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(Cracked)   So you want to build your own PC, eh? Well here are 12 steps to it that are dangerously irresponsible, so good luck   (cracked.com) divider line 179
    More: Obvious, moral responsibility, SSD  
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14104 clicks; posted to Geek » on 11 Oct 2012 at 3:56 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-11 06:47:47 PM

RexTalionis: HeartBurnKid: Some people have even told me that spreading it is completely unnecessary; you just put it in the center of the CPU and let the pressure from the heatsink spread it out.

That's great if you don't want to get an even distribution of the compound:

[img216.imageshack.us image 320x240]


Link - I still don't trust it though. I'm one of those paranoid people who spends 20 minutes with a razor blade trying to get it even at a few mils.
 
2012-10-11 06:48:48 PM

RexTalionis: HeartBurnKid: RexTalionis: lordargent: Is this enough paste? Or will the CPU melt down in a few weeks? Is this too much paste? Is it going to goosh out the side? etc.

Grain of rice-sized compound, spread evenly with a credit card. It shouldn't be some sort of nerve-racking experience.

I usually use my finger in a sandwich baggie to spread the paste, but yeah, that's about right. Some people have even told me that spreading it is completely unnecessary; you just put it in the center of the CPU and let the pressure from the heatsink spread it out.

Watch this video.


Well, that was uncanny. Guess I should have hit refresh.

/Tiny fist
 
2012-10-11 07:00:16 PM
If you think building a PC is difficult nowdays, you're a whiny little biatch. Back in my day we had to memorize our HD's stats and enter them into the BIOS by hand, then set the proper master/slave jumper and plug it in with a big fragile ribbon cable.

You children and your fancy plug and play, get off my lawn.
 
2012-10-11 07:01:45 PM

MrEricSir: If you think building a PC is difficult nowdays, you're a whiny little biatch. Back in my day we had to memorize our HD's stats and enter them into the BIOS by hand, then set the proper master/slave jumper and plug it in with a big fragile ribbon cable.

You children and your fancy plug and play, get off my lawn.


Goddamn, you must be old! Building computers before the invention of writing...
 
2012-10-11 07:02:17 PM
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2012-10-11 07:10:16 PM
You wouldn't think being able to get from power off to web browsing in 20 seconds on your desktop is big deal. It is. Loading just your OS on a SSD is worth every penny. The responsiveness of Windows is out of this world. Get a 64gb SSD now. Just do it already.
 
2012-10-11 07:12:43 PM

drewsclues: You wouldn't think being able to get from power off to web browsing in 20 seconds on your desktop is big deal. It is. Loading just your OS on a SSD is worth every penny. The responsiveness of Windows is out of this world. Get a 64gb SSD now. Just do it already.


I'll second this. At least for me, it made me willing to turn it on / off or hibernate it where I hadn't before because the startup time was so painful. A decent bit of power savings.
 
2012-10-11 07:40:45 PM
First time I built a computer I researched, bought some tgings at Fry's some from Newegg, took me a week to get all the kinks out (I knew nothing about hardware). Six months later I learned the importance of surge protectors and replaced everything but the processor and 1 stick of RAM and had it going in minutes.
 
2012-10-11 07:48:18 PM
RexTalionis: Grain of rice-sized compound, spread evenly with a credit card. It shouldn't be some sort of nerve-racking experience.

I know how to do it, and I've done it plenty of times and haven't ever blown a CPU as a result of it.

I just don't like to do it because I know the potential is there and I look at it and think "damn, there should be a better material for this by now".

// I felt the same about IDE cables and their propensity to develop bent pins ... but now we have SATA

// had an old IDE cable once where the pin had been bent back in place so much that it just snapped off in the drive, THAT was fun.
 
2012-10-11 07:58:55 PM
But, I want to costumize my mac...
 
2012-10-11 07:58:57 PM

lordargent: // had an old IDE cable once where the pin had been bent back in place so much that it just snapped off in the drive, THAT was fun.


I'm pretty sure that, on IDE, the cable had the female connectors, not the male.
 
2012-10-11 08:07:21 PM

jon787: Building your dream PC. What the experts don't tell you.


That is some of the best stuff I have read in a long time.

Holy God.
 
2012-10-11 08:17:42 PM

qsblues: Building PC's are for pussies. Try building a Mac server with off the shelf parts, then get back to me.


Been there. Done that. Even used a vanilla kernel. Not terribly hard as long as you're careful about driver support for your hardware.
 
2012-10-11 08:18:10 PM

Zarquon's Flat Tire: Six months later I learned the importance of surge protectors and replaced everything but the processor and 1 stick of RAM and had it going in minutes.


As I learned (the hard way) surges can be just as dangerous as brownouts. Always make backups, and always use a good UPS.
 
2012-10-11 08:22:09 PM
don't buy your mobo from newegg they don't care what quality they send you and won't refund.
 
2012-10-11 08:34:45 PM
drewsclues: You wouldn't think being able to get from power off to web browsing in 20 seconds on your desktop is big deal. It is. Loading just your OS on a SSD is worth every penny. The responsiveness of Windows is out of this world. Get a 64gb SSD now. Just do it already.

I have an older small (40GB) Intel SSD in the desktop. I took stats when I first installed it.

The SSD drive
lordargent.com

VS a 500 GB Western Digital Blue
lordargent.com

VS 2x500 GB Western Digital Blue drives (in RAID 1 via MDADM in Linux)
lordargent.com

VS the 60 GB OCX drive I put in my laptop about a year later.
lordargent.com

// I'm sure they have way faster stuff now
 
2012-10-11 08:41:25 PM
HeartBurnKid: I'm pretty sure that, on IDE, the cable had the female connectors, not the male.

The pin was misaligned with the connector (so the head of the pin was touching the flat part of the connector).

The pin got pushed back into the hole that it comes out of in the drive, and snapped off.

// It wasn't me that bent the pin/hamfisted the drive.
 
2012-10-11 08:44:20 PM
I miss the old days of setting dozens of jumpers on my 8086 mobo and graphics cards and sound cards. Glaring at a yellowish monochrome screen for hours typing in BASIC programs,,Switching out memory chips. Configuring the loader files, himemsys, all the fun stuff.

I wasn't even in middle school at the time.
 
2012-10-11 08:47:53 PM

Plant Rights Activist: don't buy your mobo from newegg they don't care what quality they send you and won't refund.


Really? Never had a problem with stuff from Newegg. I've had a couple bad sticks of RAM over the years and have returned them for free replacements.

As far as for what quality they send you, that's YOUR job to do the research for a decent quality mobo, or any piece of hardware. I haven't often heard of Newegg giving anyone a hassle over returns or replacements though.
 
2012-10-11 08:52:14 PM

MrEricSir: Zarquon's Flat Tire: Six months later I learned the importance of surge protectors and replaced everything but the processor and 1 stick of RAM and had it going in minutes.

As I learned (the hard way) surges can be just as dangerous as brownouts. Always make backups, and always use a good UPS.


I liked the apartment managment denying there was any surge when my friend's computer also blew out at the same time, 12 floors up.
 
2012-10-11 08:55:05 PM
First and second comments on that page:

by eWulf on Mon Aug 6th, 2001 at 06:08:52 AM PST
Will building a computer this way work with AOL?

by Tycho on Mon Aug 6th, 2001 at 06:09:53 AM PST
I need to know this as well

I don't know why, but I started laughing so hard I was crying.
 
2012-10-11 09:05:36 PM

mcmnky: Did you have to configure IRQ settings?

If not, your PC was not hard to build.


*shudder*

/so...many...command-line prompts...
 
2012-10-11 09:07:46 PM

lordargent:
// I'm sure they have way faster stuff now


Aye, and its just mind boggling:
imageshack.us
 
2012-10-11 09:11:01 PM
Plenty of people advocating SSDs. I agree with them whole heartedly. Could not be any more happier with an SSD for the OS. They're much cheaper than before. Heck I bought my 128 GB Crucial M4 SSD for $180 and that was a steal at the time. Now if you wait for a sale you can get it for $80.

My brother didn't understand the fuss about SSDs so I installed my old Crucial 64 GB C300 drive on his computer. He had a i7 920 with 8GB RAM and X58 Intel mobo with some old Seagate 1 TB HDD with 5400 RPM. Before installing the SSD bootup time was like 5 mins or so. Transferring large files took ages. Program installations took a good time. All in all I told my brother that his computer should not be that much slower than mine when I have an i5 2500k with 16 GB RAM. My computer is supposed to be 20-30% faster in all tasks but it seemed mine was at least %50 faster.

Once I loaded SSD on his computer everything was flying and boot time was less than a min. Programs installed on the fly. Games loaded so much faster.

I'm telling you guys without an SSD. Get one.
 
2012-10-11 09:18:25 PM
BumpInTheNight : Aye, and its just mind boggling:

I was talking about SSDs though, you've got a zebra RAID there.

// OCZ put out something that does 500 earlier this year.

// striping, yuck :P
 
2012-10-11 09:22:03 PM

meyerkev: mesmer242: mcmnky: Did you have to configure IRQ settings?

If not, your PC was not hard to build.

Well, you just brought back some memories. Some bad memories.

Anyway, since people keep mentioning video cards, anybody got a recommendation for a good mid-range one?

Define mid-range.

Link Scroll down and you'll see the mid-level GPU's listed at various price brackets. Luckily, the last couple months have seen some pretty major price drops.


That is awesomely helpful, thanks! We look at budget before specs so that's exactly the kind of data we needed.
 
2012-10-11 09:33:14 PM

roflmaonow: Plenty of people advocating SSDs. I agree with them whole heartedly. Could not be any more happier with an SSD for the OS. They're much cheaper than before. Heck I bought my 128 GB Crucial M4 SSD for $180 and that was a steal at the time. Now if you wait for a sale you can get it for $80.

My brother didn't understand the fuss about SSDs so I installed my old Crucial 64 GB C300 drive on his computer. He had a i7 920 with 8GB RAM and X58 Intel mobo with some old Seagate 1 TB HDD with 5400 RPM. Before installing the SSD bootup time was like 5 mins or so. Transferring large files took ages. Program installations took a good time. All in all I told my brother that his computer should not be that much slower than mine when I have an i5 2500k with 16 GB RAM. My computer is supposed to be 20-30% faster in all tasks but it seemed mine was at least %50 faster.

Once I loaded SSD on his computer everything was flying and boot time was less than a min. Programs installed on the fly. Games loaded so much faster.

I'm telling you guys without an SSD. Get one.


Can't reiterate that enough - SSDs are the way to go, if you can afford to do so. The gaming machine I built a year or so ago has an Intel X25-M 80GB SSD and a WD 300GB Velociraptor. System files on the SSD, data files on the Velociraptor, and startup is ridiculously fast.

The prices for SSDs are also dropping fast, too. I'm looking forward to building my next machine.
 
2012-10-11 09:34:15 PM

SolomonKing: First and second comments on that page:

by eWulf on Mon Aug 6th, 2001 at 06:08:52 AM PST
Will building a computer this way work with AOL?

by Tycho on Mon Aug 6th, 2001 at 06:09:53 AM PST
I need to know this as well

I don't know why, but I started laughing so hard I was crying.


Holy...crap?
 
2012-10-11 09:40:03 PM

xenomorpheus: I miss the old days of setting dozens of jumpers on my 8086 mobo and graphics cards and sound cards. Glaring at a yellowish monochrome screen for hours typing in BASIC programs,,Switching out memory chips. Configuring the loader files, himemsys, all the fun stuff.

I wasn't even in middle school at the time.


*Internet High Five*

My first computer was a Kaypro 8088 so I went through much of the same stuff and I also was still in gradeschool.

/CSB
 
2012-10-11 10:07:02 PM

mesmer242: mcmnky: Did you have to configure IRQ settings?

If not, your PC was not hard to build.

Well, you just brought back some memories. Some bad memories.

Anyway, since people keep mentioning video cards, anybody got a recommendation for a good mid-range one?


Depends on what your idea of midrange is. If you play games at or below 1080p, Newegg is having a sale on a dandy of a card right now Link for $142. Or one step down from that, the 7770 goes on sale every now and then for sub-$100, great card that uses little power.
 
2012-10-11 10:22:35 PM
The hard part is getting the duck to stand still when attaching th electrodes.
 
2012-10-11 10:40:09 PM

mcmnky: Did you have to configure IRQ settings?

If not, your PC was not hard to build.


This. Or if you didn't have to unplug, let the electrons evaporate, pray to the computer gods, plug back in your ISA drive controller for the umpteenth time then your PC was not hard to build.
 
2012-10-11 11:05:04 PM
About the whole SSD thing.

Don't SSD dies have limited writes? I've heard of drives going tits up in 6 months because they've reached their write limit. Is that still true?
 
2012-10-11 11:20:10 PM

BigLuca: mesmer242: mcmnky: Did you have to configure IRQ settings?

If not, your PC was not hard to build.

Well, you just brought back some memories. Some bad memories.

Anyway, since people keep mentioning video cards, anybody got a recommendation for a good mid-range one?

Depends on what your idea of midrange is. If you play games at or below 1080p, Newegg is having a sale on a dandy of a card right now Link for $142. Or one step down from that, the 7770 goes on sale every now and then for sub-$100, great card that uses little power.


Yeah, I think the 7770 is the other option.... might wait until black friday/cyber monday at this point though to try to snag a really good deal on it. Went to slickdeals and they already have the forum open for it. WTF, the holidays are sneaking up this year.
 
2012-10-11 11:56:21 PM

CygnusDarius: But, I want to costumize my mac...


Put a mask and big nose on it, then.
 
2012-10-12 12:12:11 AM

maq0r: About the whole SSD thing.

Don't SSD dies have limited writes? I've heard of drives going tits up in 6 months because they've reached their write limit. Is that still true?


Yes, but the newer ones have much better lifetimes, measured in years. And remember, it's the writes that degrade the SSD, not the reads.

Since RAM is cheap and SSDs are expensive, the first thing you do is bone up on your total memory for your system and shut off the goddamn page file by turning off virtual memory. "Virtual memory" - your page file - is the biggest culprit for disk I/O on Windows consumer machines. Turn off the Windows hibernation option as well. If your system boots in 15 seconds, you don't need any of that shiat.

The bulk of data transfer for any hard drive will be from reading, not writing. As long as you minimize writes to normal use (without that goddamn page file) your SSD is going to last as long as your computer, if not longer.

Naturally, if you're running a server of some sort with high disk I/O, the SSD is going to fail sooner. Then again, so will a regular hard drive.
 
2012-10-12 12:20:33 AM
i remember when buying a PCI soundcard was absolutely essential. Those were strange times
 
2012-10-12 12:24:22 AM

Lsherm: maq0r: About the whole SSD thing.

Don't SSD dies have limited writes? I've heard of drives going tits up in 6 months because they've reached their write limit. Is that still true?

Yes, but the newer ones have much better lifetimes, measured in years. And remember, it's the writes that degrade the SSD, not the reads.

Since RAM is cheap and SSDs are expensive, the first thing you do is bone up on your total memory for your system and shut off the goddamn page file by turning off virtual memory. "Virtual memory" - your page file - is the biggest culprit for disk I/O on Windows consumer machines. Turn off the Windows hibernation option as well. If your system boots in 15 seconds, you don't need any of that shiat.

The bulk of data transfer for any hard drive will be from reading, not writing. As long as you minimize writes to normal use (without that goddamn page file) your SSD is going to last as long as your computer, if not longer.

Naturally, if you're running a server of some sort with high disk I/O, the SSD is going to fail sooner. Then again, so will a regular hard drive.


And isn't this why they suggest that you load your OS on the SSD drive and have apps and data on a separate non SSD drive?
 
2012-10-12 12:46:05 AM

RexTalionis: farkeruk: I buy mobo bundles (Mobo + chip + cooler + RAM) and then do the rest myself.

The stock heatsink and fans are loud. I hate them.

I use something similar to this:
[benchmarkreviews.com image 517x600]



The Phenom II (X6 1075 in my case) black box heatsink/fans are surprisingly quiet. *However* I first tried to fit a Silent Knight II onto an M5A99X EVO (ASUS) and it would not secure without moving around. That pissed me off. It's an ASUS board with an ASUS Heat Sink/Fan. WTF?! So, I went with what came with the CPU.

I like quiet. And that means Antec P-series cases. I have a P280 right now. I didn't think they could make a more silent case than the P190 but they did. Of course, the only noise I get is from the damn single Diamond Radeon 6890. I don't know why, and I've always loved Ati/Amd radeon cards, but they have *never*, regardless of card manufacturer, installed quiet or sometimes even reliable fans on those damn things (oh yes, it's fun using solvent on the farking thermal cement they use along with a damn screw driver). 


Pretty...with lights n' stuff...

s13.postimage.org
 
2012-10-12 12:59:23 AM
Lsherm: Since RAM is cheap and SSDs are expensive, the first thing you do is bone up on your total memory for your system and shut off the goddamn page file by turning off virtual memory. "Virtual memory" - your page file - is the biggest culprit for disk I/O on Windows consumer machines. Turn off the Windows hibernation option as well. If your system boots in 15 seconds, you don't need any of that shiat.

That

// for linux users with lots of ram.

1) disable swap (note, if you run out of ram, things will start crashing with out of memory errors ... I have 12 gigs and if that gets used up, something is very wrong).
2) move /tmp to ram (you've got plenty of ram, so why should programs be writing their transient files to disk? RAM is faster than even an SSD anyway)
3) enable trim
 
2012-10-12 01:01:31 AM
Should I have not bought that used SATA drive on eBay?
 
2012-10-12 01:07:09 AM
Eh...got over that long time ago, I've built enough.

Now, I prefer to have a local vendor to discuss the specs with...
price out and purchase the components...as I need.

Have them assemble it for a decent fee, burn it in...warantee the HW for a year.

I'll do the OS and otherwise myself.
Keep it clean.

I hate the friggin' name-brand packages...glutted.
Only for a simple laptop if for that, if necessary. Desktop is still my main.
 
2012-10-12 01:33:43 AM

ongbok: Lsherm: maq0r: About the whole SSD thing.

Don't SSD dies have limited writes? I've heard of drives going tits up in 6 months because they've reached their write limit. Is that still true?

Yes, but the newer ones have much better lifetimes, measured in years. And remember, it's the writes that degrade the SSD, not the reads.

Since RAM is cheap and SSDs are expensive, the first thing you do is bone up on your total memory for your system and shut off the goddamn page file by turning off virtual memory. "Virtual memory" - your page file - is the biggest culprit for disk I/O on Windows consumer machines. Turn off the Windows hibernation option as well. If your system boots in 15 seconds, you don't need any of that shiat.

The bulk of data transfer for any hard drive will be from reading, not writing. As long as you minimize writes to normal use (without that goddamn page file) your SSD is going to last as long as your computer, if not longer.

Naturally, if you're running a server of some sort with high disk I/O, the SSD is going to fail sooner. Then again, so will a regular hard drive.

And isn't this why they suggest that you load your OS on the SSD drive and have apps and data on a separate non SSD drive?


No, they suggest that because SSDs are expensive for the total storage you get. Apps and Data should be on a different drive because they can be isolated on far cheaper drives.

Consumer SSDs still go bad because of excessive writes to a page file. The earlier ones would last over a year without any tweaking for a grandma user, but those weren't the people buying them. The new ones will last a few years based on the same grandma metric. Otherwise, kill off the virtual memory and use the SSD as intended: mostly very fast read.
 
2012-10-12 02:10:47 AM

xanadian: Also: Building a computer these days, though not for the faint of heart, isn't exactly a Herculean feat, either.


If you want a challenge, try to get Linux and Windows 7 dual-booting in EFI mode on an Intel DZ77GA-70K motherboard. Holy fark do some BIOS programmers need a good cock-punching.
 
2012-10-12 03:30:46 AM
Microsoft should sell its OS pre-installed on a SSD.
 
2012-10-12 05:07:46 AM
God that was painfully unfunny. I couldn't make it very far.

/and for the record, there are plenty of Cracked articles I do find amusing; I'm not some blanket Cracked hater
//I'm not sure, but I may have complained at some points about how unreliable they can be on historical matters -- but then, to be fair, it's a humor site, not Encyclopedia Britannica 
 
2012-10-12 05:24:25 AM
No one has built their own computer since the late 70s.

Saying you built your own today would be like saying you built your own furniture that required assembly.
 
2012-10-12 05:32:47 AM

RexTalionis: Slaxl: I had my doubts when he went at the motherboard hard with a screwdriver, using it as a lever to work in the heatsink onto the CPU.

That's how it's supposed to be done, dude. Some of the old heatsinks have a flathead slot so you can use your screwdriver to hook the heatsink onto the board.


This one didn't, and as a result the screwdriver kept slipping and smashing into the motherboard, scarring lines across imprinted circuits.
 
2012-10-12 05:34:23 AM

lordargent: 1) disable swap (note, if you run out of ram, things will start crashing with out of memory errors ... I have 12 gigs and if that gets used up, something is very wrong).
2) move /tmp to ram (you've got plenty of ram, so why should programs be writing their transient files to disk? RAM is faster than even an SSD anyway)


1. Don't disable swap. Turn down /proc/sys/vm/swappiness if you'd like, but let swap do what it was supposed to do -- take unused things out of RAM. Obviously you don't want to be swapping in active processes, but you would like idle page to stop using memory that could go to your disk cache/etc. How often do you print? Wouldn't you be willing to wait another 1.4 seconds to swap CUPS back into RAM for the sake of getting to use that RAM for the 99.8% of the day when you're not printing? Also swap is particularly important when you...

2. Move /tmp to a tmpfs, not a ramfs. If you disable swap these are effectively the same, but if you have a swap partition this will allow old, unused files in /tmp to migrate to disk instead of taking up memory space. Most distros are not configured to proactively remove files from /tmp on a short timescale, so it's easy to end up with lots of cruft that hasn't been touched for hours or days and there's no reason that can't be pushed to disk.
 
2012-10-12 05:39:23 AM

Ivo Shandor: Holy fark do some BIOS programmers need a good cock-punching.


They've all been dead since the mid-80s. The folks who need punching are the idiots that keep shipping motherboards with 30-year-old pre-boot-environments. Sure, maybe you want to provide an emulated BIOS to allow old boot-time ROMs to run (say for HBA cards and the like), but that's easy enough in EFI or any similar environment. There's really no excuse to still be shipping BIOS-enabled anything on modern computers, and there hasn't been for years.
 
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