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(Jalopnik)   So nobody really gets hurt when some pimply teen girl buys a cheap Chinese knockoff of a $1000 designer handbag. The same can't be said for cheap Chinese knockoff airbags, though   (jalopnik.com) divider line 72
    More: Scary, Chinese, clone, handbags, Chinese knockoff  
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8741 clicks; posted to Main » on 10 Oct 2012 at 6:09 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-10 07:40:43 PM  

fnordfocus: I thought free market forces and tax breaks were supposed to make this impossible.


Don't tort reform!
 
TWX
2012-10-10 07:41:19 PM  

Espertron: What cheap quality! What shoddy workmanship! What a travesty of manufacturing!
You would never, EVER, see such dangerous lapses in manufacturing quality in America.


Ah, but at least the odds of catching the arsehole are better if it's domestically produced...
 
2012-10-10 07:49:07 PM  
I bet this isn't UL listed....
 
2012-10-10 07:49:40 PM  
*)
 
2012-10-10 07:50:25 PM  
I caught the tail-end of this story on my drive home today but heard no mention of the country where these came from, so I just assumed China. Sad to see that my assumption was correct.
 
2012-10-10 07:52:29 PM  
Used to buy them from dealerships for under $10 and normally they were all sold for tidey profit.

But...

Every once in a while we would hook them up to a battery charger, upside down, and power on from a distance. BOOM!

25-30 feet in the air. Never put stuff on them because THAT seemed dangerous.

/doesn't trust airbags
 
2012-10-10 07:57:30 PM  

StoPPeRmobile: Used to buy them from dealerships for under $10 and normally they were all sold for tidey profit.

But...

Every once in a while we would hook them up to a battery charger, upside down, and power on from a distance. BOOM!

25-30 feet in the air. Never put stuff on them because THAT seemed dangerous.

/doesn't trust airbags


You ever been on the youtube?
 
2012-10-10 07:58:04 PM  
i471.photobucket.com

Really? This is the closest I can find to the Family Truckster's air bag deploying? I figured it'd be all over the place.
 
2012-10-10 08:06:54 PM  
*looks over the list of cars that are affected*

Well. It's a Good Thing(tm) I drive a Saturn, then.
 
2012-10-10 08:08:47 PM  
Air-whut?

*raises his arms and gesticulates*

*cue Ride of the Valkyries*

whup-whup-whup

They land and command the situation...

No sitch.

They remand and apologize for intruding briefly, apologies.

*)
 
2012-10-10 08:17:45 PM  

DarkVader: jjorsett: fnordfocus: I thought free market forces and tax breaks were supposed to make this impossible.

That's certainly understandable when you don't know jack about the operation of markets or taxes. Maybe in addition to admitting here on Fark that your knowledge is flawed, you should engage in some study to correct that.

It seems your sarcasm detector has failed.

If not, you should seriously engage in some study of what actually happens in a completely free market. Hint: It's really bad for everyone.


My sarcasm detector is fine, which is why I picked up on the fact that fnordfocus thinks this is actually an example of why free markets are dangerous failures. Nobody with a tablespoon of neurons in their skull thinks it would be a good idea to let markets operate free of laws governing fraud and misrepresentation. But it's also just as bad to overdo the regulation and restrict the operation of the market unnecessarily. It causes distortions, inefficiencies, cronyism and consequently higher costs and less availability.
 
2012-10-10 10:14:14 PM  

jjorsett: DarkVader: jjorsett: fnordfocus: I thought free market forces and tax breaks were supposed to make this impossible.

That's certainly understandable when you don't know jack about the operation of markets or taxes. Maybe in addition to admitting here on Fark that your knowledge is flawed, you should engage in some study to correct that.

It seems your sarcasm detector has failed.

If not, you should seriously engage in some study of what actually happens in a completely free market. Hint: It's really bad for everyone.

My sarcasm detector is fine, which is why I picked up on the fact that fnordfocus thinks this is actually an example of why free markets are dangerous failures. Nobody with a tablespoon of neurons in their skull thinks it would be a good idea to let markets operate free of laws governing fraud and misrepresentation. But it's also just as bad to overdo the regulation and restrict the operation of the market unnecessarily. It causes distortions, inefficiencies, cronyism and consequently higher costs and less availability.


Cronyism is regulation-based?

Check your definitions.

*)
 
2012-10-10 11:32:53 PM  

lohphat: KrispyKritter: the american government barely cares about the safety of the citizens. you think the Chinks give a damn about you? guess again as you wonder what that odd flavor is in your Coke.

So there's no Fark filter for Asian racial epithets?

Signed an an American (not hyphenated) of 1/4 Chinese ancestry.

So fark you.


Don't you mean "falk you" ?
 
2012-10-10 11:38:52 PM  

Indubitably: jjorsett: DarkVader: jjorsett: fnordfocus: I thought free market forces and tax breaks were supposed to make this impossible.

That's certainly understandable when you don't know jack about the operation of markets or taxes. Maybe in addition to admitting here on Fark that your knowledge is flawed, you should engage in some study to correct that.

It seems your sarcasm detector has failed.

If not, you should seriously engage in some study of what actually happens in a completely free market. Hint: It's really bad for everyone.

My sarcasm detector is fine, which is why I picked up on the fact that fnordfocus thinks this is actually an example of why free markets are dangerous failures. Nobody with a tablespoon of neurons in their skull thinks it would be a good idea to let markets operate free of laws governing fraud and misrepresentation. But it's also just as bad to overdo the regulation and restrict the operation of the market unnecessarily. It causes distortions, inefficiencies, cronyism and consequently higher costs and less availability.

Cronyism is regulation-based?

Check your definitions.

*)


the word cronyism cracks me up everytime.

and this is not an example of free-markets failing. pretty sure this is due to the USDOT not requiring airbags to be a necessary component for "safe operation" of a vehicle. due to this airbags bypass testing procedures that would certainly keep this from happening.

they will continue to make crap. whether or not we have to eat it....
 
2012-10-10 11:47:53 PM  

Pray 4 Mojo: StoPPeRmobile: Used to buy them from dealerships for under $10 and normally they were all sold for tidey profit.

But...

Every once in a while we would hook them up to a battery charger, upside down, and power on from a distance. BOOM!

25-30 feet in the air. Never put stuff on them because THAT seemed dangerous.

/doesn't trust airbags

You ever been on the youtube?


lol
 
2012-10-11 12:16:08 AM  

vodka: And guess what, no recall is issued. If you have a fake one you're going to have to spend hundreds of dollars to get it fixed yourself. Good luck!


Recall what? These aren't OEM equipment!
 
2012-10-11 02:11:55 AM  
Damn. I really hate the Chinese mindset that you can basically kill people if it means you get a little extra money. Like the pet food and infant formula scandals. Lead toys and toxic drywall. Now this shiat? I guess this is the country where people walked past a live toddler that had been ran over on the street.

Man, fark you China! I can't wait until your country's entire ecosystem collapses and all you bastards get cancer.

Well, maybe not everyone, but still, I'm looking forward to the day when your economy goes tits up and you stop sending your spoiled kids over here with their damn Beemers.

/I feel better now
 
2012-10-11 07:23:16 AM  

DeadBaby: Damn. I really hate the Chinese mindset that you can basically kill people if it means you get a little extra money.


It happens because everyone from the top executive to the lowest supplier is trying to cut corners and make a buck.

The free market more or less worked in the US because reputation carried alot of weight. If someone delivered a box of failure, it could haunt their business for decades.
These days you can buy a great reputation through the television. Because people listen to the talking heads more than their neighbors and friends, a company can convince them their products are just as good and only cost less.

So what if the product poisoned your dog or literally exploded in your face.
A slight change to the brand name followed by an ad campaign will fix everything.
 
2012-10-11 08:45:31 AM  
It was a simple mistake really. Mr Chan was told he would be in charge of airbag supplies.
He later remarked "Every time airbag go off, they get BIG supplies!"
 
2012-10-12 12:57:28 AM  

way south: DeadBaby: Damn. I really hate the Chinese mindset that you can basically kill people if it means you get a little extra money.

It happens because everyone from the top executive to the lowest supplier is trying to cut corners and make a buck.

The free market more or less worked in the US because reputation carried alot of weight. If someone delivered a box of failure, it could haunt their business for decades.
These days you can buy a great reputation through the television. Because people listen to the talking heads more than their neighbors and friends, a company can convince them their products are just as good and only cost less.

So what if the product poisoned your dog or literally exploded in your face.
A slight change to the brand name followed by an ad campaign will fix everything.


hmm...2/10
 
2012-10-12 08:25:45 AM  

way south: DeadBaby: Damn. I really hate the Chinese mindset that you can basically kill people if it means you get a little extra money.

It happens because everyone from the top executive to the lowest supplier is trying to cut corners and make a buck.

The free market more or less worked in the US because reputation carried alot of weight. If someone delivered a box of failure, it could haunt their business for decades.
These days you can buy a great reputation through the television. Because people listen to the talking heads more than their neighbors and friends, a company can convince them their products are just as good and only cost less.

So what if the product poisoned your dog or literally exploded in your face.
A slight change to the brand name followed by an ad campaign will fix everything.


ValuJet Airlines was an American low-cost carrier, headquartered in unincorporated Clayton County, Georgia,[2] that operated regularly scheduled domestic and international flights in the Eastern United States and Canada[3] during the 1990s. After a series of safety problems and the fatal crash of ValuJet Flight 592, the company merged with the much smaller regional airline AirWays Corp., now known as AirTran Holdings. ValuJet, while the nominal survivor of the merger, chose to replace its tarnished name with AirTran's. The successor airline, AirTran Airways, was acquired by Southwest Airlines in 2011. 
 
2012-10-13 05:37:27 AM  

lohphat: way south: DeadBaby: Damn. I really hate the Chinese mindset that you can basically kill people if it means you get a little extra money.

It happens because everyone from the top executive to the lowest supplier is trying to cut corners and make a buck.

The free market more or less worked in the US because reputation carried alot of weight. If someone delivered a box of failure, it could haunt their business for decades.
These days you can buy a great reputation through the television. Because people listen to the talking heads more than their neighbors and friends, a company can convince them their products are just as good and only cost less.

So what if the product poisoned your dog or literally exploded in your face.
A slight change to the brand name followed by an ad campaign will fix everything.

ValuJet Airlines was an American low-cost carrier, headquartered in unincorporated Clayton County, Georgia,[2] that operated regularly scheduled domestic and international flights in the Eastern United States and Canada[3] during the 1990s. After a series of safety problems and the fatal crash of ValuJet Flight 592, the company merged with the much smaller regional airline AirWays Corp., now known as AirTran Holdings. ValuJet, while the nominal survivor of the merger, chose to replace its tarnished name with AirTran's. The successor airline, AirTran Airways, was acquired by Southwest Airlines in 2011.


this is more interesting. however, i would hardly say a cut of 37 planes from a fleet after complying with all FAA and DOT requirements, a loss of 55 million dollars, a merger with a company that likely replaced everyone in upper management and a replacement of the CEO would be the same company. i think the name change was warranted whether or not it was bad press.

i mean...joy division changed their name to new order after just one member...um...left.
 
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