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(CNN)   R.L. Stine has finally tried his hand at writing a novel for adults, since his fans have finally finished the 1,459 Goosebumps books he wrote in the 1990s   (cnn.com) divider line 33
    More: Spiffy, R.L. Stine, Nielsen BookScan, J. K. Rowling, goosebumps  
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1626 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 10 Oct 2012 at 9:17 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-10 06:52:43 AM
I sure hope it's better than J.K. Rowling's stab at it.
 
2012-10-10 06:58:51 AM
I think John Grisham did pretty well with the Theodore Boone series for juveniles. But I think there's a world of difference between a successful adult writer writing juvenile, and a successful juvenile writer taking a stab at adult literature. Adults tend to see plot holes and crappy character development much more easily than kids.

I'll probably check it out for nostalgia's sake. He's got to be better than James f*cking Patterson.
 
2012-10-10 07:35:30 AM
FTA: "I knew he had the chops to do it, because I think writers are writers," Creamer said.

Oh, are they, you vapid twat? Christ. If you're representative of the typical publisher, it's no wonder such dreck as Fifty Shades of Grey can get published. Granted, I have yet to read Stine's book...
 
2012-10-10 09:13:44 AM
...

ermahgerd...

...
 
2012-10-10 09:27:00 AM

Shostie: ...

ermahgerd...

...


Damn you.
 
2012-10-10 09:27:25 AM

James F. Campbell: Oh, are they, you vapid twat? Christ. If you're representative of the typical publisher, it's no wonder such dreck as Fifty Shades of Grey can get published. Granted, I have yet to read Stine's book...


Give the people what they want.
 
2012-10-10 09:27:55 AM
Wait, R. L. Stine is a real person? Like, just one? I always figured that was just the pseudonym that everybody that actually wrote the Goosebumps books used.

Learn something new every day, I guess.
 
2012-10-10 09:28:04 AM

Shostie: ...

ermahgerd...

...


came, left, satisfied, etc.
 
2012-10-10 09:34:43 AM

Shostie: ...

ermahgerd...

...


aderlt friction?
 
2012-10-10 09:41:15 AM

Shostie: ...

ermahgerd...

...


I will never see the word "goosebumps" again without that being my instant reaction...
 
2012-10-10 09:53:35 AM

Wild Eyed and Wicked: Shostie: ...

ermahgerd...

...

I will never see the word "goosebumps" again without that being my instant reaction...


Shhhh... if you're very, very quiet, maybe the memesheep won't notice.

/you might also hunt wabbits
 
2012-10-10 10:00:41 AM

SteelDraco: Wait, R. L. Stine is a real person? Like, just one? I always figured that was just the pseudonym that everybody that actually wrote the Goosebumps books used.

Learn something new every day, I guess.


Likewise. Or, to be sure, I figured he was a real person whose name later writers adopted after he quit/died.
 
2012-10-10 10:01:37 AM

ox45tallboy: I think John Grisham did pretty well with the Theodore Boone series for juveniles. But I think there's a world of difference between a successful adult writer writing juvenile, and a successful juvenile writer taking a stab at adult literature. Adults tend to see plot holes and crappy character development much more easily than kids.

I'll probably check it out for nostalgia's sake. He's got to be better than James f*cking Patterson.


I grew up reading John Bellairs' books, which were supernatural gothic horror mysteries for kids. Early in his career he wrote a book for adults, The Face in the Frost, which was really good, albeit very derivative from Tolkien. His publisher at the time told him there was no market for adult fantasy stuff, and suggested he write for kids instead.

His later work became really formulaic, but he fired off 7 or 8 books that were awesome and scared the crap out of me as a kid.
 
2012-10-10 10:02:53 AM

SteelDraco: Wait, R. L. Stine is a real person? Like, just one? I always figured that was just the pseudonym that everybody that actually wrote the Goosebumps books used.

Learn something new every day, I guess.


The Goosebumps books were basically pulp fiction. Back in their heydey pulp fiction writers all produced a ridiculous amount of work. Just check out the publication history of Robert E. Howard.
 
2012-10-10 10:18:22 AM
He wrote an adult novel in 1995. I read it, having read all of Goosebumps & Fear Street. It wasn't very good. I remember very little about it other than one of the characters asking for a bj and being denied because the girl said her lips were chapped. Nice to write about sex when you've been writing kids books, but it felt like shock for shock's sake.

He also wrote & co-created Eureeka's Castle. I loved that show. Luther Vandross on "Don't Touch That Box" for the win!
 
2012-10-10 10:22:40 AM

marxychick1: He wrote an adult novel in 1995. I read it, having read all of Goosebumps & Fear Street. It wasn't very good. I remember very little about it other than one of the characters asking for a bj and being denied because the girl said her lips were chapped. Nice to write about sex when you've been writing kids books, but it felt like shock for shock's sake.

He also wrote & co-created Eureeka's Castle. I loved that show. Luther Vandross on "Don't Touch That Box" for the win!


See, the logical retort to that for the character asking for the blowjob would have been "Yeah, well, is your anus chapped?"

Also, Stine wrote his first "adult" novel at the wrong time... there was no demand. Now, his former audience is old enough for nostalgia, and will drive sales up pretty well because, well, ERMAHGERD, GERSBERMS WRRRTER!
 
2012-10-10 10:38:41 AM

SteelDraco: Wait, R. L. Stine is a real person? Like, just one?


Yup. And the books he wrote as "Jovial Bob" Stine in the early eighties were hilarious.

/if you were a geeky kid in the early eighties, of course. I doubt they have aged well.
 
2012-10-10 10:39:05 AM

ox45tallboy: I think John Grisham did pretty well with the Theodore Boone series for juveniles. But I think there's a world of difference between a successful adult writer writing juvenile, and a successful juvenile writer taking a stab at adult literature. Adults tend to see plot holes and crappy character development much more easily than kids.


Another example of an adult writer doing a children's book is Stephen King; he wrote Eyes of the Dragon, an adolescent fantasy novel.

I haven't read it in years, but I remember quite enjoying it.
 
2012-10-10 10:55:39 AM
Hey what's going on in this thread

i3.kym-cdn.com
 
2012-10-10 11:38:53 AM

marxychick1: He wrote an adult novel in 1995. I read it, having read all of Goosebumps & Fear Street. It wasn't very good. I remember very little about it other than one of the characters asking for a bj and being denied because the girl said her lips were chapped. Nice to write about sex when you've been writing kids books, but it felt like shock for shock's sake.


If I recall, that was the opening of the book, as well. Basically, "Hey, this book isn't for tweens." right in the opening just because he could.
 
2012-10-10 12:20:42 PM
They should make a 50 Shades of Grey type book that's a "Choose your own Adventure" style.

For example: The woman proceeds to enjoy the leather whip do you:

A: Hit her with it harder
B: Switch to feather.
C: Fark her silly.
 
2012-10-10 12:21:09 PM

TNel: Hey what's going on in this thread

[i3.kym-cdn.com image 402x604]


I would love to know who that girl is, and if she realizes how big of a meme she is.
 
2012-10-10 12:23:51 PM

Shostie: ...

ermahgerd...

...


This is why I clicked on this thread.
 
2012-10-10 12:27:38 PM

You Are All Sheep: TNel: Hey what's going on in this thread

[i3.kym-cdn.com image 402x604]

I would love to know who that girl is, and if she realizes how big of a meme she is.


Look at the knowyourmeme.com page for this one. The story is awesome; all I'm going to say is that she knows.
 
2012-10-10 01:01:48 PM
Sorry, Subby, but I read a book of his called Superstition which was written for adults in the early 90s.

And.. WHAT IS THAT FARKING THING ON HIS FOREHEAD???

/Moley moley moley
 
2012-10-10 01:53:56 PM

Wild Eyed and Wicked: Shostie: ...

ermahgerd...

...

I will never see the word "goosebumps" again without that being my instant reaction...


God, me too. And it still makes me laugh every time.

/er lurv berks
 
2012-10-10 02:11:05 PM

Milk D: They should make a 50 Shades of Grey type book that's a "Choose your own Adventure" style.

For example: The woman proceeds to enjoy the leather whip do you:

A: Hit her with it harder
B: Switch to feather.
C: Fark her silly.


Actually... I would probably read that. The Choose Your Own Adventure Goosebumps were actually the best ones. Not the best written, but the most fun to read. A porn version of those would actually sell pretty well because that way everyone could have their specifically desired fun.

/just in time for National Write a Novel Month!
//hmm... would have to figure out how to make an ebook version work as well...
 
2012-10-10 03:02:54 PM

Millennium: Wild Eyed and Wicked: Shostie: ...

ermahgerd...

...

I will never see the word "goosebumps" again without that being my instant reaction...

Shhhh... if you're very, very quiet, maybe the memesheep won't notice.

/you might also hunt wabbits


it's fark season
 
2012-10-10 03:16:20 PM

darkjezter: ox45tallboy: I think John Grisham did pretty well with the Theodore Boone series for juveniles. But I think there's a world of difference between a successful adult writer writing juvenile, and a successful juvenile writer taking a stab at adult literature. Adults tend to see plot holes and crappy character development much more easily than kids.

Another example of an adult writer doing a children's book is Stephen King; he wrote Eyes of the Dragon, an adolescent fantasy novel.

I haven't read it in years, but I remember quite enjoying it.


Neil Gaiman swaps between adult and young adult /juvenile fiction fairly regularly.

Coraline, Graveyard Book
American Gods, Neverwhere

Stardust kind of falls in between (believe he considers it an adult fairy tale).
 
2012-10-10 05:33:06 PM
Meh I grew up reading "Fear Street". Much better in my opinion.

/The Betrayal, The Secret, and The Burning were good
//Then I went on to Steven King's books
///Then the entire genre got boring and predictable and I moved on
 
2012-10-10 05:42:25 PM

Orgasmatron138: ox45tallboy: I think John Grisham did pretty well with the Theodore Boone series for juveniles. But I think there's a world of difference between a successful adult writer writing juvenile, and a successful juvenile writer taking a stab at adult literature. Adults tend to see plot holes and crappy character development much more easily than kids.

I'll probably check it out for nostalgia's sake. He's got to be better than James f*cking Patterson.

I grew up reading John Bellairs' books, which were supernatural gothic horror mysteries for kids. Early in his career he wrote a book for adults, The Face in the Frost, which was really good, albeit very derivative from Tolkien. His publisher at the time told him there was no market for adult fantasy stuff, and suggested he write for kids instead.

His later work became really formulaic, but he fired off 7 or 8 books that were awesome and scared the crap out of me as a kid.


Sounds similar to my experience with Piers Anthony...
 
2012-10-10 06:57:53 PM

TNel: Hey what's going on in this thread

[i3.kym-cdn.com image 402x604]


That's the first time I've ever noticed that she has American Girls books in the bookbag, too.
 
2012-10-10 07:43:34 PM
The book is called Red Rain and nobody has made a Peter Gabriel reference? Shocking, I tell you.
 
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