If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(CNN)   Lawmakers: You really want these tanks, huh? Army: No, not really. Lawmakers: Come on... you know you want 'em. Army: Goddammit we said "No"   (security.blogs.cnn.com) divider line 306
    More: Asinine, Odierno, Yoshiaki Iwasaki, General Dynamics, Drew Griffin, Sierra Nevada  
•       •       •

6454 clicks; posted to Politics » on 10 Oct 2012 at 8:24 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



306 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | » | Last | Show all
 
2012-10-10 10:01:33 AM

IAMTHEINTARWEBS: Reform to the civil legal system to a looser pays system.


Yes, the payments are rather tight, aren't they?
 
2012-10-10 10:02:18 AM

MyRandomName: keylock71: We've got money for weapons and war, but when it comes to infrastructure, education, and helping the average American citizen, well, we've all got to tighten our belts, you see... Not the wealthy, of course, though.

The united states spends more on education than any other country by pupil. Stop this lie that there is no spending on education. The problem is administration has tripled in size sucking money from actual classrooms. Stop this myth of no education spending. It is just silly.


Education spending: 3%
Military spending: 25%

Do you see some sort of problem when educating our children is 3% of the budget and the military is a full quarter of it?
 
2012-10-10 10:04:40 AM

GoldSpider: Epoch_Zero: Exactly - by pupil. Not by school. There are a few extremely rich schools where they get what they need and the rest, well, they have to get bootstrappy.

Would you support consolidating school districts to the county level (in states where it's not already so) and change the funding mechanism from local property taxes to a county income tax?


No - that wouldn't do anything. That the funding is local is already the problem. Schools should get what they need regardless of what economic area they happen to be located in. Everyone talks about how education is a way out of poverty, yet schools located in poor neighborhoods are at a disadvantage because of it. The school system needs to be nationalized. It would solve a lot of problems.
 
2012-10-10 10:05:29 AM

ox45tallboy: This is the problem with producing too many weapons - someone sees them sitting around, and before you know it, someone thinks its a good idea to sell them. Then, next thing you know, the purchaser uses them, and so the military has to order a new round of weapons to go kill someone else that is using the weapons we sold them in the first place.


You say that like it's a problem.

/General Dynamics
 
2012-10-10 10:06:05 AM

ox45tallboy: Arkanaut: Agreed. We should be focusing on ways to boost the economy so that there is more demand for other high-tech goods that will require skilled engineers to build them.

If there's one thing we do have, it's the demand. We just don't have the manufacturing capabilities anymore.

[blogs-images.forbes.com image 463x378]


Boeing & Lockheed are still here. The car companies are still here. We have lots of engineering schools.

IMO globalization is a red herring -- it's not that difficult* to bring jobs back. We just have to support wages, a la the EITC or other negative taxation schemes. That lowers costs for employers and makes life easier for workers. Of course you'd have to pay for it on the higher end with taxes, but if taxes are on the individual (e.g. the shareholders) and not the corporation then the marginal benefit to the corporation still outweighs the costs.

*not difficult conceptually; politically it would run into the usual opposition to "socialism".
 
2012-10-10 10:06:59 AM

cameroncrazy1984: MyRandomName: keylock71: We've got money for weapons and war, but when it comes to infrastructure, education, and helping the average American citizen, well, we've all got to tighten our belts, you see... Not the wealthy, of course, though.

The united states spends more on education than any other country by pupil. Stop this lie that there is no spending on education. The problem is administration has tripled in size sucking money from actual classrooms. Stop this myth of no education spending. It is just silly.

Education spending: 3%
Military spending: 25%

Do you see some sort of problem when educating our children is 3% of the budget and the military is a full quarter of it?


Bootstraps shouldn't cost as much as tanks
 
2012-10-10 10:07:28 AM
cameroncrazy1984


MyRandomName: Good points but you had to add a single line of derp. Romney said he would let them go bankrupt. Not fail. Guess what? They went bankrupt. Oh noes. Romney would have allowed normal bankruptcy, not the illegal restructured bankruptcy Obama pushed for to reward unions. Ask gm how easy it is to get private loans now that their original creditors were pushed behind unions in bankruptcy.

If it was illegal why isn't Romney suing?

And I like how in one sentence you say they "went bankrupt" just like Romney said they should, and in the next you say it was "illegal restructured bankruptcy"

Get it together man


Seems like you are the one who needs to get it together and maybe do a little research about federal law. It is the creditors that could sue, not Romney and it was illegal. Plaintiff would seek redress in civil court.
 
2012-10-10 10:08:00 AM

Epoch_Zero: GoldSpider: Epoch_Zero: Exactly - by pupil. Not by school. There are a few extremely rich schools where they get what they need and the rest, well, they have to get bootstrappy.

Would you support consolidating school districts to the county level (in states where it's not already so) and change the funding mechanism from local property taxes to a county income tax?

No - that wouldn't do anything. That the funding is local is already the problem. Schools should get what they need regardless of what economic area they happen to be located in. Everyone talks about how education is a way out of poverty, yet schools located in poor neighborhoods are at a disadvantage because of it. The school system needs to be nationalized. It would solve a lot of problems.


I'm not sure if I want Congress setting national education standards.
 
2012-10-10 10:08:01 AM

liam76: Sorry, Ithough you were talking abotu picking up out of no real research to going cutting edge like we did in WWII.

We don't employ those people (on those types of projects) and we lose that experience. however the army is talking about waiting three years, not abandoning tanks so I agree we aren't hurt by waiting this case.


Actually, the tanks that went directly into production weren't some radical redesign. The military uniforms and equipment weren't at all different from what we had already been developing. There wasn't time enough to revamp the training system for new tactics, so we went with what we had.

liam76: Military vehilces use a shiat ton of things that you can't get as commercial off the shelf products.


While this is true, it's also true that they do use a sh*t ton of things that are pretty much off-the shelf products. Like engines. And wheels. And brakes. And tires. And axles. And seats.

liam76: He didn't do it right or make the deadline, Iphone flops or is late. With military equip you have consequences on another level.


Which is why we would invest even more resources into getting it right than Jobs did. The government has far more resources than he did.
 
2012-10-10 10:09:17 AM

Arkanaut: ox45tallboy: Arkanaut: Agreed. We should be focusing on ways to boost the economy so that there is more demand for other high-tech goods that will require skilled engineers to build them.

If there's one thing we do have, it's the demand. We just don't have the manufacturing capabilities anymore.

[blogs-images.forbes.com image 463x378]

Boeing & Lockheed are still here. The car companies are still here. We have lots of engineering schools.

IMO globalization is a red herring -- it's not that difficult* to bring jobs back. We just have to support wages, a la the EITC or other negative taxation schemes. That lowers costs for employers and makes life easier for workers. Of course you'd have to pay for it on the higher end with taxes, but if taxes are on the individual (e.g. the shareholders) and not the corporation then the marginal benefit to the corporation still outweighs the costs.

*not difficult conceptually; politically it would run into the usual opposition to "socialism".


Removing the burden of providing health insurance from businesses would probably go a long way, as well, but we all know that's socialism too.
 
2012-10-10 10:09:44 AM

MyRandomName: Good points but you had to add a single line of derp. Romney said he would let them go bankrupt. Not fail. Guess what? They went bankrupt. Oh noes. Romney would have allowed normal bankruptcy, not the illegal restructured bankruptcy Obama pushed for to reward unions. Ask gm how easy it is to get private loans now that their original creditors were pushed behind unions in bankruptcy.


And how would it be easier for GM to get private loans if they had gone through "normal bankruptcy"?
 
2012-10-10 10:10:22 AM

qorkfiend: Epoch_Zero: GoldSpider: Epoch_Zero: Exactly - by pupil. Not by school. There are a few extremely rich schools where they get what they need and the rest, well, they have to get bootstrappy.

Would you support consolidating school districts to the county level (in states where it's not already so) and change the funding mechanism from local property taxes to a county income tax?

No - that wouldn't do anything. That the funding is local is already the problem. Schools should get what they need regardless of what economic area they happen to be located in. Everyone talks about how education is a way out of poverty, yet schools located in poor neighborhoods are at a disadvantage because of it. The school system needs to be nationalized. It would solve a lot of problems.

I'm not sure if I want Congress setting national education standards.


Sure you do. Who wouldn't want their kids learning about Jesus riding dinosaurs from Bethlehem to Jerusalem?
 
2012-10-10 10:10:29 AM

Epoch_Zero: No - that wouldn't do anything. That the funding is local is already the problem. Schools should get what they need regardless of what economic area they happen to be located in. Everyone talks about how education is a way out of poverty, yet schools located in poor neighborhoods are at a disadvantage because of it. The school system needs to be nationalized. It would solve a lot of problems.


Not a fan of incremental (realistic) improvement, I see.
 
2012-10-10 10:11:41 AM

qorkfiend: Removing the burden of providing health insurance from businesses would probably go a long way, as well, but we all know that's socialism too.


I'm not really sure how they got intermingled, anyhow. What the hell does my employer care about my doctor? Why can't I just buy health insurance from the health insurance company?
 
2012-10-10 10:12:26 AM

serial_crusher: Epoch_Zero: Meanwhile...
[www.onedigitallife.com image 500x326]

slightly off topic but I had to take a good hard look at that to figure out whether it was an actual photo of a collapsed bridge or a screenshot from apple maps.


i2.kym-cdn.com
"Hold on, Dear. Evidently the road turns completely vertical in 30 meters..."
 
2012-10-10 10:12:52 AM

GoldSpider: Epoch_Zero: No - that wouldn't do anything. That the funding is local is already the problem. Schools should get what they need regardless of what economic area they happen to be located in. Everyone talks about how education is a way out of poverty, yet schools located in poor neighborhoods are at a disadvantage because of it. The school system needs to be nationalized. It would solve a lot of problems.

Not a fan of incremental (realistic) improvement, I see.


A massive statewide reorganization of school districts isn't really an incremental improvement, either...
 
2012-10-10 10:13:34 AM

Philip Francis Queeg: Is the Congressman form the district Program A is based in more or less powerful than the Congressman for Project B's district?


I'm talking smaller programs - way below Congress' interest. Like the staff of a two-star general deciding which subordinate unit gets an extra $500,000 in Operations & Maintenance to spend at their installation during a fiscal year.

Nobody from Congress would bat an eyelash at a big-screen TV or popcorn machine... that's not a drop in the bucket to them - it's a drop in the ocean. I'm not saying we couldn't (or shouldn't) cut $300,000 each from 10,000 unit-level program managers throughout the DoD. But from Congress' point of view, it should be a lot easier to drop a single $3,000,000,000 acquisition when it doesn't fulfill to our combat commanders' needs, or fit with our current defense posture.

Should.
 
2012-10-10 10:13:50 AM

Philip Francis Queeg: MyRandomName: keylock71: We've got money for weapons and war, but when it comes to infrastructure, education, and helping the average American citizen, well, we've all got to tighten our belts, you see... Not the wealthy, of course, though.

The united states spends more on education than any other country by pupil. Stop this lie that there is no spending on education. The problem is administration has tripled in size sucking money from actual classrooms. Stop this myth of no education spending. It is just silly.

The United States spends more on it's military than the rest of the world COMBINED.

[upload.wikimedia.org image 270x250]


Think of what would happen if we spent more than anyone else in education, or roads and train tracks
 
2012-10-10 10:13:54 AM

Arkanaut: IMO globalization is a red herring -- it's not that difficult* to bring jobs back


Of course not. When you add in the cost of transportation, corporations don't save a huge amount of money by moving manufacturing overseas. If we built more infrastructure around manufacturing, companies could eliminate the management headaches of production facilities being halfway around the world, and create even more demand for their products by making sure more people could afford them.

But when mutual fund managers make that extra .02%, it translates directly into their own pocket, and makes a difference on whether their kid goes to Harvard or State U.

When one or two companies moves their manufacturing overseas, they make pretty well. When everyone does it, the whole system collapses because no one has customers who can afford their products anymore.
 
2012-10-10 10:14:02 AM

ox45tallboy:

Okay, speaking of the Abrams, why did Bush in 2007 approve the sale of 125 M1A1 Abrams tanks to Egypt, a regime that we only three years later supported the overthrow of?

If we are producing so many tanks that we are selling them to other countries, then maybe we're producing too many tanks.


Just an add - its pretty generous to say the US sold those tanks to Egypt. The US gives Egypt a billion dollars or so in 'military aid' that Egypt them uses to 'buy' tanks from the US. We're basically giving away these things.
 
2012-10-10 10:15:47 AM

qorkfiend: A massive statewide reorganization of school districts isn't really an incremental improvement, either...


It's a smaller change than a complete federal takeover, and it's already been done in small states.

Of course, we could just keep doing the same thing and hope it improves on its own.
 
2012-10-10 10:15:52 AM

ox45tallboy: While this is true, it's also true that they do use a sh*t ton of things that are pretty much off-the shelf products. Like engines. And wheels. And brakes. And tires. And axles. And seats.


I work with aircraft.

Tanks might share seats.
 
2012-10-10 10:16:26 AM

GoldSpider: It's a smaller change than a complete federal takeover, and it's already been done in small some states.


FTFM
 
2012-10-10 10:16:58 AM

qorkfiend: Epoch_Zero: GoldSpider: Epoch_Zero: Exactly - by pupil. Not by school. There are a few extremely rich schools where they get what they need and the rest, well, they have to get bootstrappy.

Would you support consolidating school districts to the county level (in states where it's not already so) and change the funding mechanism from local property taxes to a county income tax?

No - that wouldn't do anything. That the funding is local is already the problem. Schools should get what they need regardless of what economic area they happen to be located in. Everyone talks about how education is a way out of poverty, yet schools located in poor neighborhoods are at a disadvantage because of it. The school system needs to be nationalized. It would solve a lot of problems.

I'm not sure if I want Congress setting national education standards.


Any better than Texas setting the national standards for textbooks, mandating that 'distasteful' scientific discoveries be omitted?

GoldSpider: Epoch_Zero: No - that wouldn't do anything. That the funding is local is already the problem. Schools should get what they need regardless of what economic area they happen to be located in. Everyone talks about how education is a way out of poverty, yet schools located in poor neighborhoods are at a disadvantage because of it. The school system needs to be nationalized. It would solve a lot of problems.

Not a fan of incremental (realistic) improvement, I see.


Well, it's inconvenient and requires actual consideration to do, so let's just make insignificant changes every decade or so. Maybe.

Sometimes you have to mercy nuke a system that isn't working and just replace it with something that works.
 
2012-10-10 10:17:11 AM

moothemagiccow: qorkfiend: Removing the burden of providing health insurance from businesses would probably go a long way, as well, but we all know that's socialism too.

I'm not really sure how they got intermingled, anyhow. What the hell does my employer care about my doctor? Why can't I just buy health insurance from the health insurance company?


From what I understand, it's a holdout from back in the day when both medical costs were low and there wasn't much room to increase wages; offering health benefits was an easy way to offer increased compensation without increasing wages. The savvy businessmen also realized that a healthy workforce is more productive, so taking measures to improve worker health was good for business...
 
2012-10-10 10:17:19 AM

qorkfiend: I'm not sure if I want Congress setting national education standards.


You'd rather have this guy?

www.austinchronicle.com
"Somebody's gotta stand up to these experts!"*


*actual quote
 
2012-10-10 10:18:50 AM

NewportBarGuy: And this is why we can't cut the defense budget. We're at war with our own "Representatives."


To be fair they can't see beyond all that money donated to them by the defense/aerospace companies. It isn't just the military either. Space Launch System isn't necessarily the best solution going forward for NASA (Especially since we may only be able to afford to launch it twice or three times a year). Its just the best solution to keep those shuttle manufactures happy. No bidding necessary. That's what annoys me most about our military/space program. They've become a jobs program, damn the consequences of boondoggles like the Osprey or whether it actually benefits our country.
 
2012-10-10 10:19:48 AM

Epoch_Zero: Sometimes you have to mercy nuke a system that isn't working and just replace it with something that works.


We haven't had the political will to do that sort of thing for a VERY long time.
 
2012-10-10 10:19:49 AM

moothemagiccow: I'm not really sure how they got intermingled, anyhow. What the hell does my employer care about my doctor? Why can't I just buy health insurance from the health insurance company?


Back in the day, when corporate loyalty was high and working for the same company your entire life was the norm rather than the exception, someone thought that having healthy workers would be good for the bottom line.
 
2012-10-10 10:20:45 AM

GoldSpider: Epoch_Zero: Sometimes you have to mercy nuke a system that isn't working and just replace it with something that works.

We haven't had the political will to do that sort of thing for a VERY long time.


Doesn't mean it shouldn't be done.
 
2012-10-10 10:21:03 AM
incendi: TheGogmagog: I also don't want tanks in the hands of local police and sheriff departments.

What the fark does "Free Speech Unit" mean? That thing is an abomination on so many levels.


I posted the wrong one, That one is a Photoshop. The original is still offensive.

s/7373540/79916625#c79916625" target="_blank">imontheinternet: Is that a Cobra logo on the grill?

Yes, well... It's a Blackwater logo here:
sfist.com
 
2012-10-10 10:21:12 AM

Epoch_Zero: Any better than Texas setting the national standards for textbooks, mandating that 'distasteful' scientific discoveries be omitted?


You're seriously conflating the large textbook market of Texas with giving Congress the legal power to set national education standards?
 
2012-10-10 10:22:43 AM

ox45tallboy: qorkfiend: I'm not sure if I want Congress setting national education standards.

You'd rather have this guy?

[www.austinchronicle.com image 450x300]
"Somebody's gotta stand up to these experts!"*

*actual quote


The damage done by whackjobs on the Texas State Board of Education is mostly limited to Texas, so yes, I would prefer limiting the damage to one or two states instead of inflicting it on every state.
 
2012-10-10 10:23:54 AM

ox45tallboy: Arkanaut: IMO globalization is a red herring -- it's not that difficult* to bring jobs back

Of course not. When you add in the cost of transportation, corporations don't save a huge amount of money by moving manufacturing overseas. If we built more infrastructure around manufacturing, companies could eliminate the management headaches of production facilities being halfway around the world, and create even more demand for their products by making sure more people could afford them.

But when mutual fund managers make that extra .02%, it translates directly into their own pocket, and makes a difference on whether their kid goes to Harvard or State U.

When one or two companies moves their manufacturing overseas, they make pretty well. When everyone does it, the whole system collapses because no one has customers who can afford their products anymore.


If you read the rest of my post, what I meant was that if we support worker's wages, particularly at the lower end, we can have the best of both worlds -- the fund managers can get that .02% and we can have workers who can feed their families. I think.
 
2012-10-10 10:24:37 AM

bbfreak: They've become a jobs program


And an incredibly inefficient one at that. We'd seriously be better off canceling a defense acquisition contract and spend the same money on hiring air traffic controllers, VA and CDC doctors and researchers, US Forest Service park rangers, etc. That would put more money directly back into the economy through demand/consumption.

But lots of government jobs are socialism. A handful of private industry jobs wholly dependent upon government contracts are patriotic capitalism.
 
2012-10-10 10:25:38 AM

qorkfiend: The damage done by whackjobs on the Texas State Board of Education is mostly limited to Texas, so yes, I would prefer limiting the damage to one or two states instead of inflicting it on every state.


Actually it isn't limited to Texas. Publishers don't want to make "Texas Only" versions of their text books, so they try to make the general versions fit the rules of Texas and other states as much as we they can. So kids in classes across the nation end up with text books that follow the requirements Texas sets.
 
2012-10-10 10:26:07 AM

Endrick: WAIT, I just got a brilliant idea
[hugereviews.com image 300x225]


They are already ahead of you see above:

Also forgot to add that while the original didn't have Free Speech Unit on it, it was brought to the Occupy Oakland (May 2012).
 
2012-10-10 10:26:47 AM

liam76: Tanks might share seats.


Do you happen to know who makes the gas turbine engine used in the Abrams? Or who makes the diesel option that other countries that are buying the Abrams from us want instead of the 3 gallons per mile (not a typo) gas turbine?

I'll give you a hint: it's not General Dynamics. They buy the engines that are already in production by a couple of major US manufacturers.
 
2012-10-10 10:28:41 AM

Arkanaut: ox45tallboy: Arkanaut: IMO globalization is a red herring -- it's not that difficult* to bring jobs back

Of course not. When you add in the cost of transportation, corporations don't save a huge amount of money by moving manufacturing overseas. If we built more infrastructure around manufacturing, companies could eliminate the management headaches of production facilities being halfway around the world, and create even more demand for their products by making sure more people could afford them.

But when mutual fund managers make that extra .02%, it translates directly into their own pocket, and makes a difference on whether their kid goes to Harvard or State U.

When one or two companies moves their manufacturing overseas, they make pretty well. When everyone does it, the whole system collapses because no one has customers who can afford their products anymore.

If you read the rest of my post, what I meant was that if we support worker's wages, particularly at the lower end, we can have the best of both worlds -- the fund managers can get that .02% and we can have workers who can feed their families. I think.


How would the fund managers get their .02% in this case? They move overseas because lower labor and regulatory compliance costs offset the higher costs of transportation, thus increasing profitability. Moving them back and making them pay their workers more won't help with that.
 
2012-10-10 10:28:48 AM

Epoch_Zero: The school system needs to be nationalized. It would solve a lot of problems.


Something just occurred to me... are you a fan of No Child Left Behind?
 
2012-10-10 10:28:50 AM
Also, we can afford 3 billion a year to keep building tanks but not 3 million a year to keep the Aquarius undersea Lab running. Nice math idiots. Jobs are more important than science though eh?
 
2012-10-10 10:29:35 AM

qorkfiend: The damage done by whackjobs on the Texas State Board of Education is mostly limited to Texas, so yes, I would prefer limiting the damage to one or two states instead of inflicting it on every state.


Bless your heart, you really believe that. Too bad it's not true.
 
2012-10-10 10:30:17 AM

TheGogmagog: Endrick: WAIT, I just got a brilliant idea
[hugereviews.com image 300x225]

They are already ahead of you see above:

Also forgot to add that while the original didn't have Free Speech Unit on it, it was brought to the Occupy Oakland (May 2012).


This cracks me up because I live in Oakland County (MI), so whenever someone says Oakland, I think that instead. And apparently Oakland county also has riot vehicles... to stop the poors from Detroit from coming north. So I've been told.

/Yes sir we do have more than enough asshats here
 
2012-10-10 10:30:33 AM

Philip Francis Queeg: qorkfiend: The damage done by whackjobs on the Texas State Board of Education is mostly limited to Texas, so yes, I would prefer limiting the damage to one or two states instead of inflicting it on every state.

Actually it isn't limited to Texas. Publishers don't want to make "Texas Only" versions of their text books, so they try to make the general versions fit the rules of Texas and other states as much as we they can. So kids in classes across the nation end up with text books that follow the requirements Texas sets.


There are other large, liberal states with sizable textbook markets. Texas isn't the only game in town.
 
2012-10-10 10:30:35 AM

qorkfiend: Epoch_Zero: Any better than Texas setting the national standards for textbooks, mandating that 'distasteful' scientific discoveries be omitted?

You're seriously conflating the large textbook market of Texas with giving Congress the legal power to set national education standards?


If it prevents racists and religious zealots from injecting fascism and outright lies into the textbooks that are used for the national standard, then perhaps it should be looked into. If Homeland Security can be created and instituted in such a short time, having such a demonstrative effect on our lives, perhaps the same method should be used to correct our educational systems.

"Some board members themselves acknowledged this morning that the process for revising curriculum standards in Texas is seriously broken, with politics and personal agendas dominating just about every decision," said Kathy Miller, president of the Texas Freedom Network, which advocates for religious freedom.

Republican Terri Leo, a member of the powerful Christian conservative voting bloc, called the standards "world class" and "exceptional."

Board members argued about the classification of historic periods (still B.C. and A.D., rather than B.C.E. and C.E.); whether students should be required to explain the origins of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and its impact on global politics (they will); and whether former Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir should be required learning (she will).

In addition to learning the Bill of Rights, the board specified a reference to the Second Amendment right to bear arms in a section about citizenship in a U.S. government class.
Conservatives beat back multiple attempts to include hip-hop as an example of a significant cultural movement.

Numerous attempts to add the names or references to important Hispanics throughout history also were denied, inducing one amendment that would specify that Tejanos died at the Alamo alongside Davy Crockett and Jim Bowie. Another amendment deleted a requirement that sociology students "explain how institutional racism is evident in American society."

Democrats did score a victory by deleting a portion of an amendment by Republican Don McLeroy suggesting that the civil rights movement led to "unrealistic expectations for equal outcomes."
 
2012-10-10 10:31:01 AM

Arkanaut: If you read the rest of my post, what I meant was that if we support worker's wages, particularly at the lower end, we can have the best of both worlds -- the fund managers can get that .02% and we can have workers who can feed their families. I think.


That's kind of what I meant, too. The increased profits due to increased sales which come as a result of more people having money to buy the product should make that .02% happen.
 
2012-10-10 10:32:34 AM

ox45tallboy: qorkfiend: The damage done by whackjobs on the Texas State Board of Education is mostly limited to Texas, so yes, I would prefer limiting the damage to one or two states instead of inflicting it on every state.

Bless your heart, you really believe that. Too bad it's not true.


You'll notice I said mostly, not entirely.

You think inflicting the Texas Board of Education on the entire country by Congressional mandate is a good idea. Why?
 
2012-10-10 10:33:54 AM

Epoch_Zero: If it prevents racists and religious zealots from injecting fascism and outright lies into the textbooks that are used for the national standard, then perhaps it should be looked into.


You honestly think giving Congress the power to set national education standards would prevent racists and religious zealots from injecting fascism and outright lies into the national standard? Seriously?
 
2012-10-10 10:35:27 AM

qorkfiend: ox45tallboy: qorkfiend: The damage done by whackjobs on the Texas State Board of Education is mostly limited to Texas, so yes, I would prefer limiting the damage to one or two states instead of inflicting it on every state.

Bless your heart, you really believe that. Too bad it's not true.

You'll notice I said mostly, not entirely.

You think inflicting the Texas Board of Education on the entire country by Congressional mandate is a good idea. Why?


Alright everyone. Let's back off and cool down. We all agree that nothing will work until the fundies are purged. So let's all take a Xanax and put any ideas about nationalized education on the back burner until the Grand Ole Party of Theofascism rights itself... or dies.
 
2012-10-10 10:37:12 AM

cptjeff: ladyfortuna: Tell you what, start selling the oldest ones at auction without the firing parts included. I'll be in the line somewhere to help rid you of the back stock...

There are ways to get surplus tanks.


Oblig:
You want a toe? I can get you a toe, believe me. There are ways, Dude. You don't wanna know about it, believe me. Hell, I can get you a toe by 3 o'clock this afternoon... with nail polish. These farking amateurs...
 
Displayed 50 of 306 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report