If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Starpulse)   Jenny McCarthy says that during her Playboy days she once took a lot of pills and started making out with the other playmates. In related news, Jenny McCarthy has a new book that just came out   (starpulse.com) divider line 125
    More: Obvious, Jenny McCarthy, Playboy, Perez Hilton  
•       •       •

8496 clicks; posted to Main » on 08 Oct 2012 at 10:35 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



125 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all
 
2012-10-08 11:52:04 AM

capt.hollister:
Unfortunately, that type of basic ignorance about things in our lives is what allows the uninformed opinions of people like Ms McCarthy to ...


Well farking excuse me that i made a basic misunderstanding in flu biology, Jesus.
Thanks for lumping me in with creationists and vaccine deniers because I don't care to get a flu shot.

Also, someone want to explain to me why it needs to be boosted every year?
I mean, you need tetanus practically never, but every year you need a new flu booster.

Is it just a matter of being in contact with it so regularly wears it down, or what?
I do honestly want to know, Biology was never my strong point.
 
2012-10-08 11:52:31 AM

Litig8r: wildcardjack:

The problem with crap being wrong on the internet is that it continues to be wrong long after it's been corrected. They banned thimerosal about a decade ago and still people are fretting about mercury in vaccines.



Huh? Thimerosal is still a legal and mainstay flu vaccine preservative.


Thimerosal is also not a problem. There have been no studies linking to to any problems anyway. Thimerosal wasn't banned but several companies make flu vaccines without the preservative voluntarily.
 
2012-10-08 11:54:08 AM

Marcintosh: people are dying like flies because of contaminated shots of something or other


Yeah, you can't turn around these days without seeing a friend or co-worker dying from contaminated shots. Ten of my relatives are gone just this year.

/ eyeroll
 
2012-10-08 11:55:25 AM
I'll play:

www.moviecloudz.com
 
2012-10-08 12:02:13 PM

Wicked Chinchilla: Litig8r: wildcardjack:

The problem with crap being wrong on the internet is that it continues to be wrong long after it's been corrected. They banned thimerosal about a decade ago and still people are fretting about mercury in vaccines.



Huh? Thimerosal is still a legal and mainstay flu vaccine preservative.

Thimerosal is also not a problem. There have been no studies linking to to any problems anyway. Thimerosal wasn't banned but several companies make flu vaccines without the preservative voluntarily.


Yup. The single-dose packs are usually thimerosal free. The multi-dose vials usually have thimerosal in them (and I'm glad they do; repeatedly pulling doses in a clinical setting, no matter how careful you are, is asking for contamination).

Not that it matters to me; I have a pretty awful reaction to the flu vaccine and no longer get it. The last time (over 10 years ago), I had a lovely neuropathy that developed at the injection site. I couldn't lift my arm for almost 6 months. Time and PT returned it to about 95%. It sucks, because if I hadn't had that reaction I would get a flu shot every year.
 
2012-10-08 12:05:05 PM
Old News, Jenna Jameson already said as much in her autobiography. Something about her and McCarthy going at it in a bathroom stall after having just met each other at some party.
 
2012-10-08 12:06:33 PM

Litig8r: Wicked Chinchilla: Litig8r: wildcardjack:

The problem with crap being wrong on the internet is that it continues to be wrong long after it's been corrected. They banned thimerosal about a decade ago and still people are fretting about mercury in vaccines.



Huh? Thimerosal is still a legal and mainstay flu vaccine preservative.

Thimerosal is also not a problem. There have been no studies linking to to any problems anyway. Thimerosal wasn't banned but several companies make flu vaccines without the preservative voluntarily.

Yup. The single-dose packs are usually thimerosal free. The multi-dose vials usually have thimerosal in them (and I'm glad they do; repeatedly pulling doses in a clinical setting, no matter how careful you are, is asking for contamination).

Not that it matters to me; I have a pretty awful reaction to the flu vaccine and no longer get it. The last time (over 10 years ago), I had a lovely neuropathy that developed at the injection site. I couldn't lift my arm for almost 6 months. Time and PT returned it to about 95%. It sucks, because if I hadn't had that reaction I would get a flu shot every year.


See people? THIS is a reason to not get a vaccine. Complications can and do happen. It is perfectly reasonable to make a change based on actual issues. Some mystical connection with autism (that has been REPEATEDLY disproven), or some crazy desire to "stick it to big Pharma," is no reason to not get a vaccine.
 
2012-10-08 12:07:35 PM

Also, someone want to explain to me why it needs to be boosted every year?
I mean, you need tetanus practically never, but every year you need a new flu booster.


You need to stop sciencing. Just stop.
 
2012-10-08 12:09:20 PM
Brain cells never grow back and boobies sag.
Monetize!
 
2012-10-08 12:15:14 PM
Jenny, shut up and take off your clothes.
 
2012-10-08 12:22:57 PM
Who is Jenny McCarthy?
 
2012-10-08 12:24:42 PM

The One True TheDavid: Who is Jenny McCarthy?


Does it really matter?
 
2012-10-08 12:25:09 PM

Tigger: Also, someone want to explain to me why it needs to be boosted every year?
I mean, you need tetanus practically never, but every year you need a new flu booster.

You need to stop sciencing. Just stop.


Or you could stop thinking you're goddamn hilarious and actually explain it to me. Seriously, I want to know.
 
2012-10-08 12:27:45 PM

The One True TheDavid: Who is Jenny McCarthy?


Do you ask hookers for their name first also?
 
2012-10-08 12:30:17 PM

JokerMattly: Also, someone want to explain to me why it needs to be boosted every year?


Because 1) it's not one flu shot, just like there's not one flu virus. As was explained to you, they try to predict which flus will spread that season and get in front of those. The shot you get this year won't be exactly the same as the one you got last year, nor exactly the same as the one you get next year.

2) The efficacy of a vaccine is almost entirely dependent upon how many people get it. If enough people don't make up excuses to not get them, herd immunity does its thing. Just about everybody has the MMR vaccine, so the few (but increasing) holdouts (and the not-vaccinatable people victimized by these holdouts) are the ones who are contracting the (now) rare cases of Measles, Mumps, and Rubella.

Most people have the tetanus vaccine (certainly people most likely to be exposed to tetanus). Flus, not so much. Whooping Cough is also resurging, and so boosters are being recommended. (I'm a teacher, so it's particularly important for me to keep as up to date as possible. I'm scheduled for my WC and Tetanus update this week, and the flu shot as soon as it's available in my area.)

So yeah, fine, you're not a creationist or anything, but so long as you're coming up with reasons not to do it, you'll be part of the problem and not part of the solution.
 
2012-10-08 12:34:59 PM

Tigger: Also, someone want to explain to me why it needs to be boosted every year?
I mean, you need tetanus practically never, but every year you need a new flu booster.

You need to stop sciencing. Just stop.


SCIENCE DISCLAIMER: To laymen this might sound complicated, but to science folk this is going to be REALLY boiled down, don't hammer me on the nitty gritty.

1) Tetanus is a bacteria and Flu is a virus. This has all sorts of ramifications on replication, genetic "quality-control", etc. What it all boils down to though is Tetanus is a stable disease that changes very little over time where as Flu changes ALL the time (because of the type of virus it is, not just because its a virus)
2) Because of the constantly changing genetic disposition of flu and the vagaries of the human immune system a flu vaccine is basically only good for two years. Even if the same flu were circulating year after year you would still be recommended to get a shot every other year.
3) Great genetic variation = many different strains of virus floating around. Depending upon climate, other disease outbreaks, how contagious a strain is, and a whole cornucopia of other factors, there are usually a few main strains that make up the bulk of your standard flu season infections. The vaccine is composed of 3 different viruses that are engineered to most closely match the primary viruses floating about.

Figuring out number 3 is complicated because it takes 4-6 months to manufacture a vaccine. Starting a year before flu season (6 months prior to manufacture) you keep track of the different flu vaccines in circulation, where they are, and how they are moving through populations and geographies. You take this tracking data and extrapolate it out to what you expect the picture to look like 6 months from now. That picture becomes your vaccine. This is repeated every year, twice a year (different vaccines for northern and southern hemispheres)
 
2012-10-08 12:35:41 PM

MooseUpNorth: So yeah, fine, you're not a creationist or anything, but so long as you're coming up with reasons not to do it, you'll be part of the problem and not part of the solution.


Okay, so I have a follow-up.
There's a ton of flus, you said so yourself. hundreds of strains. The vaccine won't stop all of them. So even if we all got vaccinated, 100%, people would still get the flu, right? How do these other strains interact with the vaccine? Do they simply ignore it?

I mean, I know my knowledge of biology is laughable. I'm just trying to run my knowledge base up to speed. What you're telling me is that flu kills people every year, thousands, but even if every one of those people got the vaccine, they could still get the flu. the vaccination, then, only exists to stop the flu they think is going to be most rampant?
 
2012-10-08 12:38:39 PM
Actually nasal or oral vaccines can make a virus stronger, In fact, most of the wild cases of polio out there are a mutated superversion caused by nasal polio vaccine (Google vaccine associated paralytic poliomyelitis and look at http://www.cbsnews.com/2100-204_162-5242168.html). Basically in some individuals the weakened virus, which is supposed to be beaten off by the immune system, actually grows stronger and wins, and due to evolutionary pressures can mutate into a much stronger version, and then if people come into contact with this person it can spread.

The WHO refuses to switch to injectable vaccines in third world countries, because of a lack of trained health workers and sterilization equipment.
 
2012-10-08 12:41:36 PM

fireclown: [www.islefthanded.com image 800x600]
can't we just remember the good times?


As long as we're going back to J- girls of 1992, how about instead we focus on the great gifts of Jenna Jameson, who besides enthusiastically getting down, didn't indirectly kill any children.

/Kittens however, were not so lucky.
 
2012-10-08 12:43:38 PM

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: I bet it was all those pills that caused her to have retarded children.


Ya know I think you just nailed that sucker right on the head
 
2012-10-08 12:44:09 PM

JokerMattly: What you're telling me is that flu kills people every year, thousands, but even if every one of those people got the vaccine, they could still get the flu. the vaccination, then, only exists to stop the flu they think is going to be most rampant?


One way to slow the rate of mutation in a population is to drastically reduce how often it replicates. Think of a national lottery. Someone usually wins (mutation) every week, and the jackpot gets real big because everybody wants in. But if we made it hard enough to buy a ticket, so that only (say) a few thousand are ever sold, the pot will almost never be won.

So yeah, people can get a flu they're not actually vaccinated against, but over time, if everybody who can get vaccinated does, we're going to choke off more and more strains until the problem becomes manageable. Until we all do, yeah, whack-a-mole.
 
2012-10-08 12:47:45 PM

Wicked Chinchilla: [snip science]


Thank you, I appreciate it. that makes a lot more sense - i'm assuming most of our major vaccinations are of bacterias then, and not of viruses, hence their long staying power.

Have there been a lot of studies showing the drops in deaths with the flu vaccine in place? I'd be interested in seeing efficacy vs cost of development and rollout.
 
2012-10-08 12:48:40 PM

JokerMattly: MooseUpNorth: So yeah, fine, you're not a creationist or anything, but so long as you're coming up with reasons not to do it, you'll be part of the problem and not part of the solution.

Okay, so I have a follow-up.
There's a ton of flus, you said so yourself. hundreds of strains. The vaccine won't stop all of them. So even if we all got vaccinated, 100%, people would still get the flu, right? How do these other strains interact with the vaccine? Do they simply ignore it?

I mean, I know my knowledge of biology is laughable. I'm just trying to run my knowledge base up to speed. What you're telling me is that flu kills people every year, thousands, but even if every one of those people got the vaccine, they could still get the flu. the vaccination, then, only exists to stop the flu they think is going to be most rampant?


Incorrect.

Just because strains are different, does not mean they are utterly and completely different. You might have different levels of "matching" between strains. The three vaccine components picked are typically 3 of 12 that are tested against every single sample sent in from the surveillance network. The combination of three that best covers the strains (and the predicted extrapolation of the world viral environment) are the ones picked. Even if a strain is NOT directly in the vaccine there is a decent chance it is close enough to the included strain it confers some form of protection.

Plus, the assumption that everyone gets the flu is quite wrong.
 
2012-10-08 12:49:32 PM

MooseUpNorth: So yeah, people can get a flu they're not actually vaccinated against, but over time, if everybody who can get vaccinated does, we're going to choke off more and more strains until the problem becomes manageable. Until we all do, yeah, whack-a-mole.


That is an excellent point, and i see where you're coming from.
I suppose i have no real choice at this point but to go get myself a flu shot.

Are the vaccinations usually free? I see them offered at Walgreens and such, and i missed the opportunity to get one at work.
 
2012-10-08 12:50:52 PM

Wicked Chinchilla: Plus, the assumption that everyone gets the flu is quite wrong.


Oh, no, my implication was that even if you had a 100% success rate in Vaccination implementation, people could still get the flu due to strain diversity. But you articulated the protection argument well.
 
2012-10-08 12:55:01 PM
The purpose of vaccines has been the same since Salk first discovered that they worked, expose people to a weakened version of a virus, so that when the real one comes around it doesn't kill them, and if you get enough people vaccinated, then the virus doesn't come around so much.
 
2012-10-08 12:58:54 PM

JokerMattly: Wicked Chinchilla: [snip science]

Thank you, I appreciate it. that makes a lot more sense - i'm assuming most of our major vaccinations are of bacterias then, and not of viruses, hence their long staying power.

Have there been a lot of studies showing the drops in deaths with the flu vaccine in place? I'd be interested in seeing efficacy vs cost of development and rollout.


Actually no. This heralds back to the Boobies that flu is a "type" of virus which makes it more fluid than others.
Some viruses have DNA as their genetic material where as others have RNA. DNA viruses are very stable. Small Pox, Polio, measles, are examples of DNA viruses. They are more stable because when DNA is replicated in organisms it comes with a built in "proof-checker." The majority of replication errors are fixed so their is little change over time.

Flu is a type of virus with RNA as its genetic material. Unlike in DNA replication, RNA does NOT have a fact checker when it replications. Moreover, when an RNA virus infects an organism its genes must use something called reverse transcription to generate DNA from the RNA. This adds an extra layer of replication for errors to be introduced.

The info explained above and a lot of other more unique characteristics are why flu is tricky.
 
2012-10-08 12:59:10 PM

JokerMattly: Are the vaccinations usually free? I see them offered at Walgreens and such, and i missed the opportunity to get one at work.


It's not expensive. Should be about twenty bucks or so.
 
2012-10-08 01:09:39 PM

meadatron: The purpose of vaccines has been the same since Salk first discovered that they worked, expose people to a weakened version of a virus, so that when the real one comes around it doesn't kill them, and if you get enough people vaccinated, then the virus doesn't come around so much.


Vaccinations? That's your recommendation? Not infusions of marigold?

www.dvdtalk.com
 
2012-10-08 01:11:32 PM
Wasn't she HIV-positive ~15 years ago?
 
2012-10-08 01:21:05 PM

MooseUpNorth: JokerMattly: Are the vaccinations usually free? I see them offered at Walgreens and such, and i missed the opportunity to get one at work.

It's not expensive. Should be about twenty bucks or so.


Also, in the US, your city and/or county may give free vaccinations.
 
2012-10-08 01:28:06 PM

fireclown: [www.islefthanded.com image 800x600]
can't we just remember the good times?


Jenny is America's Brigette Bardot: Once white hot fist-of-an-angry-god, now below the Mendoza Line for "dick in the crazy".

/Talking Dead with Chris Hardwick premieres next week!
 
2012-10-08 01:28:39 PM

MooseUpNorth: JokerMattly: Are the vaccinations usually free? I see them offered at Walgreens and such, and i missed the opportunity to get one at work.

It's not expensive. Should be about twenty bucks or so.


Seems like I need to make a stop at Walgreens on my way home then.
Thanks for the patience and the help.

As an extra layer of depression for everyone involved, I work in the Pharmaceutical industry.
Mind you, I work with formulation, not with API research.
 
2012-10-08 01:32:53 PM
wadechi.swalrus.org

Moving down and to the right at an alarming rate.
 
2012-10-08 01:43:21 PM

jaytkay: Also, in the US, your city and/or county may give free vaccinations.


Considering how hard right Grand Haven and Ottowa county are, I get the feeling they're more likely to tell me to pray away the flu.
 
2012-10-08 01:56:54 PM
I like MooseUpNorth's analogy to the lottery, but I'd clarify it further to point out that part of the rationale behind mass vaccinations is that, even though a very small minority of the population can't be vaccinated due to allergies, members of that subpopulation are much less likely to meet each other. The reason why winter is known as the "cold and flu season" generally has nothing to do with the outside temperature and everything to do with people spending more time indoors and around each other. (The last time I caught the flu regularly every year was when I was still a public school student in the Upper Midwest and spent the entire day in school; it wasn't a problem in college.) If 99% of the population is immunized against a disease, the 1% that can't be is much less likely to contact an infected person, become infected themselves, and spread it to yet another non-immune person. That's why McCarthy's movement is so noxious to people who understand epidemiology, even a little; those parents aren't just risking their own children, but those kids who can't get the shots even if their parents want them to.

Also, another way of thinking of the mutability of the influenza virus is to remember Stephen King's The Stand, in which the virus that wipes out 99.4% of the world's population is a genetically-engineered version of the flu that mutates while it's still in the victim's body, so instead of someone getting sick, getting better, then getting the new version of the flu next year, they get hit with one form of the flu after another until they die from physical exhaustion. (King didn't quite get the science right, as the first victims of "Captain Trips"--the staff at the army base where it was being developed--dropped dead wherever they stood or sat, one guy with his face in a bowl of Campbell's Chunky Soup that he was eating; even the superflu couldn't work that fast, and I've had a theory that one of the failsafes at the base was to release nerve gas into the living areas in an attempt to kill everyone who could have been exposed to the virus, to keep them from escaping and spreading it, although obviously that didn't work.)

Finally, and this isn't just because I hate McCarthy with the burning hate of a thousand burning suns with the flu, but I don't think that she's all that. I mean, yes, she's conventionally pretty, but Playboy in recent years seems to have gone more and more with women who look a lot like her; do a simple GIS for playmate and you'll see what I mean. Yes, I'm one of those middle-aged dudes who complains that things aren't what they used to be, but I honestly feel like one of the reasons why the magazine has lost a huge chunk of its readership (aside from, you know, the internet) is that they have gone away from showing a variety of body types and toward women that fit Hef's personal preferences.
 
2012-10-08 02:03:36 PM

JokerMattly: Considering how hard right Grand Haven and Ottowa county are, I get the feeling they're more likely to tell me to pray away the flu


Hard right? Um what? You do realize the Jenny McCarthy and Jim Carey and Orah Winfrey, and all the other anti-vaxxer march on Washington types are lefty liberals, right?
 
2012-10-08 02:07:50 PM

ThrobblefootSpectre: Hard right? Um what? You do realize the Jenny McCarthy and Jim Carey and Orah Winfrey, and all the other anti-vaxxer march on Washington types are lefty liberals, right?


Yes, but free vaccines and social wellness programs are not.
 
2012-10-08 02:09:48 PM

JokerMattly: Yes, but free vaccines and social wellness programs are not.


Are not liberal? Do you have evidence of that?
 
2012-10-08 02:13:44 PM

OtherLittleGuy: Jenny is America's Brigette Bardot: Once white hot fist-of-an-angry-god, now below the Mendoza Line for "dick in the crazy".


Did Bardot go nutzoid?

And for the record, I'd hit McCarthy like the fist of an angry god tomorrow. I just don't wanna talk politics or science with her.
 
2012-10-08 02:17:57 PM

ThrobblefootSpectre: JokerMattly: Yes, but free vaccines and social wellness programs are not.

Are not liberal? Do you have evidence of that?


I'll be more clear.
Where I live is extremely conservative, so I am in doubt they participate heavily in social welfare outreaches such as free vaccinations.
 
2012-10-08 02:35:50 PM

JokerMattly: I'll be more clear.
Where I live is extremely conservative, so I am in doubt they participate heavily in social welfare outreaches such as free vaccinations.


Ah. Depends I guess. If it is a religious type conservative area, which it sounds like from your "pray" comment, many churches sponsor free monthly community vaccination programs. (They aren't as evil as you think. :) You should check in your area. Around where I am, the monthly church immunization drives are popular among those who don't want to deal with the county health department.

Here's a link from a pediatrician website about free vaccinations, and places to get them. Link
 
2012-10-08 02:51:16 PM
Mother Mcauley girls are easy.
 
2012-10-08 02:52:20 PM

fireclown: OtherLittleGuy: Jenny is America's Brigette Bardot: Once white hot fist-of-an-angry-god, now below the Mendoza Line for "dick in the crazy".

Did Bardot go nutzoid?

And for the record, I'd hit McCarthy like the fist of an angry god tomorrow. I just don't wanna talk politics or science with her.


FTFE
 
2012-10-08 03:03:24 PM
So, I ask the collective "wisdom" of Fark:

I am a pretty healthy guy. I can't remember the last time I got the flu. When I do get sick, it's usually just a cold.

I do remember the last time I got a flu shot, maybe 10 years ago. My arm was sore and I had a low fever for about 2 days. I also felt sick. I think this is a normal reaction, but it was still worse than nothing, which is what I usually get.

However, my odometer has ticked into a different age group (45-49). Am I that much more at risk now than I was 10 years ago? I don't have any anti-vaccine sentiments, but would rather avoid the short-term flu-like symptoms if I'm not going to see any real benefit. 

/ Also, I don't have kids and don't work with the general public, so I have limited exposure to germs that come from those sources
 
2012-10-08 03:11:36 PM
Just for you, Jenny.


Link


i1180.photobucket.com
 
2012-10-08 03:12:29 PM

Mitch Taylor's Bro: However, my odometer has ticked into a different age group (45-49). Am I that much more at risk now than I was 10 years ago? I don't have any anti-vaccine sentiments, but would rather avoid the short-term flu-like symptoms if I'm not going to see any real benefit.


I'd suggest asking this of your doctor. He/she can evaluate your circumstances better than any of us can.
 
2012-10-08 03:22:20 PM

fireclown: [www.islefthanded.com image 800x600]
can't we just remember the good times?


The good times were before she got the boob job and you couldn't hear her open her mouth.
 
2012-10-08 03:55:10 PM

fireclown: OtherLittleGuy: Jenny is America's Brigette Bardot: Once white hot fist-of-an-angry-god, now below the Mendoza Line for "dick in the crazy".

Did Bardot go nutzoid?



Oui.
 
2012-10-08 04:01:43 PM
But yet that has nothing to do with your son's autism?

Stick to comedy & keep the chrome lips ho-bag.
 
Displayed 50 of 125 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report