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(Wired)   Happy 50th birthday, visible light LED. Here's to all the people who said you'd never work and would be of no use   (wired.com) divider line 36
    More: Cool, Bell Labs, LEDs, Reader's Digest, incandescent light bulb, celebrations  
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10545 clicks; posted to Main » on 09 Oct 2012 at 3:25 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Archived thread
2012-10-09 01:35:08 PM
5 votes:
I hate hate hate hate hate hate hate bright blue LEDs that seem to be in everything.
2012-10-09 04:29:52 PM
3 votes:

jfarkinB: olddeegee: At the end of "Goldfinger" the Ft. Knox nuclear bomb ticks down and is stopped by Bond at 007. Was that a simple LED display? Within a year of it's invention?

No, those looked like Nixie tubes -- basically a neon bulb with ten electrodes, one for each digit. But looking more closely now at a movie still, it almost looks like a fiber-optic arrangement with incandescent light:

[007.graphicallstars.com image 690x300]

I think the individual dots are too small to be individual "grain-of-wheat" incandescent bulbs. I'll have to look into this a little more.

/lighting geek


Look at the bottom of this page.

www.electricstuff.co.uk 

They are sheets of edge-lit glass with dimples in them.
2012-10-09 04:16:45 PM
3 votes:

olddeegee: At the end of "Goldfinger" the Ft. Knox nuclear bomb ticks down and is stopped by Bond at 007. Was that a simple LED display? Within a year of it's invention?


No, those looked like Nixie tubes -- basically a neon bulb with ten electrodes, one for each digit. But looking more closely now at a movie still, it almost looks like a fiber-optic arrangement with incandescent light:

007.graphicallstars.com

I think the individual dots are too small to be individual "grain-of-wheat" incandescent bulbs. I'll have to look into this a little more.

/lighting geek
2012-10-09 01:19:05 PM
3 votes:
You heathens celebrating Satan's light should burn in hell. I go to sleep by the burning carbon monofilament of Thomas Alvin Edison's light bulb the way God intended like any good American who had the sense to stock up on them before Obammy's Commie EPA banned them.
2012-10-09 09:20:59 PM
2 votes:

No love?


spookyshobbyshop.com
2012-10-09 07:57:09 PM
2 votes:
After years of working with stage lighting that uses expensive lamps that brown out, I just about teared up when I got to design a show with an entire rig (36) of these babies.

conceptcompletion.co.uk
2012-10-09 07:26:48 PM
2 votes:

EngineerAU: LED Christmas lights are interesting because for indoor use in a cold climate, I don't see the point. The energy "wasted" on the old lights helped heat the space they were in so are the LEDs really more efficient? It's nice in Georgia to not have a bunch of light bulbs around the house throwing out heat the eight or nine air conditioning months of the year but for lights used only in December, LEDs seem like the wrong tool.


1. A heat source next to a combustible, drying tree is not the best idea.

2. It's not just the amount of heat, it's the spatial distribution of the heat that matters.

3. Resistive electric heating is a very expensive way to heat the home. If I absolutely had to use an electric system for my home (e.g. if gas somehow became unavailable), I would use the electricity to run a geothermal heat pump, I wouldn't use resistive heating.
2012-10-09 04:33:33 PM
2 votes:
When do light bulbs simply go away? Even if LEDs don't live up to their fifty year lifespan, something that lasts twenty five years doesn't really need to be removable. In our age of constant decor remodels, it's likely that a light fixture will be taken out of service before the LEDs give out. No doubt light bulbs will continue to exist but over time they should become a specialty item rather than something you can buy at the corner gas station.

It'll be interesting to see how lighting design changes. Will we have lamps in which there is no bulb at the top but instead hundreds (thousands?) of tiny LEDs embedded into the lamp shade? Will that form simply go away with LEDs becoming parts of the wall or ceiling or even the flooring? If the price per lumen continues to drop like it has been, things are going to get very interesting.
2012-10-09 03:54:56 PM
2 votes:

Wook: Rapmaster2000: The libs want us to put all of these LED bulbs in our houses, but did you know that there's more Gallium Arsenide in a single LED than there was on the entire Hindenburg!?

It's true. Look it up.

[o.onionstatic.com image 630x441]

Speaking of which, I worked for a German MOCVD company which designed tooling for GaAs deposition for use in LED manufacturing. The customers (producers of LEDs) were in China. Meanwhile, here in the US Obama's pitching Solar (which we all (in the industry) knew 4 years ago it was total bullshiat). Now we will be giving US dollars to China, which also made Germany rich. Bush's fault? I think not.


So, you're asking why didn't Obama subsidize the manufacture of cheap, low-margin semiconductor parts? You may be shocked to know that NOBODY in a first world nation is going to subsidize the manufacture of cheap, low-margin semiconductor parts. There's a reason MOCVD sells the tooling from Germany and doesn't build the parts themselves, and it's not the stupid libtard policies of Angela Merkel.
2012-10-09 03:49:41 PM
2 votes:
As opposed to infrared LED's in all your remote controls. farking morons, harping on and on about that visible quip.

And I hear people quivering about "oh, we don't really understand quantum mechanics" I break out my iPhone and wave it at them while saying "Look at that, BILLIONS OF QUANTUM MECHANICAL DEVICES MARCHING TO MY ORDER!" Yes, LED's and transistors are quantum devices and we do know how they work.
2012-10-09 03:48:53 PM
2 votes:
farm7.static.flickr.com

Ah, LED porn
2012-10-09 03:40:44 PM
2 votes:

AugieDoggyDaddy: dittybopper: Meh. You know what's more impressive? A light emitting resistor.

An LER? They've been around for ever. They only work for a fraction of a second before the magic smoke leaks out.


What an "LER" might look like:
upload.wikimedia.org
2012-10-09 02:45:35 PM
2 votes:

choo: A visible light LED is just like an ATM machine, amiright?


Not in this case. "Visible light" refers to the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum, so saying "visible light light emitting diode" is perfectly cromulent.
2012-10-09 01:27:16 PM
2 votes:

ginandbacon: Could not possibly be a bigger fan of any single technology.


Not even the Fleshlight?
2012-10-09 09:02:21 PM
1 votes:

Quantum Apostrophe: It's surprising how little has changed in the last few decades.


Quantum Apostrophe: A computer? No chance.


Huh? Modern computing is a really farking big thing that's changed since the 50's. Have somebody from the 50's walk down the street of a major city, and see everybody with their face buried in a smartphone. Show them doctors tapping on iPads in the hospital. Have them play a video game.

Yes, there are a lot of mature technologies that look similar, but I wouldn't trust a 50's mechanic to work on a modern car. Pull up in a Volt, or even just a prius, and watch the poor guy cry. A 50's airline pilot would probably be confounded by the cockpit of a 787. Show an engineer from 1950's corning the glass we're using for iPhones, and they'd weep with joy. Show one of the guys working on Explorer 1 the communications satellites we're throwing up on a routine basis. Show him a space shuttle, built with 70's tech and now sitting retired in a museum.

The strides we've made since the 50's are not particularly small.
2012-10-09 08:27:12 PM
1 votes:

SafetyThird: Quantum Apostrophe: SafetyThird: Quantum Apostrophe:

TotallyHeadless: LEDs are old, Plasma Lighting is the future.

Yes, like EL lighting was the future in the 1950s...

They had ElectroLuminescent wire in the 50's? I love EL wire ... and LEDs, of course.

Dunno about "wire" but they had EL dashboards in 1960.

[lh3.googleusercontent.com image 512x345]

EL was also supposed to light up homes.

Well, would ya look at that. I thought it was a much newer technology.

EL panels are lighting up homes. Sorta. I had a couple EL panel night lights. You could see them in the dark but their ability to, say, illuminate anything more than a few inches from it was poor.

Still great for costumes and decorations.


It's surprising how little has changed in the last few decades. We've gotten better at representing bits using less and less energy, and we've gotten better at making smaller and smaller containers for said bits. Everything else, we're just coasting along, improving a few % here, a few % there. That's not to say it's easy, squeezing a few % more efficiency out of a jet turbine is no small feat. 

Show a modern high bypass turbine to a person from the 1950s, they'll recognize it. A computer? No chance.
2012-10-09 08:11:38 PM
1 votes:

Sum Dum Gai: 3. Resistive electric heating is a very expensive way to heat the home. If I absolutely had to use an electric system for my home (e.g. if gas somehow became unavailable), I would use the electricity to run a geothermal heat pump, I wouldn't use resistive heating.


I used to think that electric resistance was the least efficient way to heat a home, since it has a COP of about 0.99

After years on Fark, I've learned that a fair number of misguided people think it's smart to use incandescents to heat a home. Their COP is about 10% less than the *least* cost effective form of traditional heating. You'll get 3070 BTU (~1/4 ton) for every 1,000 watts worth of bulbs, without proper distribution of the generated heat. In contrast, a heat-pump heats my house with electricity at nearly 4x's the efficiency @ 12,000 BTU (1 ton), using 1,000 watts. My lighting comes from LED.

Which is a large reason why my utility owes me $5 this month, and I haven't paid for electricity since June. Amazing what 21st technology can do.
2012-10-09 05:27:20 PM
1 votes:

SuperT: SuperT: AugieDoggyDaddy: dittybopper: Meh. You know what's more impressive? A light emitting resistor.

An LER? They've been around for ever. They only work for a fraction of a second before the magic smoke leaks out.

I see what you did there. I lol'd.

wait, aren't regular lightbulbs light emitting resistors?


Truth be told, they're more like light emitting thermistors.
2012-10-09 04:48:45 PM
1 votes:

The All-Powerful Atheismo: theorellior: The All-Powerful Atheismo: To claim that "solar is total bullshiat" remains just as retarded as it ever was no matter what companies you cite that have gone out of business.

But sochalest death panels libtard islamofascism!

"Merrill Lynch, Wachovia, Bear Stearns, AIG. MONEY IS TOTAL BULLSHIAT"


This could be fun.

Cars are total bullshiat! Tucker, Packard, Geo, Plymouth, AMC, Overland, Hummer, Nash, Oldsmobile, Studebaker.

Airlines are total bullshiat! Aloha Airlines, Arrow Air, Big Sky Airlines, PanAm, TWA,
2012-10-09 04:39:50 PM
1 votes:

EngineerAU: When do light bulbs simply go away? Even if LEDs don't live up to their fifty year lifespan, something that lasts twenty five years doesn't really need to be removable. In our age of constant decor remodels, it's likely that a light fixture will be taken out of service before the LEDs give out. No doubt light bulbs will continue to exist but over time they should become a specialty item rather than something you can buy at the corner gas station.

It'll be interesting to see how lighting design changes. Will we have lamps in which there is no bulb at the top but instead hundreds (thousands?) of tiny LEDs embedded into the lamp shade? Will that form simply go away with LEDs becoming parts of the wall or ceiling or even the flooring? If the price per lumen continues to drop like it has been, things are going to get very interesting.


I like your thinking. If the bulbs last longer than fashion, why would you even have user serviceable lamps.
2012-10-09 04:30:42 PM
1 votes:

IrateShadow: jfarkinB: I think the individual dots are too small to be individual "grain-of-wheat" incandescent bulbs. I'll have to look into this a little more.

/lighting geek

I looks like it could be some sort of shutter system with a shared backlight, but that seems like it would be ridiculously over-engineered for a timer display.


Nevermind. The wiki talk page for nixie tubes says that the Goldfinger timer was made from edge-lit lightguide readouts.
2012-10-09 04:24:32 PM
1 votes:
LED Christmas lights are awful


/There, I said it
2012-10-09 04:16:15 PM
1 votes:

olddeegee: Question:

At the end of "Goldfinger" the Ft. Knox nuclear bomb ticks down and is stopped by Bond at 007. Was that a simple LED display? Within a year of it's invention?


Re-replying because I found your answer.

Nixie tubes. Awesomest retro device ever.
2012-10-09 04:14:27 PM
1 votes:
2012-10-09 03:56:12 PM
1 votes:
Question:

At the end of "Goldfinger" the Ft. Knox nuclear bomb ticks down and is stopped by Bond at 007. Was that a simple LED display? Within a year of it's invention?
2012-10-09 03:55:44 PM
1 votes:

The All-Powerful Atheismo: Wook: Rapmaster2000: The libs want us to put all of these LED bulbs in our houses, but did you know that there's more Gallium Arsenide in a single LED than there was on the entire Hindenburg!?

It's true. Look it up.

[o.onionstatic.com image 630x441]

Speaking of which, I worked for a German MOCVD company which designed tooling for GaAs deposition for use in LED manufacturing. The customers (producers of LEDs) were in China. Meanwhile, here in the US Obama's pitching Solar (which we all (in the industry) knew 4 years ago it was total bullshiat). Now we will be giving US dollars to China, which also made Germany rich. Bush's fault? I think not.

Wharrgarbl

China is investing more heavily and successfully in solar than we are, and succeeding quite well. They've managed to make single junction panels quite cheap.

I know. I was there.




Funny, I was a semiconductor process engineer for 10 years. Our company folded about 2 years ago. I went into Defense. Approximately 7 of my research colleagues took jobs in Solar. Only one of them is currently working. All of the other Solar companies have folded. Solar is good assuming you have cheap labor. Manufacturing in the US is expensive. Excessive regulations and Unions don't help either.

Keep your Wharrgarbl to yourself Sonny, the world ain't unicorns and rainbows!
2012-10-09 03:46:32 PM
1 votes:

IrateShadow: Ivo Shandor: They'll go away eventually, once the novelty wears off. Blue LEDs used to be one of those mythical* items that you would tell the new kid to find, like a left-handed screwdriver or a 1-farad capacitor. Engineers are still getting over the fact that they actually exist now.

That was like 10 years ago. Tech moves fast enough that they should be old hat by now. What bothers me is that everything these days is ultrabright and packaged in clear resin. I miss the old low-medium intensity packaged in colored & frosted resin. They were much more useful as indicators.


Hah -- you'll know your equipment is powered on when your retina has a hole burned into it from the indicator lamp.
2012-10-09 03:46:28 PM
1 votes:

Rapmaster2000: The libs want us to put all of these LED bulbs in our houses, but did you know that there's more Gallium Arsenide in a single LED than there was on the entire Hindenburg!?

It's true. Look it up.

[o.onionstatic.com image 630x441]


Speaking of which, I worked for a German MOCVD company which designed tooling for GaAs deposition for use in LED manufacturing. The customers (producers of LEDs) were in China. Meanwhile, here in the US Obama's pitching Solar (which we all (in the industry) knew 4 years ago it was total bullshiat). Now we will be giving US dollars to China, which also made Germany rich. Bush's fault? I think not.
2012-10-09 03:44:02 PM
1 votes:

Ivo Shandor: They'll go away eventually, once the novelty wears off. Blue LEDs used to be one of those mythical* items that you would tell the new kid to find, like a left-handed screwdriver or a 1-farad capacitor. Engineers are still getting over the fact that they actually exist now.


That was like 10 years ago. Tech moves fast enough that they should be old hat by now. What bothers me is that everything these days is ultrabright and packaged in clear resin. I miss the old low-medium intensity packaged in colored & frosted resin. They were much more useful as indicators.
2012-10-09 03:41:52 PM
1 votes:
I work for a sign company. LEDs have basically replaced Neon other than a few limited applications. Every year they get cheaper and brighter.
2012-10-09 03:36:28 PM
1 votes:

dittybopper: Meh. You know what's more impressive? A light emitting resistor.


An LER? They've been around for ever. They only work for a fraction of a second before the magic smoke leaks out.
2012-10-09 03:32:58 PM
1 votes:

dittybopper: Meh. You know what's more impressive? A light emitting resistor.


I prefer the smoke-emitting diode.
2012-10-09 02:51:23 PM
1 votes:
Meh. You know what's more impressive? A light emitting resistor.
2012-10-09 02:33:47 PM
1 votes:
A visible light LED is just like an ATM machine, amiright?
2012-10-09 01:26:41 PM
1 votes:
Full-spectrum led lights = happy plants, happy people...
2012-10-09 01:15:17 PM
1 votes:
Could not possibly be a bigger fan of any single technology.
 
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