If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Computerworld)   Malware infections of Windows 7 at an all-time high with Service Pack 1 actually seeing the infection rates increase by up to 182%. Microsoft planning to release Win7 SP2 with Malware pre-installed to save time   (computerworld.com) divider line 105
    More: Asinine, Windows, malware, infections  
•       •       •

3433 clicks; posted to Geek » on 09 Oct 2012 at 2:58 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



105 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all
 
2012-10-09 04:58:02 PM

Rockstone: Linux



welcome to a Real Operating System. you won't ever miss Windblows.
 
2012-10-09 04:58:36 PM

cjoshuav: serial_crusher: I just don't like the full screen metro apps that you can't. farking. exit.

Shift-Tab to bring up the list of open metro apps on the left. Right-click the app snapshot and close it.


um, shift-tab already unindents my code. If there's a pref that changes that, I don't want to set it.
 
2012-10-09 04:59:35 PM
Windows 8 is the begining of the End for Monopoly$oft.

Linux and Open Source Software is the Future.

and Unix based MacOS X is kicking ass too.
 
2012-10-09 04:59:47 PM

DerAppie: Fark_Guy_Rob: Microsoft can give you an open system that runs anything....where stupid users will run 'Hot Chick 19 nude.jpg.exe' and they'll get infected with malware.

It doesn't help that windows insists on hiding extensions. Back when I still had to use DOS I learned what extensions were and double extensions aren't even considered for opening/downloading. People I help nowadays don't even know what I'm talking about when I tell them to go to a specific folder on the HDD.

/Always set windows to show extensions
//That shiat is useful so you don't have to name files things like "image_photoshop" "image_done"


Yah I grew careless about it myself a while back and then I was floored when someone took the time to make an song_I_wanted.mp3.exe with a winamp icon, usually I spot them easily as they set them to the WMP but that one actually got me, lesson learned for sure.
 
2012-10-09 05:00:18 PM

kid_icarus: Microsoft blamed several factors for the boost in successful malware attacks, including less savvy users.

I'm surprised they had the stones to say that.

/true, though



lots of cash tends to give people stones. temporary, though.
 
2012-10-09 05:02:29 PM

bob_ross: I just wish W7 had the snappiness that XP64 did. Still the fastest MS OS by far.



until you install Ubuntu or Mint Linux, then you discoveder XP wasn't so fast after all.

/used XP for several years and the biatch tended to slow down over time, even when i kept things defragged.

i miss defragging. ):
 
2012-10-09 05:05:45 PM

MusicMakeMyHeadPound: Fark_Guy_Rob: GoldDude: "Microsoft blamed several factors for the boost in successful malware attacks, including less savvy users."

Ahhh, back to the old "blame the customer". It couldn't be our software, it must be you.
Our software is getting better, it's just that computer users are getting stupider at a faster rate than our improvements.

You can't have your cake and eat it too.

Microsoft can give you a happy, secure, locked down computer environment....where they whitelist everything you can run (IE Windows Store) and forbid anything else (like Apple). Then people get all, 'OMG - M$ sucks'.

Microsoft can give you an open system that runs anything....where stupid users will run 'Hot Chick 19 nude.jpg.exe' and they'll get infected with malware.

Indeed.

And now for the interesting part: which of those two competing parties does Steve Ballmer think will give Microsoft the most money?

/the Linux nerds tried to warn you, but you were all like, "where did I put that Ogre-yelling jpeg?"



we tried to talk some sense into the Balmer fanboys but to no avail. and this comes from a user who used XP for serveral years until he found something alot better (and happened to be free too)
 
2012-10-09 05:07:53 PM

Tobin_Lam: Old enough to know better: I'm not sure I'd blame it totally on user stupidity. I'm very careful about where I visit, and have Spybot and MS Security Essentials running and somehow still had Babylon search work its way into my system. Thankfully its more annoying than harmful.

Every time I have to fix my in-law's computer I have to reinstall MSSE. I'm not quite sure what keeps happening to it. It doesn't help that they have XP.



put Linux Mint on that bad boy and the reinstalls go away. and your grannies can still point and click just like windows!
 
2012-10-09 05:09:14 PM

cman: belgianguy: Come to the Dark Side(not the Fruity Side, the other Dark Side)!

Someone had to do it.

/Ubuntu ftw
//A fork drenched in lemon juice is more eye-friendly than Windows 8

[i44.tinypic.com image 635x134]

Ubuntu has unity. Not as bad as metro, but still bad. Until Ubuntu gets rid of it I dont recommend it to anyone. However, Lubuntu is a great OS. If you want the ease of usage of classic Ubuntu then Lubuntu is the way to go.



yea, Unity is a bit much for me. I'm using Linux Mint (based on Ubuntu) with MATE desktop. Schweet. i have no interest in Unity.
 
2012-10-09 05:19:16 PM

serial_crusher: um, shift-tab already unindents my code. If there's a pref that changes that, I don't want to set it.


Sorry, just double-checked, it's Win-Tab.
 
2012-10-09 05:19:37 PM
Just shut up.
Please.
 
2012-10-09 05:20:48 PM

Linux_Yes: Rockstone: Linux


welcome to a Real Operating System. you won't ever miss Windblows.


Call me when I can play all of my FPSes at full performance level without having to switch between versions of Cedega and play whack-a-mole trying to figure out which obscure list of settings gives me, at best, 75% of the performance I would get running Win 7.

/For non-gaming computers I do prefer *nix though, strongly.
 
2012-10-09 05:27:36 PM

Linux_Yes: Windows 8 is the begining of the End for Monopoly$oft.

Linux and Open Source Software is the Future.

and Unix based MacOS X is kicking ass too.


You're kidding right? There are more PC running Windows 98 than all of Linux combined
 
2012-10-09 05:32:03 PM

Thudfark: iaazathot: It's really simple folks...

If something on the internet says it is free (games, coupons, recipes, quilting patterns, etc.) it is a good bet the site will infect your computer. People aren't registering domain names and setting up these pages just to give you shiat.

Fark, people are stupid.

Are free cats still kosher?


Only if you cook them properly.
 
2012-10-09 06:06:25 PM

kid_icarus: Microsoft blamed several factors for the boost in successful malware attacks, including less savvy users.

I'm surprised they had the stones to say that.

/true, though


Not neccessarily, I got the annoying FBI one over the weekend

/With Noton 360 which apparently doesn't do anything
//Had to download a free program to get rid of it
 
2012-10-09 06:20:41 PM
Linux_yes, curious, have you ever hackintoshed?
 
2012-10-09 06:26:49 PM

cman: Linux_yes, curious, have you ever hackintoshed?


Oh, I shoulda figured that'd be why this thread had 20 new posts but I only see three of them.

/yah right that persona would, it'd involve paying for something
 
2012-10-09 07:02:56 PM

Fark_Guy_Rob: Microsoft can give you a happy, secure, locked down computer environment....where they whitelist everything you can run (IE Windows Store) and forbid anything else (like Apple). Then people get all, 'OMG - M$ sucks'.


I eventually see Microsoft adopting the model that Android uses. By default, you are restricted to whitelisted applications that are purchased through their store. You could disable the restriction through the UAC panel, but you'd receive a warning by doing so.

Eventually I see ISPs being interested in which mode your desktop operates in. If you have whitelisting disabled, you're at greater risk of being infected and compromising their network. ISPs tend to get a little pissed when your desktop is participating in a sheer force DoS attack.

Honestly, I'm surprised residential ISPs haven't gotten to the point where you have to run a background agent that scans for malware. If you're clean, it'll build a VPN tunnel from that computer to an endpoint on the Internet. If you fail the malware check, you're restricted to local resources only. Make it also check to see if bridging or forwarding is enabled so a clean box can't act as a proxy for unchecked ones.
 
2012-10-09 07:07:14 PM
Sorry to mention the OS that shall not be named again...

Isn't the Linux repository a reasonable safe computing model for the average user? Being curated by a community instead of a corporation, users have the security of an App store without the corporate shenanigans..
 
2012-10-09 07:11:17 PM

Linux_Yes: Windows 8 is the begining of the End for Monopoly$oft.

Linux and Open Source Software is the Future.

and Unix based MacOS X is kicking ass too.


As much as I love Linux, at some point you have to realize: We've been saying this since WinME. I think you overestimate the average consumer.
 
2012-10-09 07:34:43 PM

belgianguy: cman: belgianguy: Come to the Dark Side(not the Fruity Side, the other Dark Side)!

Someone had to do it.

/Ubuntu ftw
//A fork drenched in lemon juice is more eye-friendly than Windows 8

[i44.tinypic.com image 635x134]

Ubuntu has unity. Not as bad as metro, but still bad. Until Ubuntu gets rid of it I dont recommend it to anyone. However, Lubuntu is a great OS. If you want the ease of usage of classic Ubuntu then Lubuntu is the way to go.

Have you tried Unity in its latest iterations? It sure sucked/bugged out in its earlier days, but nowadays I can get my (programming) work done quite well and it's become a second nature, the Dash integration was a nice touch, too.


Unity is better under 12.04, I have to admit. I didn't like it under earlier builds.

What belgianguy and some others don't seem to get is that you don't *have* to use Unity under Ubuntu, if you don't want to. First of all, you can run it in 2D or No Effects mode. Second, if you really hate Unity in all its incarnations, you can install and run other desks -- Gnome, KDE, Xfce, LDXE, Cinnamon, MATE, whatever you like.

The cool thing about Linux is that it's very highly modular, so you can mix and match compatible components however you like. (And if you're clever and knowledgeable, or know people who are, you can make practically anything compatible.) Want the well-vetted undercarriage of Ubuntu without the default desktop that a lot of people find annoying? Just pick a different one. Don't like how it's set up? Go into Tweak and mess around. (Be careful here: use a dummy Admin-level account to test settings, just in case you throw the wrong switch.)
 
2012-10-09 07:39:42 PM

Rockstone: cman: belgianguy: Come to the Dark Side(not the Fruity Side, the other Dark Side)!

Someone had to do it.

/Ubuntu ftw
//A fork drenched in lemon juice is more eye-friendly than Windows 8

[i44.tinypic.com image 635x134]

Ubuntu has unity. Not as bad as metro, but still bad. Until Ubuntu gets rid of it I dont recommend it to anyone. However, Lubuntu is a great OS. If you want the ease of usage of classic Ubuntu then Lubuntu is the way to go.

Linux Mint is what I'm using on my laptop. It's fast, and really, really nice.


Mint is definitely sweet, especially with Cinnamon, though MATE is fine with me, too. (I'm not married to any particular desk, ever since the heartbreak of Metacity becoming obsolete. And an old Slackware desk was especially awesome, too. *sniff*)

For those who don't know, Mint is a well-supported and very popular fork of Ubuntu, essentially Ubuntu without all the fancy-dancy Canonical widgets such as Unity. Basic, no-BS, solid OS. I highly recommend it. I routinely install it on older computers that I'm refurbing, because it's got a much smaller footprint than Ubuntu in memory. The better systems (faster) get Cinnamon; the slower ones get LXDE; everything else gets the default (currently MATE).

For really slow computers, I suggest Puppy.
 
2012-10-09 07:42:11 PM

Mitt Romneys Tax Return: Sorry to mention the OS that shall not be named again...

Isn't the Linux repository a reasonable safe computing model for the average user? Being curated by a community instead of a corporation, users have the security of an App store without the corporate shenanigans..


Oh it really is, I mean apart from the *really* random malicious injections that are quickly discovered I've trusted the apt-get/yum style method of installing software pretty implicitly over the years. its a veritable app store without as you say all the corporate shenanigans and I appreciate its one-stop-shop style nature when it comes to grabbing extensions to whichever linux de jour is being used. Unfortunately though I think its stability and trustedness largely stems from the OS's general unpopularity, if it ever got the install base of a microsoft OS that community would be in-veritably overwhelmed by the pure jungle of chaos that is so prevalent among the windows software ecosystem, ala say what happened when wikipedia became mainstream except its a little more grave since your OS isn't just a page you can close/ignore if its obviously feeding bad info.
 
2012-10-09 07:57:22 PM

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: belgianguy: cman: belgianguy: Come to the Dark Side(not the Fruity Side, the other Dark Side)!

Someone had to do it.

/Ubuntu ftw
//A fork drenched in lemon juice is more eye-friendly than Windows 8

[i44.tinypic.com image 635x134]

Ubuntu has unity. Not as bad as metro, but still bad. Until Ubuntu gets rid of it I dont recommend it to anyone. However, Lubuntu is a great OS. If you want the ease of usage of classic Ubuntu then Lubuntu is the way to go.

Have you tried Unity in its latest iterations? It sure sucked/bugged out in its earlier days, but nowadays I can get my (programming) work done quite well and it's become a second nature, the Dash integration was a nice touch, too.

Unity is better under 12.04, I have to admit. I didn't like it under earlier builds.

What belgianguy and some others don't seem to get...


Thanks for generalizing, but I do get it, I've experimented with XFCE and Gnome3, but didn't like it too much, had to revert an old PC to use Ubuntu Classic (now 2D) when the graphics card driver acted up. And Mint would be my second go-to OS if Ubuntu would start to lean too heavily towards tricks like the Amazon lens, I'd be right there with you.

But otherwise your arguments were sound and interesting.
 
2012-10-09 08:07:45 PM

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: belgianguy: cman: belgianguy: Come to the Dark Side(not the Fruity Side, the other Dark Side)!

Someone had to do it.

/Ubuntu ftw
//A fork drenched in lemon juice is more eye-friendly than Windows 8

[i44.tinypic.com image 635x134]

Ubuntu has unity. Not as bad as metro, but still bad. Until Ubuntu gets rid of it I dont recommend it to anyone. However, Lubuntu is a great OS. If you want the ease of usage of classic Ubuntu then Lubuntu is the way to go.

Have you tried Unity in its latest iterations? It sure sucked/bugged out in its earlier days, but nowadays I can get my (programming) work done quite well and it's become a second nature, the Dash integration was a nice touch, too.

Unity is better under 12.04, I have to admit. I didn't like it under earlier builds.

What belgianguy and some others don't seem to get is that you don't *have* to use Unity under Ubuntu, if you don't want to. First of all, you can run it in 2D or No Effects mode. Second, if you really hate Unity in all its incarnations, you can install and run other desks -- Gnome, KDE, Xfce, LDXE, Cinnamon, MATE, whatever you like.

The cool thing about Linux is that it's very highly modular, so you can mix and match compatible components however you like. (And if you're clever and knowledgeable, or know people who are, you can make practically anything compatible.) Want the well-vetted undercarriage of Ubuntu without the default desktop that a lot of people find annoying? Just pick a different one. Don't like how it's set up? Go into Tweak and mess around. (Be careful here: use a dummy Admin-level account to test settings, just in case you throw the wrong switch.)


That is not the issue. I have Cinnamon installed but I dont use it. LDXE is my fav desktop manager. It SCREAMS on any PC

There is only one problem I have with Ubuntu and their developers concerning Unity, and that is that I cannot move the farking launcher. Now, this may not seem like a big deal, but I am an OS X regular (hackintoshing and owning a real Mac), and aesthetics is important for me when it comes to the UI. The fact that not only do the developers not program it, they also are combating hacks for those who move it. There is no currenct hack to be able to move the launcher.

I am sorry, but if I wanted to be controlled by some emotionless group I would use OS X 24/7. I use Linux BECAUSE of its customizability, and the Ubuntu developers have taken a huge shiat on people like me.
 
2012-10-09 08:14:03 PM

cman: I cannot move the farking launcher


Of course you can. Just do some research, and you'll find loads of tips on how to do it. You can even go to a different desk and install Docky as a replacement, if you really want it be more like OSX.
 
2012-10-09 08:21:40 PM

meanmutton: GoldDude: "Microsoft blamed several factors for the boost in successful malware attacks, including less savvy users."

Frankly, I do blame the users. Have you seen how stupid most computer users are?


Friends and co-workers bring their PCs to me regularly to remove viruses or find out why the PCs are running slowly. Without exception their user accounts have admin access. The PCs running slowly have 2-4 virus checkers running at the same time. They also visit sites that have free iphones and kittens.. so .. I wouldn't call them stupid but they have NO IDEA about computers.
 
2012-10-09 08:27:07 PM

Linux_Yes: Windows 8 is the begining of the End for Monopoly$oft.

Linux and Open Source Software is the Future.

and Unix based MacOS X is kicking ass too.


I have been hearing that for over a decade.
 
2012-10-09 08:36:33 PM
I bet its mostly old people that get infected by malware. I know my boss doesn't know shiat about computers I wouldn't be surprised if his home PC is infected. All you need are 3 things.. ok 4.. 1. Adblock 2. Noscript or script blocking of some sort. 3. anti-virus 4. common sense.
 
2012-10-09 09:04:05 PM

Toy_Cop: I bet its mostly old people that get infected by malware. I know my boss doesn't know shiat about computers I wouldn't be surprised if his home PC is infected. All you need are 3 things.. ok 4.. 1. Adblock 2. Noscript or script blocking of some sort. 3. anti-virus 4. common sense.


frankcbishop.files.wordpress.com

/Spent years working as independent computer repair
//Knows of which the funny infobox speaks
 
2012-10-09 09:10:42 PM

likefunbutnot: Old enough to know better: I'm not sure I'd blame it totally on user stupidity. I'm very careful about where I visit, and have Spybot and MS Security Essentials running and somehow still had Babylon search work its way into my system. Thankfully its more annoying than harmful.

1. Security Essentials is AWESOME at missing threats. I know there are techs who swear by it and it does have a place (that place is small businesses or people who flat-out can't handle registering for Avast once a year), but it has become steadily less effective for detecting and removing threats since it was released.

2. The quick recipe for keeping your (home or small business) Windows computer safe online goes like this:
a. Block ads. I suggest using both hosts file blocking and browser-based blocking. This is far easier to do with Firefox or Chrome than other browsers. Adblock+ with the EasyList and Fanboy's List subscriptions is fairly comprehensive. As an aside to Farkers, Fanboy's list does include most adult ad services, so it's helpful for those of you who like teh pr0ns.
b. Use Spybot and SpywareBlaster immunizations. Keep Malwarebytes installed as well.
c. Uninstall Java entirely. If you actually need it for some legitimate reason, eventually something will get you to reinstall it, but right now Java is more of a malware vector than any other functional purpose.
d. Either keep Adobe Acrobat religiously up to date or uninstall it completely and replace it with Nitro, Foxit or Sumatra instead.
e. Allow your web browsers and Flash the opportunity to update on a fairly regular basis. If you're even close to up to date on those products, they all have silent updates now.
f. I strongly recommend the Free version of Avast Antivirus. The free version is far better than the pay version. I know that's weird. Trust me.
g. Just use the firewall that comes with Windows. Don't screw around with other firewalls. If you don't have any need to share folders or printers with other people on a net ...


Mbytes is bloated nowadays, use SAS.

I'm currently running a long term test with one of my rigs for MS:SE, I primarily use Eset NOD32. Going to toss on a fresh copy of NOD32 after a set amount of time to see what the missed detections are like...

Honestly, I haven't heard much in the way of verifiable information regarding the failures of MS:SE, just disgruntled techies who distrust MS products by default.
 
2012-10-09 10:26:59 PM
Linux_Yes: Windows 8 is the beginning of the End for Monopoly$oft. Linux and Open Source Software is the Future.

That's what you said about Windows Vista.

The biggest complaint about Windows 8, the lack of a traditional start menu, has mostly been resolved through third party utilities such as Start8 and Classic Shell. Even if Microsoft doesn't backtrack on their Metro start menu, it is trivial to do it yourself. Combined with low upgrade price of $40, I expect a lot of XP users to jump on it.

I don't see Windows 8 being a large success with corporate customers, so it'll probably be another lackluster release in that segment like Vista was. Depends a lot on how much Server 2012 is adopted.

As for open source being the future, I think you're absolutely right. As for GNU/Linux being a dominant desktop OS, not so much. Fragmentation in the GNU/Linux environment is wrecking havoc, especially when you consider the desktop environment wars between Gnome2/MATE, Gnome3, KDE3/Trinity, KDE4, and Xfce. Driver support will always be substandard because kernel devs often change the kern API in a passive-aggressive attempt to discourage closed binaries. If you're a hobbyist or in research, those aren't issues. For everyone else, it is.

Then you have the fact that there are millions of man hours invested in code for WinAPI under Visual Studio. It is extremely expensive to port it over to POSIX, GTK+ and Qt under GCC or Clang/LLVM. There are C/C++ WinAPI abstraction libraries such as WineLib and Wind/U, but they tend to have incomplete API coverage.

I also see companies dumping GPL licensed code and returning to BSD and MIT licensed code. That's really going to impact Linux, GNU and Hurd.

In the unlikely event that Windows does crash and burn to the point that it makes Microsoft weak, a more likely outcome than GNU/Linux or MacOS taking over is for some company, probably in China or India, releasing a Windows compatible OS built on BSD. They'll do for Windows what Apple did with Darwin.
 
2012-10-09 10:39:12 PM

iaazathot: It's really simple folks...

If something on the internet says it is free (games, coupons, recipes, quilting patterns, etc.) it is a good bet the site will infect your computer. People aren't registering domain names and setting up these pages just to give you shiat.


Then shouldn't you subscribe to Total Fark?
 
2012-10-09 11:55:35 PM

bob_ross: I just wish W7 had the snappiness that XP64 did. Still the fastest MS OS by far.


... Windows XP 64-Bit edition shouldn't be used as a superior product in comparison to anything.

Ever.

For any reason.

Anywhere.

By anyone.

Or anything.
 
2012-10-09 11:58:36 PM

Marine1: bob_ross: I just wish W7 had the snappiness that XP64 did. Still the fastest MS OS by far.

... Windows XP 64-Bit edition shouldn't be used as a superior product in comparison to anything.

Ever.

For any reason.

Anywhere.

By anyone.

Or anything.


This

XP64 was executed poorly and filled with extreme compatability issues.
 
2012-10-10 12:44:17 AM

cman: Marine1: bob_ross: I just wish W7 had the snappiness that XP64 did. Still the fastest MS OS by far.

... Windows XP 64-Bit edition shouldn't be used as a superior product in comparison to anything.

Ever.

For any reason.

Anywhere.

By anyone.

Or anything.

This

XP64 was executed poorly and filled with extreme compatability issues.


Have either of you actually used XP x64? This is the only complaint I ever hear about XP x64, and it almost always comes from people who either never used it, or used it once in the early days and got irritated that it didn't support the biatchin' webcam they'd been using since Windows 98.

Only problems I ever had for it were finding drivers, which cleared up once Vista launched, and dealing with programs that had hidden 16-bit components left over because the developers were lazy (I mean really, how f%$#ing long ago did we move to 32-bit OSes, people?). Beyond that it's a solid operating system, probably the most stable version of XP out there. The only compatibility issues it had are the same ones every 64-bit OS has.
 
2012-10-10 12:49:03 AM

yukichigai: cman: Marine1: bob_ross: I just wish W7 had the snappiness that XP64 did. Still the fastest MS OS by far.

... Windows XP 64-Bit edition shouldn't be used as a superior product in comparison to anything.

Ever.

For any reason.

Anywhere.

By anyone.

Or anything.

This

XP64 was executed poorly and filled with extreme compatability issues.

Have either of you actually used XP x64? This is the only complaint I ever hear about XP x64, and it almost always comes from people who either never used it, or used it once in the early days and got irritated that it didn't support the biatchin' webcam they'd been using since Windows 98.

Only problems I ever had for it were finding drivers, which cleared up once Vista launched, and dealing with programs that had hidden 16-bit components left over because the developers were lazy (I mean really, how f%$#ing long ago did we move to 32-bit OSes, people?). Beyond that it's a solid operating system, probably the most stable version of XP out there. The only compatibility issues it had are the same ones every 64-bit OS has.


Yes I did. In 2005 I bought a laptop with an Athalon 64 and it came with XP64. Drivers were impossible to find for many external USB devices. Hell, drivers in general were sparse because the user base was small for x64.
 
2012-10-10 01:05:40 AM

cman: XP64 was executed poorly and filled with extreme compatibility issues.


I disagree. XP x64 couldn't run Real Mode and 286 Protected Mode software, but neither could x64 editions of Vista or W7. Beyond that, I only found a couple of games that choked on XP x64 while working on W7 x64.

My problem with XP x64 was with device drivers. A lot of companies never released drivers for XP x64, but did release them for Vista x64. Printer drivers were often the worst to find while WiFi cards weren't far behind.

Software drivers were a pain for a long time, too. It took forever for ffdshow to release x64 versions of their DirectShow drivers. Same with Anti-Virus under x64. But that's another x64 in general issue and not one specific to XP x64. These days, it is a non-issue.
 
2012-10-10 01:10:25 AM

cman: Yes I did. In 2005 I bought a laptop with an Athalon 64 and it came with XP64. Drivers were impossible to find for many external USB devices. Hell, drivers in general were sparse because the user base was small for x64.


So... your complaint is that you were using a cutting-edge operating system that didn't have driver support, not from the publisher of the operating system, but from third-party manufacturers who were reluctant to write 64-bit compatible drivers until Vista launched a full year later (November of 2006). Is that right?

In other words, "the manufacturers of my devices hadn't written drivers for it yet, so it sucked", i.e. the same complaint I always hear? How exactly does that reflect on the OS itself?

Seems to me your complaint isn't with the OS itself so much as with the company you bought the laptop from. XP x64 was, at the time, meant to be used by early adopters who had hardware that was 64-bit compatible. These days that's not difficult at all (seriously, my laptop runs XP x64 and I have zero difficulty finding drivers), but in 2005 that was quite the task. No manufacturer should have been bundling XP x64 with any laptop or desktop by default back then.

Look at it this way: if you rented a car for you and your entire extended family to take a car trip in, and the rental company gave you a two-door compact, would you think it was a crappy car because your entire family had trouble fitting comfortably in it, or would you think the car rental company is staffed by asshats because they gave you a tiny-ass car to fit a bunch of people in?
 
2012-10-10 01:17:02 AM

yukichigai: cman: Yes I did. In 2005 I bought a laptop with an Athalon 64 and it came with XP64. Drivers were impossible to find for many external USB devices. Hell, drivers in general were sparse because the user base was small for x64.

So... your complaint is that you were using a cutting-edge operating system that didn't have driver support, not from the publisher of the operating system, but from third-party manufacturers who were reluctant to write 64-bit compatible drivers until Vista launched a full year later (November of 2006). Is that right?

In other words, "the manufacturers of my devices hadn't written drivers for it yet, so it sucked", i.e. the same complaint I always hear? How exactly does that reflect on the OS itself?

Seems to me your complaint isn't with the OS itself so much as with the company you bought the laptop from. XP x64 was, at the time, meant to be used by early adopters who had hardware that was 64-bit compatible. These days that's not difficult at all (seriously, my laptop runs XP x64 and I have zero difficulty finding drivers), but in 2005 that was quite the task. No manufacturer should have been bundling XP x64 with any laptop or desktop by default back then.

Look at it this way: if you rented a car for you and your entire extended family to take a car trip in, and the rental company gave you a two-door compact, would you think it was a crappy car because your entire family had trouble fitting comfortably in it, or would you think the car rental company is staffed by asshats because they gave you a tiny-ass car to fit a bunch of people in?


I stand corrected. I was unfair in my initial claims of xp64
 
2012-10-10 01:34:04 AM

yukichigai: Beyond that it's a solid operating system, probably the most stable version of XP out there.


It was the most stable version of Windows I've ever used. During the three years I used it, not once did I encounter a BSoD or a system freeze. I didn't have issues with system services or processes going berserk, either.

I've actually had more issues with Windows 7 x64. Windows Explorer freezes a couple times a month and needs to be restarted. The disk cache is more aggressive and likes to chew through my free physical memory faster. I also have issues connecting to my WiFi network, although that could just be a bug in the network driver.
 
2012-10-10 01:34:51 AM

cman: yukichigai: cman: Yes I did. In 2005 I bought a laptop with an Athalon 64 and it came with XP64. Drivers were impossible to find for many external USB devices. Hell, drivers in general were sparse because the user base was small for x64.

So... your complaint is that you were using a cutting-edge operating system that didn't have driver support, not from the publisher of the operating system, but from third-party manufacturers who were reluctant to write 64-bit compatible drivers until Vista launched a full year later (November of 2006). Is that right?

In other words, "the manufacturers of my devices hadn't written drivers for it yet, so it sucked", i.e. the same complaint I always hear? How exactly does that reflect on the OS itself?

Seems to me your complaint isn't with the OS itself so much as with the company you bought the laptop from. XP x64 was, at the time, meant to be used by early adopters who had hardware that was 64-bit compatible. These days that's not difficult at all (seriously, my laptop runs XP x64 and I have zero difficulty finding drivers), but in 2005 that was quite the task. No manufacturer should have been bundling XP x64 with any laptop or desktop by default back then.

Look at it this way: if you rented a car for you and your entire extended family to take a car trip in, and the rental company gave you a two-door compact, would you think it was a crappy car because your entire family had trouble fitting comfortably in it, or would you think the car rental company is staffed by asshats because they gave you a tiny-ass car to fit a bunch of people in?

I stand corrected. I was unfair in my initial claims of xp64


You Sir are entirely too rational for fark.

/^_^
 
2012-10-10 01:47:08 AM

Dinjiin: yukichigai: Beyond that it's a solid operating system, probably the most stable version of XP out there.

It was the most stable version of Windows I've ever used. During the three years I used it, not once did I encounter a BSoD or a system freeze. I didn't have issues with system services or processes going berserk, either.

I've actually had more issues with Windows 7 x64. Windows Explorer freezes a couple times a month and needs to be restarted. The disk cache is more aggressive and likes to chew through my free physical memory faster. I also have issues connecting to my WiFi network, although that could just be a bug in the network driver.


I have actually seen those problems with XP x64, but it wasn't until the OS had been installed for nearly two years before they began happening. x64 doesn't have it as bad, but it still seems to have the "OS corrupts itself after a while" problem every version of XP has, at least if you use it for anything but office work. Since I was using it for gaming, constant updates to video drivers and compatibility packs took their toll on it. Still, it took a WHILE, and wasn't that bad even when it started getting "unstable". I'm only now reinstalling the OS, some four years later.
 
2012-10-10 01:50:42 AM

yukichigai: cman: yukichigai: cman: Yes I did. In 2005 I bought a laptop with an Athalon 64 and it came with XP64. Drivers were impossible to find for many external USB devices. Hell, drivers in general were sparse because the user base was small for x64.

So... your complaint is that you were using a cutting-edge operating system that didn't have driver support, not from the publisher of the operating system, but from third-party manufacturers who were reluctant to write 64-bit compatible drivers until Vista launched a full year later (November of 2006). Is that right?

In other words, "the manufacturers of my devices hadn't written drivers for it yet, so it sucked", i.e. the same complaint I always hear? How exactly does that reflect on the OS itself?

Seems to me your complaint isn't with the OS itself so much as with the company you bought the laptop from. XP x64 was, at the time, meant to be used by early adopters who had hardware that was 64-bit compatible. These days that's not difficult at all (seriously, my laptop runs XP x64 and I have zero difficulty finding drivers), but in 2005 that was quite the task. No manufacturer should have been bundling XP x64 with any laptop or desktop by default back then.

Look at it this way: if you rented a car for you and your entire extended family to take a car trip in, and the rental company gave you a two-door compact, would you think it was a crappy car because your entire family had trouble fitting comfortably in it, or would you think the car rental company is staffed by asshats because they gave you a tiny-ass car to fit a bunch of people in?

I stand corrected. I was unfair in my initial claims of xp64

You Sir are entirely too rational for fark.

/^_^


Enjoy your free month of TF
 
2012-10-10 03:24:27 AM

cman: Enjoy your free month of TF


SqueEEEEEEE thank you. Been missing it a bit, what with finances being what they are. Goodbye boredom, hello even less productivity!

/Srsly thank you.
 
2012-10-10 03:25:33 AM

xynix: MusicMakeMyHeadPound: /growing up in the 90's

It's funny now to hear parents brag about how smart their kids are because they know what an IP address is. Seriously.. back in our day we literally had to program our way into computing platforms. I had to build my own computer from the group up. In 92 I got a hold of a few 500MB SCSI drives and took an old case, put the 4 of them in there, put the raid controller in my main computer, created a RAID 5 config and had my own array sitting next to my main box. 1.5 GIGS!!

Add to that .. everything was CLI.. we had to "copy con" our way into shiat.. make batch files to accomplish basic tasks.. etc.. Moving a mouse around and clicking an icon isn't computer savvy it's simply using a user friendly device to accomplish basic tasks.

/get off my lawn


Seriously. Kids these days don't need to fark around with IRQ settings. Or learn how to kick MS DOS into HIMEM. Or copy an IPX address without the benefit of copy-paste.

And all this without the benefit of Google or Wikipedia.

/man, it's kind of scary how much I've come to depend on Google and Wikipedia
//and deeply, deeply appreciate them
 
2012-10-10 07:56:49 AM

MusicMakeMyHeadPound: Seriously. Kids these days don't need to fark around with IRQ settings. Or learn how to kick MS DOS into HIMEM. Or copy an IPX address without the benefit of copy-paste.


I wish I did have to do that. And learn it. Although, we did have a fun Linux class instead. I think I got an 'A' in that.

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: For those who don't know, Mint is a well-supported and very popular fork of Ubuntu, essentially Ubuntu without all the fancy-dancy Canonical widgets such as Unity


I only got Mint because I want to avoid Ubuntu and it's suicidal tendencies (see- Amazon advertising in an otherwise free OS)

yukichigai: Linux_Yes: Rockstone: Linux


welcome to a Real Operating System. you won't ever miss Windblows.

Call me when I can play all of my FPSes at full performance level without having to switch between versions of Cedega and play whack-a-mole trying to figure out which obscure list of settings gives me, at best, 75% of the performance I would get running Win 7.

/For non-gaming computers I do prefer *nix though, strongly.


My feelings exactly. My gaming Desktop at home is using Windows 7, and I doubt that will change, at least not until Valve gets a good steam client out.

Windows_crest: You're kidding right? There are more PC running Windows 98 than all of Linux combined


Since when? I highly doubt this. [Citation needed]
 
2012-10-10 08:46:50 AM

cman: yukichigai: cman: Marine1: bob_ross: I just wish W7 had the snappiness that XP64 did. Still the fastest MS OS by far.

... Windows XP 64-Bit edition shouldn't be used as a superior product in comparison to anything.

Ever.

For any reason.

Anywhere.

By anyone.

Or anything.

This

XP64 was executed poorly and filled with extreme compatability issues.

Have either of you actually used XP x64? This is the only complaint I ever hear about XP x64, and it almost always comes from people who either never used it, or used it once in the early days and got irritated that it didn't support the biatchin' webcam they'd been using since Windows 98.

Only problems I ever had for it were finding drivers, which cleared up once Vista launched, and dealing with programs that had hidden 16-bit components left over because the developers were lazy (I mean really, how f%$#ing long ago did we move to 32-bit OSes, people?). Beyond that it's a solid operating system, probably the most stable version of XP out there. The only compatibility issues it had are the same ones every 64-bit OS has.

Yes I did. In 2005 I bought a laptop with an Athalon 64 and it came with XP64. Drivers were impossible to find for many external USB devices. Hell, drivers in general were sparse because the user base was small for x64.


After the decade-long 16>32-bit compatability debacle of the 9x era, 64-bit systems are designed to be backwards-compatible. As a result, 32-bit drivers and apps work under 64-bit OS. It's nice to have a 64-bit app or driver, and you'll get better performance if you do, but you don't really need it.
 
2012-10-10 08:52:34 AM

Dinjiin: yukichigai: Beyond that it's a solid operating system, probably the most stable version of XP out there.

It was the most stable version of Windows I've ever used. During the three years I used it, not once did I encounter a BSoD or a system freeze. I didn't have issues with system services or processes going berserk, either.

I've actually had more issues with Windows 7 x64. Windows Explorer freezes a couple times a month and needs to be restarted. The disk cache is more aggressive and likes to chew through my free physical memory faster. I also have issues connecting to my WiFi network, although that could just be a bug in the network driver.


I have to say -- not that it's even slightly relevant now -- that 3.11 was the most stable OS I've ever used. Never saw it crash even once in years of use. Some apps made for it were dogs, but the OS itself was rock solid. Useless junk by today's standards, but excellent by the standards of the time. So were the indestructible, no-BS printers HP was still making at the time, and the two together were unstoppable.
 
2012-10-10 08:55:55 AM

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: After the decade-long 16>32-bit compatability debacle of the 9x era, 64-bit systems are designed to be backwards-compatible. As a result, 32-bit drivers and apps work under 64-bit OS. It's nice to have a 64-bit app or driver, and you'll get better performance if you do, but you don't really need it.


Er.. unless I'm missing something, and this is an issue specific to XPx64, which I never used.
 
Displayed 50 of 105 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report