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(CNN)   "Nêtflìckš to subtitlé Λll ƒilm§ by 2ø¼"   (cnn.com) divider line 118
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4822 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Oct 2012 at 12:36 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-12 07:01:05 PM

nickerj1: The Banana Thug: Great! About time. Sure hope Amazon follows suit. Apple/iTunes has been pretty good about this as well, but still needs to work on their older contents. Obama signed a new Internet law a year ago that requires all online TV-and-movie contents providers to provide subtitles by 2013, otherwise they can pretty much expect a barrage of lawsuits from the ADA crowd (ahem, Amazon and Vudu).

ADA is the worst law ever created.

Let's make every business in the entire country spend hundreds of thousands of dollars accommodating 5% of the people. Market forces should be sufficient enough motivation to cause a reasonable amount of businesses to offer reasonable accommodations. That is, if no apartment buildings in the area are disability-friendly, one will eventually begin to be disability-friendly to capture the market share.


I sincerely hope that you never end up in a wheelchair, because if you ever do, then you will truly appreciate the benefits and protection provided by ADA. Two facts: virtually 100% of people, not 5%, will end up relying on ADA at one point or another in their lives. It could be due to an injury, a major surgery, a birth defect, or simply getting old. So unless you've discovered the Fountain of Youth, I'm pretty sure you'll be relying on ADA some day. The other fact: a country's economy is at its strongest when its potential workforce is at its full capacity and everyone capable of working has a job. Our economy boomed when more women joined the workforce, and same with those who are impaired. Yes, ADA compliance does cost money, but you are forgetting the financial burden that an impaired person would otherwise become by being on welfare instead of working a job and being a productive member of society.
 
2012-10-12 07:13:01 PM
Well, most of the movies I watch have subtitles. And they're pretty good.

Shows on the other hand... not so good. Especially Cheers. The subtitles on Cheers are horrifyingly bad even at their best.
 
2012-10-12 08:43:31 PM
This is a good thing even for people who don't have hearing problems. I've noticed a reocurring problem with the quality of dialogue in Hollywood movies. Part of it seems to be technical quality, and part of it seems to be the actor delivering the lines. Why this happens is simply baffling to me. Why would you not want to be able to understood what is being said? Why would Hollywood intentionally deliver sh*tty sound quality? Of course it's technically possible to have excellent sound recording- I don't have any problem hearing what is being said in an interview by my two-bit local news station. Why should we have to strain to hear what actors are saying, and why do some actors deliver lines as though they are whispering?
 
2012-10-12 10:21:41 PM

nickerj1: Let's make every business in the entire country spend hundreds of thousands of dollars accommodating 5% of the people. Market forces should be sufficient enough motivation to cause a reasonable amount of businesses to offer reasonable accommodations. That is, if no apartment buildings in the area are disability-friendly, one will eventually begin to be disability-friendly to capture the market share.


Ah yes, market forces, the rallying cry of the tards.
 
2012-10-12 11:10:24 PM
I thought all TV programming and DVD's were already captioned? As the source is captioned, shouldn't it be simple for Netflix to encode those captions into the current stream?
 
2012-10-13 12:05:01 AM

Gleeman: anime


Last I checked the only things subbed were Naruto and Monster... wonder if that has changed
 
2012-10-13 12:38:24 AM

LDM90: I watch all my movies with subtitles on. Started doing it when the kids were small and loud. Add to that the trend of modern actors to mumble everything they say, too-loud music, and abruptly wild changes in volume (gunshots, car chases) and subtitles are a godsend.


I do that too. Drove my wife mad at first, but now she's down with it. Try watching Snatch with the subtitles on. It actually makes sense.
 
2012-10-13 12:40:24 AM

The Banana Thug: nickerj1: The Banana Thug: Great! About time. Sure hope Amazon follows suit. Apple/iTunes has been pretty good about this as well, but still needs to work on their older contents. Obama signed a new Internet law a year ago that requires all online TV-and-movie contents providers to provide subtitles by 2013, otherwise they can pretty much expect a barrage of lawsuits from the ADA crowd (ahem, Amazon and Vudu).

ADA is the worst law ever created.

Let's make every business in the entire country spend hundreds of thousands of dollars accommodating 5% of the people. Market forces should be sufficient enough motivation to cause a reasonable amount of businesses to offer reasonable accommodations. That is, if no apartment buildings in the area are disability-friendly, one will eventually begin to be disability-friendly to capture the market share.

I sincerely hope that you never end up in a wheelchair, because if you ever do, then you will truly appreciate the benefits and protection provided by ADA. Two facts: virtually 100% of people, not 5%, will end up relying on ADA at one point or another in their lives. It could be due to an injury, a major surgery, a birth defect, or simply getting old. So unless you've discovered the Fountain of Youth, I'm pretty sure you'll be relying on ADA some day. The other fact: a country's economy is at its strongest when its potential workforce is at its full capacity and everyone capable of working has a job. Our economy boomed when more women joined the workforce, and same with those who are impaired. Yes, ADA compliance does cost money, but you are forgetting the financial burden that an impaired person would otherwise become by being on welfare instead of working a job and being a productive member of society.


And again, a rightie can't parse the "benefit" half of a "cost-benefit analysis". Which is why they want to cut government programs that, if cut, would result in a net increase in the deficit, while keeping the programs that are the real drain on our economy.
 
2012-10-13 01:07:45 AM

DigitalCoffee: Moetan Corner (NSFW)?


Still think that has to be some kind of epic troll.
 
2012-10-13 01:46:07 AM

nickerj1: Let's make every business in the entire country spend hundreds of thousands of dollars accommodating 5% of the people. Market forces should be sufficient enough motivation to cause a reasonable amount of businesses to offer reasonable accommodations. That is, if no apartment buildings in the area are disability-friendly, one will eventually begin to be disability-friendly to capture the market share.


Could you possibly have chosen a worse example? The last thing a bunch of slumlords who are so inept that they are unable to fill all of their rooms are going to do is spend money to try to attract business from people in wheelchairs.

If market forces were sufficient enough motivation, WE WOULDN'T HAVE THE ADA. Do you think it was born in a vacuum?
 
2012-10-13 04:33:42 AM

nickerj1: The Banana Thug: Great! About time. Sure hope Amazon follows suit. Apple/iTunes has been pretty good about this as well, but still needs to work on their older contents. Obama signed a new Internet law a year ago that requires all online TV-and-movie contents providers to provide subtitles by 2013, otherwise they can pretty much expect a barrage of lawsuits from the ADA crowd (ahem, Amazon and Vudu).

ADA is the worst law ever created.

Let's make every business in the entire country spend hundreds of thousands of dollars accommodating 5% of the people. Market forces should be sufficient enough motivation to cause a reasonable amount of businesses to offer reasonable accommodations. That is, if no apartment buildings in the area are disability-friendly, one will eventually begin to be disability-friendly to capture the market share.


Know how I know you have no ability to grasp economic theory?

Let's use your numbers: So one business should open up to accommodate the "5%" of customers who were dumb enough to get themselves all crippled. To do so the business has to spend "hundreds of thousands of dollars". So the business has to charge an insane premium to off ther services. Now since the non crips get a choice, only the silly cripples will be foolish enough to buy a $50 Burger or spend $1000 a night at a flea bag motel just for the pleasure of using a ramp or a crapper with handles.

Oh, and obviously the market is self-correcting, just look at history! We never had to pass any anti-segregation laws because all businesses and communities are filled with completely rational actors!

/You should feel bad about how not smart you are
 
TKM
2012-10-13 09:03:13 AM
My LearJet 8 track player discriminates against the deaf.

Me and Molly Hatchet are in big trouble.

Am I doing it right?
 
2012-10-13 09:31:53 AM

LDM90: I watch all my movies with subtitles on. Started doing it when the kids were small and loud. Add to that the trend of modern actors to mumble everything they say, too-loud music, and abruptly wild changes in volume (gunshots, car chases) and subtitles are a godsend.


I'm right there with ya on this one. Hubby can't hear most actors mumbles unless the volume is up loud enough to rattle the windows when the music starts playing. It's like this for TV shows too. I really wish I could turn down the music.

What makes things worse is that I have good hearing. Which I'd like to keep.
 
2012-10-13 02:02:51 PM

ciberido: nickerj1: ADA is the worst law ever created.

Let's make every business in the entire country spend hundreds of thousands of dollars accommodating 5% of the people. Market forces should be sufficient enough motivation to cause a reasonable amount of businesses to offer reasonable accommodations. That is, if no apartment buildings in the area are disability-friendly, one will eventually begin to be disability-friendly to capture the market share.

As was pointed out earlier in the thread, the number of deaf people living in the United States is about the same as the population of Canada. I haven't noticed you arguing that Netflix should stay the hell out of Canada, so which is it? Are you really, really sucktastic at math, or does the real reason have nothing to do with numbers or efficiency and everything to do with your biscuits getting burnt seeing anyone make any accommodations for anyone not exactly like you?


Around .1% to .5% of people in the US are "deaf". No, I'm not going to google it for you. Your whargarrbl analogy with Canada is moot and unpersuasive. You're saying Netflix should spend x money to enable features that .1% of their userbase will use (if you assume their userbase is statistically equivalent to general population and deaf people haven't already signed up with a movie service that specifically caters to deaf people).

The Banana Thug: I sincerely hope that you never end up in a wheelchair, because if you ever do, then you will truly appreciate the benefits and protection provided by ADA. Two facts: virtually 100% of people, not 5%, will end up relying on ADA at one point or another in their lives. It could be due to an injury, a major surgery, a birth defect, or simply getting old. So unless you've discovered the Fountain of Youth, I'm pretty sure you'll be relying on ADA some day. The other fact: a country's economy is at its strongest when its potential workforce is at its full capacity and everyone capable of working has a job. Our economy boomed when more women joined the workforce, and same with those who are impaired. Yes, ADA compliance does cost money, but you are forgetting the financial burden that an impaired person would otherwise become by being on welfare instead of working a job and being a productive member of society.


I agree with ADA insofar as hiring/employment practices are concerned, which you seem to be hitting on the most. I don't agree with your assumption everyone will "use ADA" at some point in your life. Seems a bit presumptions with no verifiability. I also don't agree with your assumption that the economy is inherently better off with disabled persons in the workforce. One example would be if everyone worked but was put in a job/position they were most inefficient at. A workforce with 2/3 the people, where each person is operating near 100% efficiency would be stronger.

IlGreven: And again, a rightie can't parse the "benefit" half of a "cost-benefit analysis". Which is why they want to cut government programs that, if cut, would result in a net increase in the deficit, whi ...


I'm not sure what you're talking about. ADA doesn't really cost the government anything. The costs are on the employers. As someone else pointed out, if the benefit of providing access to disabled customers outweighed the cost to the employer, they'd do it to make money.

Serious Post on Serious Thread: Know how I know you have no ability to grasp economic theory?

Let's use your numbers:...
Oh, and obviously the market is self-correcting, just look at history! We never had to pass any anti-segregation laws because all businesses and communities are filled with completely rational actors!

/You should feel bad about how not smart you are


Skipping over the hyperboles and bad analogies, who the fark includes discrimination in economic theory? I was slightly trolling regarding the market forces bit, but was also considering ideal economic market (capitalistic utopia if you will). When you take it down to the economic bones, a business will offer an extra service (disability accessible) if it will benefit from it monetarily. Thus, even without ADA, some businesses would implement disability accessibilities because they would benefit from it. Some clearly won't benefit at all. Hence my argument that you should let the ones who would benefit do it via their own volition and not force everyone to do it.

/pleasure arguing with you :)
 
2012-10-14 10:47:14 AM

nickerj1: Around .1% to .5% of people in the US are "deaf". No, I'm not going to google it for you. Your whargarrbl analogy with Canada is moot and unpersuasive. You're saying Netflix should spend x money to enable features that .1% of their userbase will use (if you assume their userbase is statistically equivalent to general population and deaf people haven't already signed up with a movie service that specifically caters to deaf people).


No, I'm saying that Netflix is a business that should cater to different market segments in order to make money.

I'm also saying you sound very, very upset and angry about something that doesn't affect you in the slightest.

But please, let's hear more about how outrageous this is. I'm enjoying your erudition. 

If you run out of other things to rail against, I'd love to hear what you think about handicapped parking spaces.
 
2012-10-14 10:52:07 AM
nickerj1: ADA is the worst law ever created.

The Banana Thug: I sincerely hope that you never end up in a wheelchair, because if you ever do, then you will truly appreciate the benefits and protection provided by ADA. Two facts: virtually 100% of people, not 5%, will end up relying on ADA at one point or another in their lives. It could be due to an injury, a major surgery, a birth defect, or simply getting old. So unless you've discovered the Fountain of Youth, I'm pretty sure you'll be relying on ADA some day. The other fact: a country's economy is at its strongest when its potential workforce is at its full capacity and everyone capable of working has a job. Our economy boomed when more women joined the workforce, and same with those who are impaired. Yes, ADA compliance does cost money, but you are forgetting the financial burden that an impaired person would otherwise become by being on welfare instead of working a job and being a productive member of society.



I,on the other hand, would love to see nickerj1 spend a month or in a wheelchair. It would be a valuable lesson. Well, it would be if you could do more than just lead a horse to water, at least.
 
2012-10-15 09:52:05 AM
Good. I like my gritty crime dramas British. Extremely British.

25.media.tumblr.com
 
2012-10-15 10:00:08 AM

endmile: Bruxellensis: My queue is 180+ titles and growing faster than I can watch them. Lots of choices between current and classic TV shows, documentaries (galore!), and movies.

There are a few good documentaries on there, but there is also a bunch of low budget crap that some idiot made on his computer while sitting in his mom's basement. Much of it is just plain unwatchable.


Most of what big studio Hollywood is farting out for $200 budgets is completely unwatchable. I'm quite happy to pay $9 a month for unlimited access to a Kurosawa or rewatch Twin Peaks series than pay $12 to sit in a megaplex for a viewing of Iron Bat Hulk Sparkly Teen Iron Vampire Romance Avenger Series Part VII
 
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