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(Springfield News-Leader)   Out of work? No prospects? No problem. Just give yourself a six figure job, print your own paychecks and cash them at Walmart   (news-leader.com) divider line 59
    More: Dumbass, woman accused, Chevy Malibu, Wal-Mart, Springfield  
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12633 clicks; posted to Main » on 13 Oct 2012 at 3:13 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-13 12:47:49 PM  
Was the person claiming to be an airline pilot?
 
2012-10-13 12:50:47 PM  
wait, I can do there? and here I am working like a sucker.
 
2012-10-13 12:54:35 PM  
I don't get this. How did the checks get cashed when everything is supposed to be verified through funds? Hell when I had my first side business (rebuilding houses) in the mid 00s I could barely use a check at Home Depot. I swear the damn things would get rejected 50% of the time even though I had never bounced a check and I had plenty of funds in there.
 
2012-10-13 01:31:04 PM  
'should have taken taxis.
 
2012-10-13 02:09:38 PM  
Pretty bootstrappy of her!
 
2012-10-13 02:59:49 PM  
So, become a banker?
 
2012-10-13 03:14:49 PM  
I know a guy who sat in jail for 6 years doing exactly this - only he gave a dozen friends paychecks, too.
 
2012-10-13 03:15:41 PM  
How the hell did she get her check cashed there? I've never had any luck cashing paychecks at Walmart.
 
2012-10-13 03:17:54 PM  

xynix: I don't get this. How did the checks get cashed when everything is supposed to be verified through funds? Hell when I had my first side business (rebuilding houses) in the mid 00s I could barely use a check at Home Depot. I swear the damn things would get rejected 50% of the time even though I had never bounced a check and I had plenty of funds in there.


These are paychecks, which are cashed instantly at WalyWorld or any check cashing place.
 
2012-10-13 03:19:01 PM  
She seems legit.
 
2012-10-13 03:19:02 PM  
I wonder if she's looking back at her plan, and saying, "AHA! *that's* where I messed up!"
 
2012-10-13 03:19:46 PM  
Calbert remained in the Greene County Jail on Friday with bond set at $50,000. She is next due in court Nov. 5.

Wonder if they'd take a check
 
2012-10-13 03:20:27 PM  
That worked for almost a year?!? And she only got caught because of video of her van's tags?

Hmmmmm. I just might have a new hobby.
 
2012-10-13 03:22:12 PM  
So more or less what Wall Street does every day? Print checks with nothing to back them up?
 
2012-10-13 03:25:36 PM  
CSB:

I used to work at a Wal-Mart in Kentucky. One day, a guy in a Brinks uniform came in to pick up the daily deposit. He walked out with about $50,000 in cash. A few minutes later, the real Brinks guy showed up for the daily deposit. Store manager was not fired. Never found out what happened to the cash.

End CSB.
 
2012-10-13 03:26:24 PM  
"Of the 732 counterfeit checks, 515 had been accepted for a total amount of $116,295.99."

"The checks had been passed at Walmart stores "throughout Arkansas, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma," the statement says."


In other words, she made just enough to cover the cost of gas and have an occasional Slurpee.
 
2012-10-13 03:26:56 PM  
Calbert remained in the Greene County Jail on Friday with bond set at $50,000.

"No problem! Can I borrow a pen?"
 
2012-10-13 03:28:30 PM  
Oh, so THAT'S what a "job creator" does.

/been wondering
 
2012-10-13 03:31:08 PM  
Robbing check cashing joints is doing the world a favor
 
2012-10-13 03:32:33 PM  

bentleypm: CSB:

I used to work at a Wal-Mart in Kentucky. One day, a guy in a Brinks uniform came in to pick up the daily deposit. He walked out with about $50,000 in cash. A few minutes later, the real Brinks guy showed up for the daily deposit. Store manager was not fired. Never found out what happened to the cash.

End CSB.


Thats crazy I wouldnt have thought that was possible. Was the manager in on it you think?
 
2012-10-13 03:32:52 PM  
Yet when wallstreet does it...
 
2012-10-13 03:37:45 PM  
Yeah but do that with billions instead of thousands and add lots of computers and suddenly you're a Nobel Prize winning economist.
 
2012-10-13 03:38:11 PM  
Why are they picking on this job creator?
 
2012-10-13 03:39:38 PM  

NickelP: bentleypm: CSB:

I used to work at a Wal-Mart in Kentucky. One day, a guy in a Brinks uniform came in to pick up the daily deposit. He walked out with about $50,000 in cash. A few minutes later, the real Brinks guy showed up for the daily deposit. Store manager was not fired. Never found out what happened to the cash.

End CSB.

Thats crazy I wouldnt have thought that was possible. Was the manager in on it you think?


a fellow who worked at a popular grocery chain in CA (Albertsons?) got this idea then implemented it after he felt he was unjustly fired. knocked off 3 or 4 stores in one morning but continued on, even though he was monitoring a police radio. now his claim to fame is "hey look that's my story on I Almost Got Away With It" while he sits in PMITA prison.
 
2012-10-13 03:40:13 PM  

NickelP: bentleypm: CSB:

I used to work at a Wal-Mart in Kentucky. One day, a guy in a Brinks uniform came in to pick up the daily deposit. He walked out with about $50,000 in cash. A few minutes later, the real Brinks guy showed up for the daily deposit. Store manager was not fired. Never found out what happened to the cash.

End CSB.

Thats crazy I wouldnt have thought that was possible. Was the manager in on it you think?


Had to be. I've never been around for cash pick ups, but every retail cash office I've been in has a board with the pictures and names of Brinks employees posted right on the wall.
 
2012-10-13 03:47:24 PM  
She gets off free for style points
 
2012-10-13 03:47:25 PM  

Glitchwerks: NickelP: bentleypm: CSB:

I used to work at a Wal-Mart in Kentucky. One day, a guy in a Brinks uniform came in to pick up the daily deposit. He walked out with about $50,000 in cash. A few minutes later, the real Brinks guy showed up for the daily deposit. Store manager was not fired. Never found out what happened to the cash.

End CSB.

Thats crazy I wouldnt have thought that was possible. Was the manager in on it you think?

Had to be. I've never been around for cash pick ups, but every retail cash office I've been in has a board with the pictures and names of Brinks employees posted right on the wall.


Not only that, they had to sign for it, and signatures were on file. The only thing I can think of is that the guy was a former Brinks employee with whom the manager was familiar. The company investigated and seemed to think the manager was innocent.
 
2012-10-13 03:47:53 PM  
Bootstrappy!

Not really a far cry from how the Work Hard(victimize workers) and Get Rich business model works.

/who is ok w/ this and lets the Wall Streeters that do the same thing with a check book and phone walk away?
 
2012-10-13 03:50:28 PM  

bentleypm: Glitchwerks: NickelP: bentleypm: CSB:

I used to work at a Wal-Mart in Kentucky. One day, a guy in a Brinks uniform came in to pick up the daily deposit. He walked out with about $50,000 in cash. A few minutes later, the real Brinks guy showed up for the daily deposit. Store manager was not fired. Never found out what happened to the cash.

End CSB.

Thats crazy I wouldnt have thought that was possible. Was the manager in on it you think?

Had to be. I've never been around for cash pick ups, but every retail cash office I've been in has a board with the pictures and names of Brinks employees posted right on the wall.

Not only that, they had to sign for it, and signatures were on file. The only thing I can think of is that the guy was a former Brinks employee with whom the manager was familiar. The company investigated and seemed to think the manager was innocent.


Semi related question- how do the sealed cash bags get reconciled? If i give the brinks guy a bag labeled to contain 51,230 and the bank opens it and counts 50,230 am i just supposed to trust them?
 
2012-10-13 03:53:07 PM  
Video surveillance showed the suspect arriving and leaving in a blue Chevrolet Malibu with license plates that tracked back to Calbert.

Wait, there are outdoor security cameras that can discern license plates now? When did they advance past VHS quality?
 
2012-10-13 03:54:50 PM  
Oops Walmart might be regretting that foray into banking.
 
2012-10-13 03:56:37 PM  

bentleypm: CSB:

I used to work at a Wal-Mart in Kentucky. One day, a guy in a Brinks uniform came in to pick up the daily deposit. He walked out with about $50,000 in cash. A few minutes later, the real Brinks guy showed up for the daily deposit. Store manager was not fired. Never found out what happened to the cash.

End CSB.


Ya probably don't want to publicize that one
 
2012-10-13 03:57:02 PM  
...only in Springfield...


www.oocities.org
 
2012-10-13 03:57:14 PM  

nytmare: Video surveillance showed the suspect arriving and leaving in a blue Chevrolet Malibu with license plates that tracked back to Calbert.

Wait, there are outdoor security cameras that can discern license plates now? When did they advance past VHS quality?


Traffic cams do it all the time.
 
2012-10-13 04:01:48 PM  

nytmare: Video surveillance showed the suspect arriving and leaving in a blue Chevrolet Malibu with license plates that tracked back to Calbert.

Wait, there are outdoor security cameras that can discern license plates now? When did they advance past VHS quality?


The other day I saw a vehicle rolling with one of these mounted on each side: MPH-900 Automatic License Plate Reader
 
2012-10-13 04:04:31 PM  

bentleypm: CSB:

I used to work at a Wal-Mart in Kentucky. One day, a guy in a Brinks uniform came in to pick up the daily deposit. He walked out with about $50,000 in cash. A few minutes later, the real Brinks guy showed up for the daily deposit. Store manager was not fired. Never found out what happened to the cash.

End CSB.


There is no possible way anyone can walk in wearing a uniform and walk about with that kind of cash. It had to be some kind of inside job, because you need to have a security key (that only the security personnel has, no one in the store has it - not even the store manager) to open the inner drop safe inside the vault.

Either the employees weren't dropping deposits into the drop safe at all or someone gave the store personnel the drop safe key.
 
2012-10-13 04:10:40 PM  

NickelP:
Semi related question- how do the sealed cash bags get reconciled? If i give the brinks guy a bag labeled to contain 51,230 and the bank opens it and counts 50,230 am i just supposed to trust them?


Yes. As someone who did these kind of deposits and sealed the bags at the store level, you better make sure its 100% correct before you seal the bag. Double and triple count the final deposit, because at the end of the day, it's your signature on the deposit slip. If there is a discrepancy between your count and the bank, the bank wins. Once I miscounted my stack of 5 dollar bills and had 49 where I thought I packed 50 - it was marked as such - this was back in the day where I didn't have a machine to count the money for me either, all it done by hand and mostly manually, every night.
 
2012-10-13 04:12:24 PM  

Dwindle: xynix: I don't get this. How did the checks get cashed when everything is supposed to be verified through funds? Hell when I had my first side business (rebuilding houses) in the mid 00s I could barely use a check at Home Depot. I swear the damn things would get rejected 50% of the time even though I had never bounced a check and I had plenty of funds in there.

These are paychecks, which are cashed instantly at WalyWorld or any check cashing place.


Any of our check cashing stores would require her to wait while we called to verify the check. Even if it was a small one (say 200-300) we'd be calling. We actually call the banks to to verify funds & title. If we don't know the customer and don't know the business, the teller better verify it and/or get a supervisor's approval.
 
2012-10-13 04:37:54 PM  
Isn't that basically how the Federal Reserve operates?
 
2012-10-13 04:43:53 PM  
Well, at least she won't have to worry about that employment/paying rent thing for a while.
 
2012-10-13 04:51:43 PM  
Read her last name as "Catbert", which didn't quite fit the story. (This woman isn't as conniving)

/ should get my eyes checked...
 
2012-10-13 05:04:08 PM  
themasterdebater:

There is no possible way anyone can walk in wearing a uniform and walk about with that kind of cash. It had to be some kind of inside job, because you need to have a security key (that only the security personnel has, no one in the store has it - not even the store manager) to open the inner drop safe inside the vault.

Either the employees weren't dropping deposits into the drop safe at all or someone gave the store personnel the drop safe key.

Former Walmart cash office assoc. here. No "drop safe" in my store, just a safe, which they never seemed to change the combo of, even after employees or managers were "let go". Probably still use the same combo as when I worked there.
 
2012-10-13 05:11:10 PM  

NickelP: bentleypm: Glitchwerks: NickelP: bentleypm: CSB:

I used to work at a Wal-Mart in Kentucky. One day, a guy in a Brinks uniform came in to pick up the daily deposit. He walked out with about $50,000 in cash. A few minutes later, the real Brinks guy showed up for the daily deposit. Store manager was not fired. Never found out what happened to the cash.

End CSB.

Thats crazy I wouldnt have thought that was possible. Was the manager in on it you think?

Had to be. I've never been around for cash pick ups, but every retail cash office I've been in has a board with the pictures and names of Brinks employees posted right on the wall.

Not only that, they had to sign for it, and signatures were on file. The only thing I can think of is that the guy was a former Brinks employee with whom the manager was familiar. The company investigated and seemed to think the manager was innocent.

Semi related question- how do the sealed cash bags get reconciled? If i give the brinks guy a bag labeled to contain 51,230 and the bank opens it and counts 50,230 am i just supposed to trust them?


I can sort of answer that. The money gets counted at the register and dropped into a safe. Then it gets counted from the safe into the sealed bag. Then it gets counted from the bag into the bank. Each count has a receipt and they all have to equal each other. Any receipt that doesn't equal the count before it is suspect--so there's your probable theft. In your example, if the sealed bag count was 51, 230 and the bank only got 50, 230, the ONLY place it could have gone missing is in the truck, at least, that's where the cops would start looking first.

It's not a foolproof system, but it does tend to keep the truck guys honest.
 
2012-10-13 05:40:45 PM  
Welcome to Springfield: the college town with the most retards per capita in America.
 
2012-10-13 05:42:39 PM  
images.businessweek.com

... now that I've finally explained how my new plan for the new economic recovery in the New America works, are you happy?
 
2012-10-13 05:45:32 PM  

Oznog: [images.businessweek.com image 630x420]

... now that I've finally explained how my new plan for the new economic recovery in the New America works, are you happy?


To be fair, the whole "let's print money" plan the Treasury Department is currently carrying out is hardly any better.

Actually, it's the exact same thing.
 
2012-10-13 06:06:20 PM  

CptnSpldng: Dwindle: xynix: I don't get this. How did the checks get cashed when everything is supposed to be verified through funds? Hell when I had my first side business (rebuilding houses) in the mid 00s I could barely use a check at Home Depot. I swear the damn things would get rejected 50% of the time even though I had never bounced a check and I had plenty of funds in there.

These are paychecks, which are cashed instantly at WalyWorld or any check cashing place.

Any of our check cashing stores would require her to wait while we called to verify the check. Even if it was a small one (say 200-300) we'd be calling. We actually call the banks to to verify funds & title. If we don't know the customer and don't know the business, the teller better verify it and/or get a supervisor's approval.


The story said she had several fake military IDs with her photo. The information on the IDs (name, number, address) were probably real. The checks probably had the routing info for real government payroll accounts which would have sufficient funds to cover an extra few grand. "Yes, we have a Major Coont on active duty." The article says the IDs and checks were fake but how often is an article 100% accurate these days.

She probably snooped thru the purses of female acquaintances in the military, photographed their ID and paychecks, and used that info to run her scam. She'd have real info on the ID, real routing info on the checks, and everything would check out on a cursory exam. The scam isn't likely to even get noticed until a check number gets re-used or the government finally audits one of the payroll accounts.
 
2012-10-13 06:36:49 PM  

bentleypm: Glitchwerks: NickelP: bentleypm: CSB:

I used to work at a Wal-Mart in Kentucky. One day, a guy in a Brinks uniform came in to pick up the daily deposit. He walked out with about $50,000 in cash. A few minutes later, the real Brinks guy showed up for the daily deposit. Store manager was not fired. Never found out what happened to the cash.

End CSB.

Thats crazy I wouldnt have thought that was possible. Was the manager in on it you think?

Had to be. I've never been around for cash pick ups, but every retail cash office I've been in has a board with the pictures and names of Brinks employees posted right on the wall.

Not only that, they had to sign for it, and signatures were on file. The only thing I can think of is that the guy was a former Brinks employee with whom the manager was familiar. The company investigated and seemed to think the manager was innocent.



Stupidity goes right around Procedure as a matter of routine.
 
2012-10-13 07:01:46 PM  
Same thing the fed reserve does.
 
2012-10-13 07:27:39 PM  

DigitalCoffee: "Of the 732 counterfeit checks, 515 had been accepted for a total amount of $116,295.99."

"The checks had been passed at Walmart stores "throughout Arkansas, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma," the statement says."

In other words, she made just enough to cover the cost of gas and have an occasional Slurpee.


$116K seems just about what it would cost to pay me to stand in the MoneyCenter line at that many Walmarts. If they were smart they would hire her as a CS or LP consultant, fee paid in advance.
 
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