If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Fark)   Subby found out his wife was pregnant this morning. (Expected and planned.) Breeders: What's the one piece of advice you WISH you could have had on day one regarding your impending crotchfruit?   (fark.com) divider line 792
    More: Advice  
•       •       •

4789 clicks; posted to Main » on 08 Oct 2012 at 11:34 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



792 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | » | Last | Show all
 
2012-10-09 05:29:31 AM

Maturin: Let me state again. All of the infants who have died from SIDS in my practice did so in their parents bed. There have been no exceptions. I have had many infants whose parents smoked, drinked, took drugs (before, during, and after pregnancy). I have had parents whose infants who slept on their stomaches, who slept in unsafe cribs with stuffed animals, bumper pads, and fleece blankets. Those were not the babies who died. The babies who died from SIDS were in a parent's bed. Were there other factors such as parental smoking? In some cases yes. But in some instances there were parents who were trying to do so safely. They failed.


How many cases are we talking about here? Your report is at odds with every significant large scale study of either SIDS or co-sleeping, so may just be a sad statistical outlier.
 
2012-10-09 05:34:37 AM
Remember that people with degrees in medicine are just as capable of giving bad advice as people without them The only difference is that they charge you more for the bad advice.
 
2012-10-09 06:02:16 AM

orbister: How many cases are we talking about here? Your report is at odds with every significant large scale study of either SIDS or co-sleeping, so may just be a sad statistical outlier.


I am a pediatrician, not a statistician. I do not keep score on diagnosis or fatalities. But I do know the circumstances of the infants in my practice who died of SIDS. I have also sat on county child mortality boards. We reviewed all child deaths in the county in which I resided. The majority (though not all) SIDS deaths we reviewed there found co-sleeping to be a factor. The father of one of my patients was a police officer who investigated child deaths, including SIDS. His observations were the same as mine. Co-sleeping is a risk not worth taking. It can be deadly.

There are interesting and intriguing aspects of co-sleeping which indicate, from an anthropologic point of view, that we are 'designed' for co-sleeping. There seem to be affects on respiratory rates, depth of sleep, and breastfeeding. However, when one looks at the numbers, where SIDS occurs, it is hard to justify the risk versus what is gained. You can raise a happy healthy child and not co-sleep, or you can take a risk with the life of a infant. It is not worth it.

There are a number of statistical studies available, some of which appear in the Journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics, Lancet, and JAMA, but my Google-foo is not up to finding them this early in the morning. Below are some links that address the risks of SIDS.

Link

Link

Link
 
2012-10-09 06:11:43 AM

Maturin: I am a pediatrician, not a statistician. I do not keep score on diagnosis or fatalities


In that case, and with all due respect, your advice is worthless. You still haven't said how many cases were actually involved. Ten? A hundred? A thousand? One?

SIDS is, thank goodness, extremely rare. There is no statistical evidence to back up claims that co-sleeping is a significant factor except when he parents smoke, or have used alcohol or other drugs.

If you have a statistically significant number of cases, impartially investigated by people who were not already firmly against co-sleeping (or, of course, firmly for it) then I suggest you publish.

Incidentally, although we very happily co-slept, we didn't until the kid was about three or four months old, and we took great care to follow all the guidelines.
 
2012-10-09 06:42:04 AM
Kids are brilliant, mostly they just want to interact with you. Spend as much time with them as you can so put down your tablet/smartphone, step away from your computer and enjoy watching them grow up because once those days are done you can't go back to them.

Kids at a young age are totally nonjudgmental and happy with anything you give them to play with, so as much as you want to shower them with lots of the best of whatever money can buy, don't, they'll be deliriously happy with a few quality toys of varying function - these don't have to be expensive (or even new) your kid will love them just the same.

Go to an antenatal class, the people you meet there are going through the same thing you are, it's a great place to make new friends, plus your kids and their kids are likely to grow up together as lifelong friends.

Remember, kids are a lot of work, but a whole lot of fun at the same time. nothing will frustrate you more that your kids, but equally nothing will improve your day quite so much either.

Hope everything goes smoothly and congrats.
 
2012-10-09 06:56:42 AM
agsfark

Two words:


SMOKING HOT NANNY


Uh... that's three words
 
2012-10-09 07:07:55 AM
Oh, oh, I just thought of another one.

Almost everything is just a phase. Celebrate and cherish the good ones and don't worry about the more taxing ones - they'll soon be over. For example, when my kid was about 15 months, he started waking at 1am every night and playing happily and fully awake until 3am. As the one with the more flexible working hours, I was the one propped up with bleary eyes, trying to be interested in teddy bears at 2am. This went on every single night without fail ... for four nights. Then everything went back to normal. All I lost was a little sleep, and I now have fond memories, improved a little by time, of sitting in a hushed house listening to a very small person playing.

Oh, and don't even think about craniosacral therapy for babies. At best it's pointless, and worst it's dangerous and in either case charlatans will try to take a lot of money from you for complete woo-woo.
 
2012-10-09 08:37:38 AM
One thing that helped with us is, when she had morning sickness, the only thing she could keep down was what she was craving.
 
2012-10-09 08:48:12 AM
1) You will no longer be the center of your own little world. You will be the center of a much larger, much more amazing world. Revel in it.

2) Remember all the stuff you loved when you were growing up? You get to love them all over again, through their eyes.

3) Get in shape. Just... get in shape.

/Proud dad of an almost 3yo.
//I still look at him with a sense of amazement.
///These slashies are awfully dusty...
 
2012-10-09 08:58:00 AM
Just got in from work and don't have time to scroll through 700 + comments to see if this one's there. Sorry if someone else has noted this already. My husband had received and ignored this bit of advice, so we're passing it on to you.

Apparently during vaginal delivery, when the baby's head begins to come out, the plates in its skull kind of overlap and bulge out a bit.... making the baby look like some kind of deformed klingon thing. Once the baby's head is all the way out, the plates slip back and the head looks normal. I don't know if this happens with all vaginal delivery births or what. A friend of mine said it had startled her when she watched a natural childbirth the first time, and tried to give us a fair word of warning.

At some point at the end of labor when I was doing the pushing business, my husband, who'd been focused on the delivery part, stared at me... attempting to give me what was supposed to be a reassuring smile. At the time, he thought something had gone wrong and our baby had a horrible "lizard head" birth defect. ( His smile wasn't very reassuring at all). Anyway, with the next push the baby's head was out and looked fine. Perfectly healthy baby... not a klingon/lizard head baby.

Just a little tidbit for you to keep in the back of your mind for delivery day.
 
2012-10-09 09:15:24 AM
When your child gets hurt, DON'T run straight to the emergency room unless it's a real emergency. Just give them an ice pack and kiss it away. Use pressure for cuts.
 
2012-10-09 09:52:29 AM

NowhereMon: Sleep now. Prepare to no longer be the center of your universe, get used to the idea that you won't be seeing your childless friends as much any more. Be prepared to really truly understand the meaning of the word "responsibility". Forget about having a spotless clean house or nice stuff for the next 6-8 years. I hope that you didn't wait till age forty to do this like I did.

Haha, who am I kidding, there is no way to prepare for what you are about to go though. You'll be fine, you are not unique, most people do it at some point, just try to not be too abusive or neglectful.


This. And take your wife out a few times in the next couple months, because as of around the start of the 3rd trimester, date night is dead for the next 18-24 months.

And This:

funzyr: When your child gets hurt, DON'T run straight to the emergency room unless it's a real emergency. Just give them an ice pack and kiss it away. Use pressure for cuts.


Don't be afraid to let the kid be a kid. They need to explore, to experiment, to test the waters and limits of their world. They need to know that when they do something risky, the world will sometimes smack them.

Take a course on first aid, there may even be toddler/infant specific first aid courses out there to prepare you for the minor injuries a young'un can acquire. It'll also help you learn how to tell the difference between a small "ouchie" or "booboo", and a serious "OMFG CALL 9-1-1!".
 
2012-10-09 09:55:55 AM
Oh, and to paraphrase Tim Allen, do NOT look at the doc seconds after the birth of your baby and ask "So, uh, how long before I can enjoy that area again?"
 
2012-10-09 10:07:36 AM
Also, print out a spreadsheet and leave it on your kitchen counter (near bottles) that contains date, time and how many ounces he/she ate. Don't forget to log your diaper changes - pee and poop (what kind - runny, chunky, dry, superpoop, etc.) This will help you if you want/need to call the doc, and you will.

FILL IT OUT!

It will make life soo much easier. You will know if lil one is hungry or just pissed off. No more waking up mommy to ask when he ate last - neither of you will remember! You will thank me later.
 
2012-10-09 10:12:46 AM

Technoir: Oh, and to paraphrase Tim Allen, do NOT look at the doc seconds after the birth of your baby and ask "So, uh, how long before I can enjoy that area again?"


If she gets an episiotomy, (I have no clue how to spell it.) ask the doctor to throw a couple extra stitches in to tighten it back up.

More advice from a fat guy:

Be consistent and fair. Tell the child what the punishment will be if he/she doesn't climb down off the display at the store, and follow through with it. At first, they won't understand, but later, they will start to realize that decisions have consequences.
 
2012-10-09 11:26:40 AM
Sleep now; enjoy the pregnancy sex, once the crotch fruit spawns, sex is diminished greatly, if not cut out completely.

Mylicon for the kid. Get the battery powered swing. Get the vibrating/bouncy seat that plays music.

Love the kid, hug on the kid, and for God's sake, share your ice cream with the kid.
 
2012-10-09 12:12:05 PM

LegacyDL: Just think of yourself as a Salmon and you'll do fine.


Snarky, but sage advice.

Don't try to compete with your child, it's not about you anymore.
 
2012-10-09 12:14:18 PM
Sign up for every diaper/formula manufacturer for coupons. Have everyone of your friends and family do likewise. I've saved hundreds already (3 mos in) on formula alone. When you find the brand that your baby digs, donate all the other coupons/samples to charity or other knocked up friend. They'll thank you.
 
2012-10-09 12:41:03 PM
Always nurse the baby/give them a bottle right BEFORE you go into the restaurant/grocery store/wherever. Makes life out in public with baby a lot more normal, and saves everyone else from your kid having a hunger meltdown.
 
2012-10-09 12:54:04 PM
Advice? How the fark should I know?
I don't know what I'm doing...I'm a parent.


/kinda true

1) Get a baby monitor with a video screen.

2) Remember how stressed out you are the first few months over whether you are doing everything right...that way you can laugh at yourself when your second one comes along.
 
2012-10-09 01:18:06 PM

grinding_journalist: Subby here - first green!


Subby, there is wisdom and wonderful advice throughout this thread, along with the usual dreck from the usual suspects.
The problem with good advice is you never know when it applies to you until you've made the mistakes and gained the experiences to which it applies.

Among my daily prayers is a modified version of Shepard's Prayer. Find your personal version of Shepard's Prayer and pray it with sincerity and humility.


Bathia_Mapes: If you have a son, learn the "peek" routine when changing diapers. Untape the diaper (assuming you're using disposibles) and lift up one side and peek to see if the baby is still peeing. If he is, put the diaper back in place until he's done. This saves you getting a faceful of pee from baby's factory installed fire hose.

I tried to warn my dad about this when he was changing my son's diapers one day during a visit. He didn't listen and got hosed down by his first grandbaby.


Bathia, your contributions here are unfailingly insightful, clever, and stem from kindness and self-knowledge, but gems like this one are why I adore you.

/OK, they constitute one very important reason why.
//The main one will always be that I can trust you alone with my voting-age single-malts.
 
2012-10-09 02:15:22 PM
The sex is about to become amazing! For you. For her, it depends. Then, sex will become a bargaining chip for your wife to hold over your head forever.
 
2012-10-09 02:25:49 PM

ChewbaccaJones:

2) Remember how stressed out you are the first few months over whether you are doing everything right...that way you can laugh at yourself when your second one comes along.


this.
 
2012-10-09 03:01:35 PM

orbister: Maturin: I am a pediatrician, not a statistician. I do not keep score on diagnosis or fatalities

In that case, and with all due respect, your advice is worthless.


But then, so is that link to Dr. Sears. It's just his advice, and he says he read a bunch of papers, and oh he co-slept with his eight kids. That last bit is as anecdotal as anything else.

That article also dismisses scientific studies that disagree with him, because the results don't square up with "common sense." This is a profoundly dumb thing to say: scientific data surprises us and challenges our intuition all the time. If we followed this guy's mindset, we'd still believe in Aristotelian physics.
 
2012-10-09 03:36:25 PM

demaL-demaL-yeH: Bathia, your contributions here are unfailingly insightful, clever, and stem from kindness and self-knowledge, but gems like this one are why I adore you.


Thank you
 
2012-10-09 04:08:30 PM
TED talk

Wisdom about balancing family life.
 
2012-10-09 04:33:33 PM
Based on a lot of previous comments, the ones I found to be true and a bit of additional stuff:

Your life will convert to three-hour days. Your baby will sleep, poop and eat once a day. You should sleep when the baby sleeps, because you have to be awake when the kid's awake. Sleeping six hours in a row will be something you count yourself very lucky getting. If you can stagger (You stay up late and feed bottles, she gets up early and releases boob pressure) you'll both get more sleep in a block.
Mom's job is to keep baby happy. Your job is to keep mom happy. Keeping you happy is nobody's job. Maybe your mom, but that's about it. Show up and do your job of keeping everybody else happy. Acknowledge you are in a supporting role for a while.
You won't see your friends like you did.
Keep in mind that your friends without kids will not really care. Your friends with kids will care a bit. Have something else to talk about besides the baby.
The only thing you NEED is a car seat. Babies can be swaddled in t-shirts, sleep on the floor, and poop in rags. Buy what you can second-hand.
Your free time is forfeit.
Keeping the house clean is wildly difficult.
The swing might be the pinnacle of humanity's engineering efforts.
Baby books can be useful and can make you insane.
Logging excretory functions will be a part of your life like you'd never guess.
Boppys are good, but "My Brest Friend" is better.
Take classes at the local hospital. Weird stuff your baby will do is totally normal. They will teach you all about them.
Practice swaddling, but unless you can find a strong, loud, wiggly pillow or doll, know that it will be harder when you have to do it for real. Get the maternity nurses to coach you on this. They are ninjas.
Let the nurses take the newborn to the nursery overnight. That sleep you will get is well worth it, and the baby is in professional care.
The poop thing isn't as bad as you think it will be.
Be prepared to change diapers on the floor.
When you are about to lose your mind and find yourself gripping or bouncing your baby a bit too hard, hand it off to your wife or put it down and walk away. Better that than you do something you can't undo. This will happen. It does not make you a bad father to get angry. It makes you a bad father if you take it out on the baby.
Invest in hardwood floors.
"The most that you can spend on any child is time."
Take photos, buy a video camera. The one on your phone isn't as good as you'll want it to be. Take a picture of the first time you see your child. You don't have to share it with everyone, but your wife will probably want one. Stand by her head, don't look down the barrel of the childbirth.
When you go out to dinner with your child, get your bill with the food. If you need to bolt because kiddo blows up, everyone will thank you.
Get your friends to bring you food for the first few weeks. Anything you don't have to cook is WAY better than cooking. A cleaning service isn't a bad idea either.
If there's anybody who loves your baby more than you, it's grandma and grandpa. Let them help, let them babysit, let them have baby time. Take the breather.
Look into a 529 college savings plan.
Don't worry about child-rearing fads. Our parents didn't have them and we turned out... alright, I guess.
Children grow far faster than the clothing sizes. Mine's 6 months and is in 9-12mos clothing.

I hope you don't have to explain a miscarriage to people. If you need support from others, announce early. If you prefer to suffer alone, keep it quiet.
 
2012-10-09 05:00:34 PM
I would recommend that you have 24-hour poison control's number on your fridge or somewhere easily accessed. You may one day believe you've locked up everything only to turn around find that your kid swallowed the ONE thing that you forgot about. Or ate something from outside. Sometimes you will have no idea what they ate and it can be hard to get a confession especially with limited communication skills. Having PC on hand can help immensely (so long as it's not an obvious 911 emergency).
 
2012-10-09 06:02:09 PM
Calendula cream for rashes or sores. Jock itch cream for that neck-fat rash they get. Don't use powder, they don't need it and corn starch just feeds yeast. Don't buy too many newborn diapers, they outgrow them, fast. You never have to buy swimming diapers, someone will give you half a pack. Don't buy a baby bath, the sink or one of you in the tub with him works great. Don't be squeamish about buying used stuff at consignment shops or church sales. There's really no reason to ever buy much but diapers and toothbrushes new. In fact, used clothes and blankets have a lot less of that toxic flame retardant stuff on them since they're well laundered.

Breastfeeding and co-sleeping aren't for everyone but now that my kid is 16 months old, I see the benefits. He's a confident little cus. Avoid circumcision. It's just unnecessarily cruel, if he wants his dick mutilated, let him decide when he's older.

Get your baby used to everything. Don't quit going out to dinner, just stick his carseat under the table if he gets fussy. Try to find a nice Episcopalian church "Parent's Day Out" for a few hours a week, you'll get your life mostly back and it's only 5 bucks an hour and no weird indoctrination.

Get the farking epidural.

If people offer help, take it.

If you have a dog, play baby noises on youtube. Let them smell all the supplies you're going to use, do a diaper change on a doll in front of them and bring home the baby's diaper and hospital hat. Have someone run the shiat out of them before you guys arrive home from the hospital.

Take a pregnancy class and see if you can meet a couple or two who seem to share your parenting outlook and are fun to hang out with. You're not meant to do this all by yourself.
 
2012-10-09 06:38:31 PM

schubie: Avoid circumcision. It's just unnecessarily cruel, if he wants his dick mutilated, let him decide when he's older.



*ahem*
While you are certainly entitled to your own strongly-held opinions, one-third of the males on this planet, including three-quarters of US males (including me), are not mutilated.

I really hate rehashing this thread.

The facts seem to disagree with your opinion, as well. The American Academy of Pediatrics Policy Statement on Male Circumcision
Bottom line: medically justified if the family wants it
The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists has endorsed this statement.
 
2012-10-09 06:42:00 PM
As a full-time, single dad since my son was 7 months old, and no family nearby (read no back-up or extra set of hands)

If the nearby laundromat has by-the-pound fluff-n-fold service, it's a sanity-saver.

General schedules are good ... get them into a bed-time routine, and generally stick to it.

Things go a lot smoother when you say "you have x minutes to do [whatever they're currently doing] and then you have to ..." instead of springing it on them NOW.

Nobody's got it all down (my sister is a pediatrician and still has to threaten/promise rewards to her kids to the extent that makes the mafia look tame) yet countries where kids are being raised in 1-room, dirt-floor, huts in 100+ degree weather, without A/C or even running water are having population explosions of perfectly well-adjusted kids.

You won't just love your kids, you'll fall in love with them.
Soak up all of those hugs and kisses while you can, because eventually, they won't think it's cool, anymore.

Remember that they're children, not just short adults. Reasoning does not work ... interesting stories, and turning tasks into games, does.

If they make a reasonable mess, make it their responsibility to clean it up. Don't scold them for having an accident (if they're NOT doing something that you've forbidden); do scold them for not taking responsibility to take care of it.

There is nothing wrong if your kid decides to be an introvert.
If s/he is having problems communicating or making friends, then look into it.
Get them involved in a TEAM sport early on .. then let them decide if they want to opt out, next season.
 
2012-10-09 07:21:32 PM
Just want to say thanks to all you parents for contributing in this thread. At our 9 week ultrasound to determine viability we were surprised with the finding of twins wriggling around, and this has been a great read for us both as we freak the Hell out about our new prognosis.

(Moreso due to the doc mentioning "vanishing twin syndrome"...WTH man!)
 
2012-10-09 08:29:31 PM
- Take prenatal courses. You don't have to go to the same hospital you choose for delivery.
- Get a Diaper Genie or equivalent. Seriously. Ours is the Munchkin diaper pail. The bags are reasonably priced.
- Mom will be a WRECK for the first 2 weeks, regardless of the method of delivery. She shouldn't cook, clean, or walk upstairs. Take at least two weeks of parental leave to help her 100%.
- No vaginal intercourse for 6 weeks. Load up on pr0n.
- Your newborn's larva phase will last about a month. That's OK. Then one day, he/she'll smile back at you. Aaaawwwwwwwwww
- Take shifts at night with the newborn. For Mom, a solid 4-hour nap will be luxury. Do her that favor.
- Get all the help you can. If reliable friends offer to help, give them specific action items. If the grandparents are nearby and able to help, you are golden.
- IF you plan to breastfeed, ask about your hospital's lactation services. During our stay we got one free private lactation consultation and two free group courses. Those are otherwise quite pricey.
- IF you plan to breastfeed and it doesn't work for the first 3-4 days, don't freak out and keep trying. My wife was "dry" and one afternoon she started taking malt beverages (Goya Malta). It was like flipping a switch. She went from dry to overflow in 3 hours.
- fill up the fridge/freezer and get a 2-week supply of wipes and diapers before you go to the hospital. 10 diapers and 20 wipes per day. You won't have energy for grocery shopping.
- Clean out the hospital room before you leave. Get all the extra supplies you can.
- If your newborn fights being bundled, that's OK. Some kids just don't like being bundled.


and

- Your kid's happiness is contagious. Find what makes him/her lauch, and repeat ad nauseum.
 
2012-10-09 10:26:07 PM
Step 1: have as many sire as you can, before realizing what thefark you were thinking

Step 2: buy as much PG, DIS and AAPL as you can afford in that order, as this is what your sire will be consuming over your first 20 yrs.
 
2012-10-10 02:52:22 AM
spank early, and spank often.
 
2012-10-10 07:49:27 AM
spank early, and spank often.

This might have prevented the pregnancy in the first place!
 
2012-10-10 08:24:20 AM

LooseLips: I would recommend that you have 24-hour poison control's number on your fridge or somewhere easily accessed


We only haad to use it once, when my son ate an entire tube of toothpaste
 
2012-10-10 08:57:27 AM

orbister: Maturin: I am a pediatrician, not a statistician. I do not keep score on diagnosis or fatalities

In that case, and with all due respect, your advice is worthless. You still haven't said how many cases were actually involved. Ten? A hundred? A thousand? One?

SIDS is, thank goodness, extremely rare. There is no statistical evidence to back up claims that co-sleeping is a significant factor except when he parents smoke, or have used alcohol or other drugs.

If you have a statistically significant number of cases, impartially investigated by people who were not already firmly against co-sleeping (or, of course, firmly for it) then I suggest you publish.

Incidentally, although we very happily co-slept, we didn't until the kid was about three or four months old, and we took great care to follow all the guidelines.


Dude, seriously. I know nobody knows you're a god on the internet, but I'll take a doctor's ten anectodals to your one anecdoltal.

/coslept as well
//farking paranoid about it - chockblocks everywhere. All survived.
///hooked the crib up to the bed for the last one. Much better
 
2012-10-10 12:18:31 PM
I'm amazed this thread is still getting posts.

I've already said it but thanks again to those who contributed real advice - I showed the wife the thread and she was amused, pleased, and agreed with all the folks who said I shouldn't call our kid "crotchfruit" in front of her. There are a number of pieces of advice (take lots of pictures, snuggle them while you can, get a dedicated diaper bucket) that were cited by enough people that we've definitely put them on our "to do" list.

I'm amazed at how many people got salty about "breeders" and "crotchfruit" after I explained multiple times I was doing it to get the green; I've been here for a bit, I know how this circus works. Why u so mad, bros? If the headline was "pregnancy advice", it wouldn't have seen the light of day.

Also, even though I know it was TFD and those run on the high side of the post counts, I wonder how many other "first greens" got to 750+ posts. #notbragging

Thanks again parents, we're pretty excited, and we see it as an early anniversary (today) gift from...ourselves to ourselves.

/have already started buying diapers
 
2012-10-10 02:48:06 PM

factoryconnection: indarwinsshadow: SIDS has an unknown cause. You can do everything right, and still end up in hell. Get the monitor.

4 months. 3 days. Jan 14th. 1999

Whoa, whoa! I wasn't the one that joked about "weeding out the weak ones." I said that the monitors provide a non-stop deluge of false positives, even the hospital ones, which doesn't help in the long run.

Also: I can't imagine what that was to go through, or what you still are carrying inside today. Seriously my heart goes out to you.

namegoeshere: Also: YOU CAN NOT SPOIL AN INFANT. The sooner you respond to their needs in the first months, the more low maintenance they will be later on.

This. Cuddle the f*ck out of that thing. They get big really quickly.


Thanks. 13 years and I'm still not over it. I don't think I ever will be. Yes, it's left me screwed up. Yes, I should probably get help. It wasn't just my son who died, I did as well. I'm not the same anymore.
 
2012-10-10 08:40:55 PM
Another thing,

If you want to save a lot of money(hundreds and hundreds of bucks), use "cloth" or reusable diapers.

Start with "Pre-folds" for first month or 2 - they have things called snappys that are used instead of safety pins to secure it.

The reusable ones out these days aren't your grandparents type of cloth diaper. They are advanced with micro-fiber, removable inserts and adjustable snaps all over the place and in the elastic. You can find them anywhere, especially ebay for Chinese knock-offs, but you get what you pay for. You will save oodles of money, but you need to stock up on about 10 to 15 at first and expand your collection as your baby grows. I also suggest doubling up on the inserts.

bumGenius is considered the shiznit when it comes to reusable diapers. We only use disposable nighttime diapers at night, but the rest of the time it's cloth.

When the baby starts solids, it's then time to invest in a diaper sprayer to move the solids into the toilet before pre-soaking the diapers.

It would also be the time to invest in a vapor respirator if you don't have one yet - there is no shiat you can't handle with that breather on.

Do not wash in a front loading clothes washer, they will not clean - only a top-loading washer will do. Soak for a few hours on cold, drain, add DRY detergent with fewest additives with hot water and wash normal. Do not use dryer, instead use drying rack for the diapers. You can dry the inserts in dryer but use lots of dryer balls and NO DRYER SHEETS.
 
2012-10-11 06:25:41 PM
A nailbrush. Make sure you've got a nailbrush. For getting the poop out from under your nails.

Congrats!
 
Displayed 42 of 792 comments

First | « | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report