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(Fark)   Subby found out his wife was pregnant this morning. (Expected and planned.) Breeders: What's the one piece of advice you WISH you could have had on day one regarding your impending crotchfruit?   (fark.com) divider line 792
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4784 clicks; posted to Main » on 08 Oct 2012 at 11:34 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-08 01:33:48 PM
For Pete's sake, have an MD in the room when your child is born. Even the most textbook easy pregnancy (like Mrs. Pilates') can have a bumpy landing. You don't have to needlessly fear anything going wrong. But on the off chance something DOES go sideways towards the end, you need a doctor, not just incense and good vibes.

Also, a good piece of broad advice I received, and this was actually helpful for me: Learn to surrender control. Sometimes you'll just have to.
 
2012-10-08 01:34:00 PM

Falin: Falin: As the father of 4 children ranging from 15 to 7 years old, there is one piece of advice that I wish I had never gotten, as it cause me more frustration and pain than anything else that happened while raising my kids.

DON'T TAKE ADVICE ABOUT HOW TO RAISE YOUR CHILDREN FROM OTHER PEOPLE.

It's a waste of time. You will be better off figuring things out for yourselves.

Bah, this doesn't make sense. You know what I mean.


No, I liked it... It sounded ultra-meta.
 
2012-10-08 01:34:02 PM
Two pieces of advice:

1.) Just because you talked and decided that you could handle the extra work, responsibility, and expense of a baby doesn't mean you won't have twins. Twins are more common than you think, and no one plans for them, and they will OWN YOU.

2.) Your life is going to change more than you can imagine, and more than anyone can sufficiently describe. When we went to the hospital I packed video games, books, and patent bar study materials in preparation for what I thought was going to be a two week break vacation from work. I used none of them. What followed was the seven most hellish days of my life, not due to any complications or economic considerations or anything like that, just the sheer amount of attention and upkeep that newborn babies require coupled with the terrifying reality that they are FRAGILE LITTLE PEOPLE. Imagine sitting awake at 5AM watching your wife hold a baby(or possibly two), and trying not to fall asleep because you've been told not to let the babies sleep in moms bed. But if mom puts the babies down they cry. So dad has to stay awake and watch mom sleep. For three straight days. Now, I'm not saying this is required or rational, but your brain will be operating in a such a state of stress and paranoia that this will seem like a reasonable solution.

Good luck.
 
2012-10-08 01:34:30 PM

Geotpf: RobDownSouth: Sooner or later your child will walk
Sooner or later your child will come into your bedroom and wake you out of a sound sleep to tell you they "don't feel good".
IMMEDIATELY cover your head to avoid the intense spew of vomit that will follow within the next 5 seconds.
Trust me on this.

/bitter experience
//lactose intolerant kiddos
///barf-o-rama
////slashies!

I actually remember doing this exact thing when I was about eight.


Oh yuck. Memories. Little kids will run to you for comfort as soon as they feel the pukey feeling. You will be showered with puke every time. The best way to handle puke is to tag-team it. The puked-on parent gets to clean up themselves and the puke, the other one gets to clean up and comfort the kid.

On that note, keep LOTS of extra bedding and jammies clean and handy for the nights where they puke faster than you can run laundry.
 
2012-10-08 01:35:01 PM
Oh dear. Having said that you shouldn't listen to advice, I keep giving it. Oh, what the hell. Here's another.

Baby slings are wonderful. They give the father a chance to get something of the same physical bonding as the mother, and are also very, very much easier than a pushchair. Get a good one, though, because there is some awkward rubbish out there. I used a Baby Bjorn and it was without doubt the best bit of baby equipment we had. Goes on in seconds, lasts the first year (three months facing in, nice months facing out) and extremely comfortable for both parties.

4.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-10-08 01:36:45 PM
The baby's fingernails and toenails may look ingrown. They really aren't. This is normal.
 
2012-10-08 01:36:46 PM

NowhereMon: Sleep now. Prepare to no longer be the center of your universe, get used to the idea that you won't be seeing your childless friends as much any more. Be prepared to really truly understand the meaning of the word "responsibility". Forget about having a spotless clean house or nice stuff for the next 6-8 years. I hope that you didn't wait till age forty to do this like I did.

Haha, who am I kidding, there is no way to prepare for what you are about to go though. You'll be fine, you are not unique, most people do it at some point, just try to not be too abusive or neglectful.


done in 1.
 
2012-10-08 01:36:48 PM
Ooh, another thing: Enjoy the little things later on in the pregnancy. Impulsive trips to the store or a night away. Do a tour of all your favorite restaurants, which mama will appreciate. Your life and fun times don't end with a child, they just require a lot more planning and strategy.
 
2012-10-08 01:36:49 PM

EdNortonsTwin: My 2.5 y/o has had this nagging barking cough for over two weeks and doctors won't give me anything for it.

We can't sleep; my daughter is miserable; she hardly eats; losing weight - any advice?

/Other than strangling the Dr which I want to do.


How has your relationship been with this pediatrician? Did they explain why they are doing what they are or aren't doing? Give you therapy options for your daughter's cough? I know first hand that some pediatricians should have either retired or never started a practice in the first place. Basically, if you don't feel comfortable with them, move on.
 
2012-10-08 01:37:37 PM

Gwendolyn: If you are having a girl, be prepared to figure out how to get liquid poop out of a teeny tiny vagina. WHY DOES NO ONE TELL YOU THAT?


img.metro.co.uk
 
2012-10-08 01:37:46 PM

ModernPrimitive01: hasty ambush: 1. Do not bubblewrap your spawn. No childhood is complete without a bloody nose or two, cuts, bruises and even a scar or broken bone.

2. Do not give them a sense of entitlement. Nobody owes them anything, life is unfair and the kid down the street will probably have more than him. Let the spawn learn to deal with it.

3.Occasionally say no even if you do not have to.

4..Because you said so is a perfectly acceptable reason that requires no further explanation.

5. Make sure the spawn behave in public

6. Spanking is OK. The spawn's frontal lobe won't even be fully developed for a couple of decades. They will be driven largely by hormones and instinct instead of common sense so they won't always respond to reason.

that's no way to teach your child logic and reason. An argument from authority isn't a good reason for your child's beliefs


Did you miss the part where their frontal lobe is not fullly developed and they don't respond to logic and reason anyway?
 
2012-10-08 01:37:51 PM

NIXON YOU DOLT!!!!!: Don't tell anyone until around week 16. Miscarriages are a biatch.


Yup. Don't uncork the champagne until you've passed this landmark. Tons of pregnancies auto-terminate within the first few months. It's fairly normal but unfortunately near taboo to talk about.
 
2012-10-08 01:37:56 PM

Sneakytoes: The people at the hospital can be assholes. Don't let you push them around. Example - I was having huge problems getting my baby to latch on, she finally started to, and a nurse swooped in and took her away because it was time for the pediatrician to look at all of the babies. I was alone and too whacked out to fight back. Asshole.


Be prepared for this! My baby-having friends say next time they will make sure there is someone (family member or midwife) who knows what they want and will stand up for them. It isn't about going against a doctor's advice or anything, but little things like what you mentioned that don't matter to the nurse or baby but are a huge deal for the parents. (i.e. I want to hold my baby before he/she is swooped away/cleaned off/etc.)
 
2012-10-08 01:38:07 PM
Oh, also on my way now to the first ultrasound. Gotta tell myself to pay attention to driving!
 
2012-10-08 01:38:30 PM
grinding_journalist: To the guy that said "this thread sucks, didn't know FARK was reddit lite",


I guess that's me, since we're the only ones who've mentioned Reddit in this thread so far.

Let me tell you what I actually said:

"This advice thread is another example of the types of things I'm seeing on Fark which seem better suited for Reddit. Why is Fark trying to turn into Reddit?"


Didn't say the thread sucked. Didn't say Fark was "reddit lite". I asked why Fark was trying to turn into Reddit. This doesn't disparage you, since you don't control what gets on the front page (as users on Reddit do). This is more of a comment pointed at the Mods. Since I've used BOTH sites for years (and have been behind the "Total Fark" curtain a few times), I can say that this is not the type of post that I've seen much on Fark.... until the last couple months.
 
2012-10-08 01:39:35 PM
Listen to your gut.

Recommended parenting methods, when to feed what, whether to sleep with your child...all of it constantly changes. Chuck the parenting books and do not get into that awful parenting competition that so many young parents seem to be engaged in these days.

Your child will proceed through life at their own pace assisted by you. Other parents will attempt to draw you into that horrid business of "Johny was fluent in Greek at age three but...I am sure Sue will speak someday" Ignore that crap and enjoy your child.

Do not make childhood a boot camp. Play, go outside and trust. Free range the kidoid as much as possible. It helps develop a sense of confidence and a spirit of exploration.

Take time to appreciate the small stuff. It goes by fast.

My grandmother always called babies "little strangers" and I think she's right. Respect the fact that your child is not you nor is your child there to make up for those things you didn't get to do. You may have wanted a pony and tragically grew up without one. Your kid might not want a pony. Your kid is someone you are lucky to know. Remember that....even when you want to kill them.

There will be times when you don't like your kid but I hope you will always love them. These moments can come up at any time but it's hard to get through the teens years without it happening at least once. You haven't failed. If we always liked our children and they always liked us they'd never move out!

My baby is now 31 and he has twin six year old girls. My middle daughter is 33 and has a three year old daughter. My oldest daughter has twins, a boy and girl who are 18 months. If you are lucky enough to one day have grand children you will be able to enjoy a whole new aspect of parenting.

It's like dessert! You can do all the fun things with the kids and worry little about the tougher aspects. Walks in the woods, coloring, cooking, showing them The Three Stooges, teaching them to whistle and a thousand other things. For me, despite always feeling I was a lousy parent or that I could have done better I knew one day that I had done well.

My son was in the kitchen with his step daughter and she was being whiny about dinner. He looked at her and told her, "This is a kitchen, not a restaurant. I've made a reasonable dinner and if you don't like it you don't have to eat it but there will be no alternate meal prepared for you" My son exited the kitchen and saw me grinning at him. He smiled and said, "damn mom...that was you coming out of me...maybe you weren't so bad!"

Follow your gut and love with every fiber of your being....you will be fine. Congrats to you, your wife and the little stranger who chose you as his or her parents!
 
2012-10-08 01:39:46 PM
My advice is not so much things we didn't do that we wish we did, but some things we did do that I'm really glad for.

1. Breast feed - this is pretty obvious. If at all possible, do it. There are long-term benefits for both the baby and the mother.

2. Baby sign - We didn't go overboard with this, but just a couple important signs. First and most important was "milk". Just sign and say "milk" every time you feed her. Eventually they'll pick up on it and start using it when they are hungry instead of crying and screaming. Later signs were "eat" and "toilet". Those three signs saved us an incredible amount of grief. She could communicate when she was hungry or thirsty or dirty instead of having to cry in frustration.

3. Talk to your baby normally - We constantly talked to our daughter. From day one we'd just talk, explain everything we were doing using full sentences. We'd use a higher pitch [since they do respond to that] but we didn't use baby words like 'baba' for 'bottle' or anything. We used the proper words and complete sentences. While I can't *prove* it, I think this went a long way to helping develop her intelligence and speaking/reading abilities.
 
2012-10-08 01:42:05 PM
Also

(7) There is no such thing as "child-proofing." You may think your living room is child-proofed, and then one day (and I really mean this happens in ONE FREAKING DAY) your furniture spontaneously transforms from obstacles to climbing walls.

As your child develops, previously irrelevant things become sudden hazards. Like movable screens on second story windows. Or the edges of tables, once your kid is tall enough to run into them. You just have to be ready as this universe of danger unfolds.

Speaking of which, here are some obvious baby-proofing tips:

*) Hang up keys. The hazard isn't that baby will swallow the keys. The hazard is that baby will see you stick a key in a keyhole 1000 times, and will try to imitate you with an electric outlet.

*) Throw spare change in a jar. Pennies are possibly the worst choking hazard in your house, because they accumulate everywhere. It takes extra vigilance to keep those things away from your kid. We're lucky that our baby rarely ever put anything in his mouth, but you never know if his personality is going to change.

*) If you use a laptop, get one of those fancy twisty outlet covers. We use standard outlet blockers, and inevitably half of them are missing because we keep plugging in laptops. If you repeatedly plug something into an outlet, don't rely on your discipline, get a better outlet cover.
 
2012-10-08 01:43:37 PM
Didn't read all the responses so these might of been covered:

- Your social life will take a major hit for about 4 years
- Good Babysitters are worth their weight in gold
- Take turns at night staying awake with the baby.

- Yard sales are your friend, you can get enough outfits for years for under a $1 each and start buying all sizes and keep them stored away for later.
- Once Upon a Child and Goodwill are great for filling out what you didn't find at yard sales.
- Baby Gap, and other 'baby' stores are a major rip off when they are this young, they will out grow whatever outfit you buy in 4 months.

- Sign up on all the major baby sites for their free programs, even if you don't really need them you can donate them to another family in the area.
- Go generic for diapers and formula, if your child can handle it

- When looking for new items (Strollers / Diaper Bags / Changing Tables / Cars / Houses) the first question you need to ask is "How much will this hold" You have no concept as to the amount of items that you will need to have available. Best thing to do is ask a friend who has a young child to borrow everything that you would need for an overnight trip. See if you can fit it all in your car. Do this as early as possible, it will help you prepare for what's coming.
-- Invest in either cargo pants or, as my wife really liked, a Survival Utilikilt so that you can become the portable diaper bag, and she doesn't have to carry everything. (The amount of stuff you can cram in the kilt was astounding)

- Take as many pictures and videos that you can. (Don't forget to back them up somewhere)
- Frozen meals are a godsend for the first few months
- Invest in a good baby monitor
- Start looking, now, for a day care

- Most of the jokes about diapers are true, but you get used to them fairly quick.
- When changing diapers, please remember to 'cover' the area if you are going to be away for more than 3 seconds.

- After the first few months have past, Force your wife to get out of the house with some of her friends to help remind her of life outside of the baby.

But most of all, its the most amazing feeling in the world to have your child sleeping in your arms. And all the stress and headache and aggravation is worth it in the end.

\ PS: Please if at all possible, keep your child at home for the first few weeks to let them get used to the outside world before you take them to Wally World
\\ Start thinking of baby names now.
 
2012-10-08 01:43:41 PM

Embden.Meyerhof: grinding_journalist: To the guy that said "this thread sucks, didn't know FARK was reddit lite",


I guess that's me, since we're the only ones who've mentioned Reddit in this thread so far.

Let me tell you what I actually said:

"This advice thread is another example of the types of things I'm seeing on Fark which seem better suited for Reddit. Why is Fark trying to turn into Reddit?"


Didn't say the thread sucked. Didn't say Fark was "reddit lite". I asked why Fark was trying to turn into Reddit. This doesn't disparage you, since you don't control what gets on the front page (as users on Reddit do). This is more of a comment pointed at the Mods. Since I've used BOTH sites for years (and have been behind the "Total Fark" curtain a few times), I can say that this is not the type of post that I've seen much on Fark.... until the last couple months.


This is very much a typical TFDiscussion thread. Hence the ADVICE tag. Sometimes the TFDs with potential make it over here to literland so we peons can see what we're missing. They're easy to avoid - look for the FARK tag.
 
2012-10-08 01:43:55 PM

Doubletwist-: 2. Baby sign


When I first heard people were doing this my first thought was 'Why the fark didn't someone think of this years ago?'
 
2012-10-08 01:44:05 PM
 
2012-10-08 01:44:16 PM
Also, one more safety tip I forgot:

*) Drink beer from a glass. If you drink beer from a bottle, your kid will eventually try to imitate you with random bottles.
 
2012-10-08 01:45:55 PM

Doubletwist-:
3. Talk to your baby normally - We constantly talked to our daughter. From day one we'd just talk, explain everything we were doing using full sentences. We'd use a higher pitch [since they do respond to that] but we didn't use baby words like 'baba' for 'bottle' or anything. We used the proper words and complete sentences. While I can't *prove* it, I think this went a long way to helping develop her intelligence and speaking/reading abilities.


I completely agree with this. Someone said "kids are dumb" upthread. They aren't dumb... just naive, ignorant and need to be taught....but obviously have a huge capacity for learning. They are human from the start. If you teach them, they will learn.
 
2012-10-08 01:46:23 PM

Yaxe: Remember: If your child isn't popping, don't feed them laxatives. Make them eat prunes. You will be surprised how effective they work.


They do work very well. After feeding them the prunes, put them in the bathtub (no water) until they poop. You will be amazed how well the prunes work.

/Did I mention the prunes work very well?
 
2012-10-08 01:46:34 PM

factoryconnection: darwin


Congratulations. You won the lottery. On the other hand, we didn't. We're non smokers, we were both under 30, he was our 3rd child, breast fed, light sheets, firm crib mattress, he had a doctors check up 24hrs before his passing. So let me repeat this since some people can't clue in that SIDS stands for sudden infant deaths syndrome.. For the smitty, ignore Dr. Doolittle. Get the monitor. SIDS has an unknown cause. You can do everything right, and still end up in hell. Get the monitor.

4 months. 3 days. Jan 14th. 1999
 
2012-10-08 01:46:48 PM

Doubletwist-: My advice is not so much things we didn't do that we wish we did, but some things we did do that I'm really glad for.

We used the proper words and complete sentences.

 

Now I understand how grammar nazi's are created.
 
2012-10-08 01:47:41 PM
Oh yeah, don't nmae your baby something stupid. We'll all tell you it's creative and unique, but when you leave we'll mock you AND the baby.
 
2012-10-08 01:47:47 PM

FooDog: NIXON YOU DOLT!!!!!: Don't tell anyone until around week 16. Miscarriages are a biatch.

Yup. Don't uncork the champagne until you've passed this landmark. Tons of pregnancies auto-terminate within the first few months. It's fairly normal but unfortunately near taboo to talk about.


God works in mysterious ways.
 
2012-10-08 01:47:56 PM
You've just invited a very drunken midget to live in your home for an indefinite amount of time. This midget is so farking drunk that it will take YEARS to sober up and become a rational, coherent person.
 
2012-10-08 01:49:00 PM

orbister: Don't put the baby in bed with you, it's so dangerous, and it creates bad habits.

Statistically there are no additional dangers in co-sleeping as long as you don't smoke, never share a bed with a baby after even the smallest amount of alcohol, and don't do it if you are particularly tired. As for bad habits ... what bad habits? Are we talking Sandusky here?


We had the best of both worlds - a flat bottomed small bassinette with mesh sides that fit right in between the pillows but was its own self contained unit. I like a lot of pillows and fluffy covers in the bed, and it's a water bed, so not ideal for cosleeping. The bassinet was an excellent compromise.

Also: YOU CAN NOT SPOIL AN INFANT. The sooner you respond to their needs in the first months, the more low maintenance they will be later on.
 
2012-10-08 01:49:02 PM

imasig: Doubletwist-: My advice is not so much things we didn't do that we wish we did, but some things we did do that I'm really glad for.

We used the proper words and complete sentences. 

Now I understand how grammar nazi's are created.


Dear god. Did not need apostrophe.
 
2012-10-08 01:49:17 PM
Don't be alarmed if the baby goes remarkably long times without taking a dump. Ten days of pee only is perfectly normal, fourteen is quite possible.
 
2012-10-08 01:49:22 PM
Definitely try to get as much sleep now as possible. My daughter's 3 1/2 and has just recently started to sleep in on the weekends. When I say "sleep in" I mean she's not waking up until 6 or 6:30am instead of her usual 4-5am.

Also, keep in mind that all babies are different. They're all born with unique personalities and temperaments. So when you see that quiet, calm baby at the store just sleeping away in their stroller or carseat without a care...there's a good chance your baby isn't going to act anything like that. Always be prepared for at least one of your kids to be the mother of all demon seeds.
 
2012-10-08 01:49:37 PM
n-a-m-e!
 
2012-10-08 01:51:27 PM
Get this book.
ecx.images-amazon.com
 
2012-10-08 01:51:39 PM
You haven't loved yet
 
2012-10-08 01:53:33 PM

Spanky McStupid: grinding_journalist: Since you all are providing me with such specifics, I figure I can ask a couple questions, and outline my situation more clearly.

As far as sleep goes, I am a night person, while my wife is a morning/day person. I'm usually up till about 2-3am anyway, and she's usually up by about 530-6 after going to be around 10. Am I crazy in thinking this will also be very helpful? This works in theory - your mileage may vary.

I've already received flak from bro and sis about "not just dumping my kid on mom" (theoretical kid, this was months ago and they don't know yet, nobody does- except this thread) which was never my plan, but I am glad that I have familial support locally. Alongside this, my wife's BFF has a 6 month old, and she's been her ... Tell your siblings to go pound sand because after the babby arrives, you might need a restraining order to keep the grandmas away.

Just saying. 

And congrats!


And when the grandmas are there, they will neither notice nor care whether or not you are, as long as the baby is. Use this time wisely.
 
2012-10-08 01:53:38 PM
Congrats. Kiss your old life goodbye and proudly welcome your new one. Other that the above, one of the more humerous pieces of true commentary I got was:

You will spend the first two years teaching them to walk and talk. Then next 16 will be spent telling them to sit down and be quiet.

And a random thought just hit me:
1) Print this thread and split the advice out from the snark, regardless of whether or not you think it's good
2) Keep track of what was good and bad advice so you can turn it into a book
3) Profit (and pay for college...)

/oh crap - I just found step 2...
 
2012-10-08 01:54:12 PM

namegoeshere: We had the best of both worlds - a flat bottomed small bassinette with mesh sides that fit right in between the pillows but was its own self contained unit. I like a lot of pillows and fluffy covers in the bed, and it's a water bed, so not ideal for cosleeping. The bassinet was an excellent compromise.


That sounds like a very good idea. Some people have one-sided cots beside the parental bed so it's continuous at mattress level, which is neat. I was going to make one, but never got round to it.

Also: YOU CAN NOT SPOIL AN INFANT. The sooner you respond to their needs in the first months, the more low maintenance they will be later on.

And how. There is a weird sentiment around that the baby's only doing it to get attention. Well of course it's only doing it to get attention. It's a tiny, helpless and utterly vulnerable creature in a huge, confusing threatening world. It wants attention. It needs attention. And the parents' job is to give it that attention, instantly and without complaint at any time of the day or night.
 
2012-10-08 01:54:30 PM

orbister: As for bad habits ... what bad habits? Are we talking Sandusky here?


Like they never want to sleep in their own bed. Having seen this happen, it's bad news. Put them in their own bed. The apart time is important for both child and parent.
 
2012-10-08 01:55:35 PM
Hope its black

danieltosh.png
 
2012-10-08 01:55:56 PM
I haven't read every comment, but my addition is:

Do not move the diaper out of the way until you have a wipe ready, or you may very well need to wipe yourself off, too.

I've been pooped on once, never peed on. The kids saved that for mommy and grandma.
 
2012-10-08 01:56:49 PM
keep having sex, we did thru the 8th month.
and the thing i loved the most was reading to my kids, get lots of books
 
2012-10-08 01:56:51 PM

Roy_G_Biv: Big Ramifications: Do not leave your laptop lying around. They rip the keys off the keyboard.

One day it will happen. At around 8 months. Strong wrists and tiny fingers.... overnight they become KEY RIPPING OFF machines. Must be like bubble wrap to them.

Haven't had that problem with either one, knock wood, but if you wear glasses get the frames that can be bent without hurting them. I did, my wife didn't, hers got bent beyond repair.

Also, keep one or more of your old cellular phones when you get new ones. After awhile mine didn't want to play with those fake toy ones anymore; they wanted to play with the real thing. Once you get your phone number removed, they can play with the old ones to their heart's content.


Until they hit 911...
 
2012-10-08 01:56:59 PM
When it comes to shower gifts, all you need are diapers, a BOB stroller, a co-sleeper, and swaddling blankets. Your best friend should be diapers.com. They have free shipping, free returns, frequent sales, and they carry everything you'll need. Have friends give you gift certificates for diapers.com.

Also, sleep when the baby sleeps.
 
2012-10-08 01:57:28 PM

namegoeshere: Geotpf: RobDownSouth: Sooner or later your child will walk
Sooner or later your child will come into your bedroom and wake you out of a sound sleep to tell you they "don't feel good".
IMMEDIATELY cover your head to avoid the intense spew of vomit that will follow within the next 5 seconds.
Trust me on this.

/bitter experience
//lactose intolerant kiddos
///barf-o-rama
////slashies!

I actually remember doing this exact thing when I was about eight.

Oh yuck. Memories. Little kids will run to you for comfort as soon as they feel the pukey feeling. You will be showered with puke every time. The best way to handle puke is to tag-team it. The puked-on parent gets to clean up themselves and the puke, the other one gets to clean up and comfort the kid.

On that note, keep LOTS of extra bedding and jammies clean and handy for the nights where they puke faster than you can run laundry.


This is good advice, until you have a second kid. Then, if one is puking, one of you handles everything to do with that kid. The other stays with the non-puking kid. If they aren't separated, then you've got two puking kids. You'll want to avoid that. Trust me, I know.
 
2012-10-08 01:58:21 PM

EdNortonsTwin: My 2.5 y/o has had this nagging barking cough for over two weeks and doctors won't give me anything for it.

We can't sleep; my daughter is miserable; she hardly eats; losing weight - any advice?

/Other than strangling the Dr which I want to do.


First, find another pediatrician. Not eating and losing weight is not a good thing. Is she staying hydrated at least?

There's not a lot of cold meds you can give a 2.5 year old. You can try Hylands Cold & Cough 4 Kids. It's safe for children 2 and up. Also, are you running the humidifier at full blast day and night? You might also want to try vicks on her feet at night. Use the regular Vicks, not the baby stuff. Put it on fairly thick and put their socks on over it. Keep in mind, it will stain the sheets.
 
2012-10-08 02:02:31 PM

vrax: orbister: As for bad habits ... what bad habits? Are we talking Sandusky here?

Like they never want to sleep in their own bed. Having seen this happen, it's bad news. Put them in their own bed. The apart time is important for both child and parent.


Also realize that reason there is even a discussion on this is because they might not want to sleep all alone in their crib to begin with. So it's easy to say put them in their own bed but if they start screaming the second they hit the bed and then fall asleep the second they make contact with you again you can see why a lot of people allow them to sleep in bed with them.

So yeah it's probably best to sleep alone but you will have to be ready to sleep even less and really work to get them to that point. Or it might not be an issue at all. They may sleep fine by themselves. Mine does not, and it's a constant battle of picking him up and comforting him and then putting him back down in hopes that he might be in a deep enough sleep to go a couple of hours on his own.
 
2012-10-08 02:02:36 PM
There is only one manual of parenting you need. Seriously, it has everything you will ever need.

www.doobybrain.com
 
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