not be held by corporations. They do not create anything, they just figure out how to manufacture and distribute something people create.
 
2012-10-14 12:58:21 PM  

FirstNationalBastard: Of course, for a character that's pushing 80, it really should be in public domain by now instead of having vultures fight over the corpse.


This.
 
2012-10-14 01:06:05 PM  

tomWright: Copyrights should not be held by corporations. They do not create anything, they just figure out how to manufacture and distribute something people create.


Wow, that's how bankers and financial institutions work....
 
2012-10-14 01:07:11 PM  
The original version of the character should've been in the public domain fifty years ago.
 
2012-10-14 01:11:21 PM  

Desmo: tomWright: Copyrights should not be held by corporations. They do not create anything, they just figure out how to manufacture and distribute something people create.

Wow, that's how bankers and financial institutions work....


Yup
 
2012-10-14 01:16:08 PM  

FirstNationalBastard: Of course, for a character that's pushing 80, it really should be in public domain by now instead of having vultures fight over the corpse.


Indeed. The rationale behind copyright in the fist place is that artists and writers and composers (etc.) get a limited right to have exclusive control over their creations, on the understanding that their creations necessarily drew from the public domain for their inspiration. And then at the end of that period, their works go into the public domain to enrich the content available for future generations to draw on. Now it's totally farked up, though - Hans Christian Andersen's "Little Mermaid" is public domain, but Disney's "Little Mermaid" never will be, now that we've essentially created a system of perpetual copyright. Creators can take and take and take from the public domain, but no longer have to give everything back, in total contravention of the social compact underlying the basic idea of copyrights.

I have no problem with corporate control of copyrights, but realistically, the current terms of copyrights are just absurd.
 
2012-10-14 01:23:25 PM  

JonBuck: The original version of the character should've been in the public domain fifty years ago.


I'd love to see a new movie/show use the original Superman character, the one that wasn't nearly god-like in power. Able to leap tall buildings in a single bound, not "fly over buildings".
 
2012-10-14 01:39:47 PM  
She could always buy them back if she wants them so bad and isn`t just after a free handout...
 
2012-10-14 01:41:02 PM  
What are the best Superman books? I would like to read a good take on the character.
 
2012-10-14 01:41:38 PM  

tomWright: Copyrights should not be held by corporations. They do not create anything, they just figure out how to manufacture and distribute something people create.


Says somebody who would have absolutely no problem watching anyone else get rich off his ideas I'm sure.
 
2012-10-14 01:41:40 PM  
Also, copyright should be on the movies and comics, not the IP branding of the character. A new story with superman should have a full life of copyright in front of it however old the character is. The character though should allow for non-profit uses.
 
2012-10-14 01:48:20 PM  
I always felt that a character should go into the public domain as soon as its creator dies. To hell with his heirs or whoever owns publishing rights.
 
2012-10-14 01:50:10 PM  

bifford: I always felt that a character should go into the public domain as soon as its creator dies. To hell with his heirs or whoever owns publishing rights.


Sounds like a good idea for a comic.
 
2012-10-14 01:51:12 PM  

NeoCortex42: JonBuck: The original version of the character should've been in the public domain fifty years ago.

I'd love to see a new movie/show use the original Superman character, the one that wasn't nearly god-like in power. Able to leap tall buildings in a single bound, not "fly over buildings".

The flight was introduced a mere 3 years after Superman first appeared in comics, when the cartoon makers thought it would look better on-screen than super-leaping.
 
2012-10-14 01:51:38 PM  

Gunny Highway: What are the best Superman books? I would like to read a good take on the character.


In no particular order:
Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow?
What's So Funny about Truth, Justice and the American Way?
Red Son
For the Man Who Has Everything
Not books, but check out some of the Paul Dini/Bruce Timm cartoons, especially the invasion of Darkseid, the Lobo episodes, and the first Mtxzylplk episode.
 
2012-10-14 01:58:08 PM  

Trocadero: Gunny Highway: What are the best Superman books? I would like to read a good take on the character.

In no particular order:
Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow?
What's So Funny about Truth, Justice and the American Way?
Red Son
For the Man Who Has Everything
Not books, but check out some of the Paul Dini/Bruce Timm cartoons, especially the invasion of Darkseid, the Lobo episodes, and the first Mtxzylplk episode.


I grew up watching the cartoon and always like Superman. That is why I am alway confused about the hate he gets.

I have Red Son and love it. I will check those other books out. Thanks, man!
 
2012-10-14 02:03:58 PM  

randomjsa: tomWright: Copyrights should not be held by corporations. They do not create anything, they just figure out how to manufacture and distribute something people create.

Says somebody who would have absolutely no problem watching anyone else get rich off his ideas I'm sure.


WAT?
 
2012-10-14 02:31:19 PM  
Solution: public domain
 
2012-10-14 02:31:48 PM  

bifford: NeoCortex42: JonBuck: The original version of the character should've been in the public domain fifty years ago.

I'd love to see a new movie/show use the original Superman character, the one that wasn't nearly god-like in power. Able to leap tall buildings in a single bound, not "fly over buildings".
The flight was introduced a mere 3 years after Superman first appeared in comics, when the cartoon makers thought it would look better on-screen than super-leaping.


Yeah, I know flying wasn't introduced too far into the mythology. I just prefer Superman stories where he's more like a super man than a living god.

Superman is probably one of the hardest characters to write for.
 
2012-10-14 02:47:46 PM  

Gunny Highway: Trocadero: Gunny Highway: What are the best Superman books? I would like to read a good take on the character.

In no particular order:
Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow?
What's So Funny about Truth, Justice and the American Way?
Red Son
For the Man Who Has Everything
Not books, but check out some of the Paul Dini/Bruce Timm cartoons, especially the invasion of Darkseid, the Lobo episodes, and the first Mtxzylplk episode.

I grew up watching the cartoon and always like Superman. That is why I am alway confused about the hate he gets.

I have Red Son and love it. I will check those other books out. Thanks, man!


Superman: Secret Identity for a non-Superman Superman story
Hitman #34 is probably the best in continuity Superman story you can find from 1990 to present. And the sad and funny thing is, it's by Garth Ennis, and was done in the pages of his subversive little book, Hitman.
 
2012-10-14 02:58:04 PM  
This is what the courts are for, to work this out.

Judges can sanction plaintiff or respondent's attorneys for farking around. It looks like this hasn't happened yet so it is going the way it should.
 
2012-10-14 03:01:59 PM  

FirstNationalBastard: Gunny Highway: Trocadero: Gunny Highway: What are the best Superman books? I would like to read a good take on the character.

In no particular order:
Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow?
What's So Funny about Truth, Justice and the American Way?
Red Son
For the Man Who Has Everything
Not books, but check out some of the Paul Dini/Bruce Timm cartoons, especially the invasion of Darkseid, the Lobo episodes, and the first Mtxzylplk episode.

I grew up watching the cartoon and always like Superman. That is why I am alway confused about the hate he gets.

I have Red Son and love it. I will check those other books out. Thanks, man!

Superman: Secret Identity for a non-Superman Superman story
Hitman #34 is probably the best in continuity Superman story you can find from 1990 to present. And the sad and funny thing is, it's by Garth Ennis, and was done in the pages of his subversive little book, Hitman.


.....bueno.
 
2012-10-14 03:09:38 PM  

MagSeven: FirstNationalBastard: Gunny Highway: Trocadero: Gunny Highway: What are the best Superman books? I would like to read a good take on the character.

In no particular order:
Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow?
What's So Funny about Truth, Justice and the American Way?
Red Son
For the Man Who Has Everything
Not books, but check out some of the Paul Dini/Bruce Timm cartoons, especially the invasion of Darkseid, the Lobo episodes, and the first Mtxzylplk episode.

I grew up watching the cartoon and always like Superman. That is why I am alway confused about the hate he gets.

I have Red Son and love it. I will check those other books out. Thanks, man!

Superman: Secret Identity for a non-Superman Superman story
Hitman #34 is probably the best in continuity Superman story you can find from 1990 to present. And the sad and funny thing is, it's by Garth Ennis, and was done in the pages of his subversive little book, Hitman.

.....bueno.

 

mlkshk.com
 
2012-10-14 03:13:43 PM  

Gunny Highway: Trocadero: Gunny Highway: What are the best Superman books? I would like to read a good take on the character.

In no particular order:
Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow?
What's So Funny about Truth, Justice and the American Way?
Red Son
For the Man Who Has Everything

Not books, but check out some of the Paul Dini/Bruce Timm cartoons, especially the invasion of Darkseid, the Lobo episodes, and the first Mtxzylplk episode.

I grew up watching the cartoon and always like Superman. That is why I am alway confused about the hate he gets.

I have Red Son and love it. I will check those other books out. Thanks, man!


Pretty good list, add in All-star Superman and Superman Earth One, and maybe Superman: True Brit, which is sorta the same idea behind Red Son, but Britain instead of the USSR and its written by John Cleese. Superman: Birthright is great too if youre not completely sick of the origin story.

/and of course Kingdom Come
 
2012-10-14 03:29:58 PM  
A tip of the cape to everyone for the suggestions.
 
2012-10-14 04:08:24 PM  

NeoCortex42: bifford: NeoCortex42: JonBuck: The original version of the character should've been in the public domain fifty years ago.

I'd love to see a new movie/show use the original Superman character, the one that wasn't nearly god-like in power. Able to leap tall buildings in a single bound, not "fly over buildings".
The flight was introduced a mere 3 years after Superman first appeared in comics, when the cartoon makers thought it would look better on-screen than super-leaping.

Yeah, I know flying wasn't introduced too far into the mythology. I just prefer Superman stories where he's more like a super man than a living god.

Superman is probably one of the hardest characters to write for.


Being the first character of his kind, the increase in Superman's powers to near-infinity was probably inevitable. Writers facing deadlines needed something new and spectacular regularly, and being able to show Superman doing something even more amazing than before is just too easy. The simple "he's from the planet Krypton" setup that gives him some powers works just as well to give him more powers.

So he's hard to write for, a complaint echoed by writers of Star Trek: The Next Generation after Gene Roddenberry said humans in the future had developed nearly flawless morals. It's a good thing there's a whole universe of characters who don't have to be like the hero but do have to figure out how to react to him. Superman has some limitations, in his mind at least: if his physical powers really are unlimited then the lack of a perfect world with him in it is due to his failure of imagination or some rationalization he uses to limit his actions that makes sense only to him. It can be argued that every other character is created to not be Superman. Superman is the inevitable constant that everything else reacts to.
 
2012-10-14 04:14:39 PM  

tomWright: WAT?


If copy rights as soooo bad. Go ahead, create a popular character, write it, and go through all the blood sweat and tears to get it recognized.

You won't mind if after you've done all that I step in and start making millions off your character will you? I'm sure you won't demand a cut at all.
 
2012-10-14 04:15:29 PM  

Cyno01: Gunny Highway: Trocadero: Gunny Highway: What are the best Superman books? I would like to read a good take on the character.

In no particular order:
Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow?
What's So Funny about Truth, Justice and the American Way?
Red Son
For the Man Who Has Everything
Not books, but check out some of the Paul Dini/Bruce Timm cartoons, especially the invasion of Darkseid, the Lobo episodes, and the first Mtxzylplk episode.

I grew up watching the cartoon and always like Superman. That is why I am alway confused about the hate he gets.

I have Red Son and love it. I will check those other books out. Thanks, man!

Pretty good list, add in All-star Superman and Superman Earth One, and maybe Superman: True Brit, which is sorta the same idea behind Red Son, but Britain instead of the USSR and its written by John Cleese. Superman: Birthright is great too if youre not completely sick of the origin story.

/and of course Kingdom Come


All good suggestions. Other great Superman stories (that don't actually have Superman in them):
Astro City #1
Irredeemable
Supreme (the Alan Moore stuff)
 
2012-10-14 04:17:45 PM  

randomjsa: tomWright: WAT?

If copy rights as soooo bad. Go ahead, create a popular character, write it, and go through all the blood sweat and tears to get it recognized.

You won't mind if after you've done all that I step in and start making millions off your character will you? I'm sure you won't demand a cut at all.


But if you legally sell your character to a company twice, your right to biatch is kind of diminished.
 
2012-10-14 04:53:19 PM  
Copyrights should expire upon the death of the work's creator. No exceptions.
 
2012-10-14 05:23:59 PM  
Call me crazy but:

"504 Gateway Time-out

The server didn't respond in time." doesn't really seem to make her case very well.
 
2012-10-14 05:31:41 PM  
Copyrights last way way way too long these days.

The current regime is a slap in the face to the Constitutional idea that copyrights be of limited duration. These are not supposed to be heirlooms to be handed down through the generations, or held by corporations in perpetuity.

I wold like to see something like a copyright term of 25 years, renewable once for another 25 years. After which it passes into the public domain. There's simply no reason anything should still be copyrighted after more than a half-century. At which point most original authors/creators will be dead anyway.
 
2012-10-14 05:59:29 PM  

randomjsa: You won't mind if after you've done all that I step in and start making millions off your character will you? I'm sure you won't demand a cut at all


"Copyright subsists for a variety of lengths in different jurisdictions. The length of the term can depend on several factors, including the type of work (e.g. musical composition, novel), whether the work has been published, and whether the work was created by an individual or a corporation. In most of the world, the default length of copyright is the life of the author plus either 50 or 70 years"

You know what this means? If I invent something and I patent it I get the exclusive right to manufacture a product for 20 years. If I'm 20 and I write a story about someone inventing something useful I (and my heirs) can get up to 130 years of exclusive rights if I die at the expected age of 80.

How is this not completely ridiculous? At the very least they need to cut the posthumous rights from copyright law.
 
2012-10-14 05:59:38 PM  

NeoCortex42: Superman is probably one of the hardest characters to write for.


Superman can be easy to write for if you use two conditions

1. limit the stupid power inflation (ie: "I hear everything"-- the simple limit of making him ABLE to hear ANYTHING fixes the problem of hearing EVERYTHING -- he has to try)

2. Recognize that Superman is to regular heroes what Columbo is to other mystery detectives -- he uses different rules.

Columbo operates as a reverse mystery -- you know who the murder is and Columbo knows who the murderer is -- the mystery is how will he PROVE it.

Superman works as the supreme hero -- The threat should never be to Superman, it should always be to other people -- the challenge is how will Superman save EVERYBODY ELSE. If you couple this with minor power limitations you can easily write for the character (sadly its rare people understand this).
 
2012-10-14 06:14:54 PM  

OhioKnight: NeoCortex42: Superman is probably one of the hardest characters to write for.

Superman can be easy to write for if you use two conditions

1. limit the stupid power inflation (ie: "I hear everything"-- the simple limit of making him ABLE to hear ANYTHING fixes the problem of hearing EVERYTHING -- he has to try)

2. Recognize that Superman is to regular heroes what Columbo is to other mystery detectives -- he uses different rules.

Columbo operates as a reverse mystery -- you know who the murder is and Columbo knows who the murderer is -- the mystery is how will he PROVE it.

Superman works as the supreme hero -- The threat should never be to Superman, it should always be to other people -- the challenge is how will Superman save EVERYBODY ELSE. If you couple this with minor power limitations you can easily write for the character (sadly its rare people understand this).


When can we expect your books on the shelf?
 
2012-10-14 06:50:18 PM  

FuturePastNow: Copyrights should expire upon the death of the work's creator. No exceptions.


So the day someone creates something awwsome is the day they have to hire security team to keep them alive?
 
2012-10-14 06:55:16 PM  
But even if the superman copyright were to expire, could any else make superman comics or tv shows or movies? I mean the trademarks for Superman, the S shield, krypton and clark kent are all owned by WB and trademarks never expire.
 
2012-10-14 07:00:59 PM  

mechgreg: But even if the superman copyright were to expire, could any else make superman comics or tv shows or movies? I mean the trademarks for Superman, the S shield, krypton and clark kent are all owned by WB and trademarks never expire.


Honestly, in the end, the heir will probably wind up with the copyrights back (actually, her scumbag lawyer will wind up owning the majority of them), and they'll either be sold or licensed to DC for a metric assload of money.

Because, as you said, Superman is pretty much worthless in his Action Comics #1 form, which only had an ugly police badge style S-Shield, the Clark Kent identity, and he could leap 1/8th of a mile and withstand a bursting shell. That's it. Pretty much everything else, from Lex Luthor to Kryptonite to the Daily Planet and Perry White and the entire Superman family were all created at a later date by people hired to work on the character.
 
2012-10-14 07:05:24 PM  

FirstNationalBastard: mechgreg: But even if the superman copyright were to expire, could any else make superman comics or tv shows or movies? I mean the trademarks for Superman, the S shield, krypton and clark kent are all owned by WB and trademarks never expire.

Honestly, in the end, the heir will probably wind up with the copyrights back (actually, her scumbag lawyer will wind up owning the majority of them), and they'll either be sold or licensed to DC for a metric assload of money.

Because, as you said, Superman is pretty much worthless in his Action Comics #1 form, which only had an ugly police badge style S-Shield, the Clark Kent identity, and he could leap 1/8th of a mile and withstand a bursting shell. That's it. Pretty much everything else, from Lex Luthor to Kryptonite to the Daily Planet and Perry White and the entire Superman family were all created at a later date by people hired to work on the character.


Isnt that what basically what happened with Superboy?
 
2012-10-14 07:46:52 PM  

mechgreg: But even if the superman copyright were to expire, could any else make superman comics or tv shows or movies? I mean the trademarks for Superman, the S shield, krypton and clark kent are all owned by WB and trademarks never expire.


That's the beauty of public domain. Anyone could make a Superman story. Earlier this year, there were two different Snow White movies, the kid-friendly Julia Roberts version and the action-focused Charlize Theron version. Snow White is public domain. Superman, Batman, etc should be public domain so more people can try new things. DC or WB could still make their own stuff, and try to sell it as "authentic" or whatever, but they'd be forced to make it good to compete in the marketplace (ideally).
 
2012-10-14 08:25:51 PM  

Trocadero: mechgreg: But even if the superman copyright were to expire, could any else make superman comics or tv shows or movies? I mean the trademarks for Superman, the S shield, krypton and clark kent are all owned by WB and trademarks never expire.

That's the beauty of public domain. Anyone could make a Superman story. Earlier this year, there were two different Snow White movies, the kid-friendly Julia Roberts version and the action-focused Charlize Theron version. Snow White is public domain. Superman, Batman, etc should be public domain so more people can try new things. DC or WB could still make their own stuff, and try to sell it as "authentic" or whatever, but they'd be forced to make it good to compete in the marketplace (ideally).


But how would it work if the copyright expired but DC still held all the trademarks? Trademarks never expire (which is why you will never be able to open a restaurant with a clown mascot called ronald as long as mcdonalds does) so does that mean if the copyright expired someone else could make a superman movie that looks nothing like superman and isnt called superman or clark kent? What good is that?
 
2012-10-14 08:32:12 PM  

FirstNationalBastard: DC bought the rights to Superman from Siegel and Shuster and paid them off on two separate occasions, and gave them a pension for the last 20 or so years of their lives, all the while making Superman into the character it is now.

In fact, almost everything memorable about Superman came from writers and editors DC hired to work on the character, not Siegel and Shuster.

Of course, for a character that's pushing 80, it really should be in public domain by now instead of having vultures fight over the corpse.


i3.photobucket.com

Basically THIS.

Superman was created as a work-for-hire. S&S were employees on the payroll. They sold their claim to Superman twice, and remained on payroll and then pension for a very long time, making a very decent living until they died. Technically, DC didn't even have to pay them for the rights in the first place, as they made it as employees during an era when work-for-hire meant anything you create for the company belongs to the company, but DC did pay them. Twice. And every year until they shuffled off this mortal coil.

And then the families decided "Hey, instead of creating anything myself, I'll just get some of the money I think I'm owed for my husband/father doing something seven decades ago." and the legal battles began again, and again. And again.

This is absolute bullshiat. The wife was paid off before Superman Returns, and the estate got continued proceeds from the merchandising related to Superman Returns. MILLIONS of dollars in t-shirts, toys, bed sheets, figurines, stickers, etc. went to them.

And then they have the gall to act like they're broke and suffering because big, bad WB/DC expects them to honor the terms of the agreement they made prior to Superman Returns-- That it was the last time dipping in the Superman well, and the rights were finally settled.

This is not some poor sick kid and her sickly (now deceased) widow mom living in a shack because their father was screwed out of his due payment for the creation of Superman. This is a grown-up millionaire brat and her dead mother (who met her husband WELL AFTER he had a hand in creating Superman) clambering for more money when THEY DON'T DESERVE ANOTHER RED CENT.

And that's not even considering that over the past seven decades, DC and its employees have taken the character so far away from his roots and created so much original material that the claim on Superman as original created should be null and void.

I hate this witch so much... She outright lies to the fans to gain sympathy. She never had ONE BIT OF INPUT into Superman's creation or design. She came into existence LONG after her father had been paid handsomely and lived quite well on the proceeds from his character. And she expects a chunk of change the size of Krypton because she has a blood tie, and little else.

She really has no legal claim. The rights were sold. The payments were made. She was born into a family that lived comfortably on Superman/DC money. She's so full of shiat that DC should make her a new Superman villain named Shiat-Witch.

I'm sick of their whining about this. They got PAID. For once, I'm not siding against WB or DC. They're RIGHT and the families are just plain greedy and wrong.
 
2012-10-14 08:53:19 PM  

ZeroCorpse:

Superman was created as a work-for-hire. S&S were employees on the payroll. They sold their claim to Superman twice, and remained on payroll and then pension for a very long time, making a very decent living until they died. Technically, DC didn't even have to pay them for the rights in the first place, as they made it as employees during an era when work-for-hire meant anything you create for the company belongs to the company, but DC did pay them. Twice. And every year until they shuffled off this mortal coil.



Not quite... Siegel and Shuster created Superman as an attempt to get into the newspapers as a comic strip. When that failed, they pasted the panels into comic book form and took it to National Publications (Now DC Comics) to get it published.

However, they soon sold the rights to the character to DC, for 130 bucks and a contract to supply DC with new material each month. Reports even have the pair making $75,000 EACH per year in 1940s money as part of their contract with DC.

But, they did sell the rights to the character to National, and then in 1948 after losing a case to void the 1938 contract, they sold the rights to Superboy (same damn character) to DC for nearly $100,000. And Siegel worked for DC, writing Superman titles, for about a decade between the mid-50s and mid-60s. And then came the $20k annual payment starting around the time of the 1978 movie.

So, they got paid. Repeatedly. And they sold DC the character on multiple occasions, in multiple forms.

/yeah, info from Wiki, but it's all sourced to real books and articles on the subject. Geeks are thorough.
 
2012-10-14 10:32:04 PM  
She does, it is called the "right of reverter." It is a very little known portion of the copyright code. It is a right that cannot be transferred by contract, and is devised by statute. Every 20 years or so the right returns to the original artist, or their heir as determined by statute. Superman can just pay her again like they did before.
 
2012-10-15 01:53:40 AM  

randomjsa: tomWright: WAT?
If copy rights as soooo bad. Go ahead, create a popular character, write it, and go through all the blood sweat and tears to get it recognized.
You won't mind if after you've done all that I step in and start making millions off your character will you? I'm sure you won't demand a cut at all.


Twenty farking years after I've made and exploited a property? Sure. If I still need to make money off it/have nothing else to rely on, and I'm too incompetent to win in the marketplace with the "authentic"/original labels, then that's my own damn problem.
 
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