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(Phys Org2)   Voyager 1 may have punched out of the solar system   (phys.org) divider line 140
    More: Spiffy, Voyager, solar system, interstellar space, magnetic fields, protons, key signing, cosmic rays  
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7367 clicks; posted to Geek » on 09 Oct 2012 at 2:12 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-09 11:55:24 AM
As someone who watched Star Trek 1 last night this prospect terrifies me.
 
2012-10-09 12:02:04 PM
It's mind-boggling that it's taken it 35 years to do so, travelling at warp speed. I don't think the human brain can even conceive of distance on that scale.
 
2012-10-09 12:03:03 PM

kid_icarus: travelling at warp speed


Qua?
 
2012-10-09 12:47:35 PM

tyguy101aa: As someone who watched Star Trek 1 last night this prospect terrifies me.


Why? We get at least one very attractive space chick for our troubles. Sure, they may be a precursor to the Borg, but that's non-canon anyway. ;)
 
2012-10-09 12:48:43 PM
Bon Voyage, Voyager 1. See you when you come back as V'ger.
 
2012-10-09 12:49:12 PM

kid_icarus: It's mind-boggling that it's taken it 35 years to do so, travelling at warp speed. I don't think the human brain can even conceive of distance on that scale.


upload.wikimedia.org


Don't we wish.

/no, really, we do
 
2012-10-09 12:49:17 PM

kid_icarus: It's mind-boggling that it's taken it 35 years to do so, travelling at warp speed. I don't think the human brain can even conceive of distance on that scale.


I can conceive of it. It's outside my normal existence, but certainly I can understand the vast distances involved intuitively through math.
 
2012-10-09 12:49:49 PM

RexTalionis: Bon Voyage, Voyager 1. See you when you come back as V'ger.


I can't not pronounce it in my head any other way.
 
2012-10-09 12:50:17 PM
I just hope that we can still communicate with it somehow. It would be a shame for it to finally get out there, then not be able to tell us what's it's "seeing".
 
2012-10-09 12:57:48 PM

Grand_Moff_Joseph: I just hope that we can still communicate with it somehow. It would be a shame for it to finally get out there, then not be able to tell us what's it's "seeing".



It breaks through, and all it finds is a constant transmission of Yackety Sax.
 
2012-10-09 12:59:29 PM

tyguy101aa: As someone who watched stayed awake through Star Trek 1 last night this prospect terrifies me.


Congrats
 
2012-10-09 01:02:30 PM

Blues_X: Grand_Moff_Joseph: I just hope that we can still communicate with it somehow. It would be a shame for it to finally get out there, then not be able to tell us what's it's "seeing".


It breaks through, and all it finds is a constant transmission of Yackety Sax.


LOL. For even more lulz though, what if it was picked up by Q? :D
 
2012-10-09 01:26:53 PM
I'm no physicist, but why would there be a "sudden" drop in photons striking Voyager? There's some sort of barrier out there where protons turn around and come back or are blocked? What I mean is, I should think it's a steady decline in photons at that distance; the only difference between September and October is that Voyager is a little farther away, right?

Shouldn't a graph show a line declining from the upper left to the lower right, without a sudden drop?
 
2012-10-09 01:34:48 PM

Grand_Moff_Joseph: I just hope that we can still communicate with it somehow. It would be a shame for it to finally get out there, then not be able to tell us what's it's "seeing".


We think it won't be seeing anything, because, as far as we know, it's very empty out there. But what if it sends back data showing stuff* we don't know about. That would be awesome.

*particles or radiation, not LGM's
 
2012-10-09 01:56:31 PM

gopher321: I'm no physicist, but why would there be a "sudden" drop in photons striking Voyager? There's some sort of barrier out there where protons turn around and come back or are blocked? What I mean is, I should think it's a steady decline in photons at that distance; the only difference between September and October is that Voyager is a little farther away, right?

Shouldn't a graph show a line declining from the upper left to the lower right, without a sudden drop?


It's at the point where the solar wind of our star and the solar winds of the galaxy meet and then cancel each other out.

www.scifiideas.com
 
2012-10-09 01:59:15 PM

gopher321: I'm no physicist, but why would there be a "sudden" drop in photons striking Voyager? There's some sort of barrier out there where protons turn around and come back or are blocked? What I mean is, I should think it's a steady decline in photons at that distance; the only difference between September and October is that Voyager is a little farther away, right?

Shouldn't a graph show a line declining from the upper left to the lower right, without a sudden drop?


Heliosphere -- Basically, beyond a certain point the solar wind hits an equilibrium pressure against the radiation and particles from interstellar space, so particles from the solar wind can't move beyond that point. So, inside the heliosphere particles from the solar wind strike Voyager, but outside it they don't.

This is evidence that Voyager has moved beyond the heliosphere and is now in interstellar space.
 
2012-10-09 02:14:15 PM
24.media.tumblr.com
 
2012-10-09 02:19:59 PM
This is very cool. How fast is that little bugger traveling these days, anyway??
 
2012-10-09 02:21:40 PM

Grand_Moff_Joseph: I just hope that we can still communicate with it somehow. It would be a shame for it to finally get out there, then not be able to tell us what's it's "seeing".


It is my understanding that it's full of stars.
 
2012-10-09 02:22:30 PM
Call me when it passes through the Oort cloud.
 
2012-10-09 02:25:02 PM
Will I dream?
 
2012-10-09 02:25:14 PM

Grither: This is very cool. How fast is that little bugger traveling these days, anyway??


A little over 35,000mph, or a little over 10 miles a second. Nothing we've ever made has gone faster as far as I know.
 
2012-10-09 02:26:20 PM

theurge14: Grither: This is very cool. How fast is that little bugger traveling these days, anyway??

A little over 35,000mph, or a little over 10 miles a second. Nothing we've ever made has gone faster as far as I know.


Oh and it got that fast by the Saturn and Titan gravity assists back in 1980.
 
2012-10-09 02:26:58 PM

Tyrosine: Call me when it passes through the Oort cloud.


I hope you're eating right and exercising. And a vampire.
 
2012-10-09 02:29:44 PM
Godspeed, little spacecraft.

Reading about Voyager during middle school is what got me addicted to science as a child. I'll always appreciate it.
 
2012-10-09 02:33:05 PM
I hate to be "that guy", but don't we get this story every couple of months around these parts?
 
2012-10-09 02:36:12 PM

Sybarite: tyguy101aa: As someone who watched stayed awake through Star Trek 1 last night this prospect terrifies me.

Congrats


It was on amazon video and I watched it in bed on my ipad to put me to sleep, so technically......
 
2012-10-09 02:37:05 PM

theurge14: Grither: This is very cool. How fast is that little bugger traveling these days, anyway??

A little over 35,000mph, or a little over 10 miles a second. Nothing we've ever made has gone faster as far as I know.


Except for a manhole cover which did an estimated 45 miles per second in 1957.
 
2012-10-09 02:39:33 PM

theurge14: A little over 35,000mph, or a little over 10 miles a second. Nothing we've ever made has gone faster as far as I know.


Almost. The two Helios probes from the 70s went (and still go, though now silently) about 5x that fast when they make their quick dip inside the orbital distance of Mercury. They then bounce out to Earth-orbit-distance in a 3-year elliptical orbit.

Using gravitational slingshots, even just using Jupiter, we could certainly fling something out much faster than the Voyager probes. But, the extrasolar mission wasn't really the core of the project.
 
2012-10-09 02:40:03 PM

meanmutton: I hate to be "that guy", but don't we get this story every couple of months around these parts?


Did you see the graph? They've been getting weird spikes in the data every couple months, so maybe there's some kind of correlation with articles being posted.
 
2012-10-09 02:41:15 PM

xynix: gopher321: I'm no physicist, but why would there be a "sudden" drop in photons striking Voyager? There's some sort of barrier out there where protons turn around and come back or are blocked? What I mean is, I should think it's a steady decline in photons at that distance; the only difference between September and October is that Voyager is a little farther away, right?

Shouldn't a graph show a line declining from the upper left to the lower right, without a sudden drop?

It's at the point where the solar wind of our star and the solar winds of the galaxy meet and then cancel each other out.

[www.scifiideas.com image 678x428]


That image is actually out of date now, although still mostly relevant for Voyager and similar to some star systems, just not ours. Results in the last few years have determined that our system may have no bow shock, as the sun is not moving quickly enough through interstellar space. As a result, there is also no tail behind it, and the system is more of a spherical bubble. This image still includes the bow shock, but otherwise has the updated model

photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA12375
 
2012-10-09 02:41:34 PM
"no official word from NASA on this"
NASA's bummed that the proton sensor broke.
 
2012-10-09 02:42:13 PM

theorellior: meanmutton: I hate to be "that guy", but don't we get this story every couple of months around these parts?

Did you see the graph? They've been getting weird spikes in the data every couple months, so maybe there's some kind of correlation with articles being posted.


Hmm... graph didn't pop up when I went to the site. Stupid DNS issues on my end, probably. That would make sense, though.
 
2012-10-09 02:44:55 PM

gopher321: I'm no physicist, but why would there be a "sudden" drop in photons striking Voyager? There's some sort of barrier out there where protons turn around and come back or are blocked? What I mean is, I should think it's a steady decline in photons at that distance; the only difference between September and October is that Voyager is a little farther away, right?

Shouldn't a graph show a line declining from the upper left to the lower right, without a sudden drop?


You said photons twice. You must like photons.
 
2012-10-09 02:45:14 PM

theurge14: Grither: This is very cool. How fast is that little bugger traveling these days, anyway??

A little over 35,000mph, or a little over 10 miles a second. Nothing we've ever made has gone faster as far as I know.


Helios 2 in 1976, went 157,078 mi/h or 43.63 mi/s.
 
2012-10-09 02:49:20 PM

Relatively Obscure: Tyrosine: Call me when it passes through the Oort cloud.

I hope you're eating right and exercising. And a vampire.


Nope, nope and nope, so it better hurry
 
2012-10-09 02:49:51 PM

theurge14: theurge14: Grither: This is very cool. How fast is that little bugger traveling these days, anyway??

A little over 35,000mph, or a little over 10 miles a second. Nothing we've ever made has gone faster as far as I know.

Oh and it got that fast by the Saturn and Titan gravity assists back in 1980.


new horizions was going 21km/s after it's jupiter assist.. that's like... 47K mp/h, it has since slowed to ~16km/s which is ~39k mp/h.

It is the fastest thing we have ever thrown.
 
2012-10-09 02:53:22 PM
shiat, disregard what I said, I forgot about helios. I fail.

new horizons is the fastest *still working* thing we have thrown. (I'm pretty sure on that one)
 
2012-10-09 02:54:53 PM
I was hoping we would see something more interesting happeneing. :-(

www.scifireaders.net

/Sick of this boundary between the Slow Zone and the Unthinking Depths...
//Obscure?
///Yes, I know it's not the perfect analogy.
 
2012-10-09 02:56:22 PM
Grither

This is very cool. How fast is that little bugger traveling these days, anyway??

I was wondering the same thing. Best I could find from NASA was this:
Traveling at speeds of over 35,000 miles per hour, it will take the Voyagers nearly 40,000 years, and they will have traveled a distance of about two light years to reach this rather indistinct boundary.

*the "boundary referred to is the Ort cloud.
 
2012-10-09 02:56:56 PM
V'ger... expects an answer.

2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-10-09 02:57:13 PM
As someone who isn't smart enough to understand all the science, but smart enough to know this is awesome, well, this is awesome. Looking forward to seeing what sort of data NASA gets back.
 
2012-10-09 03:01:02 PM
Exactly how cold would space feel to Voyager 1 and will temperature have an effect on its durability?
 
2012-10-09 03:02:35 PM

Rising_Zan_Samurai_Gunman: That image is actually out of date now, although still mostly relevant for Voyager and similar to some star systems, just not ours. Results in the last few years have determined that our system may have no bow shock, as the sun is not moving quickly enough through interstellar space. As a result, there is also no tail behind it, and the system is more of a spherical bubble. This image still includes the bow shock, but otherwise has the updated model


Isn't that just farking badass? Maybe I'm just a geek but dammit I get exciting when thinking about us hurling through interstellar space on a rock. Even if our star is kinda slow...
 
2012-10-09 03:04:03 PM

SlothB77: Exactly how cold would space feel to Voyager 1 and will temperature have an effect on its durability?


Ah, SlothB77, my old friend, do you know the Klingon proverb that tells us revenge is a dish that is best served cold?

(pause)

It is very cold in space.
 
2012-10-09 03:04:33 PM

dittybopper: kid_icarus: It's mind-boggling that it's taken it 35 years to do so, travelling at warp speed. I don't think the human brain can even conceive of distance on that scale.

I can conceive of it. It's outside my normal existence, but certainly I can understand the vast distances involved intuitively through math.


The problem is, once you get your head around some of those facts - traveling 35K mph, it's 2 billion miles from home, traversed half the solar system in a short human lifetime - you then have to account for the fact that this is a tiny, tiny part of a single galaxy.

That single galaxy is a tiny part of our Local Group.

That Local Group is a tiny part of...
 
2012-10-09 03:06:01 PM

Dr Dreidel: dittybopper: kid_icarus: It's mind-boggling that it's taken it 35 years to do so, travelling at warp speed. I don't think the human brain can even conceive of distance on that scale.

I can conceive of it. It's outside my normal existence, but certainly I can understand the vast distances involved intuitively through math.

The problem is, once you get your head around some of those facts - traveling 35K mph, it's 2 billion miles from home, traversed half the solar system in a short human lifetime - you then have to account for the fact that this is a tiny, tiny part of a single galaxy.

That single galaxy is a tiny part of our Local Group.

That Local Group is a tiny part of...


The Virgo Supercuster.... that is a tiny part of...
 
2012-10-09 03:10:05 PM

Smoky Dragon Dish: SlothB77: Exactly how cold would space feel to Voyager 1 and will temperature have an effect on its durability?

Ah, SlothB77, my old friend, do you know the Klingon proverb that tells us revenge is a dish that is best served cold?

(pause)

It is very cold in space.


I know it is farking cold. Voyager 1 has been traveling through space for 35 years and is still sending us data. So whatever conditions are out there, they have not been harsh enough to disable this vessel.
 
2012-10-09 03:12:21 PM

Smoky Dragon Dish: Dr Dreidel: dittybopper: kid_icarus: It's mind-boggling that it's taken it 35 years to do so, travelling at warp speed. I don't think the human brain can even conceive of distance on that scale.

I can conceive of it. It's outside my normal existence, but certainly I can understand the vast distances involved intuitively through math.

The problem is, once you get your head around some of those facts - traveling 35K mph, it's 2 billion miles from home, traversed half the solar system in a short human lifetime - you then have to account for the fact that this is a tiny, tiny part of a single galaxy.

That single galaxy is a tiny part of our Local Group.

That Local Group is a tiny part of...

The Virgo Supercuster.... that is a tiny part of...


The universe? Is that what comes next? (that is a timy part of....)
 
2012-10-09 03:15:35 PM

Grand_Moff_Joseph: I just hope that we can still communicate with it somehow. It would be a shame for it to finally get out there, then not be able to tell us what's it's "seeing".


At this point, it's amazing there's even still contact with the Voyager 1 probe. The radio signal is absurdly weak, and it's likely that we'll lose contact with it long before it runs out of juice.
 
2012-10-09 03:16:12 PM

ghall3: Smoky Dragon Dish: Dr Dreidel: dittybopper: kid_icarus: It's mind-boggling that it's taken it 35 years to do so, travelling at warp speed. I don't think the human brain can even conceive of distance on that scale.

I can conceive of it. It's outside my normal existence, but certainly I can understand the vast distances involved intuitively through math.

The problem is, once you get your head around some of those facts - traveling 35K mph, it's 2 billion miles from home, traversed half the solar system in a short human lifetime - you then have to account for the fact that this is a tiny, tiny part of a single galaxy.

That single galaxy is a tiny part of our Local Group.

That Local Group is a tiny part of...

The Virgo Supercuster.... that is a tiny part of...

The universe? Is that what comes next? (that is a timy part of....)


All that God created???
 
2012-10-09 03:16:40 PM

SlothB77: Smoky Dragon Dish: SlothB77: Exactly how cold would space feel to Voyager 1 and will temperature have an effect on its durability?

Ah, SlothB77, my old friend, do you know the Klingon proverb that tells us revenge is a dish that is best served cold?

(pause)

It is very cold in space.

I know it is farking cold. Voyager 1 has been traveling through space for 35 years and is still sending us data. So whatever conditions are out there, they have not been harsh enough to disable this vessel.


Agreed. Even hiding in the Mutara nebula doesn't help.

th05.deviantart.net

/Note to self: Don't mix Star Trek movie references...
 
2012-10-09 03:18:49 PM

ghall3: Smoky Dragon Dish: Dr Dreidel: dittybopper: kid_icarus: It's mind-boggling that it's taken it 35 years to do so, travelling at warp speed. I don't think the human brain can even conceive of distance on that scale.

I can conceive of it. It's outside my normal existence, but certainly I can understand the vast distances involved intuitively through math.

The problem is, once you get your head around some of those facts - traveling 35K mph, it's 2 billion miles from home, traversed half the solar system in a short human lifetime - you then have to account for the fact that this is a tiny, tiny part of a single galaxy.

That single galaxy is a tiny part of our Local Group.

That Local Group is a tiny part of...

The Virgo Supercuster.... that is a tiny part of...

The universe? Is that what comes next? (that is a timy part of....)


Galaxy Filaments comes next...
 
2012-10-09 03:21:24 PM

Smoky Dragon Dish: That single galaxy is a tiny part of our Local Group.

That Local Group is a tiny part of...

The Virgo Supercuster.... that is a tiny part of...

The universe? Is that what comes next? (that is a timy part of....)

Galaxy Filaments comes next...


that is a tiny part of a marble around some cat's neck.
 
2012-10-09 03:21:48 PM

xynix: Isn't that just farking badass?


images.wikia.com
 
2012-10-09 03:22:24 PM
Also:
My Dad worked on both Voyagers and I was able to see them both launch, I was of course young but still remember that I could not in any way understand what the hell my Dad was talking about while he was telling me what these things were going to do. (And they did soooo much more)
/Still proud of the old man even tho' he is a grumpy old fart now.
//and it's his birthday today so I should call him.


csb I know.
 
2012-10-09 03:25:35 PM

Tyrosine: Relatively Obscure: Tyrosine: Call me when it passes through the Oort cloud.

I hope you're eating right and exercising. And a vampire.

Nope, nope and nope, so it better hurry


The Oort cloud, if it exists, may extend more than halfway to the next star, which supposedly also could have an Oort cloud. It likely contains matter from other stars when stars formed closer together. Are the leaves that fall in my yard from my neighbor's tree then blow against my fence of my yard?
 
2012-10-09 03:26:40 PM

SlothB77: I know it is farking cold. Voyager 1 has been traveling through space for 35 years and is still sending us data. So whatever conditions are out there, they have not been harsh enough to disable this vessel.


We use liquid nitrogen to cool our computers.. Solid state devices enjoy temperatures as close to 0k as possible. Keep in mind that things with moving parts do NOT like cold shiat.. things like hard drives for example. Since everything on Vger is SS though that's not a problem. I actually own a memory module from the 70s that hardened against radiation (I also have a boxed, mint condition, copy of Windows 1.0 cause I collect that shiat), so anything in Vger would be rated to withstand the amounts of raw gamma rays hitting it.

One of the more toxic things in the environment to computers is oxygen.. Since we're operating in a vacuum there will be no corrosion which means all connectors will be in pristine condition, as they have been for 35 years, as if they were manufactured yesterday.

What we have in outer space is the perfect condition for operating a computer so long as it's shielded from radiation. Vacuum and extremely low temps.
 
2012-10-09 03:27:30 PM

Grither: Smoky Dragon Dish: That single galaxy is a tiny part of our Local Group.

That Local Group is a tiny part of...

The Virgo Supercuster.... that is a tiny part of...

The universe? Is that what comes next? (that is a timy part of....)

Galaxy Filaments comes next...

that is a tiny part of a marble around some cat's neck.


3.bp.blogspot.com

That would explain a lot...
 
2012-10-09 03:28:04 PM
www.magnetmagazine.com
 
2012-10-09 03:33:03 PM
We're never getting off this miserable rock. Just get fargin' idea through your heads right now.
 
2012-10-09 03:34:12 PM
Send more Chuck Berry.
 
2012-10-09 03:34:28 PM

Lt. Cheese Weasel: We're never getting off this miserable rock. Just get fargin' idea through your heads right now.


No.
 
2012-10-09 03:35:09 PM

xynix: We use liquid nitrogen to cool our computers.. Solid state devices enjoy temperatures as close to 0k as possible. Keep in mind that things with moving parts do NOT like cold shiat.. things like hard drives for example. Since everything on Vger is SS though that's not a problem. I actually own a memory module from the 70s that hardened against radiation (I also have a boxed, mint condition, copy of Windows 1.0 cause I collect that shiat), so anything in Vger would be rated to withstand the amounts of raw gamma rays hitting it.


Is that what the "digital tape recorder" on Voyager I and II are?
 
2012-10-09 03:35:49 PM

Yaxe: Grand_Moff_Joseph: I just hope that we can still communicate with it somehow. It would be a shame for it to finally get out there, then not be able to tell us what's it's "seeing".

At this point, it's amazing there's even still contact with the Voyager 1 probe. The radio signal is absurdly weak, and it's likely that we'll lose contact with it long before it runs out of juice.


Well, Voyager 1 is roughly 11,325,400,000 miles from Earth, and it's transmitter is putting out 23 watts of power, for a "Miles per Watt" (MPW) of 492,408,696, or about 492 million miles per watt.

The current ham radio record is around 2 billion miles per watt (much shorter distance, and vanishingly small transmitter power).

I actually think that record might fall sometime soon, what with modes like JT65A allowing signals to be copied below the noise level.
 
2012-10-09 03:36:55 PM

Lt. Cheese Weasel: We're never getting off this miserable rock. Just get fargin' idea through your heads right now.


Well, until Jesus returns, anyway.

api.ning.com
 
2012-10-09 03:37:57 PM
Also if I remember right, the solar wind detector on Voyager I has been out for years so all the discoveries made have to be inferred from the other onboard instruments.

(thanks for the Helios info, I totally forgot about the New Horizons initial speeds, just remembered that it slowed down)
 
2012-10-09 03:38:58 PM

dittybopper: Yaxe: Grand_Moff_Joseph: I just hope that we can still communicate with it somehow. It would be a shame for it to finally get out there, then not be able to tell us what's it's "seeing".

At this point, it's amazing there's even still contact with the Voyager 1 probe. The radio signal is absurdly weak, and it's likely that we'll lose contact with it long before it runs out of juice.

Well, Voyager 1 is roughly 11,325,400,000 miles from Earth, and it's transmitter is putting out 23 watts of power, for a "Miles per Watt" (MPW) of 492,408,696, or about 492 million miles per watt.

The current ham radio record is around 2 billion miles per watt (much shorter distance, and vanishingly small transmitter power).

I actually think that record might fall sometime soon, what with modes like JT65A allowing signals to be copied below the noise level.


Does tha take into account the inverse square law?

/73 de er.. er... QSB... sorry...
 
2012-10-09 03:39:04 PM
Haven't we been seeing this same story every three months for about three years now?
 
2012-10-09 03:39:36 PM
I'm on my phone otherwise I'd post Futurama's V-Gny. Fark, I am disappoint.
 
2012-10-09 03:40:14 PM

SlothB77: I know it is farking cold. Voyager 1 has been traveling through space for 35 years and is still sending us data. So whatever conditions are out there, they have not been harsh enough to disable this vessel.


V'ger runs on a nuclear power source that provides a certain amount of heat to keep its components warm.
 
2012-10-09 03:40:41 PM

lilbjorn: Haven't we been seeing this same story every three months for about three years now?


Well, to be fair, it IS breaking records EVERY SECOND OF EVERY DAY. So hearing about it once every 3 months ain't so bad...
 
2012-10-09 03:44:52 PM

Cthulhu_is_my_homeboy: SlothB77: I know it is farking cold. Voyager 1 has been traveling through space for 35 years and is still sending us data. So whatever conditions are out there, they have not been harsh enough to disable this vessel.

V'ger runs on a nuclear power source that provides a certain amount of heat to keep its components warm.


It is my understanding that the heat is used more to generate electricity, rather than keeping the components "warm." Solar panels don't work so well that far away.
 
2012-10-09 03:48:02 PM

Smoky Dragon Dish: Cthulhu_is_my_homeboy: SlothB77: I know it is farking cold. Voyager 1 has been traveling through space for 35 years and is still sending us data. So whatever conditions are out there, they have not been harsh enough to disable this vessel.

V'ger runs on a nuclear power source that provides a certain amount of heat to keep its components warm.

It is my understanding that the heat is used more to generate electricity, rather than keeping the components "warm." Solar panels don't work so well that far away.


Electric generation is the primary purpose, but that waste heat doesn't just go away because you've done work with it. Just by virtue of having radioactive material onboard, the spacecraft is getting some small amount of warmth.
 
2012-10-09 03:49:51 PM

Smoky Dragon Dish: Does tha take into account the inverse square law?

/73 de er.. er... QSB... sorry...


Yeah, that's why you divide the miles by watts, to make a fair comparison.


BTW, if you had a legal-limit 1.2 gig ham transmitter feeding a 3 meter dish, you could in theory communicate with Earth using a mode like PSK31 and the DSN out to about 270 AU. If you upped the freq to 2.4 GHz, you could communicate out to about 540 AU. At that distance, if you sent a message, it would take 3.1 days to reach Earth.

Currently Voyager 1 is 122 AU from Earth.
 
2012-10-09 03:50:20 PM

Smoky Dragon Dish: Lt. Cheese Weasel: We're never getting off this miserable rock. Just get fargin' idea through your heads right now.

Well, until Jesus returns, anyway.

[api.ning.com image 450x600]


Why is Barry Gibbs laughing so hard?
 
2012-10-09 03:54:26 PM
i2.listal.com

www.deonandan.com
She's dead, Jim.
 
2012-10-09 03:59:37 PM

dittybopper: Smoky Dragon Dish: Does tha take into account the inverse square law?

/73 de er.. er... QSB... sorry...

Yeah, that's why you divide the miles by watts, to make a fair comparison.


BTW, if you had a legal-limit 1.2 gig ham transmitter feeding a 3 meter dish, you could in theory communicate with Earth using a mode like PSK31 and the DSN out to about 270 AU. If you upped the freq to 2.4 GHz, you could communicate out to about 540 AU. At that distance, if you sent a message, it would take 3.1 days to reach Earth.

Currently Voyager 1 is 122 AU from Earth.


Maybe that could explain the Wow! signal....
 
2012-10-09 04:01:17 PM
Abe Vigoda's Ghost: McCoy : She's dead, Jim.

Kirk : But I'm still going to try to tap that.
 
2012-10-09 04:01:20 PM

gopher321: I'm no physicist, but why would there be a "sudden" drop in photons striking Voyager? There's some sort of barrier out there where protons turn around and come back or are blocked? What I mean is, I should think it's a steady decline in photons at that distance; the only difference between September and October is that Voyager is a little farther away, right?

Shouldn't a graph show a line declining from the upper left to the lower right, without a sudden drop?


No, it's a relatively sharp transition.
upload.wikimedia.org
Not a picture of the solar system, but it's the same principle.
 
2012-10-09 04:01:31 PM

dittybopper: Smoky Dragon Dish: Does tha take into account the inverse square law?

/73 de er.. er... QSB... sorry...

Yeah, that's why you divide the miles by watts, to make a fair comparison.


BTW, if you had a legal-limit 1.2 gig ham transmitter feeding a 3 meter dish, you could in theory communicate with Earth using a mode like PSK31 and the DSN out to about 270 AU. If you upped the freq to 2.4 GHz, you could communicate out to about 540 AU. At that distance, if you sent a message, it would take 3.1 days to reach Earth.

Currently Voyager 1 is 122 AU from Earth.


Except that miles/watt is only a sensible metric in a two-dimensional context, such as signals that remain confined to the quasi-2D region between the surface of the Earth and the ionosphere. For free-space propagation, you should be thinking in miles squared per watt.
 
2012-10-09 04:02:18 PM

old_toole: Also:
My Dad worked on both Voyagers and I was able to see them both launch, I was of course young but still remember that I could not in any way understand what the hell my Dad was talking about while he was telling me what these things were going to do. (And they did soooo much more)
/Still proud of the old man even tho' he is a grumpy old fart now.
//and it's his birthday today so I should call him.


csb I know.


Tell him some random dude from the internet says, "thank you for your contributions to the exploration of space."
 
2012-10-09 04:02:29 PM
Just did a bit of googling on Voyager 1. It's currently about 122 AUs out, which means it takes the radio signals roughly 16.3 hours to get back to us...

DANG
 
2012-10-09 04:02:33 PM
No, wait. The picture I posted was wrong. Sorry. Disregard that.
 
2012-10-09 04:07:38 PM

Professor Science: Except that miles/watt is only a sensible metric in a two-dimensional context, such as signals that remain confined to the quasi-2D region between the surface of the Earth and the ionosphere. For free-space propagation, you should be thinking in miles squared per watt.


Except that propagation over the Earth is in 3 dimensions also, when it involves the ionosphere, which these records invariably do. Only ground waves are essentially propagated in 2 dimensions.
 
2012-10-09 04:11:21 PM

theurge14: s that what the "digital tape recorder" on Voyager I and II are?


That was powered down long ago.. The only thing working now is the spectrometer. The tape device was not intended to operate long term, it was part of a scan package data collection and relay system.
 
2012-10-09 04:12:39 PM

dittybopper: Professor Science: Except that miles/watt is only a sensible metric in a two-dimensional context, such as signals that remain confined to the quasi-2D region between the surface of the Earth and the ionosphere. For free-space propagation, you should be thinking in miles squared per watt.

Except that propagation over the Earth is in 3 dimensions also, when it involves the ionosphere, which these records invariably do. Only ground waves are essentially propagated in 2 dimensions.


Don't they technically go through the Earth as well? Sure, no one in the middle of the Indian Ocean gives a flying fark about your radio waves, but couldn't they be measured from "a 3rd dimension" just the same?

// or is that what you meant by "essentially"?
// there's probably lots of signal loss going through the Earth as well
 
2012-10-09 04:12:45 PM
What punching it out of the solar system might look like:

i.i.com.com
 
2012-10-09 04:16:50 PM

dittybopper: Professor Science: Except that miles/watt is only a sensible metric in a two-dimensional context, such as signals that remain confined to the quasi-2D region between the surface of the Earth and the ionosphere. For free-space propagation, you should be thinking in miles squared per watt.

Except that propagation over the Earth is in 3 dimensions also, when it involves the ionosphere, which these records invariably do. Only ground waves are essentially propagated in 2 dimensions.


For distances not much greater than the altitude of the ionosphere, that's true. But once the vertical spread of your beam becomes comparable to the altitude of the ionosphere, it ceases to expand vertically and only spreads out in the remaining two dimensions (well, really, it's only spreading along one of them since it's propagating along the other), meaning the power density falls off roughly as 1/r from that point on. It's the 1/r regime where miles/watt makes sense as a measure of performance; anywhere that the usual 1/r2 law is followed should really be described in terms of miles2/watt.
 
2012-10-09 04:18:20 PM

xynix: theurge14: s that what the "digital tape recorder" on Voyager I and II are?

That was powered down long ago.. The only thing working now is the spectrometer. The tape device was not intended to operate long term, it was part of a scan package data collection and relay system.


Thanks, kinda figured that was the case.
 
2012-10-09 04:31:09 PM

Smoky Dragon Dish: Dr Dreidel: dittybopper: kid_icarus: It's mind-boggling that it's taken it 35 years to do so, travelling at warp speed. I don't think the human brain can even conceive of distance on that scale.

I can conceive of it. It's outside my normal existence, but certainly I can understand the vast distances involved intuitively through math.

The problem is, once you get your head around some of those facts - traveling 35K mph, it's 2 billion miles from home, traversed half the solar system in a short human lifetime - you then have to account for the fact that this is a tiny, tiny part of a single galaxy.

That single galaxy is a tiny part of our Local Group.

That Local Group is a tiny part of...

The Virgo Supercuster.... that is a tiny part of...


If only you'd had Virgo Supercuster at Little Bighorn.

/not a grammar Nazi, it just made me laugh, it's like a wrestlers name.
 
2012-10-09 04:33:10 PM

Slaxl: Smoky Dragon Dish: Dr Dreidel: dittybopper: kid_icarus: It's mind-boggling that it's taken it 35 years to do so, travelling at warp speed. I don't think the human brain can even conceive of distance on that scale.

I can conceive of it. It's outside my normal existence, but certainly I can understand the vast distances involved intuitively through math.

The problem is, once you get your head around some of those facts - traveling 35K mph, it's 2 billion miles from home, traversed half the solar system in a short human lifetime - you then have to account for the fact that this is a tiny, tiny part of a single galaxy.

That single galaxy is a tiny part of our Local Group.

That Local Group is a tiny part of...

The Virgo Supercuster.... that is a tiny part of...

If only you'd had Virgo Supercuster at Little Bighorn.

/not a grammar Nazi, it just made me laugh, it's like a wrestlers name.


Ack. Too much vodak.
 
2012-10-09 04:41:16 PM

Smoky Dragon Dish: Ack. Too much vodak.


(assumes european time, clicks on link, New Jersey)

4:40 on a Tuesday, too much Vodak?
 
2012-10-09 04:49:01 PM
Interstellar Wind would be a good name for a prog rock band
 
2012-10-09 04:51:34 PM

H31N0US: Smoky Dragon Dish: Ack. Too much vodak.

(assumes european time, clicks on link, New Jersey)

4:40 on a Tuesday, too much Vodak?


That's how we roll in Jesery. It dulls the pain of living here.
 
2012-10-09 04:52:44 PM

Crewmannumber6: Interstellar Wind would be a good name for a prog rock band


IMHO, sounds more like something Yanni would front.
 
2012-10-09 05:10:30 PM
i0.kym-cdn.com
 
2012-10-09 05:13:59 PM

Dumb-Ass-Monkey: Tell him some random dude from the internet says, "thank you for your contributions to the exploration of space."


I called him for his birthday right after I read this and I did tell him. He got a kick out of it.

Thanks
 
2012-10-09 05:40:55 PM
I should have sold in July.

cdn.physorg.com
 
2012-10-09 05:50:15 PM
why aren't we sending out more of these suckers all the time? They can't cost all that much and certainly the two that we did have been worth the effort. It might be nice to have something more powerful than a 70s processor on board as well.
 
2012-10-09 05:51:06 PM
I'm just waiting for New Horizons to reach Charon so that we can see whether there's a mass relay embedded in the ice...
 
2012-10-09 05:53:42 PM

Confabulat: why aren't we sending out more of these suckers all the time? They can't cost all that much and certainly the two that we did have been worth the effort. It might be nice to have something more powerful than a 70s processor on board as well.


Because of the poor people in Alabama or whatever other Republican "poor people" thingy that stops science from progressing. You know how pissed off they get when they have to take money from some war and apply it to science.. Some vet that's not getting enough benefits or some shiat gets really mad when science spends money.
 
2012-10-09 05:55:22 PM

tyguy101aa: As someone who watched Star Trek 1 last night this prospect terrifies me.


You should be more worried about Pioneer 10 (it was discovered by the Psychlos and the probe's "gold record" lead them straight to Earth for conquest).
 
2012-10-09 05:55:43 PM

theurge14: Grither: This is very cool. How fast is that little bugger traveling these days, anyway??

A little over 35,000mph, or a little over 10 miles a second. Nothing we've ever made has gone faster as far as I know.


Wow, at that speed it should be able to make the Kessel Run in about 20 parsecs.
 
2012-10-09 05:56:17 PM

Grand_Moff_Joseph: kid_icarus: It's mind-boggling that it's taken it 35 years to do so, travelling at warp speed. I don't think the human brain can even conceive of distance on that scale.

[upload.wikimedia.org image 850x510]


Don't we wish.

/no, really, we do


White-Juday Warp Field Interferometer testing may yield results leading to this soon.

/wish granted!
 
2012-10-09 05:57:16 PM

Cthulhu_is_my_homeboy: SlothB77: I know it is farking cold. Voyager 1 has been traveling through space for 35 years and is still sending us data. So whatever conditions are out there, they have not been harsh enough to disable this vessel.

V'ger runs on a nuclear power source that provides a certain amount of heat to keep its components warm.


Is V'ger a nuclear wessel?
s11.postimage.org
 
2012-10-09 06:17:34 PM

old_toole: Also:
My Dad worked on both Voyagers and I was able to see them both launch, I was of course young but still remember that I could not in any way understand what the hell my Dad was talking about while he was telling me what these things were going to do. (And they did soooo much more)
/Still proud of the old man even tho' he is a grumpy old fart now.
//and it's his birthday today so I should call him.


csb I know.


Tell your dad that geeks everywhere think he did a great job and we thank him.
 
2012-10-09 06:26:22 PM
It knows only that it needs, Commander. But, like so many of us... it does not know what.
 
2012-10-09 06:42:00 PM
i45.tinypic.com
 
2012-10-09 06:50:37 PM

Confabulat: why aren't we sending out more of these suckers all the time? They can't cost all that much and certainly the two that we did have been worth the effort. It might be nice to have something more powerful than a 70s processor on board as well.


Well we could certainly use more exploration, but there won't be a chance to do the grand tour like the Voyagers and Pioneer 10 and 11 for another 175 or so years.
 
2012-10-09 06:53:04 PM

Tyrosine: Call me when it passes through the Oort cloud.


You're confusing Star Trek with Doctor Who.

i105.photobucket.com

What? Oh, sorry, I thought you said Ood crowd.
 
2012-10-09 06:53:20 PM

Dumb-Ass-Monkey: old_toole: Also:
My Dad worked on both Voyagers and I was able to see them both launch, I was of course young but still remember that I could not in any way understand what the hell my Dad was talking about while he was telling me what these things were going to do. (And they did soooo much more)
/Still proud of the old man even tho' he is a grumpy old fart now.
//and it's his birthday today so I should call him.

csb I know.

Tell him some random dude from the internet says, "thank you for your contributions to the exploration of space."


mouser_inc: Tell your dad that geeks everywhere think he did a great job and we thank him.


(Insert Futurama Scruffy the Janitor "Second." pic here [though, technically, I'm Thirding].)
 
2012-10-09 06:56:24 PM
thecuriousastronomer.files.wordpress.com 


"Heeeer'es a MENU!"
 
2012-10-09 07:09:20 PM

old_toole: Also:
My Dad worked on both Voyagers and I was able to see them both launch, I was of course young but still remember that I could not in any way understand what the hell my Dad was talking about while he was telling me what these things were going to do. (And they did soooo much more)
/Still proud of the old man even tho' he is a grumpy old fart now.
//and it's his birthday today so I should call him.


csb I know.



I have a really stupid question that maybe you ask your old man: did they they have special belt buckles for the Voyager Team? They briefly show one on Cosmos and I've been searching for more info for years. One of the very few things I have had zero luck in finding. Looks like only the people that worked on the probe got one.
 
2012-10-09 07:14:18 PM

theurge14: A little over 35,000mph, or a little over 10 miles a second. Nothing we've ever made has gone faster as far as I know.


I've been friendzoned faster.
 
2012-10-09 07:17:27 PM

Abe Vigoda's Ghost: [i2.listal.com image 500x1083]

[www.deonandan.com image 320x240]
She's dead, Jim.


OMFG that pic. Where did you get it?

/V'ger was my hero. It went directly for the hottest girl on the ship. That's keeping your priorities in order.
//I didn't expect to live to see this. Srsly.
//Bummed that she died at around my age ;_;
 
2012-10-09 07:22:10 PM

xynix: Confabulat: why aren't we sending out more of these suckers all the time? They can't cost all that much and certainly the two that we did have been worth the effort. It might be nice to have something more powerful than a 70s processor on board as well.

Because of the poor people in Alabama or whatever other RepublicanDemocrat "poor people" thingy that stops science from progressing. You know how pissed off they get when they have to take money from some warGreen technology that has absolutely no farking way to make a return on investment and apply it to science.. Some vet that's not getting enough benefits or some shiat gets really mad when science spends money.


FTFY
 
2012-10-09 07:57:31 PM

Lt. Cheese Weasel: We're never getting off this miserable rock. Just get fargin' idea through your heads right now.


"The escape from pain in surgical operations is a chimera...'Knife' and 'pain' in surgery are words which are always inseparable in the minds of patients" ~ Alfred-Armand-Louis-Marie Velpeau, 1839

Ether was first used successfully in surgery three years after the above quote.

Just shut up already.
 
2012-10-09 08:05:56 PM

Dr Dreidel: dittybopper: kid_icarus: It's mind-boggling that it's taken it 35 years to do so, travelling at warp speed. I don't think the human brain can even conceive of distance on that scale.

I can conceive of it. It's outside my normal existence, but certainly I can understand the vast distances involved intuitively through math.

The problem is, once you get your head around some of those facts - traveling 35K mph, it's 2 billion miles from home, traversed half the solar system in a short human lifetime - you then have to account for the fact that this is a tiny, tiny part of a single galaxy.

That single galaxy is a tiny part of our Local Group.

That Local Group is a tiny part of...


Which reminds me of a song...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=buqtdpuZxvk
 
2012-10-09 08:06:55 PM

Professor Science: dittybopper: Professor Science: Except that miles/watt is only a sensible metric in a two-dimensional context, such as signals that remain confined to the quasi-2D region between the surface of the Earth and the ionosphere. For free-space propagation, you should be thinking in miles squared per watt.

Except that propagation over the Earth is in 3 dimensions also, when it involves the ionosphere, which these records invariably do. Only ground waves are essentially propagated in 2 dimensions.

For distances not much greater than the altitude of the ionosphere, that's true. But once the vertical spread of your beam becomes comparable to the altitude of the ionosphere, it ceases to expand vertically and only spreads out in the remaining two dimensions (well, really, it's only spreading along one of them since it's propagating along the other), meaning the power density falls off roughly as 1/r from that point on. It's the 1/r regime where miles/watt makes sense as a measure of performance; anywhere that the usual 1/r2 law is followed should really be described in terms of miles2/watt.


Er, not really: Only a small fraction of the signal is reflected. Signals that hit the ionosphere above the critical frequency end up just going out into space. Signals that are reflected are still subject to the inverse square law: If you double the distance, you cut the amount of signal available to 1/4th.

I haven't even gone into D-layer absorption, or all the other funky stuff that happens.

But the short answer is no, the inverse square law still pertains to HF signals propagated via skywave.
 
2012-10-09 08:07:20 PM

Smoky Dragon Dish: Dr Dreidel: dittybopper: kid_icarus: It's mind-boggling that it's taken it 35 years to do so, travelling at warp speed. I don't think the human brain can even conceive of distance on that scale.

I can conceive of it. It's outside my normal existence, but certainly I can understand the vast distances involved intuitively through math.

The problem is, once you get your head around some of those facts - traveling 35K mph, it's 2 billion miles from home, traversed half the solar system in a short human lifetime - you then have to account for the fact that this is a tiny, tiny part of a single galaxy.

That single galaxy is a tiny part of our Local Group.

That Local Group is a tiny part of...

The Virgo Supercuster.... that is a tiny part of...


It goes more like..

Earth
Solar System
Solar Interstellar Neighbourhood
Orion Arm
Miky Way Galaxy
Local Group (Galaxy Cluster)
Virgo Supercluster
Local Superclusters (among millions)
Galactic Filaments and Walls
Observable Universe
Universe
 
2012-10-09 08:21:07 PM

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: Lt. Cheese Weasel: We're never getting off this miserable rock. Just get fargin' idea through your heads right now.

"The escape from pain in surgical operations is a chimera...'Knife' and 'pain' in surgery are words which are always inseparable in the minds of patients" ~ Alfred-Armand-Louis-Marie Velpeau, 1839

Ether was first used successfully in surgery three years after the above quote.

Just shut up already.


Three years, with 19th century technology, before a complete knowledge of chemistry. How many years now has it been that we even went to the Moon, with all the technology and resources we have now?

They thought the Milky Way WAS the universe until the 1930s or so.

The universe is huge. The technology and energy available to us is tiny.

Get over it already.

We are HERE FOREVER. 

Or to put it another way, in the 1950s fission nuclear power was supposed to be too cheap to bother metering.

"Our children will enjoy in their homes electrical energy too cheap to meter... It is not too much to expect that our children will know of great periodic regional famines in the world only as matters of history, will travel effortlessly over the seas and under them and through the air with a minimum of danger and at great speeds, and will experience a lifespan far longer than ours, as disease yields and man comes to understand what causes him to age."

Lewis Strauss, then Chairman of the United States Atomic Energy Commission, in a 1954 speech

We can toss around phrases till the Sun goes black.

REALITY DECIDES. *WHERE IS THE ENGINEERING?* And no, Star Trek is not the same as PhD in engineering, OK?

F=ma

Periodic Table of Elements

Materials science

END
OF
STORY

How's that free electricity coming along?

How about the leisure society of the 1970s? Where's my 10 hour work week?
 
2012-10-09 08:43:44 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: Sylvia_Bandersnatch: Lt. Cheese Weasel: We're never getting off this miserable rock. Just get fargin' idea through your heads right now.

"The escape from pain in surgical operations is a chimera...'Knife' and 'pain' in surgery are words which are always inseparable in the minds of patients" ~ Alfred-Armand-Louis-Marie Velpeau, 1839

Ether was first used successfully in surgery three years after the above quote.

Just shut up already.

Three years, with 19th century technology, before a complete knowledge of chemistry. How many years now has it been that we even went to the Moon, with all the technology and resources we have now?

They thought the Milky Way WAS the universe until the 1930s or so.

The universe is huge. The technology and energy available to us is tiny.

Get over it already.

We are HERE FOREVER. 

Or to put it another way, in the 1950s fission nuclear power was supposed to be too cheap to bother metering.

"Our children will enjoy in their homes electrical energy too cheap to meter... It is not too much to expect that our children will know of great periodic regional famines in the world only as matters of history, will travel effortlessly over the seas and under them and through the air with a minimum of danger and at great speeds, and will experience a lifespan far longer than ours, as disease yields and man comes to understand what causes him to age."

Lewis Strauss, then Chairman of the United States Atomic Energy Commission, in a 1954 speech

We can toss around phrases till the Sun goes black.

REALITY DECIDES. *WHERE IS THE ENGINEERING?* And no, Star Trek is not the same as PhD in engineering, OK?

F=ma

Periodic Table of Elements

Materials science

END
OF
STORY

How's that free electricity coming along?

How about the leisure society of the 1970s? Where's my 10 hour work week?


Wow, the let's-piss-in-everyone's-cornflakes crowd is out in force tonight.

It's very easy to focus on the negative, and pretend that that's all of reality. But it's also intellectually dishonest, and both of you are smart enough to know better -- especially you, QA.

I could not agree with you more that it's a farking crime we haven't gone back to the Moon, or much of anywhere else, and I certainly agree that we could and should have by now. And I've said myself many times that this is, in the widest perspective, a test of the ultimate capacity of humanity to overcome its pettiness and fear and do the needful. But I do not accept that the past dictates the future, and I do not assume or believe that we will "never" do all the great things we're capable of (including the things we don't even know yet that we can do). Humans are extremely curious creatures, and if something can be done, I believe we'll figure out a way to do it. And then actually do it.

Everything you're describing is recent and comparatively short-term history, and that primariy owing to political and economic issues not directly related to technology, science, and the longer arc of history. It's that longer arc that matters, and that's where the concept of "never" is proven wrong over and over and over again. There are extremely few people on this planet who can use words such as "never" and "impossible" and be correct. No one on Fark is among them.
 
2012-10-09 09:10:28 PM

xynix: What we have in outer space is the perfect condition for operating a computer so long as it's shielded from radiation. Vacuum and extremely low temps.


Except that you have to find a way to keep electronics from overheating. The amount of heat that you loose by radiation is very limited.
 
2012-10-09 09:13:23 PM

SuperT: shiat, disregard what I said, I forgot about helios. I fail.

new horizons is the fastest *still working* thing we have thrown. (I'm pretty sure on that one)


You also forgot:

sprott.physics.wisc.edu
 
2012-10-09 09:18:31 PM
There is a whole lot of nothing past the heliosphere for a very, very, very long way. Other than for taking pictures of distant objects from a slightly different angle than we would see on Earth, I don't think that the Voyagers are going to be very useful.

There might be stuff in the Oort cloud, but very little compared to the volume of that space, and none of it near the Voyagers.
 
2012-10-09 10:26:22 PM

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: I could not agree with you more that it's a farking crime we haven't gone back to the Moon, or much of anywhere else, and I certainly agree that we could and should have by now.


Hear that, QA? He agrees with you we should have gone back to the Moon! How about them apples!
 
2012-10-09 11:13:21 PM

The6502Man: xynix: Confabulat: why aren't we sending out more of these suckers all the time? They can't cost all that much and certainly the two that we did have been worth the effort. It might be nice to have something more powerful than a 70s processor on board as well.

Because of the poor people in Alabama or whatever other RepublicanDemocrat "poor people" thingy that stops science from progressing. You know how pissed off they get when they have to take money from some warGreen technology that has absolutely no farking way to make a return on investment and apply it to science.. Some vet that's not getting enough benefits or some shiat gets really mad when science spends money.

FTFY



i105.photobucket.com
 
2012-10-10 12:53:54 AM

Abe Vigoda's Ghost: [i2.listal.com image 500x1083]

[www.deonandan.com image 320x240]
She's dead, Jim.


She had great farking legs!
 
2012-10-10 01:10:51 AM

Myria: There is a whole lot of nothing past the heliosphere for a very, very, very long way. Other than for taking pictures of distant objects from a slightly different angle than we would see on Earth, I don't think that the Voyagers are going to be very useful.

There might be stuff in the Oort cloud, but very little compared to the volume of that space, and none of it near the Voyagers.


Useful or not, IT'S LEAVING THE SOLAR SYSTEM! Sure, it was bound to happen at some point, but it's still really farking cool.
 
2012-10-10 05:19:19 AM

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: and both of you are smart enough to know better -- especially you, QA.


Please, QA is always good for a laugh but he's definitely not smart. He's more negative than Negative Nancy and her gang of negative pals who go around being negative. He's either incredibly ignorant or thoroughly intellectually dishonest. In another thread someone called him the Space Bevets, and I think that is a very apt description.

Anyone who thinks humans can't leave Earth because "3D PRINTERS IN SPACE" and "NEED MORE ELEMENTS!!!" Is farking retarded.

Sorry QA, but you are.

I do still wish you great success in your ambition to prolong human life.
 
2012-10-10 09:04:04 AM

Hassan Ben Sobr: [thecuriousastronomer.files.wordpress.com image 850x673] 


"Heeeer'es a MENU!"


shiat, we need to send another one correcting that plate since Pluto isn't a planet anymore.
 
2012-10-10 09:33:58 AM

dittybopper: Yaxe: Grand_Moff_Joseph: I just hope that we can still communicate with it somehow. It would be a shame for it to finally get out there, then not be able to tell us what's it's "seeing".

At this point, it's amazing there's even still contact with the Voyager 1 probe. The radio signal is absurdly weak, and it's likely that we'll lose contact with it long before it runs out of juice.

Well, Voyager 1 is roughly 11,325,400,000 miles from Earth, and it's transmitter is putting out 23 watts of power, for a "Miles per Watt" (MPW) of 492,408,696, or about 492 million miles per watt.

The current ham radio record is around 2 billion miles per watt (much shorter distance, and vanishingly small transmitter power).

I actually think that record might fall sometime soon, what with modes like JT65A allowing signals to be copied below the noise level.


Let me ask you radio guys something that has puzzled me for a while.
Is it possible to send crafts chasing after these distant probes to act as radio relay stations thereby increasing their functional distance?
At some point we will not be able to hear voyager and it will not be able to hear us but if there was a craft between us that could act as a relay station we could increase the effective range by that of the new craft couldn't we?

How much could that cost?
 
2012-10-10 10:01:30 AM

Hassan Ben Sobr: [thecuriousastronomer.files.wordpress.com image 850x673] 


"Heeeer'es a MENU!"



I can't believe that was made in the 70s and both of their genitals aren't obscured in a tangled mass of pubic hair.
 
2012-10-10 10:16:05 AM

TV's Vinnie: tyguy101aa: As someone who watched Star Trek 1 last night this prospect terrifies me.

You should be more worried about Pioneer 10 (it was discovered by the Psychlos and the probe's "gold record" lead them straight to Earth for conquest).


Ah,so YOUR the guy who watched that shiat?
 
2012-10-10 12:36:09 PM

IAMTHEINTARWEBS: dittybopper: Yaxe: Grand_Moff_Joseph: I just hope that we can still communicate with it somehow. It would be a shame for it to finally get out there, then not be able to tell us what's it's "seeing".

At this point, it's amazing there's even still contact with the Voyager 1 probe. The radio signal is absurdly weak, and it's likely that we'll lose contact with it long before it runs out of juice.

Well, Voyager 1 is roughly 11,325,400,000 miles from Earth, and it's transmitter is putting out 23 watts of power, for a "Miles per Watt" (MPW) of 492,408,696, or about 492 million miles per watt.

The current ham radio record is around 2 billion miles per watt (much shorter distance, and vanishingly small transmitter power).

I actually think that record might fall sometime soon, what with modes like JT65A allowing signals to be copied below the noise level.

Let me ask you radio guys something that has puzzled me for a while.
Is it possible to send crafts chasing after these distant probes to act as radio relay stations thereby increasing their functional distance?
At some point we will not be able to hear voyager and it will not be able to hear us but if there was a craft between us that could act as a relay station we could increase the effective range by that of the new craft couldn't we?

How much could that cost?


Sure, a repeater must sample, rebuild, amplify and transmit the original signal. It might be too late to fire off another probe since Voyagers are so far away already. Return on investment probably would not be there depending on the sampling rate required to rebuild the original signal with a high degree of accuracy. Not a comms engineer but took a few classes for my EE.
 
2012-10-10 01:24:17 PM

cards fan by association: IAMTHEINTARWEBS: dittybopper: Yaxe: Grand_Moff_Joseph: I just hope that we can still communicate with it somehow. It would be a shame for it to finally get out there, then not be able to tell us what's it's "seeing".

At this point, it's amazing there's even still contact with the Voyager 1 probe. The radio signal is absurdly weak, and it's likely that we'll lose contact with it long before it runs out of juice.

Well, Voyager 1 is roughly 11,325,400,000 miles from Earth, and it's transmitter is putting out 23 watts of power, for a "Miles per Watt" (MPW) of 492,408,696, or about 492 million miles per watt.

The current ham radio record is around 2 billion miles per watt (much shorter distance, and vanishingly small transmitter power).

I actually think that record might fall sometime soon, what with modes like JT65A allowing signals to be copied below the noise level.

Let me ask you radio guys something that has puzzled me for a while.
Is it possible to send crafts chasing after these distant probes to act as radio relay stations thereby increasing their functional distance?
At some point we will not be able to hear voyager and it will not be able to hear us but if there was a craft between us that could act as a relay station we could increase the effective range by that of the new craft couldn't we?

How much could that cost?

Sure, a repeater must sample, rebuild, amplify and transmit the original signal. It might be too late to fire off another probe since Voyagers are so far away already. Return on investment probably would not be there depending on the sampling rate required to rebuild the original signal with a high degree of accuracy. Not a comms engineer but took a few classes for my EE.


You're talking pure socialism, my friend. Careful.
 
2012-10-10 09:36:10 PM
This is farking awesome.
 
2012-10-10 11:07:55 PM

kid_icarus: It's mind-boggling that it's taken it 35 years to do so, travelling at warp speed.


Imagine if Voyager 1 had been travelling at ludicrous speed.
 
2012-10-11 12:18:04 AM

Slaxl: Sylvia_Bandersnatch: and both of you are smart enough to know better -- especially you, QA.

Please, QA is always good for a laugh but he's definitely not smart. He's more negative than Negative Nancy and her gang of negative pals who go around being negative. He's either incredibly ignorant or thoroughly intellectually dishonest. In another thread someone called him the Space Bevets, and I think that is a very apt description.

Anyone who thinks humans can't leave Earth because "3D PRINTERS IN SPACE" and "NEED MORE ELEMENTS!!!" Is farking retarded.

Sorry QA, but you are.

I do still wish you great success in your ambition to prolong human life.


I should have said 'intelligent' instead, you're right. I realised years ago that there's a huge difference between the two.
 
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