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(Cracked)   So you want to build your own PC, eh? Well here are 12 steps to it that are dangerously irresponsible, so good luck   (cracked.com) divider line 179
    More: Obvious, moral responsibility, SSD  
•       •       •

14107 clicks; posted to Geek » on 11 Oct 2012 at 3:56 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



179 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2012-10-12 06:31:11 AM

Celerian: I wouldn't worry about an SSD right now. First, they're still really expensive, and if they crash, there's no possibility to get at the data. Its not like a hard drive where if you REALLY wanted to, someone you reconstruct the plates or recover the files forensically. They're GONE. Second, the only real benefit you would see is in initial startup, as they don't offer much in the way of actually making programs run faster or better. I think eventually (read: 2-3 years tops) we'll start seeing the price come down to something that is much more affordable, and it will be common place for people to get use to creating a boot drive on the SSD and having their programs and files somewhere else.


At that point, it would seem to me to make more sense to have a flashable (and replaceable) firmware boot chip on the board itself. Why have a whole drive for it, if that's all you're going to use it for?
 
2012-10-12 06:32:45 AM

DarthBart: I've upgraded memory in machines ranging from a Radio Shack Color Computer to a Cray J90 and I've never had to solder memory in.


Same here. But it was probably true before the '80s. I wouldn't be surprised if the first Apple required it.
 
2012-10-12 06:40:23 AM

Magnanimous_J: When planning your build, post it on the Asperser's squad over at Newegg.com tech forums and within minutes they will let you know if you have a problem.


So it's like Fark, then.
 
2012-10-12 06:45:28 AM

Hardy-r-r: jon787: Building your dream PC. What the experts don't tell you.

Aug 06, 2001


Thanks, expert. Where would we be without out? O right, onto the next interesting comment already.
 
2012-10-12 06:56:15 AM

meyerkev: Regular hard drive:
Price: ~$.05-$.10/GB
Capacity: Up to 4TB.
Speed: ~100MBps sequential, ~1MBps random. (So it's great for videos, not so hot for anything that requires pulling stuff off lots of different spots on the drive at once like booting up your computer).
Boot time: ~ 5 minutes.

SSD:
Price: ~$1/GB. (So a 250GB drive is ~$250). Since they WERE $4/GB or more, this is historically low and getting lower.
Capacity: up to 512 GB. (There might be bigger. I haven't seen any, but that doesn't mean they don't exist)
Speed: ~700MBps sequential, ~350 MBps random.
Boot Time: ~ 30 seconds.


If I'm reading this right, SSD costs 10-20 times as much per GB, but tops out at only seven times the speed. I'm trying to figure why I'd want to bleed that much to save -- by your numbers -- maybe four and a half minutes. I can see the DOD, NSA, CIA, FBI, Mossad, Mi6, or the like seeing a real benefit to that, but I can't think of anything I use my computer for that would justify it. In all the decades I've been using computers, I've never once had the kind of computer-related emergency where those four minutes would justify that much extra cost, especially given that I'd have to replace the driver sooner, and irrevocably lose everything on it when it goes. (Yes, use it only for OS and apps, blah blah -- or only for boot?)

If and when the price comes down to only seven times as much, or less, I'll very strongly consider it.
 
2012-10-12 06:56:23 AM

lordargent: BumpInTheNight : Aye, and its just mind boggling:

I was talking about SSDs though, you've got a zebra RAID there.

// OCZ put out something that does 500 earlier this year.

// striping, yuck :P


Hehehe yah that's a pair of its slightly cheaper/GB cousins slapped together, figured what else are those sata3 ports gonna be used for except for plowing head on into the danger zone at full afterburn :P
 
2012-10-12 07:04:45 AM

Magnanimous_J: meyerkev: Here's the short version: The BEST upgrade you can make to your computer today is to get a small 128 GB - 256 GB drive for the OS (I need 256 GB), and any programs you commonly use, and then use the bigger drives to store your data. It just feels snappier.

Would you put games on the boot drive or the storage drive?


The way I had it explained to me (simplifying a bit) is like this:

SSD is much faster, but it's also more volatile. When it goes, it goes, and takes everything with it. There is no chance for data retrieval after it bricks. And right now, they last maybe half as long as a daily-use HDD, if that. (And cost more, but that's not relevant as a technical issue.)

The setup I've seen recommended by a number of sources is to put the OS and apps -- and games are apps, too -- on the SSD (primary drive) and 'data' on a large standard HDD (secondary drive). The first set here refers to things you can easily restore from backups you have on hand, and that's mostly all the programs that you want to run -- OS, apps, and so on. 'Data' here refers to things that are harder to replace if you don't back them regularly, such as all your personal material.

So the setup described (and let me say right here that I'm NOT an expert in this area, just parroting what I've read and heard) would have you put the game itself on the SSD, and game player's data (saves and so on) on the HDD. Though I don't know if all games will let you do that. My own advice would be that if you can't have the game on one drive and save player data on the other, either accept that you could lose it all at some point, find a way to back it up when you want to, or else keep it all on the HDD. (You'll have to forgive me, as I'm also a bit ignorant about 'serious' PC games.)
 
2012-10-12 07:29:40 AM

Jiro Dreams Of McRibs: Should I have not bought that used SATA drive on eBay?


Depends on what kind of porn you enjoy.
 
2012-10-12 07:41:09 AM

Ivo Shandor: xanadian: Also: Building a computer these days, though not for the faint of heart, isn't exactly a Herculean feat, either.

If you want a challenge, try to get Linux and Windows 7 dual-booting in EFI mode on an Intel DZ77GA-70K motherboard. Holy fark do some BIOS programmers need a good cock-punching.


If I'm reading the references correctly, you're talking about forcing an I/O firmware standard that was formally deprecated seven years ago onto a brand-new mobo probably not designed for long-deprecated standards. I'll bet it's got some issues with floppy drives, too.
 
2012-10-12 07:46:20 AM

Isildur: God that was painfully unfunny. I couldn't make it very far.

/and for the record, there are plenty of Cracked articles I do find amusing; I'm not some blanket Cracked hater
//I'm not sure, but I may have complained at some points about how unreliable they can be on historical matters -- but then, to be fair, it's a humor site, not Encyclopedia Britannica


Yeah, it's basically a bluer version of Uncle John's Bathroom Reader for the Internet. I love those books, but I've embarrassed myself plenty of times by parroting stuff I read in them, until I figured out that their factchecking sucks even more than their editing. Still fun to read, as long as you don't assume anything in them in correct. Same for Cracked. It's not the Economist.
 
2012-10-12 08:00:26 AM

lordargent: I know how to do it, and I've done it plenty of times and haven't ever blown a CPU as a result of it.

I just don't like to do it because I know the potential is there and I look at it and think "damn, there should be a better material for this by now".


And the other thing is "what value am I getting from this?"

The difference in performance between having my perfect choice of i7 processor and mobo vs buying a pack is almost insignificant. Memory, hard drive and network speed is where it's at. So, get someone else to do the dirty work on the crap that makes little difference, then I'll stick the hard drive in.
 
2012-10-12 08:31:39 AM
BLIMEY a cracked article that is actually a humor piece rather than a misguided rant with some puns thrown in no wonder people are confused about it.
 
2012-10-12 08:55:25 AM

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: meyerkev: Regular hard drive:
Price: ~$.05-$.10/GB
Capacity: Up to 4TB.
Speed: ~100MBps sequential, ~1MBps random. (So it's great for videos, not so hot for anything that requires pulling stuff off lots of different spots on the drive at once like booting up your computer).
Boot time: ~ 5 minutes.

SSD:
Price: ~$1/GB. (So a 250GB drive is ~$250). Since they WERE $4/GB or more, this is historically low and getting lower.
Capacity: up to 512 GB. (There might be bigger. I haven't seen any, but that doesn't mean they don't exist)
Speed: ~700MBps sequential, ~350 MBps random.
Boot Time: ~ 30 seconds.

If I'm reading this right, SSD costs 10-20 times as much per GB, but tops out at only seven times the speed. I'm trying to figure why I'd want to bleed that much to save -- by your numbers -- maybe four and a half minutes every time I turn on my computer, plus a few seconds any time I do large reads from disk, plus a few milliseconds every time I do any reads from disk, which makes the computer feel way snappier, and old-style computers feel broken. I can see the DOD, NSA, CIA, FBI, Mossad, Mi6, or the like seeing a real benefit to that, but I can't think of anything I use my computer for that would justify it. In all the decades I've been using computers, I've never once had the kind of computer-related emergency where those four minutes would justify that much extra cost, especially given that I'd have to replace the driver sooner, and irrevocably lose everything on it when it goes. (Yes, use it only for OS and apps, blah blah -- or only for boot?)

If and when the price comes down to only seven times as much, or less, I'll very strongly consider it.


Key points added and bolded.

And while the old ones had write issues, the new ones are good for 5 years or more unless you're rewriting the entire disk every day. (And I remember hearing somewhere that even after you "ran out of writes", you could still read, so you'd just mount it like a normal drive, and copy all the data off onto a new drive after 5 or 10 years. Can't find any info either way though in my quick searching). 

/Of course, the way prices have been falling, it'll be 7x within a year or two.
 
2012-10-12 08:57:50 AM
This thread is much better than the article
 
2012-10-12 09:26:33 AM

meyerkev: every time I turn on my computer, plus a few seconds any time I do large reads from disk, plus a few milliseconds every time I do any reads from disk, which makes the computer feel way snappier, and old-style computers feel broken


THIS

I'm getting an SSD soon (after Win 8 upgrade) because I saw the effect of doing a build in Visual Studio and then debugging a website. If you're debugging, doing little fixes and then relaunching, it's really slow. The cost of £100 compared to the annoying frustration of current VS speeds will pay for itself in a month or two.
 
2012-10-12 09:41:21 AM
The first PC I built was a 286. Although that one really doesnt count since I was just using parts found around my friends garage (his dad works at IBM), this was back when SCSI was king. The first PC I built for myself using my own cash was a 486/66, which at the time was godlike. Ran it off dos 5 on a 3.5, swapped disk to run programs for local bbs's and games. Took me months before I could afford a hard drive. Yes i'm too farking old and should just die already.


I have built dozens of computers for myself and others over the years, maybe over a hundred. And today, sadly I am struggling to find another I.T job. Yea shiatty story bro.
 
2012-10-12 09:42:59 AM
I know this isn't the best video out there to portray the difference between traditional HDD vs SSDs but it is a valid example of real life use. Ignore the theatrics in the video, the point still stands.

Link
 
2012-10-12 11:28:10 AM
I've built plenty of PCs and the only problem I have had is where the manual has missed something and the addendum to it is stored in some obscure place on the manufacturer's website, or when the manual covers the hardware portion of the product and neglects to mention some weird feature of the software.

I had a Gigabyte board from a bunch of years ago that the manual neglected to mention which port the CPU fan absolutely needed to be plugged into. Not a hard problem to figure out, but there was no info on it anywhere in the manual. I could see how that could mess up someone who never installed a CPU fan before.

My most recent Asus board has a network "optimizer" in the drivers which for some reason picks the first thing you do on the net as the most important thing ever and to hell with anything else you want to do. So when I downloaded drivers it worked great, but It timed out almost every other task on the network. The off switch for it was buried in driver bloatware. I found it by accident when I was looking for something else. I just about broke that board in half over the frustration I had with it.
 
2012-10-12 11:33:23 AM

Rockstone: This thread is much better than the article


I was about to say the same thing. Great minds think alike.
 
2012-10-12 11:39:05 AM

soopey: Only hard part is trying to contort your fingers to get that fan power plug onto the most improbably placed header ever.


Plug the fan in before you mount it and the problem goes away.

Slaxl: I learned a lot by building my own PCs, lots of trial and error. The very first time I ever tried I asked the help of a friend who said he was tech savvy, I had my doubts when he went at the motherboard hard with a screwdriver, using it as a lever to work in the heatsink onto the CPU. Lesson 1 was don't let other people touch your stuff, lesson 2 is be gentle and never force anything. I didn't learn that one straight away, though, because I tried upgrading some RAM but didn't realise that you had different types of sockets, I just bought RAM and tried putting it in, and when it didn't go I tried harder, and harder, until I cracked the motherboard. Lesson 3 was learn what everything is so I don't buy the wrong stuff again.

Silly me.


All the heatsinks have to be very solidly pressed against the CPU. I can't recall using a screwdriver to mount one but there were definitely some that required levering with a screwdriver to get them off. (You had to compress a spring enough to get a clip off a catch.)

Celerian: I wouldn't worry about an SSD right now. First, they're still really expensive, and if they crash, there's no possibility to get at the data. Its not like a hard drive where if you REALLY wanted to, someone you reconstruct the plates or recover the files forensically. They're GONE. Second, the only real benefit you would see is in initial startup, as they don't offer much in the way of actually making programs run faster or better. I think eventually (read: 2-3 years tops) we'll start seeing the price come down to something that is much more affordable, and it will be common place for people to get use to creating a boot drive on the SSD and having their programs and files somewhere else.


I disagree. It's a lot more than just startup assuming you're actually asking much of your machine. The thing is most people actually need so little power compared to what they have that the benefit of the SSD is minimal.

GRCooper: It's been implied several times, but not specified, so I will:

When building your own PC, do NOT scrimp on the power supply.


And don't buy el-cheapo supplies, either. I've seen too many machines destroyed by bad power supplies.

/get off my lawn if you haven't had to shoehorn shiat into 640k

640k? My first machine had a whopping 128k, half of which was only accessible via swapping.

Old enough to know better: My cpu and mb are coming up on six years old now and doing fine, although I've upgraded RAM, storage space, and the video card since then.


I upgraded the whole thing because 32-bit/4gb simply doesn't cut it anymore. As it stands right now my machine says it's using about 10gb of ram.

meyerkev: SSD:
Price: ~$1/GB. (So a 250GB drive is ~$250). Since they WERE $4/GB or more, this is historically low and getting lower.
Capacity: up to 512 GB. (There might be bigger. I haven't seen any, but that doesn't mean they don't exist)
Speed: ~700MBps sequential, ~350 MBps random.
Boot Time: ~ 30 seconds.


I believe everything above 512gb is enterprise class equipment. I just put one in this box, ~$.75/GB.

maq0r: About the whole SSD thing.

Don't SSD dies have limited writes? I've heard of drives going tits up in 6 months because they've reached their write limit. Is that still true?


They are write-limited but that's not a big deal. I can't check the life left on the drive that was in this box for 18 months as it's currently sitting on my desk awaiting installation in my laptop. The last I checked it it was at 99%, though. The new one is only a few weeks old, of course it still shows 100%.

farkeruk: meyerkev: every time I turn on my computer, plus a few seconds any time I do large reads from disk, plus a few milliseconds every time I do any reads from disk, which makes the computer feel way snappier, and old-style computers feel broken

THIS

I'm getting an SSD soon (after Win 8 upgrade) because I saw the effect of doing a build in Visual Studio and then debugging a website. If you're debugging, doing little fixes and then relaunching, it's really slow. The cost of £100 compared to the annoying frustration of current VS speeds will pay for itself in a month or two.


Yup. The difference between VS on my SSD/24gb machine vs slow HDD/4gb machine is incredible. The CPUs aren't all that different, though.

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: If I'm reading this right, SSD costs 10-20 times as much per GB, but tops out at only seven times the speed. I'm trying to figure why I'd want to bleed that much to save -- by your numbers -- maybe four and a half minutes. I can see the DOD, NSA, CIA, FBI, Mossad, Mi6, or the like seeing a real benefit to that, but I can't think of anything I use my computer for that would justify it. In all the decades I've been using computers, I've never once had the kind of computer-related emergency where those four minutes would justify that much extra cost, especially given that I'd have to replace the driver sooner, and irrevocably lose everything on it when it goes. (Yes, use it only for OS and apps, blah blah -- or only for boot?)

If and when the price comes down to only seven times as much, or less, I'll very strongly consider it.


It depends on what you do with your machine. I wouldn't go SSD for the boot times. The issue is if you spend a lot of time waiting while the drive light blinks at you. That's where the SSD shines. It's especially good if you're doing a lot of small disk accesses--a hard disk must reposition the head assembly (~10ms) and wait for the data to come under the head (another ~5ms, there may be some overlap between these two times.) That's the cost for the first byte--you read 100 one-byte files and you're up over 1s for 100 bytes of data. The SSD incurs no positioning costs as every byte is hooked up all the time. Think of the chatter you often hear from your HDD--every little noise there is another head reposition. Moving the head assembly is normally the only source of noise from a HDD.
 
2012-10-12 11:43:38 AM
It's been nearly 20 years since I first built a computer. My programmer boyfriend at the time had bought the components for one (having shopped around for weeks to find the absolute cheapest possible parts), but never got around to assembling it. After the parts had been sitting there for about 3 months, I got sick of waiting and decided to do it myself. I had never even looked inside a case before, but it only took me about half an hour to build it. Installing Debian 0.9somethingorother took a while, especially figuring out how to get X11 working, but everything was up and running by the time he got home from work. I asked him to set up PPP so I could get online, but after two hours of wrestling with it he gave up, so I figured that out myself too.

I've been building my own PCs ever since. Everyone said I was nuts a couple of years ago when I got a sweet deal on a wussy laptop with an upgradable processor, but even that only took me a little over an hour, though I did end up with one extra screw. It's still working fine, though I've had to replace the screen twice now.

Last year I decided for once in my life to buy a prebuilt system. Bad idea. Since I bought it, I've had to replace the power supply (twice), the motherboard, the video card, and the fan. Since I upgraded the dead parts when I replaced them and have since doubled the RAM, I'm going to upgrade the processor and hard drive before the end of the year.

The case and DVD drive are fine though.

/won't be buying a prebuilt system again
 
2012-10-12 11:47:23 AM

roflmaonow: I know this isn't the best video out there to portray the difference between traditional HDD vs SSDs but it is a valid example of real life use. Ignore the theatrics in the video, the point still stands.


There's 2 other benefits to laptop users: lower power consumption and less liable to damage if dropped.
 
2012-10-12 11:49:49 AM
SSDs are getting close to .50 a GB..... Have at it people. Best bang for the buck you can do.
 
2012-10-12 12:17:33 PM

profplump: They've all been dead since the mid-80s. The folks who need punching are the idiots that keep shipping motherboards with 30-year-old pre-boot-environments.


No, this is one of the shiny-new varieties. Intel Visual BIOS, a layer of eye candy slapped on top of that 30-year-old foundation and then duct-taped together with the tentacled horror that is UEFI (sorry, left out the 'U' on my Boobies).
 
2012-10-12 02:40:40 PM
profplump: Don't disable swap. Turn down /proc/sys/vm/swappiness if you'd like, but let swap do what it was supposed to do -- take unused things out of RAM. Obviously you don't want to be swapping in active processes, but you would like idle page to stop using memory that could go to your disk cache/etc. How often do you print? Wouldn't you be willing to wait another 1.4 seconds to swap CUPS back into RAM for the sake of getting to use that RAM for the 99.8% of the day when you're not printing? Also swap is particularly important when you...

Well, we were originally discussing prolonging the life of SSDs. So.

1) I have plenty of RAM, there's no reason for anything to swap (except in the case of unforseeable circumstances, but in my experience, when unforseeable circumstances happen, it's better to kill the offending process than to rely on swapping to save your butt).

2) Even with swappiness at 0, the system will still use the swap on occassion. So if one of your goals is to keep swapping to a SSD, swappiness 0 is not enough.

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/SwapFaq

"Even if you have lots of RAM and even if you have a low swappiness value, it is possible that your computer swaps. This can hurt the multitasking performance of your desktop system."

3) Even with swappiness at 0, you still need to have a swap partition mounted or a swap file. On ubuntu IIRC, the default swap partition size is twice the amount of installed RAM (or was it RAM + 2GB for large ram systems? Err, or was that redhat?)

In my case, that would mean putting a 24GB (or 14GB if the second calculation is the right one) swap partition on a 60 GB SSD.

3) I could put the swap on another drive, but that would consume 24 (14?) GB of slightly less expensive drive space.

In any event, after disabling swapping entirely and removing the swap partition, my system seems to perform noticeably faster (though that could be the result of going from 60 swappiness to no swap, in addition to adding a ton of ram).

I've run the box this way for over a year and have not had any major issues (except for that one time I accidentally opened every link in a large RSS feed (over 3000 links) in new tabs and caused firefox to go down in flames ... but this falls under 'unforseeable circumstances').

// Disabling swapping means that you have less RAM to use as a disk cache (so you have to read from disk more often). BUT, the disk we're reading from is a SSD :D

// IMO, the only way to figure out what's right for your system is to tweak it and tweak it until you're comfortable with the results. In my case, I ended up with no swap.

// If I ever have any memory issues, I'll be on newegg buying new sticks. The next step for me is 24 gigs.

// Ohh yeah, I never print either.

2. Move /tmp to a tmpfs, not a ramfs. If you disable swap these are effectively the same.

I've disabled swap :)
 
2012-10-12 10:45:57 PM

meyerkev: Sylvia_Bandersnatch: meyerkev: Regular hard drive:
Price: ~$.05-$.10/GB
Capacity: Up to 4TB.
Speed: ~100MBps sequential, ~1MBps random. (So it's great for videos, not so hot for anything that requires pulling stuff off lots of different spots on the drive at once like booting up your computer).
Boot time: ~ 5 minutes.

SSD:
Price: ~$1/GB. (So a 250GB drive is ~$250). Since they WERE $4/GB or more, this is historically low and getting lower.
Capacity: up to 512 GB. (There might be bigger. I haven't seen any, but that doesn't mean they don't exist)
Speed: ~700MBps sequential, ~350 MBps random.
Boot Time: ~ 30 seconds.

If I'm reading this right, SSD costs 10-20 times as much per GB, but tops out at only seven times the speed. I'm trying to figure why I'd want to bleed that much to save -- by your numbers -- maybe four and a half minutes every time I turn on my computer, plus a few seconds any time I do large reads from disk, plus a few milliseconds every time I do any reads from disk, which makes the computer feel way snappier, and old-style computers feel broken. I can see the DOD, NSA, CIA, FBI, Mossad, Mi6, or the like seeing a real benefit to that, but I can't think of anything I use my computer for that would justify it. In all the decades I've been using computers, I've never once had the kind of computer-related emergency where those four minutes would justify that much extra cost, especially given that I'd have to replace the driver sooner, and irrevocably lose everything on it when it goes. (Yes, use it only for OS and apps, blah blah -- or only for boot?)

If and when the price comes down to only seven times as much, or less, I'll very strongly consider it.

Key points added and bolded.

And while the old ones had write issues, the new ones are good for 5 years or more unless you're rewriting the entire disk every day. (And I remember hearing somewhere that even after you "ran out of writes", you could still read, so you'd just mount it like a normal drive, ...


Whoops, missed that little detail. That is a pretty significant difference, yes.
 
2012-10-12 10:56:17 PM

Farktastic: I've built plenty of PCs and the only problem I have had is where the manual has missed something and the addendum to it is stored in some obscure place on the manufacturer's website, or when the manual covers the hardware portion of the product and neglects to mention some weird feature of the software.

I had a Gigabyte board from a bunch of years ago that the manual neglected to mention which port the CPU fan absolutely needed to be plugged into. Not a hard problem to figure out, but there was no info on it anywhere in the manual. I could see how that could mess up someone who never installed a CPU fan before.

My most recent Asus board has a network "optimizer" in the drivers which for some reason picks the first thing you do on the net as the most important thing ever and to hell with anything else you want to do. So when I downloaded drivers it worked great, but It timed out almost every other task on the network. The off switch for it was buried in driver bloatware. I found it by accident when I was looking for something else. I just about broke that board in half over the frustration I had with it.


My most recent "WFT, are you kidding?!" story has to do with a manufacturer I'm trying hard to still like a lot, Toshiba. I cleaned up, updated, and upgraded my father's Toshi laptop. No hassle, I figured, I've got three of my own. Then the wifi went. And would. not. come. back. ipconfig? No help. Driver? Good. Device? Good. Device I/O? Hahaha, NO. Baffled, I spent a good two or three hours researching online. Eventually, I realised that it had something to do with my turning off all the damn Toshi bloatware at Startup. ::le sigh:: Fine, turned that shiat back on. Working now? Hahaha, no, but got all my bloatware back. Joke's on me. FINALLY -- and mind you, this was four or five hours into an increasingly maddening circle of frustration -- I figured out that turning the bloatware off defaulted some stuff to "off," even when the bloatware was turned back on. I found a bit of bloatware I'd never had to deal with before, though it was there all along, the 'Black Cards' menu. If you've got a Toshiba, you know exactly what this is, even if you don't know they call it that. It's the Fn menu that controls a bunch of stuff. It's part of Toshiba's *totally proprietary* set of system *master* swiches, overriding even CLI-level commands such as ipconfig (which is why that didn't work for me). I had to find that switch that turned those back on, then open them up to find the true wifi master I/O switch. Pissed. Me. Off. Especially because now, I don't know what bloatware can be safely turned off or not, and Toshiba's keeping their cards close to their chest about it. Nicely played, Toshiba.
 
2012-10-13 12:14:23 PM

gglibertine: My programmer boyfriend at the time


Congrats on having a programmer boyfriend? :P What I actually wanted to mention though is programmer != technician and while you'll often find the combo package among us you'll encounter programmers that haven't a freakin clue about anything inside of the box just as much as a technician that hasn't a clue how to write switch statement or know what that even means. But again, good for you for having a programmer boyfriend who was clueless about hardware and installing linux but you managed to figure it out. Good for you. ;)
 
2012-10-14 02:00:14 AM
Also, glad this is here so I have some guidance and advice. Maybe I will get started now...
 
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