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(Business Standard)   Finally sold that uninsured vehicle and think it's no longer your problem? Just hope that the new owner doesn't hit anyone with it, or you can be held partially financially liable   (business-standard.com) divider line 53
    More: Strange, MACT, registered owner, Singh, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, SUV Tavera  
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10594 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Oct 2012 at 12:23 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-11 11:50:36 PM
IN INDIA.

You can be killed there for being the wrong religion in some places, still.
 
2012-10-12 12:09:39 AM

doglover: IN INDIA.

You can be killed there for being the wrong religion in some places, still.


Exactly.

I seriously doubt this would be applicable in the U.S.
 
2012-10-12 12:25:15 AM
Usual situation anywhere actually.. the REGISTERED owner and the buyer (who hadnt registered it, therefore was not the owner) are liable. This would be the same in the UK and probably the USA, if you sell a vehicle be damned sure you get the ownership paperwork transferred before they take it away.
 
2012-10-12 12:26:31 AM
That's a page full of words, alright.
 
2012-10-12 12:30:41 AM

gaspode: Usual situation anywhere actually.. the REGISTERED owner and the buyer (who hadnt registered it, therefore was not the owner) are liable. This would be the same in the UK and probably the USA, if you sell a vehicle be damned sure you get the ownership paperwork transferred before they take it away.


This would be a state issue and would vary from state to state. In Wisconsin, you have two full business days to register and license a vehicle that you just got possession of.
 
2012-10-12 12:31:53 AM

gaspode: This would be the same in the UK and probably the USA,


Not in California

When the owner of a California registered vehicle sells or transfers title or interest in the vehicle, the seller must complete a Notice of Transfer and Release of Liability (REG 138) and submit it to the department within five calendar days. This releases the owner from civil or criminal liability for any parking, abandonment, or operation of the vehicle occurring after the transfer date. Keep a copy of the REG 138 for your own records.
 
2012-10-12 12:33:11 AM
FTA: "Admittedly the offending vehicle...

Sounds like a Login from a Politics thread.
 
2012-10-12 12:34:33 AM

Bathia_Mapes: doglover: IN INDIA.

You can be killed there for being the wrong religion in some places, still.

Exactly.

I seriously doubt this would be applicable in the U.S.


The only way you have any problem in the US is if the sale isn't actually legally final, as in transfer of title. That's why when you are selling your car, like maybe peopel are trying it out, you keep insurance on it. Once you've signed it over to them, then you drop it.

In India... well probably depends on who bribed the judge. That country has a bit of a corruption problem.
 
2012-10-12 12:36:20 AM
I sure hope I'm never found liable for 3.5 lakh rupees.
 
2012-10-12 12:37:02 AM

un_farking_real: gaspode: This would be the same in the UK and probably the USA,

Not in California

When the owner of a California registered vehicle sells or transfers title or interest in the vehicle, the seller must complete a Notice of Transfer and Release of Liability (REG 138) and submit it to the department within five calendar days. This releases the owner from civil or criminal liability for any parking, abandonment, or operation of the vehicle occurring after the transfer date. Keep a copy of the REG 138 for your own records.


Yeah if you don't complete the paper work it is your own damn fault.

On another note, if your car ever gets stolen, even if it is a clunker you don't care about, report it stolen. I have a friend that just blew his clunker off that was stolen, and didn't report it stolen, and ended up with a huge lawsuit on his hands.
 
2012-10-12 12:39:54 AM
I don't think I have ever seen the word mishap so many times in one place.
 
2012-10-12 12:41:50 AM
you know who drives cars?

SUCK-ERZ!!!
 
2012-10-12 12:42:32 AM
RICKSHAWS!?

Oh, say there dear fellow, you didst hit mine mailbox with thine horse and buggy! The previous owner of thy carriage owes me money, since he didst clean you out and you have none.

...

The British should have done a better job at enlightening that hole while they were still in power...
 
2012-10-12 12:43:25 AM
Oh, FFS, this is Iin NDIA, you putz.
 
2012-10-12 12:44:22 AM
in INDIA, that is. You're still a putz, subby.
 
2012-10-12 12:49:45 AM
We're worried about what decisions men in diapers are passing now?

Oh wait
 
2012-10-12 12:52:16 AM
So the owner is being forced to pay because he's the owner? If I were the owner, I'd take my car back. After all, the court just ruled that I'm the owner and I'm responsible, so screw the idiot who wrecked my car. Take it back, and hope you can sell it for enough to offset the bill you just got.
 
2012-10-12 12:53:36 AM
This is what you get when you hold tribunals.

Tribunal.
 
2012-10-12 12:55:56 AM
"while asking them to pay nearly Rs 3.5 lakh to..."

Ok, you totally threw me.
 
2012-10-12 12:57:47 AM
"Due to the impact, the rickshaw turned turtle and she fell off "

That's Twice, you win.
 
2012-10-12 01:03:13 AM

Bathia_Mapes: doglover: IN INDIA.

You can be killed there for being the wrong religion in some places, still.

Exactly.

I seriously doubt this would be applicable in the U.S.


It is if you don't submit a transfer of title and release of liability and the new owner fails to transfer the title. The specifics vary from state to state. Happens all the time. Someone sells a junker to a crackhead for a few hundred bucks. The former owner doesn't inform the DMV, the crackhead never transfers the title. The crackhead crashes into a line of cars and flees. The person who still owns the vehicle is on the hook.

The last time I sold a couple of vehicles, I was filling out the transfer/release form on my state's DMV website with the new owner's info 5 minutes after the sale.
 
2012-10-12 01:03:38 AM
Funny, you don't hear about Americans migrating to India. Tribunals might be why {snicker}.
 
2012-10-12 01:04:37 AM
The Tribunal has spoken.

Hit a rickshaw might be a good name for a band.
 
2012-10-12 01:09:27 AM

un_farking_real: gaspode: This would be the same in the UK and probably the USA,

Not in California

When the owner of a California registered vehicle sells or transfers title or interest in the vehicle, the seller must complete a Notice of Transfer and Release of Liability (REG 138) and submit it to the department within five calendar days. This releases the owner from civil or criminal liability for any parking, abandonment, or operation of the vehicle occurring after the transfer date. Keep a copy of the REG 138 for your own records.


I think you're wrong. What this says is that it absolutely can occur in California.

As soon as someone buys your car, the next thing you do is head to the DMV and transfer it the fark away from you.
 
2012-10-12 01:17:55 AM
Depending on where in the USA you live, you file a vehicle report of sale or a seller's report of sale. End of story.

USA! USA! USA! 

/fark yeah
 
2012-10-12 01:20:12 AM
Oh, those wacky Indians ;)
 
2012-10-12 01:24:13 AM

un_farking_real: gaspode: This would be the same in the UK and probably the USA,

Not in California

When the owner of a California registered vehicle sells or transfers title or interest in the vehicle, the seller must complete a Notice of Transfer and Release of Liability (REG 138) and submit it to the department within five calendar days. This releases the owner from civil or criminal liability for any parking, abandonment, or operation of the vehicle occurring after the transfer date. Keep a copy of the REG 138 for your own records.


Thats what I meant.. if that paperwork isnt completed and an accident occurs you might be held responsible.
 
2012-10-12 01:25:58 AM

doglover: IN INDIA.

You can be killed there for being the wrong religion in some places, still.


You know, who's to say this won't be of interest to Indian farkers?
 
2012-10-12 01:27:08 AM
This is why you date a bill of sale and have the buyer sign it and both parties get a copy as well. In most places in USA this would be proof enough.
 
2012-10-12 01:28:06 AM
Guys, calm down, this is only in INDIANA.
 
2012-10-12 01:28:47 AM

Amusement: Funny, you don't hear about Americans migrating to India. Tribunals might be why {snicker}.


No, it's because they get cancelled.

/love that show
//Mrs. de_Selby is Indian ...
 
2012-10-12 01:29:23 AM

the_chief: Guys, calm down, this is only in INDIANA.


ftw
 
2012-10-12 01:33:39 AM

jtown: Bathia_Mapes: doglover: IN INDIA.

You can be killed there for being the wrong religion in some places, still.

Exactly.

I seriously doubt this would be applicable in the U.S.

It is if you don't submit a transfer of title and release of liability and the new owner fails to transfer the title. The specifics vary from state to state. Happens all the time. Someone sells a junker to a crackhead for a few hundred bucks. The former owner doesn't inform the DMV, the crackhead never transfers the title. The crackhead crashes into a line of cars and flees. The person who still owns the vehicle is on the hook.

The last time I sold a couple of vehicles, I was filling out the transfer/release form on my state's DMV website with the new owner's info 5 minutes after the sale.


Yeah I thought of that. In Tx, you sign over the title- but it's on them to actually register it. Which involves taxes unless they put down "sold for $1", so sometimes they don't.

Get the person to present a Driver's License and sign a Bill of Sale. At least you'd have SOMETHING to indicate you sold it and to a real person, provided the license wasn't forged.

And money orders ain't worth diddley if they're forged... cash. Foldin' money.
 
2012-10-12 02:08:36 AM
The buyer has to pay tax when they transfer the title in CA too. I'd be very surprised if Texas didn't have a method for the seller to notify their DMV. To the googlemachine! [Waynes_World_Transition]Here it is.[/Waynes_World_Transition] Yep. Online or paper. It would take a truly lazy DMV to fail to provide vehicle owners with a method of reporting the sale of a vehicle.
 
2012-10-12 02:47:35 AM

Oznog: jtown: Bathia_Mapes: doglover: IN INDIA.

You can be killed there for being the wrong religion in some places, still.

Exactly.

I seriously doubt this would be applicable in the U.S.

It is if you don't submit a transfer of title and release of liability and the new owner fails to transfer the title. The specifics vary from state to state. Happens all the time. Someone sells a junker to a crackhead for a few hundred bucks. The former owner doesn't inform the DMV, the crackhead never transfers the title. The crackhead crashes into a line of cars and flees. The person who still owns the vehicle is on the hook.

The last time I sold a couple of vehicles, I was filling out the transfer/release form on my state's DMV website with the new owner's info 5 minutes after the sale.

Yeah I thought of that. In Tx, you sign over the title- but it's on them to actually register it. Which involves taxes unless they put down "sold for $1", so sometimes they don't.

Get the person to present a Driver's License and sign a Bill of Sale. At least you'd have SOMETHING to indicate you sold it and to a real person, provided the license wasn't forged.

And money orders ain't worth diddley if they're forged... cash. Foldin' money.


You guys are rookies.

Sell old crappy car... watch crackhead drive away... walk inside... call poilce... report car stolen. Voila... no more liability.
 
2012-10-12 02:48:06 AM
US State Regulations: because the agreements made between Charles II and William Penn should have some place in our modern world today.
 
2012-10-12 02:52:08 AM

Amusement: Funny, you don't hear about Americans migrating to India. Tribunals might be why {snicker}.


Nope, it's people bathing next to dog eaten corpses in the Ganges. I tried to post a link I got here to a site with some gross vacation pics but IDK if they got deleted or I had a touch screen fail. Just google "filthy India" if you care to see some bucolic depictions of daily life.
 
2012-10-12 02:57:14 AM
here in NJ i sold my Caddy under a year ago. turned the plates in that day. my insurance company called me the next day to confirm i had sold the car. insurance companies seem to know everything.
 
2012-10-12 03:02:10 AM
FTFA ...which was hit by a rashly-driven SUV Tavera.

Due to the impact, the rickshaw turned turtle and she fell off it and was rushed to a hospital where she was diagnosed to have sustained multiple fractures in the mishap.

(Where IS a female lady wimins 'mishap'?)

I must say I giggled at the phrasing, but I do have to say that such 'fun' journalistic flair is rather more entertaining to read than "Just The Facts" words on newsprint.

I do like to meet and have conversations with people of other cultures. I always end up learning something new and feeling like I'm being a 'Global citizen' instead of growling at "all them thar danged furners frum sumplace that aint USA!!!"

People that hunker down in their small worlds and only want to interact with others exactly like themselves have tiny, atrophied brains and hearts and will never enjoy life and all this world has to offer.
 
2012-10-12 03:12:29 AM

RoyBatty: un_farking_real: gaspode: This would be the same in the UK and probably the USA,

Not in California

When the owner of a California registered vehicle sells or transfers title or interest in the vehicle, the seller must complete a Notice of Transfer and Release of Liability (REG 138) and submit it to the department within five calendar days. This releases the owner from civil or criminal liability for any parking, abandonment, or operation of the vehicle occurring after the transfer date. Keep a copy of the REG 138 for your own records.

I think you're wrong. What this says is that it absolutely can occur in California.

As soon as someone buys your car, the next thing you do is head to the DMV and transfer it the fark away from you.


You don't do it at the DMV. You either mail in the tear-off form that was on the title or just report the sale online. It's the buyer's job to go in and pay the transfer fee, but as long as you've reported the sale, the car isn't your problem. Every state I've lived in where plates stay on the car has some system like this.

In a lot of US states, the seller keeps the plates and the buyer has to get new ones. In those states, if the buyer doesn't register it, the vehicle is unregistered and that's the operator's problem.

tl;dr: When you sell a car, either take the plates off or report the sale, whichever your state requires. And don't move to India.
 
2012-10-12 03:20:23 AM

saeufer82: You don't do it at the DMV. You either mail in the tear-off form that was on the title or just report the sale online. It's the buyer's job to go in and pay the transfer fee, but as long as you've reported the sale, the car isn't your problem.


Not true in CA. The only truly safe way to do it IS at the DMV. The "Release of Liability" from is pretty much a placebo. The car is your responsibility until the new owner registers it. With a signed bill of sale and a completed and mailed in RoL... you have some ground to stand on, but it's still your burden to prove.

State of CA sends me mail once or twice a year to pay for back registration for cars I haven't owned in going on a decade. Having lived in San Diego... and being poor and owning crappy cars... all the cars I sold went right to Mexico. They even stole my tax refund one year to apply to the back charges.

Unless you go to the DMV and see the new owner pay his fees, sign his papers and get his stickers... it is still your problem.
 
2012-10-12 04:17:01 AM
In PA you usually go to a notary who does titles and they check your ID/insurance and issue you a title and registration through the state system on the spot. So the best way to do a sale is agree on the price, then drive to a titling agency, take off your plates, go inside with the buyer and accept the money in front of the notary (nice to have a witness in case of discrepancies or anything questionable), and as soon as you sign the documents to have the title is transferred, GTFO and get a ride home from a friend or family member. Not your problem ever again. But in PA you don't transfer the plates with the car unless it's a family member.

If my state didn't have such a system, I would strongly request, i.e., force, the buyer to sign a notarized statement proving purchase and liability. Might not get you off the hook in all situations, but at least it's a strong argument if a problem crops up. Notary fees are pretty cheap considering the peace of mind you might get from it.
 
2012-10-12 04:55:53 AM

Pray 4 Mojo: State of CA sends me mail once or twice a year to pay for back registration for cars I haven't owned in going on a decade. Having lived in San Diego... and being poor and owning crappy cars... all the cars I sold went right to Mexico. They even stole my tax refund one year to apply to the back charges.


Have even tried to really get this fixed? Worst case, couldn't you report the cars stolen?
 
2012-10-12 05:03:02 AM
Being disabled is a plus in this situation seeing as the plates are registered to me so I always make sure any purchaser knows this ahead of time, and still I will either go with them to the DMV or to get a notarized bill of sale.

I had a problem once with a pick up that the buyer never transferred the title on, a couple years later when I was awarded SSDI/SSI and could only own one vehicle per social security rules I had to jump through many hoops and sign a bunch of papers and other crap including swear before a notary and witnesses that I had sold it, the notary was also a DMV employee!
 
2012-10-12 05:14:26 AM

Firethorn: Pray 4 Mojo: State of CA sends me mail once or twice a year to pay for back registration for cars I haven't owned in going on a decade. Having lived in San Diego... and being poor and owning crappy cars... all the cars I sold went right to Mexico. They even stole my tax refund one year to apply to the back charges.

Have even tried to really get this fixed? Worst case, couldn't you report the cars stolen?


I'm not a California resident anymore... so I don't care. Although they still send me letters every year or two. Back when I would respond to them... I could just get a supervisor on the phone and explain that I had sold the car. I was told that would "clear it up". It obviously didn't.

They wanted a notarized bill of sale and a copy of the release of liability to give me back the money they were holding. Not having those things... I just let them keep my money since I was already on my way out.

The lingering budget crisis in CA has made them very grabby. I get letters from them trying to collect back registrations on cars/motorcycles/etc I took with me in 2008 when I left the state... that have new titles and current tags.
 
2012-10-12 05:17:12 AM

just_another_asshole/jaa: Being disabled is a plus in this situation seeing as the plates are registered to me so I always make sure any purchaser knows this ahead of time, and still I will either go with them to the DMV or to get a notarized bill of sale.

I had a problem once with a pick up that the buyer never transferred the title on, a couple years later when I was awarded SSDI/SSI and could only own one vehicle per social security rules I had to jump through many hoops and sign a bunch of papers and other crap including swear before a notary and witnesses that I had sold it, the notary was also a DMV employee!


I much prefer the States that have the system where you own your plates. Makes the whole thing a lot simpler.
 
2012-10-12 06:45:18 AM
the rickshaw turned turtle

For whatever reason, I love that phrase.
 
2012-10-12 07:04:07 AM
I remember a story like this in the USA. A few years ago. Well without the rickshaw and the seller had to pay because the crackhead hadn't filed the paperwork.
 
2012-10-12 07:10:38 AM
You should also be wary when donating a vehicle. I've donated a few beaters over the years only to be contacted by the Philly PD months later informing me that my vehicle has been abandoned and towed. Evidently they get sold at auction and then never registered. Luckily, each time the group I donated to has backed me up and the police have dropped it. Guess I'm just lucky whoever bought the car didn't decide to use it in a real crime...
 
2012-10-12 07:15:54 AM

Pray 4 Mojo: j
I much prefer the States that have the system where you own your plates. Makes the whole thing a lot simpler.


Yep, another way that Ohio rules.

As soon as the back of the title is signed over and notarized, it's not my car anymore. A signed and notarized title is proof of ownership enough to register the car to the new owner (with a temporary registration, anyway) and IIRC, even just driving off with the previous owner's plates is technically driving with falsified plates, but this is kind of a gray area so it's usually just let go. (I've been in a car pulled over with NO plates on it - owner had the bill of sale, title, and eBay transaction printout - and we were let go since we were just transporting it home. But we got a god long talking to)
 
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