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(NPR)   Welcome to Sizzler, it's a pleasure to serve you. The buffet is right over there. Oh, what's this? Your Gastric Bypass Discount Card? Very good, sir, you can park your mobility scooter right there on the right   (npr.org) divider line 104
    More: Stupid, WLS, Cracker Barrel, pleasures, family practices, Red Lobster  
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19191 clicks; posted to Main » on 10 Oct 2012 at 12:37 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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Archived thread
2012-10-10 01:16:49 PM
8 votes:
I understand this phenomenon, the whole "I don't want to pay $18 for twice as much food as I'll actually eat" thing, but there ARE options.

You can not fill up on free bread beforehand. Eat the veggies first. Save half for later. Split a plate with someone. Or just order a side of something. I do this a lot- order a side dinner salad and share an appetizer and call it dinner.

I think this is a bad idea. People who have had GP's shouldn't be eating at buffets. At ALL. And honestly, they can do any of the suggestions I've given above. If your stomach can only hold half a sandwich, then share a plate with someone! You don't need your own order!

Also, personal responsibility doesn't exist anymore. If you neglect your body to the point that walking 30 steps into the grocery store pains you, you shouldn't get handicap placards. Y'all need to walk. If you have a legit medical issue I understand, but a lot of people who are hugely obese blame a "thyroid problem" and yet proceed to eat two bags of McDonald's. I have no sympathy for you.

I'm positive some people here will think I'm trolling, but I'm not. As an ex EMT, I got more calls for shortness of breath for people who weighed twice what I do. I'm going, you know why you can't breathe? BECAUSE YOUR BLOAT IS CRUSHING YOUR LUNGS!

And don't get me started on the girlfriend of mine who complained she was fat but then proceeded to tell me she didn't like vegetables, and orders a "salad" with lettuce, bacon, crispy chicken, and five kinds of cheese, and drowns it in ranch dressing.

/ endrant
2012-10-10 09:30:13 AM
8 votes:
This article is further proof that the once noble American Experiment has failed, and serves as a reminder that I need to get my Canadian citizenship documents in order.
2012-10-10 10:49:56 AM
7 votes:

mysticcat: So you have to have a note from your doctor to get a meal with a reasonable portion size?


Yes, sadly. At some restaurants. I realize that I'm leaving myself open for all sorts of abuse, but I've had RNY gastric bypass (and I don't regret it one bit -- 100 pounds lighter and a marathon runner these days. There's more to the story, but that's the quick version.).

Applebees does have a Weight Watchers menu with reasonable sizes, but what I usually do is just order what I actually want to eat, eat about 1/3, and my naturally skinny husband does his best to take up my slack.

I could get a card from my doc, but I don't eat out that often. And kids' menu items are usually horribly unhealthy anyway, so I don't see the point in using a card to order kid food.
2012-10-10 11:07:43 AM
5 votes:
If you're eating at the Golden Corral buffet, I'm pretty sure you haven't actually addressed the issues that made you fat in the first place.
2012-10-10 03:13:09 PM
4 votes:

Beanlet: I am considered overweight for my height and have gotten comments about being a fatty (I am a size 12, marilyn monroe was a 14).


Women's clothing sizes were different back then.

Marilyn would be about a size 6 in today's clothing sizes.

Fat chicks do themselves no justice and sound ridiculous when they try to say that they've got the same body as Marilyn Monroe.
2012-10-10 01:18:23 PM
4 votes:

Hebalo: Fark_Guy_Rob:
It's easy to say "stop eating things that are bad for you", but when the majority of the country is overweight to obese, it's clearly not working.


Now granted some obesity can be written off as genetics, but those people are the minority. Obesity can be controlled with diet and exercise, but most people don't want to put forth the effort
2012-10-10 01:12:49 PM
4 votes:

Hebalo: Fark_Guy_Rob: I absolutely love how all the gastric bypass surgery does forcefully encourage people to eat less. And it's incredibly effective.

You can get the same benefit, for free, by simply eating the same amount you'd eat if you'd had the surgery.

But no, no, it's a medical condition and I've tried every diet and nothing works! Unless you cut out my stomach so I can't eat and am forced to follow a diet - then everything works great!


I'm not saying the individual is blameless in all of this, but nutritional education in North America is farking brutal. For decades, the concept that refined flours are good for us was drilled in, that low calories are all that count, that eating fat is bad, that fruit juice is healthy.

We're seeing the effects of that now. HFCS was king for a good long stretch, and it's showing. Diabetes is on the rise, obesity is everywhere.

It's easy to say "stop eating things that are bad for you", but when the majority of the country is overweight to obese, it's clearly not working.


All three of these things are driven by the brain, hard to combat, but only one is considered 'acceptable'
"Hey exhausted guy, quit falling asleep"
"Hey Alcoholic, quit drinking, you lush".
"Hey Obese guy, quit eating so much".


My naturally skinny husband can attest to the fact that I tried really farking hard to lose weight for over 10 years. I went to the gym, ran (until back pain put a stop to that), and I did Weight Watchers, low-carb diets, you name it. What I didn't know is that my pancreas has all the power of a 3-wheeled Yugo, and that that, combined with (I'll admit it) a love of carb-y food, meant that my blood sugar was swinging wildly around for 10 years before I found out about it.

My fasting blood sugar was always normal, so no one caught that these swings were happening. I'd eat, blood sugar would spike, then two hours later or so it would plummet and send the "you have to eat NOW" signal. I couldn't figure out why I was always hungry. Once I started the 6-month prep for surgery, my doc ordered an A1C and found out that I was diabetic. Yes, Type II. The kind the fatties get. But the blood sugar swings and insulin resistance actually started when I weighed 130, so that wasn't what kicked it off. But it did contribute to the 100-pound weight gain and the development of Type II diabetes over those 10 years when I was trying desperately to lose weight.

So now I have forced portion control. Yay. It works for me, so I don't give a rat's ass if people think I'm cheating. I'm thin, I'm healthy (no longer required to take Metformin), I'm happy, and I can run most people into the ground. (I run slowly, but I can run forever.)
2012-10-10 12:51:34 PM
4 votes:
I absolutely love how all the gastric bypass surgery does forcefully encourage people to eat less. And it's incredibly effective.

You can get the same benefit, for free, by simply eating the same amount you'd eat if you'd had the surgery.

But no, no, it's a medical condition and I've tried every diet and nothing works! Unless you cut out my stomach so I can't eat and am forced to follow a diet - then everything works great!
2012-10-10 12:50:04 PM
4 votes:
As a person who has a gastric bypass, this is an interesting article.

The closest restaurant to my house is a Golden Corral, and my family and I used to eat there about once a month or so. I haven't gone since my bypass earlier this year, I saw no point in paying $11 or so for "all you can eat" when all I can eat is about 5-6 ounces of anything.

Literally.

If I eat more than that (it's happened twice), I double over in pain.

I've dropped 65 pounds in 4 months post-op, and I'll probably lose another 40 or so before I level off.
2012-10-10 09:45:06 AM
4 votes:
That's like giving an alcoholic free drinks in exchange for their AA medallions. Which a bar in here in Minneapolis did back in the day, they had a wall full of them.
2012-10-10 03:21:20 PM
3 votes:

SchlingFocker: CheetahOlivetti: If you're faster than that, you shouldn't be bothered by us. We're way in the back anyway, so what do you care?

Y'all take up limited slots that could be used by actual runners.

I wish the Houston Marathon required qualifying times in other, smaller marathons like other major cities.


Wow. Shouldn't you be proud of them for putting in the effort? Not everyone can run 26 miles and not break a sweat like you apparently can. And running marathons don't mean much when you do it once a month, dude, so why do you deserve that slot more than another? Someone has to come in last, and it's not a race, so really- why do you care?
2012-10-10 01:53:42 PM
3 votes:
This just highlights the fact that the restaurant industry in America - not just fast food even - is largely responsible for obesity in America. We've been trained to demand quantity instead of quality. To get a normal portion for a lower price, you have to have a note from your doctor.
2012-10-10 01:49:09 PM
3 votes:
The trick with the gastric bypass is to train yourself ahead of the surgery for three months, gradually reducing your portions to what you'll be forced to eating after the surgery. Then don't have the surgery.
2012-10-10 01:39:10 PM
3 votes:
These gastric bypass and lap band surgeries have to be the laziest shiat I've ever heard of. I can't stop gorging myself and can't be bothered with exercise, so let me have an operation to shrink my stomach so I no longer have to eat 8 servings before I feel full. fark all you lazy assholes that jack up people's health insurance because we have to pay for your fat asses.
2012-10-10 01:20:00 PM
3 votes:

big pig peaches: Well the veggies depend as a lot on how they are prepared, but rotisserie chicken is pretty horrifying. Unless you're doing the low carb thing, and then there is still some debate about how the chicken was raised.


You sound Portlandian.
2012-10-10 01:19:56 PM
3 votes:

sigdiamond2000: This article is further proof that the once noble American Experiment has failed, and serves as a reminder that I need to get my Canadian citizenship documents in order.


Actually, it proved it was a success, but this is the decline of things. Everything in this world, even abstract constructs, are subject to entropy, and in this case, Social Entropy. It's only natural that the 'American dream' we used to know no longer exists, now being replaced by a new one, and in a few generations this one will cease to exist only to be replaced by another social construct.
2012-10-10 01:10:21 PM
3 votes:

NowhereMon: That's like giving an alcoholic free drinks in exchange for their AA medallions. Which a bar in here in Minneapolis did back in the day, they had a wall full of them.



Wow...

That's some evil shiat... like "if Satan ran a bar" evil. I see Al Pacino pouring glowing amber shots in glistening glasses and chewing up the scenery shouting "Come on, fellas... I know you're thirsty. Drinks are on me. Don't fear it, master it... or ain't ya got no spine?"
2012-10-10 01:01:18 PM
3 votes:
Oh, and there is this thing called a doggie-bag. Personally I like having a day our two worth of leftovers. Makes the restaurants' prices almost worth it.
2012-10-10 12:58:03 PM
3 votes:

Mark Ratner: Hagbardr: Where is my discount for being rail thin and usually only able to finish half a regular restaurant portion?

They don't give out to discount cards to anorexic people.

/yeah, sure you have a high metabolism


You sound fat.

/yeah I called you fat, look at me I'm skinny
2012-10-10 12:43:03 PM
3 votes:
Where is my discount for being healthfully thin and not eating nearly as much as the fatass at the next table over?
2012-10-10 11:37:50 AM
3 votes:

Sybarite: If you're eating at the Golden Corral buffet, I'm pretty sure you haven't actually addressed the issues that made you fat in the first place.


Not necessarily. Here is their everyday menu:

Everyday Menu Items
Assorted Steamed Vegetables
Awesome Pot Roast
Baked Potatoes
Banana Pudding
Bourbon Street Chicken
Broccoli
Cabbage

Carrot Cake
Carrots
Cauliflower

Chocolate Cake w/ Chocolate Frosting
Clam Chowder
Coleslaw
Corn
Fresh fruit

Fried Chicken
Fudgy Brownies
Green Beans
Greens
Grilled-to-order USDA Sirloin Steaks (*dinner only)

Macaroni & Cheese
Macaroni Salad
Mashed Potatoes & Gravy
Meatloaf
No Sugar Added Chocolate Pudding
Pizza
Potato Salad
Rotisserie Chicken
Seafood Salad
Soft Serve Ice Cream
Spaghetti
Sugar Free Red Gelatin
Sweet Potatoes
Timberline Chili
Yeast Rolls
50+ Toppings on our Fresh Cold Salad Bar


I bolded everything that is pretty much unequivocally healthy food, and yes that includes grilled red meat. You could eat "Lean and Green" at a Golden Corral quite easily. 

/Gave half-credit for the fresh cold salad bar, as some of it probably is good, and some bad.
2012-10-10 10:07:16 AM
3 votes:
So you have to have a note from your doctor to get a meal with a reasonable portion size?
2012-10-11 01:28:01 AM
2 votes:
I had RNY gastric bypass surgery 8 yrs ago, and I have kept the weight off. I am by no means "skinny" but I am healthy now. Average size. I participate in a sport I love, and life is just more fulfilling. I was young when I had it though (24 at the time). The cards are only really helpful at the beginning, during the weight loss stage, & should have an expiration date of 1 year after the surgery. The stomach does stretch a bit over time. But if you don't like leftovers, eat ala carte. And don't biatch about buffets. You should be thankful you were able to have the surgery, and are more than likely saving money in the long run by not having heart disease, knee replacement, diabetes, etc.
2012-10-10 10:35:17 PM
2 votes:
I don't understand why anyone would eat at a buffet period. They're gross. Food that sits out all day, random people touching it and putting stuff back or sneezing all over it. I think of a buffet and I think of disgusting germs and rancid food.
2012-10-10 08:35:10 PM
2 votes:

SchlingFocker: CheetahOlivetti: I am actually running, so that makes me an actual runner.

When you're not going any faster than the bulk of the walkers, you're not a runner. You're just walking the marathon with a slightly different gait.

Striving for improved fitness is fantastic, but taking slots up in a marathon where you're just walking and then saying that you've run a marathon is disingenuous and ridiculous and not fair to the actual runners who aren't able to get a slot in the race because 1/4 of the people signed up for it are walking.

Find a park with a few miles of trails, take a fanny pack with some gu and a sandwich, and go out there with a friend. Walk/trot it for 6 hours, and knock out your 26 miles that way. You've gotten the same distance, same benefits, and you haven't taken slots away from the runners. You can still tell people you've done a marathon.


i.imgur.com

I can tell people I've run a marathon. Because I've farking run one. And I raised $500 for Autism Speaks while doing it. And I'm going to do it again in January. I won't even take any space away from "actual runners" like you. Don't worry, I won't go near your precious Houston Marathon.
2012-10-10 02:47:06 PM
2 votes:
Oh also, if you eat "empty" calories you can put the weight on without even stretching the stomach back out.

Rule 1: Protien
Rule 2: veggies
Rule 3: Your full stop now
2012-10-10 02:40:26 PM
2 votes:
I can never finish restaurant-sized portions of food, and sometimes it's just not practical to take half of it home (like, if I'm not going straight home afterward, leaving the food to sit in my car for hours). Why can't I pay less for a smaller sized portion that I can actually eat? Where's my incentive to continue eating right?

Instead of having special children's or senior's menus (or gastric bypass discounts), restaurants should have a "small portions" section of their menu, or offer smaller servings of regular menu items (when they're practical to downsize). I've occasionally seen restaurants offer "half size" pastas and salads, but only charge like $1 less and still too much food goes to waste.
2012-10-10 01:53:41 PM
2 votes:

Mitch Taylor's Bro: Well I use Mac/Linux...: These gastric bypass and lap band surgeries have to be the laziest shiat I've ever heard of. I can't stop gorging myself and can't be bothered with exercise, so let me have an operation to shrink my stomach so I no longer have to eat 8 servings before I feel full. fark all you lazy assholes that jack up people's health insurance because we have to pay for your fat asses.

I thought this was a net positive for health insurance because most of these people do lose weight and don't get the weight-related diseases later in life?


It is. That's why more insurance companies are covering it. Mine covered it 100%. I'm sure it's cheaper to cover one surgery than a lifetime of Metformin, insulin, diabetic wound care, canes, walkers, scooters, heart problems, clogged arteries, and sleep apnea.
2012-10-10 01:52:55 PM
2 votes:

kiwimoogle84: Also, personal responsibility doesn't exist anymore. If you neglect your body to the point that walking 30 steps into the grocery store pains you, you shouldn't get handicap placards. Y'all need to walk. If you have a legit medical issue I understand, but a lot of people who are hugely obese blame a "thyroid problem" and yet proceed to eat two bags of McDonald's. I have no sympathy for you.

I'm positive some people here will think I'm trolling, but I'm not. As an ex EMT, I got more calls for shortness of breath for people who weighed twice what I do. I'm going, you know why you can't breathe? BECAUSE YOUR BLOAT IS CRUSHING YOUR LUNGS!


I don't know how old you are, but I'm in my mid-forties. When I was a kid in the seventies, you rarely saw really obese people (by that I mean over 250 pounds). Now? They're everywhere. Hell, I work with about ten people who weigh over 300, and out of those there's three that have to be close to 400 and one guy who amazes me that he can even move. Watch one of those shows with enormously fat people and look at what they're eating. Pizza. Chips. Cake. Cookies. Candy. Potatoes. If they're eating meat, it's on a bun, battered and/or breaded. They're not powering down a side of beef. There is more and more evidence that sugar is just as addictive as drugs and alcohol if you have that propensity. And sugar and starch is in EVERY processed food. But it's much easier to grab McDonald's or a frozen pizza or go out to Golden Corral than to actually, you know, cook.
2012-10-10 01:46:30 PM
2 votes:
FTFA: "Even "all-you-can-eat" buffet restaurant Golden Corral provides a discounted buffet price upon seeing a proof-of-surgery card in some locations."

If you got a bypass surgery..., what in the world is taking you back to Golden Corral, where you got that big fat ass, to begin with???

Lack of responsibility of the consequences of your own acts. In a nutshell, that's the problem with society nowadays...
2012-10-10 01:42:56 PM
2 votes:

CapeFearCadaver: Mark Ratner: Hagbardr: Where is my discount for being rail thin and usually only able to finish half a regular restaurant portion?

They don't give out to discount cards to anorexic people.

/yeah, sure you have a high metabolism

Yep. You nailed it. Everyone who's thin is anorexic.


Mr. Kiwi is a perfect example. He's rail thin. 6 feet, 155ish. Narrow shoulders. He wears one pants size smaller than I do. I've seen him put away two racks of ribs before. And it has nothing to do with youth or growing, he's 40.

People of all shapes, sizes and metabolisms exist. Frames have a lot to do with it too. I'm two inches shorter than Mr Kiwi and my shoulders are broader.

I'm saying you can't get to MORBID obesity without horrific diet neglect or a serious medical issue. I'm not in perfect shape myself but I also grab baskets at the store so I have to carry the weight, I park far away, and I stop eating when I'm not hungry anymore, not when the plate is empty. I ain't a 17 year old athlete anymore.
2012-10-10 01:41:35 PM
2 votes:

RobDownSouth: WeenerGord: So all you guys with the surgery...when you can only eat a few ounces...do you still feel hungry?
Do you feel hungry, and frustrated that there is nothing you can do about it?
Or do you now feel full and satisfied after a couple ounces of food?

I don't feel hungry about 95% of the time after I eat. That's a huge improvement (pun intended).

The only frustration is being unable to eat AND drink at the same time...I have to wait 20 minutes after eating to drink anything, minimum. It's a re-learning process.

Interestingly, I really get annoyed/frustrated now that tailgating season is here, I feel the urge to gorge watching games and can't do that anymore.


Just adding to the "what hunger feels like" question: The hunger feeling is different. It used to be "holy crap, need food now", and it wasn't satiated until my stomach was full. Now I don't have much of a stomach, so it took a while to be able to sense what "full" means now. I found out the hard way when I upchucked some tuna a few weeks after surgery. Yuck. Hunger is more like: "Running low, time to refuel."

It's been almost 2 years, so now I just judge by portion size. I know how much I can eat of pretty much any food (prioritizing protein and minimizing carbs), and I can still have treats once in a while. The memory of how horrible dumping syndrome is keeps me from overdoing it.

One Oreo as a treat: OK. Three Oreos: I'm gonna die. Half a Starbucks strawberry smoothie and give the rest to my kid: OK. Half a small McDonald's shake: I'm *really* gonna die.
2012-10-10 01:37:22 PM
2 votes:

CygnusDarius: fireclown: big pig peaches: Well the veggies depend as a lot on how they are prepared, but rotisserie chicken is pretty horrifying. Unless you're doing the low carb thing, and then there is still some debate about how the chicken was raised.

You sound Portlandian.

I always heard that if you boil vegetables, you kill what's nutritious of them. That it's best to eat them raw (clean, of course), and with no dressing whatsoever.


Yes, cooking stuff has completely removed all the nutrition. That's why the human race died out long ago.
2012-10-10 01:34:07 PM
2 votes:

Generation_D: You don't order as much food, or you don't eat everything they bring you and instead stop when you are supposed to.


If they knew how to do that they wouldn't be in any of these predicaments to begin with, now would they?
2012-10-10 01:33:48 PM
2 votes:
I know we at Fark jump at the chance to make fun of the fatties, but the article makes clear that the discount card is for people who can't or don't want to eat a ton of food at all-you-can-eat-type places. So I don't see the problem. (shrug)

Don't you have a gym to get to, submitter?
2012-10-10 01:28:26 PM
2 votes:

WeenerGord: So all you guys with the surgery...when you can only eat a few ounces...do you still feel hungry?
Do you feel hungry, and frustrated that there is nothing you can do about it?
Or do you now feel full and satisfied after a couple ounces of food?


I don't feel hungry about 95% of the time after I eat. That's a huge improvement (pun intended).

The only frustration is being unable to eat AND drink at the same time...I have to wait 20 minutes after eating to drink anything, minimum. It's a re-learning process.

Interestingly, I really get annoyed/frustrated now that tailgating season is here, I feel the urge to gorge watching games and can't do that anymore.
2012-10-10 01:27:04 PM
2 votes:

Fark_Guy_Rob: I absolutely love how all the gastric bypass surgery does forcefully encourage people to eat less. And it's incredibly effective.

You can get the same benefit, for free, by simply eating the same amount you'd eat if you'd had the surgery.

But no, no, it's a medical condition and I've tried every diet and nothing works! Unless you cut out my stomach so I can't eat and am forced to follow a diet - then everything works great!


Can't agree with the bolded part. I've seen quite a few failures in the ER and ICU.
2012-10-10 01:25:27 PM
2 votes:

technicolor-misfit: NowhereMon: That's like giving an alcoholic free drinks in exchange for their AA medallions. Which a bar in here in Minneapolis did back in the day, they had a wall full of them.
Wow...That's some evil shiat... like "if Satan ran a bar" evil. I see Al Pacino pouring glowing amber shots in glistening glasses and chewing up the scenery shouting "Come on, fellas... I know you're thirsty. Drinks are on me. Don't fear it, master it... or ain't ya got no spine?"


Minneapolis. And when they become incapacitated, the bar just rolls them out in the snow to freeze to death. Take bets on when they stop breathing. Hahaahaha. Stupid alcoholics.
2012-10-10 01:23:59 PM
2 votes:

CheetahOlivetti: mysticcat: So you have to have a note from your doctor to get a meal with a reasonable portion size?

Yes, sadly. At some restaurants. I realize that I'm leaving myself open for all sorts of abuse, but I've had RNY gastric bypass (and I don't regret it one bit -- 100 pounds lighter and a marathon runner these days. There's more to the story, but that's the quick version.).

Applebees does have a Weight Watchers menu with reasonable sizes, but what I usually do is just order what I actually want to eat, eat about 1/3, and my naturally skinny husband does his best to take up my slack.

I could get a card from my doc, but I don't eat out that often. And kids' menu items are usually horribly unhealthy anyway, so I don't see the point in using a card to order kid food.


On my phone, want to edit out all but the last paragraph but can't.. Came here to say this this this.

We either split an adult meal or ordered my daughter food from the ala carte menu if the restaurant would not serve her smaller portions of the adult menu. The children's menu at most places offer a corndog, a hamburger or breaded and deep fried fish parts. Or you could order some breakfast items, pancakes or scrambled eggs (many do not give you a written choice for other styles). A lot of places put junk on the panckaes, like whipped cream and even chocolate sauce.

Those foods, for a growing child.. yuck! For a bypass patient? Seems like all that grease and fat would be very uncomfortable to digest.

Btw, grats on your success! Nice to hear of a good outcome.
2012-10-10 01:18:15 PM
2 votes:
So all you guys with the surgery...when you can only eat a few ounces...do you still feel hungry?

Do you feel hungry, and frustrated that there is nothing you can do about it?

Or do you now feel full and satisfied after a couple ounces of food?
2012-10-10 01:08:45 PM
2 votes:

Fark_Guy_Rob: I absolutely love how all the gastric bypass surgery does forcefully encourage people to eat less. And it's incredibly effective.

You can get the same benefit, for free, by simply eating the same amount you'd eat if you'd had the surgery.

But no, no, it's a medical condition and I've tried every diet and nothing works! Unless you cut out my stomach so I can't eat and am forced to follow a diet - then everything works great!


For all the advertising about how Alli helps you lose weight by blocking the absorption of some calories, the main mechanism is training people to eat less fat because those unabsorbed fats generate mild-Olestra symptoms. In the end, the answer is always teaching people to eat differently, it's just about how extreme a mechanism they need.
2012-10-10 01:07:36 PM
2 votes:

carrion_luggage: Sort of like all-you-can't-eat.


Yes. Because too many Americans took a Challenge Accepted attitude to that, and it hurts the restaurants' bottom lines.

"You here FOUR HOUR!! Why you here four hour?! You scare my wife!! You reave now! You go!!"
2012-10-10 01:00:02 PM
2 votes:

Fark_Guy_Rob: I absolutely love how all the gastric bypass surgery does forcefully encourage people to eat less. And it's incredibly effective.

You can get the same benefit, for free, by simply eating the same amount you'd eat if you'd had the surgery.

But no, no, it's a medical condition and I've tried every diet and nothing works! Unless you cut out my stomach so I can't eat and am forced to follow a diet - then everything works great!



I'm not saying the individual is blameless in all of this, but nutritional education in North America is farking brutal. For decades, the concept that refined flours are good for us was drilled in, that low calories are all that count, that eating fat is bad, that fruit juice is healthy.

We're seeing the effects of that now. HFCS was king for a good long stretch, and it's showing. Diabetes is on the rise, obesity is everywhere.

It's easy to say "stop eating things that are bad for you", but when the majority of the country is overweight to obese, it's clearly not working.


All three of these things are driven by the brain, hard to combat, but only one is considered 'acceptable'
"Hey exhausted guy, quit falling asleep"
"Hey Alcoholic, quit drinking, you lush".
"Hey Obese guy, quit eating so much".
2012-10-10 12:58:58 PM
2 votes:

big pig peaches: Well the veggies depend as a lot on how they are prepared, but rotisserie chicken is pretty horrifying. Unless you're doing the low carb thing, and then there is still some debate about how the chicken was raised.


Rotisserie chicken isn't that bad. It's just roasted. It's *FRIED* chicken that will kill you.
2012-10-10 12:54:05 PM
2 votes:
Sick a fork in yourself, America, you're done!
2012-10-10 12:53:31 PM
2 votes:
Never used it but my doctor gave me one when I had my surgery in 2002.

If I used it, it was supposed to have me get charged as a kid or senior as opposed to the full adult price. Like I said never used it.

/10 years in
//still within +/- 10lbs of my goal weight
///200lbs gone
2012-10-10 12:48:36 PM
2 votes:
Yeah...no. I'd rather eat at home or have some sushi.

/Lap-Band
//hit 75 lbs lost in 18 months 9/15
///on my second round of Insanity with Hip Hop Abs
////doing my first 5k next month
2012-10-10 10:19:41 AM
2 votes:
So you need doctors' orders and a special card issued so you can somehow manage not to gorge, or be charged for only a normal amount of food instead of the restaurants standard order, which is 2 to 5 times enough calories. I have a unique and revolutionary proposal: You don't order as much food, or you don't eat everything they bring you and instead stop when you are supposed to.

Buy my book and I'm running for office, this amazing new personal responsibility will sweep the nation.
2012-10-10 09:23:30 PM
1 votes:

CheetahOlivetti: Medic Zero: I partially blame whoever gave them the surgery for going ahead when they clearly hadn't "bought in" to what they needed to do.

That does happen. A good surgeon at a Bariatric Center of Excellence won't do the surgery unless you've got a reasonably clean bill of health, including mental health. Mine required a check-in with a psychiatrist, plus six months of a diet and exercise program between the initial weigh-in and the surgery. They didn't expect a lot of weight loss during that time frame, but if you gain during that six months, you're out. They also test patients for nicotine before surgery. You've been smoking? Surgery cancelled. A Bariatric Center of Excellence will do everything they can to make sure a patient is both physically and mentally ready for the surgery and the restrictions you have to live with afterward.

If you work in health care (obviously, Medic Zero), then you probably don't see all the patients who are doing what they're supposed to do and having the surgery work out well for them. I think there are quite a few of us. We're the ones who stop posting to the bariatric surgery forums after a year or so because we're busy living our lives.


Yeah, I remind myself of that fact often. From what I saw in the ICU, for a while there I was about convinced that the gullet resection surgery that people with Barrett's Esophagus get killed 100% of them. It's not far from that from what I can tell, but occasionally someone does actually survive it. I was totally shocked when one night we had a guy who seemed to be just spending a night in observation in the ICU after the surgery, because every other one we had was dieing and we were just trying to keep them alive for 6 weeks so that they could blame nursing instead of the surgery for their death to help the surgeons stats.
2012-10-10 09:11:07 PM
1 votes:

Medic Zero: I partially blame whoever gave them the surgery for going ahead when they clearly hadn't "bought in" to what they needed to do.


That does happen. A good surgeon at a Bariatric Center of Excellence won't do the surgery unless you've got a reasonably clean bill of health, including mental health. Mine required a check-in with a psychiatrist, plus six months of a diet and exercise program between the initial weigh-in and the surgery. They didn't expect a lot of weight loss during that time frame, but if you gain during that six months, you're out. They also test patients for nicotine before surgery. You've been smoking? Surgery cancelled. A Bariatric Center of Excellence will do everything they can to make sure a patient is both physically and mentally ready for the surgery and the restrictions you have to live with afterward.

If you work in health care (obviously, Medic Zero), then you probably don't see all the patients who are doing what they're supposed to do and having the surgery work out well for them. I think there are quite a few of us. We're the ones who stop posting to the bariatric surgery forums after a year or so because we're busy living our lives.
2012-10-10 08:53:14 PM
1 votes:

RobDownSouth: Well I use Mac/Linux...: These gastric bypass and lap band surgeries have to be the laziest shiat I've ever heard of. I can't stop gorging myself and can't be bothered with exercise, so let me have an operation to shrink my stomach so I no longer have to eat 8 servings before I feel full. fark all you lazy assholes that jack up people's health insurance because we have to pay for your fat asses.

Insurance didn't pay for my bypass. I paid for it myself. Did a bit of medical tourism down to Tijuana Mexico, paid $4500 and spent 3 days recuperating.

Insurance nowadays rarely covers gastric surgery, fark you very much.


Probably has something to do with the failure rates.

To answer an earlier question: "What kind of failures? Infections? or ruptures from gorging?" - the latter. Most of the patients I've seen with failed gastric bypasses seemed to think they could still eat whatever they want and somehow the surgery would make them skinnier. I partially blame whoever gave them the surgery for going ahead when they clearly hadn't "bought in" to what they needed to do.
2012-10-10 08:05:53 PM
1 votes:

Great Porn Dragon: Also of neat note--GLP1 agonists are about the only class of drugs used in Type II diabetes that have found any sort of use in Type I diabetes (the nasty autoimmune type) in clinical trials--in essence, the glucagon regulation effects of GLP1 agonists enable Type I diabetics to use less insulin. Not a cure, but it does mean one has to fill up the insulin pump less frequently. :D)

/Anyone who's considering lap band and at risk for Type II diabetes might wanna ask an endocrinologist re a trial of "lizard spit", just sayin'


Smarted. That is extremely interesting. My surgeon did tell me that that surgery was also a sort of endocrine system reset, and that's one of the things the surgery did for me. No more Metformin. If that can be done without surgery, that is very good news.
2012-10-10 07:52:08 PM
1 votes:

Fark_Guy_Rob: I absolutely love how all the gastric bypass surgery does forcefully encourage people to eat less. And it's incredibly effective.

You can get the same benefit, for free, by simply eating the same amount you'd eat if you'd had the surgery.


Not quite. If you eat the same amount (calories in vs. calories out, etc) you'll lose weight, but with the surgery, for about the first 9 months or so, the person with the surgery won't be hungry. That person will not want to eat, and eating is almost a chore. The surgery does something to a person that makes them not want to eat for a while. That's when most of the weight loss occurs. The person without the surgery will be starving, and won't be able to stay on the diet for too long without getting the munchies.

/rny - 9/11/96
// -178 lbs
2012-10-10 07:51:11 PM
1 votes:

Fark_Guy_Rob: I absolutely love how all the gastric bypass surgery does forcefully encourage people to eat less. And it's incredibly effective.

You can get the same benefit, for free, by simply eating the same amount you'd eat if you'd had the surgery.

But no, no, it's a medical condition and I've tried every diet and nothing works! Unless you cut out my stomach so I can't eat and am forced to follow a diet - then everything works great!


I used to process big thick survey packets from patients who wanted this surgery. They were all told they would need to alter their diet after surgery. Almost all acknowledged that they understood that it would only work if they did this. Quite a few said that they would most likely not change. They still wanted the surgery. A few of those files had notes indicating that they had died due to complications with the surgery. It was always difficult for me to try and put myself in the place of the people making these decisions.
2012-10-10 07:30:39 PM
1 votes:

CheetahOlivetti: Hebalo: Fark_Guy_Rob: I absolutely love how all the gastric bypass surgery does forcefully encourage people to eat less. And it's incredibly effective.

You can get the same benefit, for free, by simply eating the same amount you'd eat if you'd had the surgery.

But no, no, it's a medical condition and I've tried every diet and nothing works! Unless you cut out my stomach so I can't eat and am forced to follow a diet - then everything works great!


I'm not saying the individual is blameless in all of this, but nutritional education in North America is farking brutal. For decades, the concept that refined flours are good for us was drilled in, that low calories are all that count, that eating fat is bad, that fruit juice is healthy.

We're seeing the effects of that now. HFCS was king for a good long stretch, and it's showing. Diabetes is on the rise, obesity is everywhere.

It's easy to say "stop eating things that are bad for you", but when the majority of the country is overweight to obese, it's clearly not working.


All three of these things are driven by the brain, hard to combat, but only one is considered 'acceptable'
"Hey exhausted guy, quit falling asleep"
"Hey Alcoholic, quit drinking, you lush".
"Hey Obese guy, quit eating so much".

My naturally skinny husband can attest to the fact that I tried really farking hard to lose weight for over 10 years. I went to the gym, ran (until back pain put a stop to that), and I did Weight Watchers, low-carb diets, you name it. What I didn't know is that my pancreas has all the power of a 3-wheeled Yugo, and that that, combined with (I'll admit it) a love of carb-y food, meant that my blood sugar was swinging wildly around for 10 years before I found out about it.

My fasting blood sugar was always normal, so no one caught that these swings were happening. I'd eat, blood sugar would spike, then two hours later or so it would plummet and send the "you have to eat NOW" signal. I couldn't figure out why I was always hung ...


Interestingly (as noted before) it's now thought that GLP1 agonists (the "new hotness" in type II diabetes meds) and lap-band work rather similarly in how they help in diabetes control--GLP1 helps in regulating insulin release and glucagon, whilst gastric surgery somehow (we really don't know HOW yet) seems to do SOMETHING to GLP1 synthesis or metabolism to the point that folks who've had lap-band have been outright cured of type II diabetes. So not really surprised at this at all, to be honest.

And yes, if you're insulin-resistant, the "spike-drop" weirdness can show up as early as the 130s.
2012-10-10 07:24:14 PM
1 votes:

Fark_Guy_Rob: I absolutely love how all the gastric bypass surgery does forcefully encourage people to eat less. And it's incredibly effective.

You can get the same benefit, for free, by simply eating the same amount you'd eat if you'd had the surgery.

But no, no, it's a medical condition and I've tried every diet and nothing works! Unless you cut out my stomach so I can't eat and am forced to follow a diet - then everything works great!


Yes and no--one of the interesting things that's been found re lap-band and gastric bypass surgery is that it does cause changes in insulin metabolism that are actually unrelated to imbibing less food--basically there's better glucagon regulation. (There have actually been people who've been cured of Type II diabetes and insulin resistance via the surgery, in a far shorter time than one would expect from weight loss alone.) We're not 100% sure how it happens, but it IS something independent of the weight loss and the inability to eat more than about six ounces of food at a setting--perhaps the surgery forces a sort of "reset" of the body's insulin metabolism.

That said--GLP1 agonists have much the same effects without the horrible risk of weight loss surgery (these are a class of type II diabetes meds that help in regulating glucagon metabolism (and were found in gila monster spit via scientists who research venom for Pharmacologically Interesting Compounds) and cause appetite reduction and (often) weight loss as a beneficial side effect. I've actually heard of some docs referring to the GLP1 agonist drugs as "lap band via lizard spit", in fact (as it's figured that lap-band and gastric bypass surgery might actually do something with GLP1 metabolism in the human body).

(Also of neat note--GLP1 agonists are about the only class of drugs used in Type II diabetes that have found any sort of use in Type I diabetes (the nasty autoimmune type) in clinical trials--in essence, the glucagon regulation effects of GLP1 agonists enable Type I diabetics to use less insulin. Not a cure, but it does mean one has to fill up the insulin pump less frequently. :D)

/Anyone who's considering lap band and at risk for Type II diabetes might wanna ask an endocrinologist re a trial of "lizard spit", just sayin'
2012-10-10 05:58:08 PM
1 votes:

Mr_Fabulous: CheetahOlivetti: I run slowly

Then your login is totally wrong.

/so is mine, really


Heh. Actually, it's a play on Cheetah = the chimpanzee, Olivetti = on a typewriter.
2012-10-10 05:51:30 PM
1 votes:

HeartBurnKid: FTFA: To accommodate the patients' reduced stomach volumes, the cards, called WLS (Weight Loss Surgery) cards, ask restaurants to allow patients to order a smaller portion of food for a discounted price.

Ummm... why not just let everyone order the smaller portions? Are gastric bypass patients the only people who have to worry about portion size?


Thread over in 228ish.

This.
2012-10-10 05:50:36 PM
1 votes:

CheetahOlivetti: I run slowly


Then your login is totally wrong.

/so is mine, really
2012-10-10 05:08:05 PM
1 votes:
FTFA: To accommodate the patients' reduced stomach volumes, the cards, called WLS (Weight Loss Surgery) cards, ask restaurants to allow patients to order a smaller portion of food for a discounted price.

Ummm... why not just let everyone order the smaller portions? Are gastric bypass patients the only people who have to worry about portion size?
2012-10-10 04:04:03 PM
1 votes:

Grandemadaca: CheetahOlivetti: SchlingFocker: CheetahOlivetti: If you're faster than that, you shouldn't be bothered by us. We're way in the back anyway, so what do you care?

Y'all take up limited slots that could be used by actual runners.

I wish the Houston Marathon required qualifying times in other, smaller marathons like other major cities.

I am actually running, so that makes me an actual runner.

I'm not a professional level runner, and I probably never will be, but I love running, and I love the camaraderie of racing, even though I suck at it. Also, I'm running in the RnR Arizona marathon. I don't think they've ever run out of space for us slow-asses.

I always check the cut-off times before I register for a race, and I don't register for one where I'll end up being kicked out for being too slow. I'd like to run the Whiskey Row Marathon next year, I won't register until I know I can stay well ahead of the cut-off pace, especially considering that it's a hilly and difficult course.

Don't let the D-bags get you down. Running a marathon, no matter how slow, is a MAJOR accomplishement. Be proud and keep running. Soon enough you may not be running with the Kenyans, but you won't be worrying about the cut-off time either.


THIS! I hope to run one next year. 13.1 is the farthest I've run so far. Much respect!
2012-10-10 03:51:43 PM
1 votes:

CheetahOlivetti: SchlingFocker: CheetahOlivetti: If you're faster than that, you shouldn't be bothered by us. We're way in the back anyway, so what do you care?

Y'all take up limited slots that could be used by actual runners.

I wish the Houston Marathon required qualifying times in other, smaller marathons like other major cities.

I am actually running, so that makes me an actual runner.

I'm not a professional level runner, and I probably never will be, but I love running, and I love the camaraderie of racing, even though I suck at it. Also, I'm running in the RnR Arizona marathon. I don't think they've ever run out of space for us slow-asses.

I always check the cut-off times before I register for a race, and I don't register for one where I'll end up being kicked out for being too slow. I'd like to run the Whiskey Row Marathon next year, I won't register until I know I can stay well ahead of the cut-off pace, especially considering that it's a hilly and difficult course.


Don't let the D-bags get you down. Running a marathon, no matter how slow, is a MAJOR accomplishement. Be proud and keep running. Soon enough you may not be running with the Kenyans, but you won't be worrying about the cut-off time either.

/mid-packer.
2012-10-10 03:49:59 PM
1 votes:

Kit Fister: proof that anyone can be a snob/dick/douchebag about anything


Pretty common with the "Oh fatties are so stupid, everyone should be skinny like me!" crowd. People who are real proud and in your face about their weight are often that way because they've got nothing else going for them. Hence they get snobbish about things like running a marathon or the like. Despite their claim that everyone should be thin they don't actually want that because they like it as something they can brag on.
2012-10-10 03:27:15 PM
1 votes:

kiwimoogle84: SchlingFocker: CheetahOlivetti: If you're faster than that, you shouldn't be bothered by us. We're way in the back anyway, so what do you care?

Y'all take up limited slots that could be used by actual runners.

I wish the Houston Marathon required qualifying times in other, smaller marathons like other major cities.

Wow. Shouldn't you be proud of them for putting in the effort? Not everyone can run 26 miles and not break a sweat like you apparently can. And running marathons don't mean much when you do it once a month, dude, so why do you deserve that slot more than another? Someone has to come in last, and it's not a race, so really- why do you care?


proof that anyone can be a snob/dick/douchebag about anything
2012-10-10 03:19:19 PM
1 votes:

SchlingFocker: Beanlet: I am considered overweight for my height and have gotten comments about being a fatty (I am a size 12, marilyn monroe was a 14).

Women's clothing sizes were different back then.

Marilyn would be about a size 6 in today's clothing sizes.

Fat chicks do themselves no justice and sound ridiculous when they try to say that they've got the same body as Marilyn Monroe.


Shape and frame mean much. Not saying they have the same body, merely giving a visual. A size 12 on a 5'3 girl is extremely different from a size 12 on a six foot tall girl.

If I was anorexic-skinny, I'd still not be able to fit in size 4 jeans. My bone structure wouldn't allow for it. I am built with huge, wide bones. I have linebacker shoulders.

And bullcrap it's a 6 these days. I'd say 10, maybe. In high school I weighed 135 at 5'9 and I was a size 8. I had very little fat on my frame. She was very curvy. Sizes may be different but not that drastically.
2012-10-10 03:12:48 PM
1 votes:
I bet if most people did the 3 following things, they'd find themselves losing weight gradually and in a healthy manner without being hungry:

1) Eat mostly protein, vegetables, and fruit. As a friend of mine who was a personal trainer commented, "if it comes in a bag or a box, don't eat it."

2) Exercise moderately to vigorously 3-4 times a week for 30 minutes.

3) Eat smaller meals, snack on something every 2-3 hours, and don't eat ANYTHING after dinner (or ~3 hours before bed). It's called break-FAST for a reason - you should be fasting for ~12 hours a day, with 8 of them being when you're asleep.

That's it. No need to blame your metabolism, count calories, or engage in yo-yo dieting. I've lost ~35 lbs in the last year by doing these three things, and I don't feel like I'm depriving myself of anything. I actually allow myself to eat ANYTHING I want all day on Satudays.
2012-10-10 03:11:53 PM
1 votes:

SchlingFocker: CheetahOlivetti: mysticcat: So you have to have a note from your doctor to get a meal with a reasonable portion size?

Yes, sadly. At some restaurants. I realize that I'm leaving myself open for all sorts of abuse, but I've had RNY gastric bypass (and I don't regret it one bit -- 100 pounds lighter and a marathon runner these days. There's more to the story, but that's the quick version.).

Applebees does have a Weight Watchers menu with reasonable sizes, but what I usually do is just order what I actually want to eat, eat about 1/3, and my naturally skinny husband does his best to take up my slack.

I could get a card from my doc, but I don't eat out that often. And kids' menu items are usually horribly unhealthy anyway, so I don't see the point in using a card to order kid food.

Are you an actual marathon runner or just one of those people who goes out and pretty much just walks it in about 6 hours?

The Houston Marathon has become over-run with those people.


I run really slow, as slow as some of the walkers, but I run the whole way. I've run two half-marathons and a full marathon so far, and I'm training for another marathon now. I run 4-5 times a week and follow a training schedule. It takes me a long time, but I'm also 42 years old, a mom of three, and I was never athletically inclined, so I'm think I'm doing pretty good.

If you're faster than that, you shouldn't be bothered by us. We're way in the back anyway, so what do you care?
2012-10-10 03:05:04 PM
1 votes:
Gastric Bypass patient here - 4 years ago, 80 lbs total kept off. It was a lifesaver.

I will on occasion go to buffets for the variety now, even though I certainly can't come close to making it worth the money. When I see the amount that I eat now and compare it to the amount that my skinniest friends eat, I now realize that the only reason 100% of Americans aren't morbidly obese is just some freak of genetics. It isn't the fat people that are abnormal - it's the skinny ones that somehow eat what they do and aren't obese.

I didn't get one of these cards, but it might be worthwhile just to avoid wasting the amount of food that I end up throwing away.
2012-10-10 02:43:05 PM
1 votes:

Mitch Taylor's Bro: kiwimoogle84: Mitch Taylor's Bro: Obama4Life: Mitch Taylor's Bro: Obama4Life: Hebalo: Fark_Guy_Rob:
It's easy to say "stop eating things that are bad for you", but when the majority of the country is overweight to obese, it's clearly not working.

Now granted some obesity can be written off as genetics, but those people are the minority. Obesity can be controlled with diet and exercise, but most people don't want to put forth the effort

Sometimes, your location can make the diet part a little harder than I think it should be.

I just got back from a short vacation in a flyover state I'd never visited before. I was shocked at the menus at the local restaurants and the selection at the local markets. Iceberg lettuce and pink, artificially ripened tomatoes were the only non-fried vegetable options (I suppose I could've ordered the fried zucchini and removed the breading). Yes, they're probably responding to demand--and years of tradition and habits that are hard to break--but it creates a problem for those who do want to change their diets.

Anything can be done. It's just we're too busy looking for excuses, rather than options.

You're a troll. Got it. Moving on.

Actually, no, he's not. I live in Indiana now after having lived in California all my life. Finding healthy veggies on menus out in most places is like yanking teeth. I agree with this statement. And a lot of people do use it as an excuse.

I apply the troll tag to people who just come in and poop on a thread without offering a solution. "It's your fault you're fat" when the situation is more complicated than that = troll in my book. YMMV.


Actually, that's the opposite of what he said, and what he said was relevant to the article. He said a lot of locations like the Midwest, who have some of the highest obesity rates in America, just deep fry everything because its what they do out here. It's true. Therefore it's ingrained into portions of society and people need to make better choices for themselves, but it's hard when this is all you're offered.

I apply troll to people who just come in, say something just to ignite anger and tempers, and laugh at the bites. Which isn't the case here.
2012-10-10 02:30:45 PM
1 votes:

Beanlet: Had a third child in my 30s, metabolism slowed down, had a lot of medical issues.

Long story, but I gained weight after the pregnancy, about 30 lbs, and haven't been able to lose it. I am considered overweight for my height and have gotten comments about being a fatty (I am a size 12, marilyn monroe was a 14).

Reason I post this.. I have been on both sides of this issue and know it isn't as simple as a lot of people believe. Putting down the fork is not everyone's problem, even if it is some people's. We come in all shapes and sizes, we all have different metabolisms. Eating the exact same amount I did when I was in my early 30s would have me tipping the "omg, let's cut out the wall to get her out of the house" scale.

And last, just because you are a skinny kid/teen/young adult, this does not mean you will remain skinny your whole life. And it is difficult to suddenly need to change a lifetime of habits. The person you judge may have been just as thin, or even more thin than you at one point. We don't need to be reminded to put down the fork. It doesn't help and just makes you look like a judgemental prick.



Not to be a prick but it sounds like you are contradicting yourself here. Sounds like if you COULD put down the fork it WOULD solve your problem. Yes, it can be difficult to discover in middle age that you can't eat like you used to when your metabolism was different. Welcome to the club, you are not the first person this has happened to. It's difficult for most of them, that's why some resort to surgery. The end result of the surgery is simply to force them to put down the fork. Of course more exercise and vegetables is also an option.

Don't call someone a judgmental prick for telling you the truth that you have not yet been able to accept about yourself. Someone could just as easily call you a stuck up arttention whore for bragging about how skinny you used to be, and comparing yourself to "marilyn monroe"
2012-10-10 02:28:38 PM
1 votes:
For everyone wondering where their discount is for being thin, here you go;

It's 50% off your tab.

Order one meal, split it with your companion. That's what Mrs. Tanvulva and I do.
2012-10-10 02:20:38 PM
1 votes:

ProfessorOhki: Wouldn't it be cheaper and less risky to just pay someone to punch you in the gut every time you ate too much?

kiwimoogle84: I'm almost 30. Mr kiwi is 40. And yes that's true, but I blame bad parenting. If a kid never tasted fries, he wouldn't throw a tantrum until Mummy gave in and got them for him. My mother wouldn't let us have dessert unless we are an EXTRA helping of veggies at dinner. We had to eat one anyway. If we wanted the reward, we had to make up for it.

The only issue with this course of action is it firmly establishes vegetables as "the stuff you have to eat to get the stuff you actually want." Which means the moment you have freedom, you go "fark the vegetables, I don't have to eat them now." The amount of time it took me to realize I actually LIKE vegetables is a bit embarrassing; I was just used to viewing them as an obstacle.


I liked them anyway, and have chosen to freely eat them as an adult. It helped that my mom prepared them in a way that made them delicious, not just opening a can of something and heating it up, or boiling to death. All three of us love veggies. We just had to have more for sake of the "I'm full but I want dessert" argument.
2012-10-10 02:20:25 PM
1 votes:

Obama4Life: Mitch Taylor's Bro: Obama4Life: Hebalo: Fark_Guy_Rob:
It's easy to say "stop eating things that are bad for you", but when the majority of the country is overweight to obese, it's clearly not working.

Now granted some obesity can be written off as genetics, but those people are the minority. Obesity can be controlled with diet and exercise, but most people don't want to put forth the effort

Sometimes, your location can make the diet part a little harder than I think it should be.

I just got back from a short vacation in a flyover state I'd never visited before. I was shocked at the menus at the local restaurants and the selection at the local markets. Iceberg lettuce and pink, artificially ripened tomatoes were the only non-fried vegetable options (I suppose I could've ordered the fried zucchini and removed the breading). Yes, they're probably responding to demand--and years of tradition and habits that are hard to break--but it creates a problem for those who do want to change their diets.

Anything can be done. It's just we're too busy looking for excuses, rather than options.


You're a troll. Got it. Moving on.
2012-10-10 02:15:33 PM
1 votes:

WeenerGord: So all you guys with the surgery...when you can only eat a few ounces...do you still feel hungry?

Do you feel hungry, and frustrated that there is nothing you can do about it?

Or do you now feel full and satisfied after a couple ounces of food?


I had the surgery that was popular back in '89. It was called gastric segmentation at the time, and its similar to the lap band but not adjustable. I started at 428lbs, and fairly quickly lost down to 230lbs. The doc said I'd likely never get below 250 due to my frame/metabolism etc.

The simple answer to your question is, sometimes you do still feel hungry. Yes, sometimes its quite frustrating when your body is telling you that you need food and you can't eat it. Satisfied isn't the word I would use, even when I felt full. It was more like "If I eat anything else I'm going to puke." I liken it to surgically induced bulimia unless you eat the small portions.

Here's the scarier part. Eventually, your body will adjust. You'll stop losing, you'll be able to eat more than you did originally, and lo and behold, the weight starts to come back. As a result, in 2008 or so I was back up to 380lbs or so. After I saw it getting out of hand again, I decided to take a more healthy approach and start using the Weight Watcher points system, as well as add a regular walking schedule. The crazy thing is that because my surgery still affects how I can eat, I had to really work towards eating what Weight Watchers told me was my normal daily intake. After the first 2 weeks, I had actually gained a couple of pounds. I dropped my points to what my much thinner wife was allotted and started slowly loosing again.

I guess the bottom line is that you do have to change your habits. The surgeries are a quick (and sometimes dangerous) fix, and only a tool for initial weight loss. Your body is more adaptive than you can imagine. I don't know anyone who had the surgery that lost it and kept everything off without a serious lifestyle change. Even then, its rare in my experience.

Best of luck to the former fatty marathon running farkers who have had success with the surgery. I do hope for the best for you and all those struggling with being healthy.
2012-10-10 02:15:27 PM
1 votes:

strapp3r: i seriously need to get into the fatty business

/recession proof


Combine that with a tatto removal business and you'll be laughing all the way to the bank!
2012-10-10 02:14:55 PM
1 votes:
Wouldn't it be cheaper and less risky to just pay someone to punch you in the gut every time you ate too much?

kiwimoogle84: I'm almost 30. Mr kiwi is 40. And yes that's true, but I blame bad parenting. If a kid never tasted fries, he wouldn't throw a tantrum until Mummy gave in and got them for him. My mother wouldn't let us have dessert unless we are an EXTRA helping of veggies at dinner. We had to eat one anyway. If we wanted the reward, we had to make up for it.


The only issue with this course of action is it firmly establishes vegetables as "the stuff you have to eat to get the stuff you actually want." Which means the moment you have freedom, you go "fark the vegetables, I don't have to eat them now." The amount of time it took me to realize I actually LIKE vegetables is a bit embarrassing; I was just used to viewing them as an obstacle.
2012-10-10 02:11:22 PM
1 votes:

WeenerGord: CheetahOlivetti: The memory of how horrible dumping syndrome is keeps me from overdoing it.

What is "dumping syndrome"?


There are 2 kinds. Well for me there was.

Eating too much sugar caused and issue at one end, and eating too much caused me to throw up. Took awhile to learn new boundaries.
2012-10-10 02:10:22 PM
1 votes:

Mitch Taylor's Bro: Obama4Life: Hebalo: Fark_Guy_Rob:
It's easy to say "stop eating things that are bad for you", but when the majority of the country is overweight to obese, it's clearly not working.

Now granted some obesity can be written off as genetics, but those people are the minority. Obesity can be controlled with diet and exercise, but most people don't want to put forth the effort

Sometimes, your location can make the diet part a little harder than I think it should be.

I just got back from a short vacation in a flyover state I'd never visited before. I was shocked at the menus at the local restaurants and the selection at the local markets. Iceberg lettuce and pink, artificially ripened tomatoes were the only non-fried vegetable options (I suppose I could've ordered the fried zucchini and removed the breading). Yes, they're probably responding to demand--and years of tradition and habits that are hard to break--but it creates a problem for those who do want to change their diets.


Yep. I spent about ten days touring the midwest a couple years ago. Great trip, nice folks and it's beautiful.

But it was almost impossible to find fresh veggies and fruit. Iceberg lettuce and baked potatoes were about it.

Don't get me wrong - I'd enjoy gorging on meat and fried stuff. But I dropped 110 lbs. a few years back and am keeping it off by not eating this stuff. I do now and then while keeping an eye on calories or fasting the day after.

I lost the weight by putting down the fork.
2012-10-10 02:09:28 PM
1 votes:

WeenerGord: Medic Zero: Fark_Guy_Rob: I absolutely love how all the gastric bypass surgery does forcefully encourage people to eat less. And it's incredibly effective.

You can get the same benefit, for free, by simply eating the same amount you'd eat if you'd had the surgery.

But no, no, it's a medical condition and I've tried every diet and nothing works! Unless you cut out my stomach so I can't eat and am forced to follow a diet - then everything works great!

Can't agree with the bolded part. I've seen quite a few failures in the ER and ICU.


What kind of failures? Infections? or ruptures from gorging?


My friend's mother died from complications from bypass surgery. Can't remember what exactly, but was surgery related, not gorging related.

Not such a csb
2012-10-10 02:05:41 PM
1 votes:

WeenerGord: So all you guys with the surgery...when you can only eat a few ounces...do you still feel hungry?

Do you feel hungry, and frustrated that there is nothing you can do about it?

Or do you now feel full and satisfied after a couple ounces of food?


Completely full.

Here is how. When you get full your stomach send a message to the brain, most ignore it "to clean your plate", hence overeating. With half a stomach, you still get the signal and you cannot overeat because there are consequences if you do. You do retrain yourself to stop when you are told to.

As far as that one post about never going to a buffet, I still have a family that likes to go to one or two now and again. Why punish them? No, they are not fatties like I was
2012-10-10 01:57:37 PM
1 votes:

Marisyana: kiwimoogle84: Also, personal responsibility doesn't exist anymore. If you neglect your body to the point that walking 30 steps into the grocery store pains you, you shouldn't get handicap placards. Y'all need to walk. If you have a legit medical issue I understand, but a lot of people who are hugely obese blame a "thyroid problem" and yet proceed to eat two bags of McDonald's. I have no sympathy for you.

I'm positive some people here will think I'm trolling, but I'm not. As an ex EMT, I got more calls for shortness of breath for people who weighed twice what I do. I'm going, you know why you can't breathe? BECAUSE YOUR BLOAT IS CRUSHING YOUR LUNGS!


I don't know how old you are, but I'm in my mid-forties. When I was a kid in the seventies, you rarely saw really obese people (by that I mean over 250 pounds). Now? They're everywhere. Hell, I work with about ten people who weigh over 300, and out of those there's three that have to be close to 400 and one guy who amazes me that he can even move. Watch one of those shows with enormously fat people and look at what they're eating. Pizza. Chips. Cake. Cookies. Candy. Potatoes. If they're eating meat, it's on a bun, battered and/or breaded. They're not powering down a side of beef. There is more and more evidence that sugar is just as addictive as drugs and alcohol if you have that propensity. And sugar and starch is in EVERY processed food. But it's much easier to grab McDonald's or a frozen pizza or go out to Golden Corral than to actually, you know, cook.


I'm almost 30. Mr kiwi is 40. And yes that's true, but I blame bad parenting. If a kid never tasted fries, he wouldn't throw a tantrum until Mummy gave in and got them for him. My mother wouldn't let us have dessert unless we are an EXTRA helping of veggies at dinner. We had to eat one anyway. If we wanted the reward, we had to make up for it.

With regards to my age, I'm old fashioned anyway. I'm close to the generation of spoiled kids and I despise them.

I cook every single night. I was cooking dinners for my family at 14. And yes, it is easier, but not cheaper. Also, last I checked, a subway sandwich was just as fast and cheap as Burger King.
2012-10-10 01:50:40 PM
1 votes:

Well I use Mac/Linux...: These gastric bypass and lap band surgeries have to be the laziest shiat I've ever heard of. I can't stop gorging myself and can't be bothered with exercise, so let me have an operation to shrink my stomach so I no longer have to eat 8 servings before I feel full. fark all you lazy assholes that jack up people's health insurance because we have to pay for your fat asses.


Insurance didn't pay for my bypass. I paid for it myself. Did a bit of medical tourism down to Tijuana Mexico, paid $4500 and spent 3 days recuperating.

Insurance nowadays rarely covers gastric surgery, fark you very much.
2012-10-10 01:48:56 PM
1 votes:

kiwimoogle84: People of all shapes, sizes and metabolisms exist.


Exactly. I'm tiny yet eat practically anything I want. It does help that I've never been a fan of processed sugars, however.
2012-10-10 01:46:21 PM
1 votes:

kiwimoogle84: But why would a person who has had weight loss surgery go to a buffet? And they can split plates or order smaller things already. I don't see why this is necessary.


We have families, for one thing. Families like to do stuff together like eat out, and we sometimes let the kids pick the restaurant.

And I invite you to try and "split plates" at a buffet sometime. Let us know how that works for you.
2012-10-10 01:46:09 PM
1 votes:

Well I use Mac/Linux...: These gastric bypass and lap band surgeries have to be the laziest shiat I've ever heard of. I can't stop gorging myself and can't be bothered with exercise, so let me have an operation to shrink my stomach so I no longer have to eat 8 servings before I feel full. fark all you lazy assholes that jack up people's health insurance because we have to pay for your fat asses.


I thought this was a net positive for health insurance because most of these people do lose weight and don't get the weight-related diseases later in life?
2012-10-10 01:44:05 PM
1 votes:
Ride your bike an hour a day/4-5 days a week.
No fast food.
No sodas (except after a pounding 1.5 hour ride)
Don't eat pre-prepared food.

There. Problem solved.
2012-10-10 01:36:08 PM
1 votes:

Smelly Pirate Hooker: I know we at Fark jump at the chance to make fun of the fatties, but the article makes clear that the discount card is for people who can't or don't want to eat a ton of food at all-you-can-eat-type places. So I don't see the problem. (shrug)

Don't you have a gym to get to, submitter?


But why would a person who has had weight loss surgery go to a buffet? And they can split plates or order smaller things already. I don't see why this is necessary.
2012-10-10 01:34:56 PM
1 votes:
Rogers says it's OK for patients to use the WLS card and splurge at the buffet every once in a while, and the card also encourages them to order smaller meals at other restaurants.

No, it encourages their fat asses to keep going to the discount buffet.

Bulimia would be a better course for these people.
2012-10-10 01:32:45 PM
1 votes:
CSB:

I know a guy who is an eating machine. I only see him at a Christmas dinner, where there is a lot of food. I don't think his arms ever stopped moving from table to mouth (except to put on the Santa suit for the wee ones). He wanted to get gastric bypass, but wouldn't go in for the mandatory counseling, and he was rejected. So he got a lap-band instead ( I guess the requirements are less stringent, or his doctor's name was Nick Riviera.)

I saw him the next Christmas. Still the same size. His arms were still moving, cramming food into his figgy-pudding-hole just like always, although I noticed a bead of sweat rolling down his temple. He was fighting that band with everything he had. I could just picture the tension on that lap-band, on the verge of snapping quite audibly to everyone in the room.

It was fascinating to watch his resolve to enjoy every morsel in the room.

/eat less, exercise more.
//worked for me.
///75lbs gone, running my second marathon next week.
2012-10-10 01:23:56 PM
1 votes:

Obama4Life: Now granted some obesity can be written off as genetics, but those people are the minority. Obesity can be controlled with diet and exercise, but most people don't want to put forth the effort


Too easy. I mean, that's part of the answer, but it's too easy to say "Just go be thin". You're fighting society, your own brain, your predisposition to carbs (in essence, your brain).

I don't think the answer is legislation, but some independent nutritional research would be a good start. Tim Ferriss is launching something to that effect, which is promising.
2012-10-10 01:23:44 PM
1 votes:

CygnusDarius: fireclown: big pig peaches: Well the veggies depend as a lot on how they are prepared, but rotisserie chicken is pretty horrifying. Unless you're doing the low carb thing, and then there is still some debate about how the chicken was raised.

You sound Portlandian.

I always heard that if you boil vegetables, you kill what's nutritious of them. That it's best to eat them raw (clean, of course), and with no dressing whatsoever.


I've heard that too, I prefer to lightly steam. Keeps the nutrients in and helps someone like me who has had her jaw broken from unnecessary crunching. It's painful.
2012-10-10 01:21:39 PM
1 votes:

fireclown: big pig peaches: Well the veggies depend as a lot on how they are prepared, but rotisserie chicken is pretty horrifying. Unless you're doing the low carb thing, and then there is still some debate about how the chicken was raised.

You sound Portlandian.


I always heard that if you boil vegetables, you kill what's nutritious of them. That it's best to eat them raw (clean, of course), and with no dressing whatsoever.
2012-10-10 01:14:08 PM
1 votes:

Amy78: I have a csb. Back in my teen years I worked at the local Golden Corral. Some lady wanted to pay the children's price because she had had the gastric bypass and couldn't eat as much as a normal adult. She had a doctor's note and everything. I told her no, but would get my manager to speak to her. She vowed to never enter that restaurant again.


If she kept her vow you may saved her life
2012-10-10 01:12:12 PM
1 votes:

dittybopper: big pig peaches: Well the veggies depend as a lot on how they are prepared, but rotisserie chicken is pretty horrifying. Unless you're doing the low carb thing, and then there is still some debate about how the chicken was raised.

Rotisserie chicken isn't that bad. It's just roasted. It's *FRIED* chicken that will kill you.


Well, it's not alfredo but compared to a grilled chicken breast, yes it is. If you''re choosing it for health reasons, just have a steak.
2012-10-10 01:09:38 PM
1 votes:
I have a csb. Back in my teen years I worked at the local Golden Corral. Some lady wanted to pay the children's price because she had had the gastric bypass and couldn't eat as much as a normal adult. She had a doctor's note and everything. I told her no, but would get my manager to speak to her. She vowed to never enter that restaurant again.
2012-10-10 01:00:18 PM
1 votes:
When did the bar get lowered this much?
2012-10-10 12:57:47 PM
1 votes:

sigdiamond2000: dittybopper: Sybarite: If you're eating at the Golden Corral buffet, I'm pretty sure you haven't actually addressed the issues that made you fat in the first place.

Not necessarily. Here is their everyday menu:

I think by "issues," Sybarite means things like incest and emotional abuse, not poor eating habits. If you're eating at Golden Corral, there's a pretty good chance there's some deep wound within you that you're trying to cover with their chocolate fountain of shame (and assorted beard hairs).


Not everyone who is overweight has "issues" like that. In fact, given the widespread, cheap availability of calorie dense foods, I'd say the opposite is true: While it may have been that 30 years ago many of the obese were self-medicating with food, today it's quite likely that the majority of people who are obese are that way because it's easy for them to be obese.
2012-10-10 12:56:08 PM
1 votes:
the fark?
2012-10-10 12:54:11 PM
1 votes:

Hebalo: dittybopper:

Corn

I bolded everything that is pretty much unequivocally healthy food, and yes that includes grilled red meat. You could eat "Lean and Green" at a Golden Corral quite easily.


Ummmmmmm no.


Well, corn is iffy, to be sure, but in moderate amounts it's healthy enough.
2012-10-10 12:43:02 PM
1 votes:

Sybarite: If you're eating at the Golden Corral buffet, I'm pretty sure you haven't actually addressed the issues that made you fat in the first place.


HEY!

balanceoffood.typepad.com
2012-10-10 12:42:38 PM
1 votes:
Headline can't be accurate.

*clicks*

F***. Really?
2012-10-10 11:59:47 AM
1 votes:

dittybopper: Sybarite: If you're eating at the Golden Corral buffet, I'm pretty sure you haven't actually addressed the issues that made you fat in the first place.

Not necessarily. Here is their everyday menu:


I think by "issues," Sybarite means things like incest and emotional abuse, not poor eating habits. If you're eating at Golden Corral, there's a pretty good chance there's some deep wound within you that you're trying to cover with their chocolate fountain of shame (and assorted beard hairs).
2012-10-10 11:51:23 AM
1 votes:
I've never heard of this. My mom hasn't, either. She usually just gets a small cup of soup for dinner when we go out.
2012-10-10 09:33:47 AM
1 votes:
Sizzler? What is this, 1987?
 
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