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(Cracked)   So you want to build your own PC, eh? Well here are 12 steps to it that are dangerously irresponsible, so good luck   (cracked.com) divider line 179
    More: Obvious, moral responsibility, SSD  
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14097 clicks; posted to Geek » on 11 Oct 2012 at 3:56 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-11 05:12:25 PM

IamSoSmart_S_M_R_T: FormlessOne: xanadian: Also: Building a computer these days, though not for the faint of heart, isn't exactly a Herculean feat, either. Just RTFMs, have a steady hand, and have some patience. If you can't do any of the previous 3, pack that shiat back up, return it, and dude...you're getting a Dell!

This. I've been doing it for over 20 years, and it's ridiculously easy compared to the horrifying maze of compliance & compatibility that it used to be when I started. I regularly build machines - typically, every 18-24 months - for home use, and I've done so at work when needed, as well. Compared to what it was like even a decade ago, it's like playing with friggin' Legos now.

This as well. Ridiculously easy to build nowadays...I think the most difficult part of my last build was getting the add-on RAID controller to work, and that just required 10 min of RTFM.

/CSB
//Remembers the bad old days when you had to solder RAM onto the board
///My lawn, off of it


Wha?

I've upgraded memory in machines ranging from a Radio Shack Color Computer to a Cray J90 and I've never had to solder memory in.
 
2012-10-11 05:15:40 PM

Slaxl: I had my doubts when he went at the motherboard hard with a screwdriver, using it as a lever to work in the heatsink onto the CPU.


That's how it's supposed to be done, dude. Some of the old heatsinks have a flathead slot so you can use your screwdriver to hook the heatsink onto the board.
 
2012-10-11 05:17:37 PM
Heck, the first PCs I built were 100mHz Pentiums. I would dig motherboards and other parts out of the dumpster behind work and cobble one together. I usually took three or four PCs of parts to build one working PC. I only fried one when I put the CPU in wrong. This was before the CPUs were keyed to fit only one way. I thought I was Pimp Daddy when I built a 133mHz Pentium with 32MB or RAM and on board IDE controllers. (Remember the old ISA IDE cards?)

Outlawtsar: I'm not sure when it started, but every time I cold boot my homebuilt PC these days, it has to start 3 times. Meaning that it starts, the fans start to spin, but before it posts, it powers down. It does that same set of things again, then it does it again, but instead of powering down, it posts.


We have Dell PCs that do the very same thing. New, out of the box PCs. You power it on and just when you think it'll POST, it will power back down. You have to press the button a second time for it it come up all the way. A BIOS flash usually corrects it, but not every time.
 
2012-10-11 05:19:01 PM

RexTalionis: How hard is it to build a computer these days? It's all standardized connectors and plug and play now!


The only thing I hate is fitting the CPU. I buy mobo bundles (Mobo + chip + cooler + RAM) and then do the rest myself.

If you've got your own MSDN sub, it works out cheaper than something off-the-shelf
 
2012-10-11 05:21:10 PM

farkeruk: I buy mobo bundles (Mobo + chip + cooler + RAM) and then do the rest myself.


The stock heatsink and fans are loud. I hate them.

I use something similar to this:
benchmarkreviews.com
 
2012-10-11 05:24:04 PM
Building a PC isn't that hard, but there are special obstacles you may not anticipate. A lot of video cards today are freaking huge and may not physically fit in your case (I've also had to remove fans and HD slots to make room for everything). Not everything may come with the right adapters or cords, so expect at least 1 Radio Shack run (unless you have a big Rubbermaid bin full of misc cords and tiny screws like I do). If you buy 7 components, assume at least 1 will be DOA, usually a RAM stick.

My protip: Download your internet and video drivers before you install and keep them on a thumb drive. Trying to operate a PC without a working video driver is painful at best (some MB's come with built in chipsets)

As far as graphics cards go, its way more cost effective to buy a good graphics card (not top of the line) and replace it in 2 years than to buy the absolute best card on the market.

When planning your build, post it on the Asperser's squad over at Newegg.com tech forums and within minutes they will let you know if you have a problem.
 
2012-10-11 05:26:01 PM

Magnanimous_J: As far as graphics cards go, its way more cost effective to buy a good graphics card (not top of the line) and replace it in 2 years than to buy the absolute best card on the market.


My next build will feature an AMD Trinity APU running in Crossfire mode with a relatively cheap Radeon.
 
2012-10-11 05:26:25 PM

Havokmon: mcmnky: Did you have to configure IRQ settings?

If not, your PC was not hard to build.

Did you optimize your conventional memory manually?

If you used QEMM, congratulations, you're an MCSE. :P


Thanks. Years of therapy...gone.
 
2012-10-11 05:28:40 PM

DarthBart:
Wha?

I've upgraded memory in machines ranging from a Radio Shack Color Computer to a Cray J90 and I've never had to solder memory in.


I don't recall the brand offhand (it's been almost 30 years now?), but it held true for the Amiga 2500:

"It included 2Mb of 32bit Fast RAM expandable to 4Mb RAM if you were handy with a soldering iron and felt comfortable handling the uniquely packaged fragile ZIP (Zigzag Inline Package) chips!"
 
2012-10-11 05:29:31 PM

StoPPeRmobile: That reminds me.

Don't blow your wad on the video card/s.



THIS

They never show the picture right afterwards, and it smells like fried eggs and bleach.
 
2012-10-11 05:31:57 PM

biyaaatci: StoPPeRmobile: That reminds me.

Don't blow your wad on the video card/s.


THIS

They never show the picture right afterwards, and it smells like fried eggs and bleach.


Besides, you gotta have something left to put between the CPU and its heatsink.
 
2012-10-11 05:36:24 PM
RexTalionis: How hard is it to build a computer these days? It's all standardized connectors and plug and play now!

The hardest part about building/working on computers today is shiatty cases.

// happy computer assembly starts with a decent case.

// do they still sell steel cases? I still have scars from the lacerations I earned while working in those things.
 
2012-10-11 05:39:22 PM
It's been implied several times, but not specified, so I will:

When building your own PC, do NOT scrimp on the power supply.

/get off my lawn if you haven't had to shoehorn shiat into 640k
//and, yeah, I always order my CPU/MB together. Even if you pay a little more for the chip - I've just had too many problems with wonkiness and at least if you get them both together and they don't work, you won't have your chip vendor blaming the MB or vice versa
 
2012-10-11 05:41:08 PM

xanadian: Also: Building a computer these days, though not for the faint of heart, isn't exactly a Herculean feat, either. Just RTFMs, have a steady hand, and have some patience. If you can't do any of the previous 3, pack that shiat back up, return it, and dude...you're getting a Dell!


It always amazes me how this somehow becomes such an Herculean task that it stumps even the most educated people and causes them to give up on even the easiest of task with the excuse of "I'm not a technician".
 
2012-10-11 05:42:07 PM

ongbok: xanadian: Also: Building a computer these days, though not for the faint of heart, isn't exactly a Herculean feat, either. Just RTFMs, have a steady hand, and have some patience. If you can't do any of the previous 3, pack that shiat back up, return it, and dude...you're getting a Dell!

It always amazes me how this somehow becomes such an Herculean task that it stumps even the most educated people and causes them to give up on even the easiest of task with the excuse of "I'm not a technician".


500 million people will buy and assemble their own furniture from IKEA but when it comes to putting stuff into slots in a computer - it's rocket science.
 
2012-10-11 05:42:56 PM
My cpu and mb are coming up on six years old now and doing fine, although I've upgraded RAM, storage space, and the video card since then.

I remember the one thing that always put the fear of God into me was installing the heatsink. Slipping the end of a screwdriver into the slot and prying the tab into place. I always expected to hear a sickening snap as I put pressure on the components.

And as someone mentioned above, trying the squeeze my sausagelike fingers into that tangle of cards and wires to try to put in a new drive, switch out Ram, or just plug in a fan. Hoping you don't break a pin or a board or knock something out of alignment. I'd almost always come away with at least one scratch.
 
2012-10-11 05:43:19 PM

jon787: Building your dream PC. What the experts don't tell you.


Aug 06, 2001
 
2012-10-11 05:43:55 PM
UberDave :Turns out it was the relatively new one-switch overclock feature ASUS added to their boards and it was set to "on". Doh!

The last board I built had a power, reset, and clear CMOS button built RIGHT into the mobo.

www.techspot.com

shiat, who even needs a case now.?
 
2012-10-11 05:45:57 PM

Celerian: I wouldn't worry about an SSD right now. First, they're still really expensive, and if they crash, there's no possibility to get at the data. Its not like a hard drive where if you REALLY wanted to, someone you reconstruct the plates or recover the files forensically. They're GONE. Second, the only real benefit you would see is in initial startup, as they don't offer much in the way of actually making programs run faster or better. I think eventually (read: 2-3 years tops) we'll start seeing the price come down to something that is much more affordable, and it will be common place for people to get use to creating a boot drive on the SSD and having their programs and files somewhere else.


Wait, what?

Here's the short version: The BEST upgrade you can make to your computer today is to get a small 128 GB - 256 GB drive for the OS (I need 256 GB), and any programs you commonly use, and then use the bigger drives to store your data. It just feels snappier. 

Regular hard drive:
Price: ~$.05-$.10/GB
Capacity: Up to 4TB.
Speed: ~100MBps sequential, ~1MBps random. (So it's great for videos, not so hot for anything that requires pulling stuff off lots of different spots on the drive at once like booting up your computer).
Boot time: ~ 5 minutes.

SSD:
Price: ~$1/GB. (So a 250GB drive is ~$250). Since they WERE $4/GB or more, this is historically low and getting lower.
Capacity: up to 512 GB. (There might be bigger. I haven't seen any, but that doesn't mean they don't exist)
Speed: ~700MBps sequential, ~350 MBps random.
Boot Time: ~ 30 seconds.
 
2012-10-11 05:48:30 PM
mcmnky:Did you have to configure IRQ settings?

My old work machine (about four machines ago), had a problem with the video card/video driver. So this was a daily thing.



// made it hard to work from home because I wasn't sure if the machine would be up, or sitting at a BSOD.

// also, rebooting the machine remotely was also problematic, because I could never be sure that the machine would come up fully. And once it's at a BSOD, the game is over (and I have to drive in).
 
2012-10-11 05:52:18 PM

Lando Lincoln: Because People in power are Stupid: I don't really get it. Doesn't even mention the hard parts so that's not really building your own computer.

As a veteran computer builder, I got a lot of laughs out of it.


I also found it fairly amusing.

\I just wish at some point in step one he told you to start hot-swapping HD's
 
2012-10-11 05:52:51 PM

Treygreen13: ongbok: xanadian: Also: Building a computer these days, though not for the faint of heart, isn't exactly a Herculean feat, either. Just RTFMs, have a steady hand, and have some patience. If you can't do any of the previous 3, pack that shiat back up, return it, and dude...you're getting a Dell!

It always amazes me how this somehow becomes such an Herculean task that it stumps even the most educated people and causes them to give up on even the easiest of task with the excuse of "I'm not a technician".

500 million people will buy and assemble their own furniture from IKEA but when it comes to putting stuff into slots in a computer - it's rocket science.


or try to figure out how to program the channels on their T.V. or turn off the default parental settings on their new DVD player.

I bet you IKEA has a helpdesk for people to call. They have to, because you can't possibly be able to put together IKEA furniture but can't figure out how to look in the instruction manual of your DVD player to figure out how to input 0000 to turn off the parental controls on your dvd player.
 
2012-10-11 05:53:17 PM

Hardy-r-r: jon787: Building your dream PC. What the experts don't tell you.

Aug 06, 2001


Also from the same site as "How to tell if your son is a computer hacker" (#6: Does your son use Quake?)

God, I miss adequacy. Most trolls nowadays just blow their load within 1 or 2 posts. Adequacy went in dry and kept you coming back for more.

Even K5 couldn't match them.
 
2012-10-11 05:54:05 PM

ProfessorOhki: StoPPeRmobile: ProfessorOhki: soopey: Only hard part is trying to contort your fingers to get that fan power plug onto the most improbably placed header ever.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^ THIS

Also,
[img218.imageshack.us image 614x434]

lol.

That reminds me.

Don't blow your wad on the video card/s. Wait a few months then get it/them.

Unless you don't already have one.

Guilty as charged. I built a desktop recently. My main machine went from being a convertible tablet which wasn't a complete slouch (dual-core 2.4Ghz/4GB RAM was passable for 2008), but the ATI HD3200 was... eeeh. So I was in the mind set of, "I want a desktop and one that will last for a while," and went a bit overboard.

/And that's the story of my GTX680


Sounds like a TX2500 or TX2. I always found them brilliant for a portable but would never consider them a primary.
 
2012-10-11 05:59:09 PM

meyerkev: Here's the short version: The BEST upgrade you can make to your computer today is to get a small 128 GB - 256 GB drive for the OS (I need 256 GB), and any programs you commonly use, and then use the bigger drives to store your data. It just feels snappier.


Would you put games on the boot drive or the storage drive?
 
2012-10-11 05:59:13 PM
farkeruk: The only thing I hate is fitting the CPU. I buy mobo bundles (Mobo + chip + cooler + RAM) and then do the rest myself.

Ditto,

I'm all fine and dandy with "insert card A into slot B" and "insert screw X into mounting bracket Y", but when it comes to putting thermal compound on a heat sink/cpu, I get queasy and start to second guess myself.

// because, in the life of a machine, how often do you mount the heat sink compared to the number of times you move drives or cards around.
 
2012-10-11 06:06:12 PM

Magnanimous_J: meyerkev: Here's the short version: The BEST upgrade you can make to your computer today is to get a small 128 GB - 256 GB drive for the OS (I need 256 GB), and any programs you commonly use, and then use the bigger drives to store your data. It just feels snappier.

Would you put games on the boot drive or the storage drive?


If you do what I did and just raid0 a pair of 256GB vertex 4s you don't really care at that point :D

/Previously though with just a single 120GB SSD I'd put the OS on it and try to install all the apps/games(steam) to the storage drive (a raid of 7200s) but then for my favoured games du jour I'd use creative mklink'ing to move the appropriate folder for them over to the SSD and make a link back to where the OS/steam thinks it is...tada SSD speed ala carte.

/Same with creating Ram drives out of the ridiculously cheap 16GB DDR3 kits.
// 9GB/sec transfer out of those even at 1600Mhz Dualchannel, wooosh!
 
2012-10-11 06:08:48 PM

lordargent: farkeruk: The only thing I hate is fitting the CPU. I buy mobo bundles (Mobo + chip + cooler + RAM) and then do the rest myself.

Ditto,

I'm all fine and dandy with "insert card A into slot B" and "insert screw X into mounting bracket Y", but when it comes to putting thermal compound on a heat sink/cpu, I get queasy and start to second guess myself.

// because, in the life of a machine, how often do you mount the heat sink compared to the number of times you move drives or cards around.


Why is that?
Most folks won't need to remount the heat sink ever again, but every now and then when I think about it, (every 4-5 months or so) I'll decide I need to clean out the computer case and heatsinks that have accumulated bunches of dust and shiat. I'll usually end up removing the heatsink from the cpu entirely, cleaning the old gunk off and reapplying. Currently on the 3rd year with this machine, will likely build another one after it's 4th year and hand this one down to my kid after I do a few minor upgrades.
 
2012-10-11 06:11:06 PM

mcmnky: Did you have to configure IRQ settings?

If not, your PC was not hard to build.


Well, you just brought back some memories. Some bad memories.

Anyway, since people keep mentioning video cards, anybody got a recommendation for a good mid-range one?
 
2012-10-11 06:12:29 PM

RexTalionis: farkeruk: I buy mobo bundles (Mobo + chip + cooler + RAM) and then do the rest myself.

The stock heatsink and fans are loud. I hate them.

I use something similar to this:
[benchmarkreviews.com image 517x600]


that looks like a funky pastry of tits from outerspace
 
2012-10-11 06:12:35 PM

mesmer242: Anyway, since people keep mentioning video cards, anybody got a recommendation for a good mid-range one?


GeForce 560.
 
2012-10-11 06:13:35 PM

Magnanimous_J: meyerkev: Here's the short version: The BEST upgrade you can make to your computer today is to get a small 128 GB - 256 GB drive for the OS (I need 256 GB), and any programs you commonly use, and then use the bigger drives to store your data. It just feels snappier.

Would you put games on the boot drive or the storage drive?


It depends.

Putting it on the SSD will reduce load times. (Guild Wars 2 on Desktop HDD: 30 second loading times, Laptop SSD: 10 seconds). In exchange, if you have a 30GB game, you're paying $60 for the game, and $30 for the hard drive space it's on. So it depends on how much you hate loading screens, and how much free space you have on your SSD.
 
2012-10-11 06:15:20 PM

RexTalionis: mesmer242: Anyway, since people keep mentioning video cards, anybody got a recommendation for a good mid-range one?

GeForce 560.


Yup those guys were very standard issue last year for sure. No 660s (released) yet so its the 560 or pick from AMD's lineup.
 
2012-10-11 06:17:41 PM

dyhchong: ProfessorOhki: StoPPeRmobile: ProfessorOhki: soopey: Only hard part is trying to contort your fingers to get that fan power plug onto the most improbably placed header ever.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^ THIS

Also,
[img218.imageshack.us image 614x434]

lol.

That reminds me.

Don't blow your wad on the video card/s. Wait a few months then get it/them.

Unless you don't already have one.

Guilty as charged. I built a desktop recently. My main machine went from being a convertible tablet which wasn't a complete slouch (dual-core 2.4Ghz/4GB RAM was passable for 2008), but the ATI HD3200 was... eeeh. So I was in the mind set of, "I want a desktop and one that will last for a while," and went a bit overboard.

/And that's the story of my GTX680

Sounds like a TX2500 or TX2. I always found them brilliant for a portable but would never consider them a primary.


Yeah, a TX2z. Neat little thing esp with an external monitor. I'd love to just use it as an input device for my desktop now. Unfortunately, it's gotten this weird error where it forgets it has a primary display. It'll work fine with an external display. But here's where it gets weird - if you do a hard power off - like tear the battery out while it's running, sometimes... sometimes... it will come back on with the primary display working again. It's not a fuzzy, it's going out - it's a "the backlight isn't even on" vs. "works like the day I got it."

If anyone's got any ideas, I'd appreciate 'em. It's not drivers or the OS, because even off of a live CD you get no screen. Some people have complained of bad solder joints, but I'd expect that to be more intermittent.
 
2012-10-11 06:20:27 PM

mesmer242: mcmnky: Did you have to configure IRQ settings?

If not, your PC was not hard to build.

Well, you just brought back some memories. Some bad memories.

Anyway, since people keep mentioning video cards, anybody got a recommendation for a good mid-range one?


Define mid-range.

Link Scroll down and you'll see the mid-level GPU's listed at various price brackets. Luckily, the last couple months have seen some pretty major price drops.
 
2012-10-11 06:20:39 PM
rickycal78 : Most folks won't need to remount the heat sink ever again,

Everything else is rigid and confined, applying thermal compound isn't ... the potential for chaos is immense.

Is this enough paste? Or will the CPU melt down in a few weeks? Is this too much paste? Is it going to goosh out the side? etc.

I friggin hate that stuff.
 
2012-10-11 06:24:17 PM

rickycal78: lordargent: farkeruk: The only thing I hate is fitting the CPU. I buy mobo bundles (Mobo + chip + cooler + RAM) and then do the rest myself.

Ditto,

I'm all fine and dandy with "insert card A into slot B" and "insert screw X into mounting bracket Y", but when it comes to putting thermal compound on a heat sink/cpu, I get queasy and start to second guess myself.

// because, in the life of a machine, how often do you mount the heat sink compared to the number of times you move drives or cards around.

Why is that?
Most folks won't need to remount the heat sink ever again, but every now and then when I think about it, (every 4-5 months or so) I'll decide I need to clean out the computer case and heatsinks that have accumulated bunches of dust and shiat. I'll usually end up removing the heatsink from the cpu entirely, cleaning the old gunk off and reapplying. Currently on the 3rd year with this machine, will likely build another one after it's 4th year and hand this one down to my kid after I do a few minor upgrades.


For me, it's because it's the one thing you can't verify. You can see if a card is seated, you can see if a plug is mated. To see if you got even coverage and no bubbles, you'd have to pull off the heatsink, undoing all your work. Outside of temp measurements, you don't know if something's wrong until it's too late. Hotspots are bad. Not to mention CPUs tend to be one of the bigger ticket items in a PC.
 
2012-10-11 06:25:04 PM

lordargent: rickycal78 : Most folks won't need to remount the heat sink ever again,

Everything else is rigid and confined, applying thermal compound isn't ... the potential for chaos is immense.

Is this enough paste? Or will the CPU melt down in a few weeks? Is this too much paste? Is it going to goosh out the side? etc.

I friggin hate that stuff.


You really don't need much paste at all. If you buy a tube or syringe of compound you'll likely never need to buy another one. It really only takes a very thin layer of the stuff to do it's job. Just make sure you take some rubbing alcohol or something of that nature that dries extremely fast and get rid of that stupid heat transfer square that gets stuck on a lot of stock heatsinks before you start.
 
2012-10-11 06:26:33 PM

lordargent: Is this enough paste? Or will the CPU melt down in a few weeks? Is this too much paste? Is it going to goosh out the side? etc.


Grain of rice-sized compound, spread evenly with a credit card. It shouldn't be some sort of nerve-racking experience.
 
2012-10-11 06:28:06 PM
The whole idea with thermal compound is that less is better. What you want is just enough to fill in the microscopic imperfections on the mating surface of the CPU and the heatsink. If you put too much, it interferes with thermal conductance. Always err on the side of less, as long as you get even coverage all around.
 
2012-10-11 06:32:14 PM

Outlawtsar: Is it worth tearing it down and rebuilding from scratch or do I just deal?


Check the fans inside the machine and on the GPU, one might not be firing up or getting up to an 'acceptable' speed in time for the BIOS to be happy with. Dust, grunge and general wear & tear on them can cause this... as can a fan failing because well sometimes they do.

I'd also make sure you've not done something dumb like trying to get 350w PSU to drive a Core i7 and a 680.

But it's probably either dust or age related and beyond the time required to de grunge stuff or swap a duff fan out a very easy thing to fix. I mean you can check for bad caps as well but that isn't that common.
 
2012-10-11 06:37:27 PM

BumpInTheNight: RexTalionis: mesmer242: Anyway, since people keep mentioning video cards, anybody got a recommendation for a good mid-range one?

GeForce 560.

Yup those guys were very standard issue last year for sure. No 660s (released) yet so its the 560 or pick from AMD's lineup.


What.
 
2012-10-11 06:37:45 PM

Outlawtsar: OK, so to threadjack about homebuilt PC issues - figure this one out for me:

I'm not sure when it started, but every time I cold boot my homebuilt PC these days, it has to start 3 times. Meaning that it starts, the fans start to spin, but before it posts, it powers down. It does that same set of things again, then it does it again, but instead of powering down, it posts. It doesn't seem to have any problems once it is up, and it can hibernate/come out of hibernate just fine, but why would it do 3 boots (and always 3). I would think a short or something would be more random than 3 every single time.

Is it worth tearing it down and rebuilding from scratch or do I just deal?


Modern/capable motherboard that's trying to auto-detect and test for ram speed/timing but it somehow isn't remembering that? That confounded the crap out of me with the current build(Asus WS Revolution MB + some corsair ram called vengeance or some such), the ram sticks weren't on its official compatibility list so by default the motherboard would attempt to find an optimal setting for it and it'd reboot several times during that process. Resolved by going in and just telling it what timing it should use manually, it stopped doing that.
 
2012-10-11 06:39:31 PM

RexTalionis: lordargent: Is this enough paste? Or will the CPU melt down in a few weeks? Is this too much paste? Is it going to goosh out the side? etc.

Grain of rice-sized compound, spread evenly with a credit card. It shouldn't be some sort of nerve-racking experience.


I usually use my finger in a sandwich baggie to spread the paste, but yeah, that's about right. Some people have even told me that spreading it is completely unnecessary; you just put it in the center of the CPU and let the pressure from the heatsink spread it out.
 
2012-10-11 06:40:02 PM

meyerkev: Putting it on the SSD will reduce load times. (Guild Wars 2 on Desktop HDD: 30 second loading times, Laptop SSD: 10 seconds). In exchange, if you have a 30GB game, you're paying $60 for the game, and $30 for the hard drive space it's on. So it depends on how much you hate loading screens, and how much free space you have on your SSD.


But if you're moving games around, like maybe you have your current favourite game on the SSD and park other things elsewhere, it's not really $30 for the game.

Personally, I'm getting one when Win 8 comes out. It'll cost me something like £100 for a 256GB SSD + £25 for the Windows upgrade. I'll have to do a convert to Win 8, then Ghost the drive onto an SSD.
 
2012-10-11 06:40:12 PM

HeartBurnKid: What.


Yah, doh, I realized afterwards the link I'd checked was dated for September so they were likely released by this point.
 
2012-10-11 06:42:48 PM

HeartBurnKid: Some people have even told me that spreading it is completely unnecessary; you just put it in the center of the CPU and let the pressure from the heatsink spread it out.


That's great if you don't want to get an even distribution of the compound:

img216.imageshack.us
 
2012-10-11 06:43:32 PM

HeartBurnKid: RexTalionis: lordargent: Is this enough paste? Or will the CPU melt down in a few weeks? Is this too much paste? Is it going to goosh out the side? etc.

Grain of rice-sized compound, spread evenly with a credit card. It shouldn't be some sort of nerve-racking experience.

I usually use my finger in a sandwich baggie to spread the paste, but yeah, that's about right. Some people have even told me that spreading it is completely unnecessary; you just put it in the center of the CPU and let the pressure from the heatsink spread it out.


Eh, that doesn't work all that well unless you're using oversized blobs of compound. I tend to use a bit larger blobs than RexTalionis mentioned, but that's more for ease of spreading it and I always end up wiping off some excess.
 
2012-10-11 06:44:04 PM
i herd the Abit BH6 with a Celeron 266 can be overclocked to like 448 mhz right out of the BOX!!!
 
2012-10-11 06:46:08 PM

HeartBurnKid: RexTalionis: lordargent: Is this enough paste? Or will the CPU melt down in a few weeks? Is this too much paste? Is it going to goosh out the side? etc.

Grain of rice-sized compound, spread evenly with a credit card. It shouldn't be some sort of nerve-racking experience.

I usually use my finger in a sandwich baggie to spread the paste, but yeah, that's about right. Some people have even told me that spreading it is completely unnecessary; you just put it in the center of the CPU and let the pressure from the heatsink spread it out.


Watch this video.
 
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