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(Phys Org2)   Voyager 1 may have punched out of the solar system   (phys.org) divider line 140
    More: Spiffy, Voyager, solar system, interstellar space, magnetic fields, protons, key signing, cosmic rays  
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7367 clicks; posted to Geek » on 09 Oct 2012 at 2:12 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-09 11:55:24 AM
As someone who watched Star Trek 1 last night this prospect terrifies me.
 
2012-10-09 12:02:04 PM
It's mind-boggling that it's taken it 35 years to do so, travelling at warp speed. I don't think the human brain can even conceive of distance on that scale.
 
2012-10-09 12:03:03 PM

kid_icarus: travelling at warp speed


Qua?
 
2012-10-09 12:47:35 PM

tyguy101aa: As someone who watched Star Trek 1 last night this prospect terrifies me.


Why? We get at least one very attractive space chick for our troubles. Sure, they may be a precursor to the Borg, but that's non-canon anyway. ;)
 
2012-10-09 12:48:43 PM
Bon Voyage, Voyager 1. See you when you come back as V'ger.
 
2012-10-09 12:49:12 PM

kid_icarus: It's mind-boggling that it's taken it 35 years to do so, travelling at warp speed. I don't think the human brain can even conceive of distance on that scale.


upload.wikimedia.org


Don't we wish.

/no, really, we do
 
2012-10-09 12:49:17 PM

kid_icarus: It's mind-boggling that it's taken it 35 years to do so, travelling at warp speed. I don't think the human brain can even conceive of distance on that scale.


I can conceive of it. It's outside my normal existence, but certainly I can understand the vast distances involved intuitively through math.
 
2012-10-09 12:49:49 PM

RexTalionis: Bon Voyage, Voyager 1. See you when you come back as V'ger.


I can't not pronounce it in my head any other way.
 
2012-10-09 12:50:17 PM
I just hope that we can still communicate with it somehow. It would be a shame for it to finally get out there, then not be able to tell us what's it's "seeing".
 
2012-10-09 12:57:48 PM

Grand_Moff_Joseph: I just hope that we can still communicate with it somehow. It would be a shame for it to finally get out there, then not be able to tell us what's it's "seeing".



It breaks through, and all it finds is a constant transmission of Yackety Sax.
 
2012-10-09 12:59:29 PM

tyguy101aa: As someone who watched stayed awake through Star Trek 1 last night this prospect terrifies me.


Congrats
 
2012-10-09 01:02:30 PM

Blues_X: Grand_Moff_Joseph: I just hope that we can still communicate with it somehow. It would be a shame for it to finally get out there, then not be able to tell us what's it's "seeing".


It breaks through, and all it finds is a constant transmission of Yackety Sax.


LOL. For even more lulz though, what if it was picked up by Q? :D
 
2012-10-09 01:26:53 PM
I'm no physicist, but why would there be a "sudden" drop in photons striking Voyager? There's some sort of barrier out there where protons turn around and come back or are blocked? What I mean is, I should think it's a steady decline in photons at that distance; the only difference between September and October is that Voyager is a little farther away, right?

Shouldn't a graph show a line declining from the upper left to the lower right, without a sudden drop?
 
2012-10-09 01:34:48 PM

Grand_Moff_Joseph: I just hope that we can still communicate with it somehow. It would be a shame for it to finally get out there, then not be able to tell us what's it's "seeing".


We think it won't be seeing anything, because, as far as we know, it's very empty out there. But what if it sends back data showing stuff* we don't know about. That would be awesome.

*particles or radiation, not LGM's
 
2012-10-09 01:56:31 PM

gopher321: I'm no physicist, but why would there be a "sudden" drop in photons striking Voyager? There's some sort of barrier out there where protons turn around and come back or are blocked? What I mean is, I should think it's a steady decline in photons at that distance; the only difference between September and October is that Voyager is a little farther away, right?

Shouldn't a graph show a line declining from the upper left to the lower right, without a sudden drop?


It's at the point where the solar wind of our star and the solar winds of the galaxy meet and then cancel each other out.

www.scifiideas.com
 
2012-10-09 01:59:15 PM

gopher321: I'm no physicist, but why would there be a "sudden" drop in photons striking Voyager? There's some sort of barrier out there where protons turn around and come back or are blocked? What I mean is, I should think it's a steady decline in photons at that distance; the only difference between September and October is that Voyager is a little farther away, right?

Shouldn't a graph show a line declining from the upper left to the lower right, without a sudden drop?


Heliosphere -- Basically, beyond a certain point the solar wind hits an equilibrium pressure against the radiation and particles from interstellar space, so particles from the solar wind can't move beyond that point. So, inside the heliosphere particles from the solar wind strike Voyager, but outside it they don't.

This is evidence that Voyager has moved beyond the heliosphere and is now in interstellar space.
 
2012-10-09 02:14:15 PM
24.media.tumblr.com
 
2012-10-09 02:19:59 PM
This is very cool. How fast is that little bugger traveling these days, anyway??
 
2012-10-09 02:21:40 PM

Grand_Moff_Joseph: I just hope that we can still communicate with it somehow. It would be a shame for it to finally get out there, then not be able to tell us what's it's "seeing".


It is my understanding that it's full of stars.
 
2012-10-09 02:22:30 PM
Call me when it passes through the Oort cloud.
 
2012-10-09 02:25:02 PM
Will I dream?
 
2012-10-09 02:25:14 PM

Grither: This is very cool. How fast is that little bugger traveling these days, anyway??


A little over 35,000mph, or a little over 10 miles a second. Nothing we've ever made has gone faster as far as I know.
 
2012-10-09 02:26:20 PM

theurge14: Grither: This is very cool. How fast is that little bugger traveling these days, anyway??

A little over 35,000mph, or a little over 10 miles a second. Nothing we've ever made has gone faster as far as I know.


Oh and it got that fast by the Saturn and Titan gravity assists back in 1980.
 
2012-10-09 02:26:58 PM

Tyrosine: Call me when it passes through the Oort cloud.


I hope you're eating right and exercising. And a vampire.
 
2012-10-09 02:29:44 PM
Godspeed, little spacecraft.

Reading about Voyager during middle school is what got me addicted to science as a child. I'll always appreciate it.
 
2012-10-09 02:33:05 PM
I hate to be "that guy", but don't we get this story every couple of months around these parts?
 
2012-10-09 02:36:12 PM

Sybarite: tyguy101aa: As someone who watched stayed awake through Star Trek 1 last night this prospect terrifies me.

Congrats


It was on amazon video and I watched it in bed on my ipad to put me to sleep, so technically......
 
2012-10-09 02:37:05 PM

theurge14: Grither: This is very cool. How fast is that little bugger traveling these days, anyway??

A little over 35,000mph, or a little over 10 miles a second. Nothing we've ever made has gone faster as far as I know.


Except for a manhole cover which did an estimated 45 miles per second in 1957.
 
2012-10-09 02:39:33 PM

theurge14: A little over 35,000mph, or a little over 10 miles a second. Nothing we've ever made has gone faster as far as I know.


Almost. The two Helios probes from the 70s went (and still go, though now silently) about 5x that fast when they make their quick dip inside the orbital distance of Mercury. They then bounce out to Earth-orbit-distance in a 3-year elliptical orbit.

Using gravitational slingshots, even just using Jupiter, we could certainly fling something out much faster than the Voyager probes. But, the extrasolar mission wasn't really the core of the project.
 
2012-10-09 02:40:03 PM

meanmutton: I hate to be "that guy", but don't we get this story every couple of months around these parts?


Did you see the graph? They've been getting weird spikes in the data every couple months, so maybe there's some kind of correlation with articles being posted.
 
2012-10-09 02:41:15 PM

xynix: gopher321: I'm no physicist, but why would there be a "sudden" drop in photons striking Voyager? There's some sort of barrier out there where protons turn around and come back or are blocked? What I mean is, I should think it's a steady decline in photons at that distance; the only difference between September and October is that Voyager is a little farther away, right?

Shouldn't a graph show a line declining from the upper left to the lower right, without a sudden drop?

It's at the point where the solar wind of our star and the solar winds of the galaxy meet and then cancel each other out.

[www.scifiideas.com image 678x428]


That image is actually out of date now, although still mostly relevant for Voyager and similar to some star systems, just not ours. Results in the last few years have determined that our system may have no bow shock, as the sun is not moving quickly enough through interstellar space. As a result, there is also no tail behind it, and the system is more of a spherical bubble. This image still includes the bow shock, but otherwise has the updated model

photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA12375
 
2012-10-09 02:41:34 PM
"no official word from NASA on this"
NASA's bummed that the proton sensor broke.
 
2012-10-09 02:42:13 PM

theorellior: meanmutton: I hate to be "that guy", but don't we get this story every couple of months around these parts?

Did you see the graph? They've been getting weird spikes in the data every couple months, so maybe there's some kind of correlation with articles being posted.


Hmm... graph didn't pop up when I went to the site. Stupid DNS issues on my end, probably. That would make sense, though.
 
2012-10-09 02:44:55 PM

gopher321: I'm no physicist, but why would there be a "sudden" drop in photons striking Voyager? There's some sort of barrier out there where protons turn around and come back or are blocked? What I mean is, I should think it's a steady decline in photons at that distance; the only difference between September and October is that Voyager is a little farther away, right?

Shouldn't a graph show a line declining from the upper left to the lower right, without a sudden drop?


You said photons twice. You must like photons.
 
2012-10-09 02:45:14 PM

theurge14: Grither: This is very cool. How fast is that little bugger traveling these days, anyway??

A little over 35,000mph, or a little over 10 miles a second. Nothing we've ever made has gone faster as far as I know.


Helios 2 in 1976, went 157,078 mi/h or 43.63 mi/s.
 
2012-10-09 02:49:20 PM

Relatively Obscure: Tyrosine: Call me when it passes through the Oort cloud.

I hope you're eating right and exercising. And a vampire.


Nope, nope and nope, so it better hurry
 
2012-10-09 02:49:51 PM

theurge14: theurge14: Grither: This is very cool. How fast is that little bugger traveling these days, anyway??

A little over 35,000mph, or a little over 10 miles a second. Nothing we've ever made has gone faster as far as I know.

Oh and it got that fast by the Saturn and Titan gravity assists back in 1980.


new horizions was going 21km/s after it's jupiter assist.. that's like... 47K mp/h, it has since slowed to ~16km/s which is ~39k mp/h.

It is the fastest thing we have ever thrown.
 
2012-10-09 02:53:22 PM
shiat, disregard what I said, I forgot about helios. I fail.

new horizons is the fastest *still working* thing we have thrown. (I'm pretty sure on that one)
 
2012-10-09 02:54:53 PM
I was hoping we would see something more interesting happeneing. :-(

www.scifireaders.net

/Sick of this boundary between the Slow Zone and the Unthinking Depths...
//Obscure?
///Yes, I know it's not the perfect analogy.
 
2012-10-09 02:56:22 PM
Grither

This is very cool. How fast is that little bugger traveling these days, anyway??

I was wondering the same thing. Best I could find from NASA was this:
Traveling at speeds of over 35,000 miles per hour, it will take the Voyagers nearly 40,000 years, and they will have traveled a distance of about two light years to reach this rather indistinct boundary.

*the "boundary referred to is the Ort cloud.
 
2012-10-09 02:56:56 PM
V'ger... expects an answer.

2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-10-09 02:57:13 PM
As someone who isn't smart enough to understand all the science, but smart enough to know this is awesome, well, this is awesome. Looking forward to seeing what sort of data NASA gets back.
 
2012-10-09 03:01:02 PM
Exactly how cold would space feel to Voyager 1 and will temperature have an effect on its durability?
 
2012-10-09 03:02:35 PM

Rising_Zan_Samurai_Gunman: That image is actually out of date now, although still mostly relevant for Voyager and similar to some star systems, just not ours. Results in the last few years have determined that our system may have no bow shock, as the sun is not moving quickly enough through interstellar space. As a result, there is also no tail behind it, and the system is more of a spherical bubble. This image still includes the bow shock, but otherwise has the updated model


Isn't that just farking badass? Maybe I'm just a geek but dammit I get exciting when thinking about us hurling through interstellar space on a rock. Even if our star is kinda slow...
 
2012-10-09 03:04:03 PM

SlothB77: Exactly how cold would space feel to Voyager 1 and will temperature have an effect on its durability?


Ah, SlothB77, my old friend, do you know the Klingon proverb that tells us revenge is a dish that is best served cold?

(pause)

It is very cold in space.
 
2012-10-09 03:04:33 PM

dittybopper: kid_icarus: It's mind-boggling that it's taken it 35 years to do so, travelling at warp speed. I don't think the human brain can even conceive of distance on that scale.

I can conceive of it. It's outside my normal existence, but certainly I can understand the vast distances involved intuitively through math.


The problem is, once you get your head around some of those facts - traveling 35K mph, it's 2 billion miles from home, traversed half the solar system in a short human lifetime - you then have to account for the fact that this is a tiny, tiny part of a single galaxy.

That single galaxy is a tiny part of our Local Group.

That Local Group is a tiny part of...
 
2012-10-09 03:06:01 PM

Dr Dreidel: dittybopper: kid_icarus: It's mind-boggling that it's taken it 35 years to do so, travelling at warp speed. I don't think the human brain can even conceive of distance on that scale.

I can conceive of it. It's outside my normal existence, but certainly I can understand the vast distances involved intuitively through math.

The problem is, once you get your head around some of those facts - traveling 35K mph, it's 2 billion miles from home, traversed half the solar system in a short human lifetime - you then have to account for the fact that this is a tiny, tiny part of a single galaxy.

That single galaxy is a tiny part of our Local Group.

That Local Group is a tiny part of...


The Virgo Supercuster.... that is a tiny part of...
 
2012-10-09 03:10:05 PM

Smoky Dragon Dish: SlothB77: Exactly how cold would space feel to Voyager 1 and will temperature have an effect on its durability?

Ah, SlothB77, my old friend, do you know the Klingon proverb that tells us revenge is a dish that is best served cold?

(pause)

It is very cold in space.


I know it is farking cold. Voyager 1 has been traveling through space for 35 years and is still sending us data. So whatever conditions are out there, they have not been harsh enough to disable this vessel.
 
2012-10-09 03:12:21 PM

Smoky Dragon Dish: Dr Dreidel: dittybopper: kid_icarus: It's mind-boggling that it's taken it 35 years to do so, travelling at warp speed. I don't think the human brain can even conceive of distance on that scale.

I can conceive of it. It's outside my normal existence, but certainly I can understand the vast distances involved intuitively through math.

The problem is, once you get your head around some of those facts - traveling 35K mph, it's 2 billion miles from home, traversed half the solar system in a short human lifetime - you then have to account for the fact that this is a tiny, tiny part of a single galaxy.

That single galaxy is a tiny part of our Local Group.

That Local Group is a tiny part of...

The Virgo Supercuster.... that is a tiny part of...


The universe? Is that what comes next? (that is a timy part of....)
 
2012-10-09 03:15:35 PM

Grand_Moff_Joseph: I just hope that we can still communicate with it somehow. It would be a shame for it to finally get out there, then not be able to tell us what's it's "seeing".


At this point, it's amazing there's even still contact with the Voyager 1 probe. The radio signal is absurdly weak, and it's likely that we'll lose contact with it long before it runs out of juice.
 
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