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(Lincoln Journal Star)   Mansion belong to a former Buffalo Bills defensive lineman turned furniture magnate turned pauper will be burned to the ground by the Gretna fire department as part of a training exercise   (journalstar.com) divider line 39
    More: Sad, Rod Kush, fire departments, lineman, Catholic Charities, furniture, Sarpy County, exercises  
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11125 clicks; posted to Main » on 11 Oct 2012 at 6:33 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



39 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2012-10-11 06:43:17 AM
img397.imageshack.us
/fire fighters gonna fire fight
 
2012-10-11 07:03:40 AM
So, the house won't get the hose then?
 
2012-10-11 07:09:38 AM
I hardly think the guy's a pauper. He still owns two furniture stores in Nebraska.
 
2012-10-11 07:18:43 AM
Lived in Omaha for twelve years, bought furniture at the 72nd Street store. Never new the guy played in the NFL.
 
2012-10-11 07:25:36 AM
bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com

Just goes to show you that any dwelling, no matter how costly & opulent, can get fubar'd by one little patch of mold.

/Mold is truly evil
 
2012-10-11 07:29:45 AM

theknuckler_33: I hardly think the guy's a pauper. He still owns two furniture stores in Nebraska.


Owning a business is not indicative of one having wealth any more than thinking someone is rich because they drive a Mercedes or wear a Rolex. The business may be losing money or barely breaking even. Just as the douche driving the 750 BMW might be leverage out to the hilt.
 
2012-10-11 07:43:07 AM
How is that sad, materialistmitter?

That live burn teaches firefighters practical experience that could save their lives in a working fire
 
2012-10-11 07:47:00 AM
Looks like we're giving money to the wrong people these days.
 
2012-10-11 07:51:35 AM
"Has anyone really been far even as decided to use even go want to do look more like?"
 
2012-10-11 07:52:45 AM
Meh, people with money rarely build interesting mansions. For every winterthur there are a million double wide mcmansions.

Square footage alone won't make a cool home.
 
2012-10-11 07:58:29 AM
It's pretty close to Strategic Air Command Memorial Highway. When did SAC get sacked? The news must have been Offutt.
 
2012-10-11 08:01:38 AM
Beaver Knievel
"Has anyone really been far even as decided to use even go want to do look more like?"

"You've got to be kidding me. I've been further even more decided to use even go need to do look more as anyone can. Can you really be far even as decided half as much to use go wish for that? My guess is that when one really been far even as decided once to use even go want, it is then that he has really been far even as decided to use even go want to do look more like. It's just common sense."
 
2012-10-11 08:03:27 AM
I read headline in Mongo's voice.

/RIP Mr. Carras
 
2012-10-11 08:05:15 AM
Are we not even trying to form coherent sentences for headlines now?
 
2012-10-11 08:06:30 AM
Good for the firefighters, that's a huge amount of training for them. They usually only get to train on smaller older houses that are being torn down.
 
2012-10-11 08:11:18 AM
Grammar book belong to submitter already burned to the ground.
 
2012-10-11 08:14:37 AM

sodomizer: Looks like we're giving money to the wrong people these days.


No shiat. Now give me some money I have bills to pay.
 
2012-10-11 08:26:28 AM

OBBN: theknuckler_33: I hardly think the guy's a pauper. He still owns two furniture stores in Nebraska.

Owning a business is not indicative of one having wealth any more than thinking someone is rich because they drive a Mercedes or wear a Rolex. The business may be losing money or barely breaking even. Just as the douche driving the 750 BMW might be leverage out to the hilt.


"Paupers" own businesses and retain assets, accountants and business connections that can help them even if they declare bankruptcy?

I forgot...$250,000 is "middle class" these days.
 
2012-10-11 08:37:12 AM
Approves...most definitely approves

i0.kym-cdn.com
 
2012-10-11 08:46:55 AM
Up in flames... just like the reign of Chan Gailey.
 
2012-10-11 08:57:11 AM

kim jong-un: Meh, people with money rarely build interesting mansions. For every winterthur there are a million double wide mcmansions.

Square footage alone won't make a cool home.


Yea, I knew what the house looked like even before I clicked. Maybe it's just me but if I was going to spend $2.5m on a home I'd want something that was, well, cool. Or different. Not just a home where it's defining characteristic was that it was big.
 
2012-10-11 09:13:45 AM

GendoIkari: Grammar book belong to submitter already burned to the ground.


charlie kelly approves
 
2012-10-11 09:29:58 AM
Defensive lineman?

Rod Kush (born December 29, 1956 in Omaha, Nebraska) is a former safety in the National Football League.
 
2012-10-11 09:31:33 AM
Mold is evil! Disgusting, too.

So...no pictures of the house now? They need to burn Mike Tyson's house in Ohio. I'm sure that's full of mold as well. If you google it, there are some great/sad pictures of the Tyson house.
 
2012-10-11 09:31:40 AM
The house doesn't have mold - and even if it does it isn't a problem.

The guy wants to move and the value of the property has dropped to less than his equity. A loophole in the tax law allows him to 'donate' the house to the fire department at full value and get a complete write-off on his equity loss. So he is getting a big tax credit to cover his real estate loss. This loophole only exists for high-earners with high-value homes with negative equity.
 
2012-10-11 09:32:02 AM
Silly aside, but when Rod was in Buffalo, he did business with my father and as thanks he gave us two tickets on the 45-yard line about 10 rows up. First game I attended and I'll never forget it.
 
2012-10-11 09:45:10 AM

madgonad: The house doesn't have mold


Yes it does. It's the reason why it's being burnt down as a trainer. It's been left unoccupied for years as it changed hands from one owner to another to the point where mold has crept in and it's been declared unfit for occupancy.
 
2012-10-11 09:56:30 AM
Rod Kush is a size queen
 
2012-10-11 10:15:54 AM
All your mansion are belong to us.

-Fire Dept
 
2012-10-11 10:22:11 AM

madgonad: The house doesn't have mold - and even if it does it isn't a problem.

The guy wants to move and the value of the property has dropped to less than his equity. A loophole in the tax law allows him to 'donate' the house to the fire department at full value and get a complete write-off on his equity loss. So he is getting a big tax credit to cover his real estate loss. This loophole only exists for high-earners with high-value homes with negative equity.


I'll believe the fire department over you, thanks
 
2012-10-11 10:32:02 AM

madgonad: The house doesn't have mold - and even if it does it isn't a problem.

The guy wants to move and the value of the property has dropped to less than his equity. A loophole in the tax law allows him to 'donate' the house to the fire department at full value and get a complete write-off on his equity loss. So he is getting a big tax credit to cover his real estate loss. This loophole only exists for high-earners with high-value homes with negative equity.


Know how I know you didn't RTFA?
 
TWX
2012-10-11 10:45:18 AM
madgonad:
The house doesn't have mold - and even if it does it isn't a problem.

The guy wants to move and the value of the property has dropped to less than his equity. A loophole in the tax law allows him to 'donate' the house to the fire department at full value and get a complete write-off on his equity loss. So he is getting a big tax credit to cover his real estate loss. This loophole only exists for high-earners with high-value homes with negative equity.


You know how I can tell that you didn't read the article?
 
2012-10-11 10:51:38 AM

JuicePats: I'll believe the fire department over you, thanks


Fire department gets a free house to burn down. All they need to do is wink and have the chief sign the documents.
 
2012-10-11 10:58:18 AM

TWX: You know how I can tell that you didn't read the article?


I actually did read the article. I just didn't believe the BS.

That, and my dad had a MAJOR mold problem in his home about ten years ago. Cost about $20k to have walls torn out, beams replaced... If it is worth the money on my dad's $350k home, it is worth the effort on a $2.5M home. The presence of mold will devalue a property, yes, but giving real estate to the fire department is a well known tax-dodge and a not uncommonly used solution to homes with negative equity. Only homes with lots of space around them can fit through this loophole. The owner is lucky. Everyone else who saw their home depreciate just has to eat their losses. This guy is getting those losses deducted from his tax bill.
 
2012-10-11 11:04:55 AM

madgonad: That, and my dad had a MAJOR mold problem in his home about ten years ago. Cost about $20k to have walls torn out, beams replaced... If it is worth the money on my dad's $350k home, it is worth the effort on a $2.5M home. The presence of mold will devalue a property, yes, but giving real estate to the fire department is a well known tax-dodge and a not uncommonly used solution to homes with negative equity. Only homes with lots of space around them can fit through this loophole. The owner is lucky. Everyone else who saw their home depreciate just has to eat their losses. This guy is getting those losses deducted from his tax bill.


Is your dad's house 14000 sq. feet with 20 foot ceilings? It could cost a hell of a lot to fix up, which might be a problem if no one wants a torn up 14000 sq foot house in Gretna, Nebraska at any price.
 
2012-10-11 11:07:08 AM

you have pee hands: madgonad: That, and my dad had a MAJOR mold problem in his home about ten years ago. Cost about $20k to have walls torn out, beams replaced... If it is worth the money on my dad's $350k home, it is worth the effort on a $2.5M home. The presence of mold will devalue a property, yes, but giving real estate to the fire department is a well known tax-dodge and a not uncommonly used solution to homes with negative equity. Only homes with lots of space around them can fit through this loophole. The owner is lucky. Everyone else who saw their home depreciate just has to eat their losses. This guy is getting those losses deducted from his tax bill.

Is your dad's house 14000 sq. feet with 20 foot ceilings? It could cost a hell of a lot to fix up, which might be a problem if no one wants a torn up 14000 sq foot house in Gretna, Nebraska at any price.


Don't bother, if someone wants to be a trendy skeptic then reason won't make a difference
 
TWX
2012-10-11 11:29:24 AM
madgonad:
I actually did read the article. I just didn't believe the BS.

That, and my dad had a MAJOR mold problem in his home about ten years ago. Cost about $20k to have walls torn out, beams replaced... If it is worth the money on my dad's $350k home, it is worth the effort on a $2.5M home. The presence of mold will devalue a property, yes, but giving real estate to the fire department is a well known tax-dodge and a not uncommonly used solution to homes with negative equity. Only homes with lots of space around them can fit through this loophole. The owner is lucky. Everyone else who saw their home depreciate just has to eat their losses. This guy is getting those losses deducted from his tax bill.


My point is that according to the article, the former NFL player doesn't own the property anymore:
Kush had closed most of his stores and sold the residential property for $1.6 million.

and
The buyer gave it to Catholic Charities ... then sold it to an Elkhorn developer two years ago for $612,000.

It's had three owners since the football player. The current owner never lived in it as they're a business, and it looks like the last owner that actually lived there was Kush.

This is probably the most effective way for the developer to rid the property of the structure. Demolition costs are reduced when it's already sitting in a neat flat pile on the ground. There might be a tax credit that can be claimed for letting the fire department practice on it, but I doubt that it's anything like an insurance claim for a fire, and if the structure was a known loss in advance of the developer's acquisition, there's only so much loss that they can claim anyway.
 
2012-10-11 06:27:46 PM
I hate my bathroom with a passion. My home was built in 79/80 and the bathroom was built in the center of it and has the worst ventalation. Im planning on remodeling it next summer and fixing a lot of the half assed repairs previous owners have done. Fighting mold has been my #1 pain in the butt. It's nowhere else in the house but the bathroom.
 
2012-10-12 12:13:05 AM

TV's Vinnie: [bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com image 620x411]

Just goes to show you that any dwelling, no matter how costly & opulent, can get fubar'd by one little patch of mold.


and it also shows you that money cannot buy taste.
 
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