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(Some Bathrobe Wearing Guy)   The Internet should have allowed most people to work from home. So why are we still commuting?   (domikepayne.blogspot.com) divider line 177
    More: Interesting, workers of the world, telecommuting, driverless cars  
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3382 clicks; posted to Business » on 08 Oct 2012 at 12:42 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-08 08:56:45 AM  
FTA:
"Who makes the policy on working from home? Bosses do, and bosses need conference rooms to herd people into for unnecessary meetings. Bosses need everyone in that conference room looking attentive as they go through their latest list of impossible goals and unspecific ideas on achieving those impossible goals. If this same unnecessary discussion takes place through a conference call with everyone calling in from home, one person will be making the call while watching a Hoarders marathon. Another will be painting her toes. Another will be cleaning the cat box, and still another will be closing his sleepy eyes and grunting agreement when it appears necessary. Ultimately those employees will probably be just as productive, but in this scenario, the manager's power is diminished. On a conference call where everyone is at home, no one is staring up at the boss in search of "direction." Without that hierarchical structure, the fact that he and his bosses get paid much more for contributing far less becomes easier to see (and prove). "

I think he nailed it right on the head.
 
2012-10-08 09:10:34 AM  

Bonkthat_Again: FTA:
"Who makes the policy on working from home? Bosses do, and bosses need conference rooms to herd people into for unnecessary meetings. Bosses need everyone in that conference room looking attentive as they go through their latest list of impossible goals and unspecific ideas on achieving those impossible goals. If this same unnecessary discussion takes place through a conference call with everyone calling in from home, one person will be making the call while watching a Hoarders marathon. Another will be painting her toes. Another will be cleaning the cat box, and still another will be closing his sleepy eyes and grunting agreement when it appears necessary. Ultimately those employees will probably be just as productive, but in this scenario, the manager's power is diminished. On a conference call where everyone is at home, no one is staring up at the boss in search of "direction." Without that hierarchical structure, the fact that he and his bosses get paid much more for contributing far less becomes easier to see (and prove). "

I think he nailed it right on the head.


i think that's a really myopic view. probably about half of my company telecommutes, and we still have a very well-defined hierarchy (although i will admit that it is flatter than most). the real problem we see as we have shifted to more telecommuting is an erosion of our company culture. a lot of our new hires that telecommute never seem to develop any sort of bond with the broader company and attrition among that group is much higher.
 
2012-10-08 09:15:16 AM  

thomps: i think that's a really myopic view. probably about half of my company telecommutes, and we still have a very well-defined hierarchy (although i will admit that it is flatter than most). the real problem we see as we have shifted to more telecommuting is an erosion of our company culture. a lot of our new hires that telecommute never seem to develop any sort of bond with the broader company and attrition among that group is much higher.


There are solutions to that.

Where I work, you aren't eligible to telecommute for the first 6 months or so. After that, you can telecommute up to 2 days a week. That still puts you physically here for meetings and such most days of the week, so you can schedule for those, but you still get a significant savings on things like gas and commute time.
 
2012-10-08 09:17:33 AM  

thomps: i think that's a really myopic view.


I'll agree with you there. All of my employees have the option to telecommute when they're not actually on travel. Only about half take advantage (although all of them work from home from time to time).

thomps: a lot of our new hires that telecommute never seem to develop any sort of bond with the broader company


Totally agree again. When you enable telecommuting, you need to take some of the money saved and put it toward some social/team building exercises - the kind that people actually want to take part in. Even if it's just a weekly happy hour (if everyone's local), or a quarterly off-site (if everyone's remote).
 
2012-10-08 09:19:53 AM  

dittybopper: Where I work, you aren't eligible to telecommute for the first 6 months or so. After that, you can telecommute up to 2 days a week. That still puts you physically here for meetings and such most days of the week, so you can schedule for those, but you still get a significant savings on things like gas and commute time.


yeah our telecommuting is more a function of our hiring outside of chicago and SF, where we have offices. we have people fly in and work from the office each quarter and are really active with an internal social network, but for a lot of new guys, we're just a pay check and if a better one comes along that still lets you stay at home, they'll take it.
 
2012-10-08 09:21:46 AM  
TFA is spot on. It's management. Something that wasn't mentioned is that there are political reasons for keeping people in the office.

For example, the last job I had I worked from home 60% of the time. Management didn't care so long as the work was getting done. This job it's a rarity. Why? Because IT management is fearful that without asses in the seats the beancounters will want to outsource.

The ironic thing is that if I work from home, I tend to work longer hours with fewer breaks and distractions....despite the fact I may end up working in my underwear all day.
 
2012-10-08 09:23:29 AM  
Sometimes there are personal reasons for choosing to not telecommute. In my case, I could be 100% work at home, but with a stay at home wife and 2 kids in the house, it is not a good work environment.
With kids that want to check in on dad all the time and a wife that has admitted she gets frustrated when watching the kids while I 'just sit up there on the computer' while working.

So it is a lot safer for me and my marriage to get out of the house to work.
 
2012-10-08 09:23:34 AM  
Strange, we find it quite possible to have pointless clusterfk meetings while working remotely. Your 20th century union hall ranting will have to wait for another day... my outlook calendar is full today and I have to update the powerpoint on sharepoint in time. Two on-deadline reports due by friday, and I have to get the various people's crap to me by today.

But, please do go on about bosses and workers, you sound so awesome, international workers of the world FTW.
 
2012-10-08 09:25:32 AM  
A couple of lots laptops with sensitive information on them put a halt to that real damn quick here.
 
2012-10-08 09:27:46 AM  

Aarontology: A couple of lots laptops with sensitive information on them put a halt to that real damn quick here.


Must suck your corporate IT security allowed that fail to happen. Have you considered hiring a security consultant?
 
2012-10-08 09:29:37 AM  

Generation_D: Aarontology: A couple of lots laptops with sensitive information on them put a halt to that real damn quick here.

Must suck your corporate IT security allowed that fail to happen. Have you considered hiring a security consultant?


It was less about IT security as it was about some dumbass leaving the company laptop at a cafe. No information got out as far as I know, but they got super paranoid after that.
 
2012-10-08 09:30:17 AM  

Aarontology: A couple of lots laptops with sensitive information on them put a halt to that real damn quick here.


That's a case for disk encryption and VDI, not a case against telecommuting.
 
2012-10-08 09:33:04 AM  

Babwa Wawa: ... When you enable telecommuting, you need to take some of the money saved and put it toward some social/team building exercises - the kind that people actually want to take part in. Even if it's just a weekly happy hour (if everyone's local), or a quarterly off-site (if everyone's remote).


Another way to help lots of remote members is to have some type of group chat program that everybody is in. Encourage folks to use that chat and been flexible about when non-work stuff comes up and you help build some of those same bridges that being in person does. We do a lot of work day coordination of activities through group chat and still manage to compare stories about kids and trips we have taken and such like that. The team I am on has 9 members working out of 5 different states, so even just the occasional chat about baseball helps to build some bonds between us.
 
2012-10-08 09:36:19 AM  

slayer199: That's a case for disk encryption and VDI, not a case against telecommuting.


True. I never said their reaction was all that rational.
 
2012-10-08 09:45:01 AM  

thomps: i think that's a really myopic view. probably about half of my company telecommutes, and we still have a very well-defined hierarchy (although i will admit that it is flatter than most). the real problem we see as we have shifted to more telecommuting is an erosion of our company culture. a lot of our new hires that telecommute never seem to develop any sort of bond with the broader company and attrition among that group is much higher


Well, we're a non-telecommuting company, so I have a different perspective.
I'm more annoyed at our unnecessary facility costs.

As for the company culture....I think a requirement for new hires to work at least a year in the office before telecommuting, would be reasonable.
 
2012-10-08 09:51:22 AM  
If the equipment here keeps shiatting the bed the way it has, I may have no choice but to telecommute.
 
2012-10-08 09:57:04 AM  
I feel sorry for people that have to go to an office. I currently have the best boss I have had in 30 years of my working life. The only thing he cares about is me getting the job done. He stays out of my way and lets me do it. The only time he pokes his nose in my projects is when there is a battle I need him to help me fight. He gets my back every time. He earned my loyalty and I actually put more effort into this job than I have any other and my results show it. What's crazy is he has 30+ people around the world he manages the same way. I've never seen a micro manager come close to being that effective. I've had plenty of those. They suck. Point is if you have the right management and culture telecommuting is much more effective. But management is stubborn and it will be a while until it adapts to new technology.
 
2012-10-08 10:03:23 AM  

Bonkthat_Again: Well, we're a non-telecommuting company, so I have a different perspective.
I'm more annoyed at our unnecessary facility costs.

As for the company culture....I think a requirement for new hires to work at least a year in the office before telecommuting, would be reasonable.


yeah, we're just finishing up an extended period of really aggressive scaling and telecommuting has been a big part of that strategy, partly because we just couldn't keep expanding physically enough to keep up with our headcount growth. i'm a proponent of telecommuting, just wanted to point out an issue we've had with it that doesn't include management egos.
 
2012-10-08 10:08:37 AM  

sammyk: I feel sorry for people that have to go to an office. I currently have the best boss I have had in 30 years of my working life. The only thing he cares about is me getting the job done. He stays out of my way and lets me do it. The only time he pokes his nose in my projects is when there is a battle I need him to help me fight. He gets my back every time. He earned my loyalty and I actually put more effort into this job than I have any other and my results show it. What's crazy is he has 30+ people around the world he manages the same way. I've never seen a micro manager come close to being that effective. I've had plenty of those. They suck. Point is if you have the right management and culture telecommuting is much more effective. But management is stubborn and it will be a while until it adapts to new technology.


My department is slightly smaller, but this sounds a lot like where I work. We have extremely low turnover and no deadweight in our department. If we aren't doing our jobs, it's immediately noticeable, so we don't have to be local to prove that we're working.
 
2012-10-08 10:29:27 AM  
As much as I'd rather telecommute, there are some advantages to being on site for me:

(1) it drags my ass out of the house daily and forces a disciplined schedule on me.
(2) Sadly, we're not a paperless office, so I still need access to the physical files sometimes.
(3) Coworkers do, in fact, make one's brain think about things you wouldn't think about if you weren't physically present. Sure, the chairwhale in the next cube may be droning on and on about jellybeans, but that can strangely spur your brain to remember the update the TPS report.
(4) And sometimes the chairwhale does have good ideas that you wouldn't have otherwise have heard if you weren't nearby.

Whatever, though: I just want to nap at the office and maybe bring my cat.
 
2012-10-08 10:29:38 AM  

Aarontology: Generation_D: Aarontology: A couple of lots laptops with sensitive information on them put a halt to that real damn quick here.

Must suck your corporate IT security allowed that fail to happen. Have you considered hiring a security consultant?

It was less about IT security as it was about some dumbass leaving the company laptop at a cafe. No information got out as far as I know, but they got super paranoid after that.


I'm pretty paranoid about my work laptop. The nature of my job as a programmer/analyst means that there are at times a *BUNCH* of information that could be used both to hack into our systems, and also to steal the identity of tens of thousands of people associated in some way with my employer. If it's not at my house or in my office, it's locked in the trunk of my car.
 
2012-10-08 10:30:45 AM  

Angry Drunk Bureaucrat: As much as I'd rather telecommute, there are some advantages to being on site for me:

(1) it drags my ass out of the house daily and forces a disciplined schedule on me.
(2) Sadly, we're not a paperless office, so I still need access to the physical files sometimes.
(3) Coworkers do, in fact, make one's brain think about things you wouldn't think about if you weren't physically present. Sure, the chairwhale in the next cube may be droning on and on about jellybeans, but that can strangely spur your brain to remember the update the TPS report.
(4) And sometimes the chairwhale does have good ideas that you wouldn't have otherwise have heard if you weren't nearby.

Whatever, though: I just want to nap at the office and maybe bring my cat.


That's why I like a mix of telecommuting and physical presence. I get the benefits of both.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2012-10-08 10:48:02 AM  
The Boston Globe had an article in 2001 about suburban office buildings. There's a reason they are surrounded by acres of parking with no other businesses nearby. Being able to go out to lunch is a big negative to corporate planners. You're supposed to arrive, work, eat in the cafeteria while talking about work, work, and go home, with no distractions. One of the newcomers to the I-495 belt was Cisco. The article observed, "If Cisco can't move bits instead of butts, who can?"

I do work from home a lot. My job is near the edge of my commuting range (half hour).
 
2012-10-08 10:51:12 AM  
As much as I would like to, it's pretty hard to use the welder over the internet.
 
2012-10-08 10:57:42 AM  

Angry Drunk Bureaucrat: As much as I'd rather telecommute, there are some advantages to being on site for me:

(1) it drags my ass out of the house daily and forces a disciplined schedule on me.
(2) Sadly, we're not a paperless office, so I still need access to the physical files sometimes.
(3) Coworkers do, in fact, make one's brain think about things you wouldn't think about if you weren't physically present. Sure, the chairwhale in the next cube may be droning on and on about jellybeans, but that can strangely spur your brain to remember the update the TPS report.
(4) And sometimes the chairwhale does have good ideas that you wouldn't have otherwise have heard if you weren't nearby.

Whatever, though: I just want to nap at the office and maybe bring my cat.


5) I like to keep work-place and home-place seperate. I feel more motivated to work and stay on task better at the office (he said while hanging out on Fark at work).
 
2012-10-08 11:06:57 AM  
The thrill of furtively masturbating under my desk while staring at the cleaning lady is sharply reduced whem I'm at home.
 
2012-10-08 11:12:16 AM  

Mr. Coffee Nerves: The thrill of furtively masturbating under my desk while staring at the cleaning lady is sharply reduced whem I'm at home.


Then get a cleaning lady for your home. Problem solved.
 
2012-10-08 11:13:26 AM  

give me doughnuts: Angry Drunk Bureaucrat: As much as I'd rather telecommute, there are some advantages to being on site for me:

(1) it drags my ass out of the house daily and forces a disciplined schedule on me.
---------
5) I like to keep work-place and home-place seperate. I feel more motivated to work and stay on task better at the office (he said while hanging out on Fark at work).


I mostly interact with coworkers by email, even when they're on the same floor. On days I decide to remote login from home, they may not even know I'm not there. But I need to avoid the distractions of being at home. Otherwise, I'm doing little chores and errands all day.
 
2012-10-08 12:04:05 PM  
I live in the DC metro area/NoVa/Fairfax county. With DC traffic what it is, high gas prices and the general stress of daily, long commutes, the inability to telecommute to work is an outright deal breaker for me at this point. With my last job hunt, I was very specific about being able to telecommute when I wanted to. Currently I live in Herndon and commute to Reston (specifically the Reston Town Center). 4.5 miles door to door. Traffic in DC is a farking nightmare, especially because of all the construction for the metro.

I suspect as time goes on, as the olde upper management dinosaurs retire and as a new, fresh workforce that is used to doing everything online, remotely...we will see a change in the way people do business. Hell, my company just hired a Java programmer who lives in the farking middle of no where North Dakota. We have only spoken with him over the phone and email, and will never likely meet him face to face.

The change is coming, slowly, but it is getting there.
 
2012-10-08 12:34:21 PM  

Mr. Coffee Nerves: The thrill of furtively masturbating under my desk while staring at the cleaning lady is sharply reduced whem I'm at home.


At home I get to bang the cleaning lady.
 
2012-10-08 12:39:50 PM  
Because people tend to be slow to embrace culture changes. And organizations made up of these people are slower still
 
2012-10-08 12:46:45 PM  

dittybopper: Angry Drunk Bureaucrat: As much as I'd rather telecommute, there are some advantages to being on site for me:

(1) it drags my ass out of the house daily and forces a disciplined schedule on me.
(2) Sadly, we're not a paperless office, so I still need access to the physical files sometimes.
(3) Coworkers do, in fact, make one's brain think about things you wouldn't think about if you weren't physically present. Sure, the chairwhale in the next cube may be droning on and on about jellybeans, but that can strangely spur your brain to remember the update the TPS report.
(4) And sometimes the chairwhale does have good ideas that you wouldn't have otherwise have heard if you weren't nearby.

Whatever, though: I just want to nap at the office and maybe bring my cat.

That's why I like a mix of telecommuting and physical presence. I get the benefits of both.


this.  I genrally go into my office on Tuesday and Thursday, allowing me to catch up with folks face to face, get some stuff done that is just easier there - like big print jobs or getting my expense report scanned in and sent. but I also avoid the always bad Atlanta commute 3 days out of the week, and everyone knows how to get in touch with me throughout the day when I am working from home.
 
2012-10-08 12:47:32 PM  
give me doughnuts:
5) I like to keep work-place and home-place seperate. I feel more motivated to work and stay on task better at the office (he said while hanging out on Fark at work).

Yeah, forgot to mention that one. I could never study effectively in college from my dorm room. I needed to go somewhere that felt like "work".
 
2012-10-08 12:47:51 PM  
Anybody with that much text on a black background site cannot have an opinion worth noting.
 
2012-10-08 12:48:52 PM  
Been working at home for 12 years (two jobs worth). I wouldn't take a job where I had to be in the office every day, unless I was WAY down in my job search...
 
2012-10-08 12:49:30 PM  
Because while I'm paying for "high speed" internet service at home, I'm not receiving High Speed internet service at home.
 
2012-10-08 12:49:45 PM  
Because sometimes the most important thing I do all day is tell my boss where on his desk he is likely to have buried certain papers.
 
2012-10-08 12:50:03 PM  

slayer199: The ironic thing is that if I work from home, I tend to work longer hours with fewer breaks and distractions....despite the fact I may end up working in my underwear all day.


It's not ironic. Been working 100% at home for over four years now. When people ask me if there are any drawbacks I always tell them "The bad thing about working from home is that you are always at work." It's very easy to put in 50 hours a week without batting an eye.
 
2012-10-08 12:50:16 PM  

slayer199: Aarontology: A couple of lots laptops with sensitive information on them put a halt to that real damn quick here.

That's a case for disk encryption and VDI, not a case against telecommuting.


There's problems with both of those (Off hour backups, cost of internet, and lack of internet in certain parts of the world). Still it's likely a problem with management and policy more than anything.
 
2012-10-08 12:51:48 PM  

Pincy: slayer199: The ironic thing is that if I work from home, I tend to work longer hours with fewer breaks and distractions....despite the fact I may end up working in my underwear all day.

It's not ironic. Been working 100% at home for over four years now. When people ask me if there are any drawbacks I always tell them "The bad thing about working from home is that you are always at work." It's very easy to put in 50 hours a week without batting an eye.


I tell em:

Good: Great coffee, easy commute
Bad: No snow days.
 
2012-10-08 12:52:10 PM  
Subby: So why are we still commuting?

Because they like having you under their control, always in their sights. Report to your cell cubicle by 0900 sharp, or be cast back in to poverty.

/and because we let them, but that's another story.
 
2012-10-08 12:52:17 PM  
Some people need an office environment to work. I know a significant number of coworkers who just straight up admit that they don't do anything when they're "working" at home... which makes it annoying because then they assume that because they can't do any work from home, that the rest of us are slacking off as well. Wasting our time on fark all day instead of... oh... wait...
 
2012-10-08 12:57:36 PM  
while at times i don't need to be in the office, they still want me there

especially if i'm supposed to be running a training class
 
2012-10-08 01:00:49 PM  
A couple bad apples here got telecommuting shut down completely.

If you're "working from home", don't take your family to Disney World.
 
2012-10-08 01:02:43 PM  
why are we still communting?

the Owners like it that way. and its their ballgame, not ours.

they don't deal with rush hour.
 
2012-10-08 01:03:53 PM  

dittybopper: I'm pretty paranoid about my work laptop. The nature of my job as a programmer/analyst means that there are at times a *BUNCH* of information that could be used both to hack into our systems, and also to steal the identity of tens of thousands of people associated in some way with my employer. If it's not at my house or in my office, it's locked in the trunk of my car.


i too am freaking paranoid about the laptop

if i'm rioding with someone it always goes in the trunk, if they have no trunk then it stays with me at all times

/lost several umbrellas but never a laptop
 
2012-10-08 01:04:37 PM  
Most people are lazy sobs.

I worked at a company that used to allow telecommuting. But lazy people ruined it. Far too many people abused the system. They stayed home and did nothing.

The truth is, I'd be willing to take a significant pay cut (and the company would save on equipment/office space) if I could telecommute 100% of the time. The real benefit (for me anyway) would be going to the middle of Montana and buying a nice house with lots of land for 150k with low, low property tax and a 0% sales tax. I could still work for the same Chicago-based company, but instead of feeling poor with my 80k salary, I could live like a king with my 60k salary.

// If anyone is hiring....let me know ;)
 
2012-10-08 01:06:16 PM  
If you ever had to be on a conference call with sales reps/engineers that are working from home and all you can hear are their screaming kids in the background, then you should know the answer to this question
 
2012-10-08 01:08:12 PM  

smerfnablin: If you ever had to be on a conference call with sales reps/engineers that are working from home and all you can hear are their screaming kids in the background, then you should know the answer to this question


i've called in to a software comapny that lets their techs work from home, and heard their dogs barking

but this same company lets people bring dogs to work so they could have been in the office as well
 
2012-10-08 01:08:57 PM  
I kinda wish I could telecommute. Difficulty: Security Guard.
 
2012-10-08 01:10:38 PM  

smerfnablin: If you ever had to be on a conference call with sales reps/engineers that are working from home and all you can hear are their screaming kids in the background, then you should know the answer to this question


Haha, this.

But there could be a happy middle between 100% work from home and 100% work in the main office.

Microoffices would be cool. There are single-desk 200 sq ft offices available blocks from my apartment that are really affordable. If I had a 100% telecommuting job, I'd rent one for myself so I could be motivated to put on pants and feel like I'm "going to work."
 
2012-10-08 01:20:50 PM  
I can't work at home because of my cat. If I sit in my 'office' the cat constantly jumps up and nudges the screen, walks on the keyboard, etc. If I lock him out of the room, he howls constantly and throws himself at the door.
 
2012-10-08 01:22:12 PM  
I can't work from home. I can do maybe an hour or two, but sooner or later I end up doing housework or playing Borderlands or taking my dog for a walk or something when I should be working. Being in my office keeps me focused on the job at hand.
 
2012-10-08 01:32:33 PM  
I don't know if I'd want to work from home. I don't want to blur the lines between my sanctuary and my job.
 
2012-10-08 01:34:12 PM  
As someone who works in IT, part of my job could be done remotely (Image creation), but part of it can't. Only because our people are too lazy to walk to a network printer, I can't imagine the biatching if I had to tell them to go to the IT department with their old printer, get a new one, set it up and send me the numbers for inventory
 
2012-10-08 01:37:27 PM  
It really seems like most people's problems with telecommuting can be resolved if they are willing to dedicate resources to fixing them.

IMHO - you really should have an equivalent 'office environment' in your home. I'd absolutely want a clear, physical, delineation between being 'at work' and 'at home' even if it's just opening the spare-bedroom door. I'd go so far as having a work computer and a home computer.
 
2012-10-08 01:42:57 PM  
It really depends on the job, and your personality. If you don't have the discipline to get the job done on your own, then telecommuting is not for you. The upside is that I can live in a low cost of living area, while earning a good salary.

I've worked from home for over three years now, and am far more productive than in an office environment. Between the phone and chat programs, I'm never isolated. One cat is always resident on my desk - if I could only get her on the payroll as an assistant, I'd be styling.

It's not for everyone, but if it works, it's great.
 
2012-10-08 01:43:03 PM  
Some companies like to have a body in a chair. I work from home sometimes during the week, but my employer will not allow a permanent telecommute solution, even though almost all of my work is done remotely. Silly really.
 
2012-10-08 01:43:21 PM  

Aarontology: Generation_D: Aarontology: A couple of lots laptops with sensitive information on them put a halt to that real damn quick here.

Must suck your corporate IT security allowed that fail to happen. Have you considered hiring a security consultant?

It was less about IT security as it was about some dumbass leaving the company laptop at a cafe. No information got out as far as I know, but they got super paranoid after that.


I disagree. That situation has EVERYTHING to do with IT security.
 
2012-10-08 01:46:07 PM  
It's not enough for workers to be busy. They must look busy and you can't look busy if no one can see you.
 
2012-10-08 01:47:19 PM  
Because working from home sucks?

s3.amazonaws.com
 
2012-10-08 01:49:04 PM  

smerfnablin: If you ever had to be on a conference call with sales reps/engineers that are working from home and all you can hear are their screaming kids in the background, then you should know the answer to this question


I work at home with three kids (when they're not at school), two dogs, and a cat. (I gotta say, the cat has never been a problem.) My co-workers almost never hear anything in the background because I stay on mute until I have something to say. If I have a lot to say, the door is shut, the dogs go outside, and the kids know to shut their yaps when mom is on a call.

I also agree with the "office environment" at home. My office is just a corner of my bedroom, but it's the "work zone". If I want to play games, I take one of the laptops or my iPad into the dining room or the living room and play there.
 
2012-10-08 01:53:06 PM  
There are some jobs that just can't be done by telecomuting Like mine for instance.

I drive a truck delivering sheet metal parts to job sites. Despite what many people think, there are STILL jobs out there that require a human to do physical labor!
 
2012-10-08 01:53:07 PM  
Ahh, the thread where everyone talks about how much smarter he is than his boss and how he should get paid more than his boss and the only reason his boss is the boss is because of buzzwords and how he could totally use buzzwords just as well, but it's beneath him and that's why he'll never be the boss. It's the system's fault.
 
2012-10-08 01:54:51 PM  
Most policymakers assume that anybody who's permitted to "work from home" will spend their days the same way they would: about an hour a day of trying to seem responsive, and seven hours of masturbating themselves raw.
 
kab
2012-10-08 01:57:54 PM  
Working from home, getting a kick, etc.

Helps save a good chunk of change, that much is certain.
 
2012-10-08 02:03:10 PM  
I wish I could telecommute. Difficulty: I'm the one organizing our switch to a paperless office so other people can telecommute. So instead I read Fark all day while watching people scan thousands of pages of financial information.
 
2012-10-08 02:04:17 PM  

smerfnablin: If you ever had to be on a conference call with sales reps/engineers that are working from home and all you can hear are their screaming kids in the background, then you should know the answer to this question


THIS is the reason i rent an office 5 miles from home

and those random honeydos don't help either
 
2012-10-08 02:04:33 PM  

ThatGuyFromTheInternet: I kinda wish I could telecommute. Difficulty: Security Guard.


I telecommute working on learning systems that analyze video and respond in real time. Shortly, you won't be telecommuting, you'll be automated out of a job.
 
2012-10-08 02:06:23 PM  

tricycleracer: A couple bad apples here got telecommuting shut down completely.

If you're "working from home", don't take your family to Disney World.


That's what happened here. People started doing teleconferences from ball games, playgrounds and while in the checkout line of Target. The privlage got totally abused by a select few and it got yanked except for senior managers getting 2 days a week.
 
2012-10-08 02:07:07 PM  
Another problem with being set up to work from home is when something catastrophically breaks at work, everyone feels OK texting you while you're on vacation, and they're surprised when you don't respond instantly.
 
2012-10-08 02:07:17 PM  
Ever have that feeling that most people at your job have no idea what you do for a living? Well, guess what, they don't. "Thinking" jobs are quite difficult to measure. It takes a lot of discipline and verification on the part of those doing the measuring. It's quite easy to measure how much time you spend warming a seat.

/problem solved
 
2012-10-08 02:09:42 PM  

the_geek: Ever have that feeling that most people at your job have no idea what you do for a living? Well, guess what, they don't. "Thinking" jobs are quite difficult to measure. It takes a lot of discipline and verification on the part of those doing the measuring. It's quite easy to measure how much time you spend warming a seat.

/problem solved


The flip side is mostly true too. Sure, I understand what my 'team' does and there is typically direct communication with one or two other teams.....the rest? No f***ing clue.
 
2012-10-08 02:12:32 PM  
I have no choice but to work from home on mondays and fridays (work 150 miles away tue/wen/thur). I would prefer being in an office collaborating with people, the days i work from home I get up at 8am and work/drink coffee without a shower or whatever. Just feels weird. Sometimes I get a lot done from home, but sometimes the distractions are just too much. Definitely looking forward to next year when we'll be done commuting and have an office in my city. I would like the option to work from home once in a while, but its not my preferred environment.

That, and I miss being around people. I'm home alone plenty, even if my co-workers drive me insane its still better than being home with my cat 24x7.
 
2012-10-08 02:16:15 PM  
Honestly, there's plenty of times where having somebody right next to you is helpful. I used to have a boss who worked from home all the time, and it was cool because I could duck out early or whatever, but it was frustrating when I needed him to run interference against other people in the office, and my only way to get hold of him was an email that he wouldn't see until he took his break after the 9th hole.
 
2012-10-08 02:18:27 PM  

kab: Working from home, getting a kick, etc.

Helps save a good chunk of change, that much is certain.


Me too

In my underwear. You?

// Send pics
 
2012-10-08 02:25:25 PM  

Slives: Sometimes there are personal reasons for choosing to not telecommute. In my case, I could be 100% work at home, but with a stay at home wife and 2 kids in the house, it is not a good work environment.
With kids that want to check in on dad all the time and a wife that has admitted she gets frustrated when watching the kids while I 'just sit up there on the computer' while working.

So it is a lot safer for me and my marriage to get out of the house to work.



I'm 100% for allowing all employees to telecommute, but I totally get you here.  My business is just me and my business partner.  No employees.  I was single (now married, but no kids).  I absolutely want to work from home, and do. 
 
He couldn't handle it with young kids growing up and the wife.  So we got a small office for him (and its nice to have a real address and not his house, just looks more professional even though we haven't had a physical meeting with partners/clients in years.)
 
Also, in my case... I'm lucky to have an upstairs office.  So I have the separation between work and life.  Yeah, smartphones and laptops with wi-fi and all that... but there's something to be said for "I'm downstairs, I'm not at work."
 
2012-10-08 02:25:37 PM  
I've tried to telecommunte as much as I can. I do onsite tech support for a bank, and my coverage area is about 110 miles in every direction and includes 75 branches, one office with 400 people and one office with 45. I'll get up in the morning, get on remote access, check my calls for the day, answer e-mails, order replacement equipment for what I used the previous day, check on the status of equipment orders, then I go in, load the car, go from branch to branch, and head home after my last call. Sometimes I get home at 2pm, sometimes 9 pm, but it averages out to 50 hours a week.

At least one day a week, I'll stay at home most or all of the day working on reports and data entry for various projects we're working on, and one day a week, I'll go into the shop and do nothing but repairs and inventory management.

Really, I'm getting the best of both worlds. But if there was some way for me to load software for the PCs here at home, and they would let me get equipment delivered to my house, I figure I would only need to go in about once every 2 weeks. But there's this idea that I have to be in an office at all times, even though my job entails me being outside of that office 80% of the time.
 
2012-10-08 02:32:08 PM  

RumsfeldsReplacement: Ahh, the thread where everyone talks about how much smarter he is than his boss and how he should get paid more than his boss and the only reason his boss is the boss is because of buzzwords and how he could totally use buzzwords just as well, but it's beneath him and that's why he'll never be the boss. It's the system's fault.



The Peter Principle is still alive and well in most large companies.
 
2012-10-08 02:33:04 PM  

slayer199: TFA is spot on. It's management. Something that wasn't mentioned is that there are political reasons for keeping people in the office.


I'm a manager and I completely disagree. Unless you have it ingrained in your culture that people will not be in the office and develop the tools to support it - telecommuting simply won't work. That takes leadership and many have failed trying to change such a culture.

/one of my employees is moving to 100% telecommuting and I fully support it
//it will make my job a little harder but that is what I get paid to do
 
2012-10-08 02:37:22 PM  

Aarontology: It was less about IT security as it was about some dumbass leaving the company laptop at a cafe. No information got out as far as I know, but they got super paranoid after that.


Bullshiat. Its a general rule of thumb that at least 10% of laptops are lost every year due to theft, taxies, left on planes, hotel pools, etc. If your organization does not have the tools to deal with that - they are completely incompetent.

/IT Security Manager
 
2012-10-08 02:37:59 PM  

Bonkthat_Again: FTA:
"Who makes the policy on working from home? Bosses do, and bosses need conference rooms to herd people into for unnecessary meetings. Bosses need everyone in that conference room looking attentive as they go through their latest list of impossible goals and unspecific ideas on achieving those impossible goals. If this same unnecessary discussion takes place through a conference call with everyone calling in from home, one person will be making the call while watching a Hoarders marathon. Another will be painting her toes. Another will be cleaning the cat box, and still another will be closing his sleepy eyes and grunting agreement when it appears necessary. Ultimately those employees will probably be just as productive, but in this scenario, the manager's power is diminished. On a conference call where everyone is at home, no one is staring up at the boss in search of "direction." Without that hierarchical structure, the fact that he and his bosses get paid much more for contributing far less becomes easier to see (and prove). "

I think he nailed it right on the head.


I work from home, as does everyone else in my company, and we still have plenty of unnecessary meetings.

That being said, I will never work in an office again if I can avoid it. I love working from home. I get to see my son and my wife whenever I want, I don't have to get all dressed up like I'm going to Wal-Mart or something, and I save a ton of money on gas and lunch.
 
2012-10-08 02:38:04 PM  

tricycleracer: A couple bad apples here got telecommuting shut down completely.

If you're "working from home", don't take your family to Disney World.


Why not? Then again my kid was 3 and after a day at the park crashed around 6:30 and I just worked for about 4 hours while the wife and I enjoyed some cocktails on the patio of the hotel.

But then again if I say I'm going to meet a deadline I mean I'm going to meet a deadline.

I get far more work done at home where I can concentrate without having boss/co-workers pop in every 5 seconds to "chat" AND I can give you 90 more minutes of work since I can cut out the commute.
 
2012-10-08 02:38:50 PM  
Because hanging out in the same place every single day interacting solely via a phone and computer is depressing to most normal people.
 
2012-10-08 02:42:32 PM  

poot_rootbeer: Most policymakers assume that anybody who's permitted to "work from home" will spend their days the same way they would: about an hour a day of trying to seem responsive, and seven hours of masturbating themselves raw.


Which is why policy makers have offices w/doors.
 
2012-10-08 02:47:26 PM  

gingerjet: slayer199: TFA is spot on. It's management. Something that wasn't mentioned is that there are political reasons for keeping people in the office.

I'm a manager and I completely disagree. Unless you have it ingrained in your culture that people will not be in the office and develop the tools to support it - telecommuting simply won't work. That takes leadership and many have failed trying to change such a culture.

/one of my employees is moving to 100% telecommuting and I fully support it
//it will make my job a little harder but that is what I get paid to do


I see the young bucks being against telecommuting because 'networking' and 'askissing' are required workshops at MBA school.

/seriously, how would they get promoted if they were not buttering up the boss everyday?
 
2012-10-08 02:48:04 PM  

SacriliciousBeerSwiller: Because hanging out in the same place every single day interacting solely via a phone and computer is depressing to most normal people.


This pretty much described my life in the down town cube farm offices over the past decade.
Howeve, now both Lady Buk and I work from home. We have coffee, watch TV on our lunch, get pestered by the cats in the afternoon, and watch the sunset together from our floor to ceiling windows.
 
2012-10-08 02:51:21 PM  

Bonkthat_Again: Another will be cleaning the cat box


Holy crap, I forgot to clean the cat box before I left for work this morning.

/Now I can't focus on work.
//Not that I was really focusing on work anyway.
 
2012-10-08 02:56:34 PM  

Bukharin: SacriliciousBeerSwiller: Because hanging out in the same place every single day interacting solely via a phone and computer is depressing to most normal people.

This pretty much described my life in the down town cube farm offices over the past decade.
Howeve, now both Lady Buk and I work from home. We have coffee, watch TV on our lunch, get pestered by the cats in the afternoon, and watch the sunset together from our floor to ceiling windows.


I think it really has a lot more to do with what "work" is.

If I have 2-3 days straight of working from home i'll do a morning or an afternoon at a coffee shop or other location unless I have a conference call. I know some people could not do that as they HAVE to be available by phone, but I have 5 distinct non phone ways of being contacted and since my company and my client are spread all over the globe that is usually the perfered method. (I can send you an email any time without having to calculate your time zone and figure out if you might be sleeping/lunching/or other wise occupied).

I like hitting the office as well where I can have face to face chats and have a happy hour with co workers/friends.

But then I also like "Chicken Nugget Fridays" eating lunch with my 4 year old.
 
2012-10-08 02:57:59 PM  

Bonkthat_Again: FTA:
"Who makes the policy on working from home? Bosses do, and bosses need conference rooms to herd people into for unnecessary meetings. Bosses need everyone in that conference room looking attentive as they go through their latest list of impossible goals and unspecific ideas on achieving those impossible goals. If this same unnecessary discussion takes place through a conference call with everyone calling in from home, one person will be making the call while watching a Hoarders marathon. Another will be painting her toes. Another will be cleaning the cat box, and still another will be closing his sleepy eyes and grunting agreement when it appears necessary. Ultimately those employees will probably be just as productive, but in this scenario, the manager's power is diminished. On a conference call where everyone is at home, no one is staring up at the boss in search of "direction." Without that hierarchical structure, the fact that he and his bosses get paid much more for contributing far less becomes easier to see (and prove). "

I think he nailed it right on the head.


verydemotivational.files.wordpress.com
 
2012-10-08 03:00:19 PM  
I'm a real estate appraiser and figured this out the first day i bought an epson digital(1998-9) camera that could take 26 pic's.

Really took off when i could just pdf something to a client and they finally knew what a pdf is/was.

I pretty much sit in my underwear depending on how cold it is until around 2pm when i check my fancy P.O. box address that actually says suite # instead of P.O. box because for some reason banks liked to see that and i didn't want angry customer's showing up to my house.

Right now my pregnant wife and I are about to go for a drive, take some photo's for new construction on a lake in oklahoma, then drive back to tulsa inspect a forelcosed duplex.

Tomorrow, i'll leave the house early measure 3-4 houses, get a friend of mine out of jail since he's been in there since Sept 30th and his attorney couldn't get his bail lowered until Tuesday, (He's black in a small town in Oklahoma they don't really move to quickly to get bond lowered requests for his kind around here)

Then on Wednesday & thursday i'll sit at home all day typing listening to music drinking beer and smoking pot, and when i'm finished with the reports I upload them to a website never having contact with anyone, but the person who is letting me into the house.

It's beautiful and i love it.

Plus you make 6 figures a year while your in your underwear for at least 150 days of it.
 
2012-10-08 03:05:01 PM  
To put it simply.

Most bosses do not trust you to be actually working at home.

I know I would trust maybe 1 or 2 out of the 6 person team I work with to actually work while they are home.
 
2012-10-08 03:09:53 PM  

thomps: Bonkthat_Again: FTA:
"Who makes the policy on working from home? Bosses do, and bosses need conference rooms to herd people into for unnecessary meetings. Bosses need everyone in that conference room looking attentive as they go through their latest list of impossible goals and unspecific ideas on achieving those impossible goals. If this same unnecessary discussion takes place through a conference call with everyone calling in from home, one person will be making the call while watching a Hoarders marathon. Another will be painting her toes. Another will be cleaning the cat box, and still another will be closing his sleepy eyes and grunting agreement when it appears necessary. Ultimately those employees will probably be just as productive, but in this scenario, the manager's power is diminished. On a conference call where everyone is at home, no one is staring up at the boss in search of "direction." Without that hierarchical structure, the fact that he and his bosses get paid much more for contributing far less becomes easier to see (and prove). "

I think he nailed it right on the head.

i think that's a really myopic view. probably about half of my company telecommutes, and we still have a very well-defined hierarchy (although i will admit that it is flatter than most). the real problem we see as we have shifted to more telecommuting is an erosion of our company culture. a lot of our new hires that telecommute never seem to develop any sort of bond with the broader company and attrition among that group is much higher.


Perhaps your company is different, but in my experience a company never bothers to form a bond with the employee, and will get rid of them as soon as they can (reducing expenses is more important than keeping knowledgeable people around). So I don't see why an employee should put more effort into it.
 
2012-10-08 03:18:37 PM  

meat0918: To put it simply.

Most bosses do not trust you to be actually working at home.

I know I would trust maybe 1 or 2 out of the 6 person team I work with to actually work while they are home.


So you hired people you can't trust?
 
2012-10-08 03:20:33 PM  

meat0918: To put it simply.

Most bosses do not trust you to be actually working at home.

I know I would trust maybe 1 or 2 out of the 6 person team I work with to actually work while they are home.


I hardly work when I'm at work.
 
2012-10-08 03:21:02 PM  
I was working from home until my company decided it was too hip to have its new software work on PCs.
 
2012-10-08 03:25:17 PM  
I worked for a company that once you got high enough up in the manager food chain, you worked from home. This basically meant taking phone calls about problems and visiting physical locations a couple times a month. One guy, delegated all of his calls/trips to lower managers. Then he got another job.... He didn't quit 'our' company, just went to work at his other job and let the checks keep rolling in from 'our' company... I think he made it about a year before they caught on. Company tried to sue him, court said basically 'you can't sue somebody because you're too stupid to run your own company.'
/CSB
 
2012-10-08 03:27:55 PM  
It's more easy to intimidate subordinates in person.
 
2012-10-08 03:28:57 PM  
Management just gets better "warm & fuzzies" having people onsite.

Or if they can continually track your status constantly...like on Lync, then they're good with that.
 
2012-10-08 03:42:55 PM  
I'm not so sure that the Internet really has enabled all that many people to telecommute. Office workers, yes, but I'm forced to wonder: just how much of the population do they really make up?

/office worker
//not allowed to telecommute T_T
 
2012-10-08 03:48:59 PM  

JolobinSmokin: ... camera that could take 26 pic's.

...Really took off when i could just ...

...until around 2pm when i check my fancy P.O. box address that actually says suite # instead of P.O. box because for some reason banks liked to see that and i didn't want angry customer's showing up to my house...

... take some photo's for new construction on a lake in oklahoma, then drive back to tulsa inspect a forelcosed duplex...

...Tomorrow, i'll leave the house... they don't really move to quickly ...

...Then on Wednesday & thursday i'll sit at home all day typing listening to music drinking beer and smoking pot, and when i'm finished with the reports I...

...It's beautiful and i love it...

...6 figures a year while your in your underwear...


You're claiming to earn a 6-figure salary based solely on your ability to communicate online, and you don't understand basic capitalization or how to use apostrophes and commas? I question your credibility.
 
2012-10-08 03:49:01 PM  

meat0918: To put it simply.

Most bosses do not trust you to be actually working at home.

I know I would trust maybe 1 or 2 out of the 6 person team I work with to actually work while they are home.


Then you didn't do your job very well when you hired the other 4 did you?

/I know, management is hard
 
2012-10-08 03:50:54 PM  
I can do some things from home, but this has not let me work from home yet:

rohos.com

And we are in the midst of a long library conversion; culling a herd of obsolete circuit breakers from the shared library while making default settings. The 1 gig shared library got to be really really slow.

/anyone else use SKM?
 
2012-10-08 03:52:28 PM  

DoBeDoBeDo: meat0918: To put it simply.

Most bosses do not trust you to be actually working at home.

I know I would trust maybe 1 or 2 out of the 6 person team I work with to actually work while they are home.

So you hired people you can't trust?


I never said I was the boss, and my input on hiring decisions has fark all to do with my boss's decision to hire some of the people we've hired. The last few individuals I've helped interview, I could tell he had made up his mind to hire or not hire that individual before the interview had even been scheduled.
 
2012-10-08 03:53:33 PM  

rohar: meat0918: To put it simply.

Most bosses do not trust you to be actually working at home.

I know I would trust maybe 1 or 2 out of the 6 person team I work with to actually work while they are home.

Then you didn't do your job very well when you hired the other 4 did you?

/I know, management is hard


What worries me the most is that he went through the same thought process when he hired me.
 
2012-10-08 03:53:46 PM  
In our office, it's one word: jealousy.

Some workers will never be able to telecommute, so they raise holy hell every time those of us who can bring it up to the management.
 
2012-10-08 03:55:40 PM  

Angry Drunk Bureaucrat: give me doughnuts:
5) I like to keep work-place and home-place seperate. I feel more motivated to work and stay on task better at the office (he said while hanging out on Fark at work).

Yeah, forgot to mention that one. I could never study effectively in college from my dorm room. I needed to go somewhere that felt like "work".


This one is a biggie.

I have the option of telecommuting, which I exercise 95% of the time. But you know what? Even with knowing that the next time I have to go into the office at rush hour time, I feel better at home when I leave the computer at the office. Not having work lurking 10 feet from my dining room is better for mental health. Also, the commute serves to create a mental boundary between work and home, gives you time to switch gears and disconnect. As long as it isn't a ridiculous long one, it's a benefit to your mental health to have a commute.

One other thing: I have little kids that just learned to use doorknobs. Telecommute levels of home peace are now a rarity. :(

Now I just switched jobs to another one where I'll not have the telecommute option as easy as here. I'll miss that, but bigger paycheck, closer to home, etc...
 
2012-10-08 04:10:20 PM  
"The Internet should have allowed most people to work from home. So why are we still commuting?"

Maybe because here I baked you a cookie on-line and it is zero calories! isn't very filling and you sure can't drive it to work.

Or; most people still do stuff.
 
2012-10-08 04:21:23 PM  

Richelieu: JolobinSmokin: ... camera that could take 26 pic's.

...Really took off when i could just ...

...until around 2pm when i check my fancy P.O. box address that actually says suite # instead of P.O. box because for some reason banks liked to see that and i didn't want angry customer's showing up to my house...

... take some photo's for new construction on a lake in oklahoma, then drive back to tulsa inspect a forelcosed duplex...

...Tomorrow, i'll leave the house... they don't really move to quickly ...

...Then on Wednesday & thursday i'll sit at home all day typing listening to music drinking beer and smoking pot, and when i'm finished with the reports I...

...It's beautiful and i love it...

...6 figures a year while your in your underwear...

You're claiming to earn a 6-figure salary based solely on your ability to communicate online, and you don't understand basic capitalization or how to use apostrophes and commas? I question your credibility.


Lol, I was unaware fark comment section was an official transcript that needed correct punctuation.

You make me laugh, and the fact that you know nothing of the real estate appraisal business or how it works makes me laugh.

I type up reports and I punctuate and engrishify them up as much as needed and most our reports are typed in all caps because of the form and formats of the software.

Your ignorance or the industry and its standards is only as laughable as your trying to check my punctuation.

You sound mad that you don't get paid as much for more work than I do, but be happy that you'll never be an appraiser because noone will ever take you as an apprentice even if you get your degree and take the extra 300 hours of appraisal school no one will ever allow you to gain the experience to become one us of,

So I would be mad too if I were u, B-)
 
2012-10-08 04:23:53 PM  

gingerjet: I'm a manager and I completely disagree. Unless you have it ingrained in your culture that people will not be in the office and develop the tools to support it - telecommuting simply won't work. That takes leadership and many have failed trying to change such a culture.

/one of my employees is moving to 100% telecommuting and I fully support it
//it will make my job a little harder but that is what I get paid to do


Telecommuting works fine, apparently it's just YOU that has a problem with it. How does it make YOUR job more difficult? All you should care about is if the work assigned is being completed on time and competently...and if they show up for conference calls.

My last gig, I had to be in the office once a week (on Friday) for our weekly meeting. Occasionally I'd show up for other meetings if there was a vendor on site...but 90% of my work could be completed remotely.

Besides, if I'm expected to work with people around the globe (basically working early mornings for Europe or midnights for Asia) then a little flexibility from management goes a long way.
 
2012-10-08 04:24:36 PM  
Will only telecommute. fark the office!
 
2012-10-08 04:28:13 PM  
I've been working at home for about the past 6.5 years. Over the years, I'd have to say the biggest benefit to the company would have to be my productivity. If I am always working from home, I'm more likely to put in longer hours, I'll start work when most people are leaving to travel to work and I'm working until they get home from work. I normally work much longer hours than that, but at a minimum, the company is gaining 2 hours a day from me, give or take.
 
2012-10-08 04:39:48 PM  

poot_rootbeer: Most policymakers assume that anybody who's permitted to "work from home" will spend their days the same way they would: about an hour a day of trying to seem responsive, and seven hours of masturbating themselves raw.


But the chaffing is a whole ne sensation that can reinvigorate your passion!
 
2012-10-08 04:45:44 PM  
i291.photobucket.com
 
2012-10-08 05:04:14 PM  
My wife has worked (is working now, in fact) in a couple situations that allow telecommuting, and it seems like some of the basic problems can solved thusly, as they have been at her shops:

1. Set hours when you're expected to be at your "desk" or otherwise available or reachable.

2. A requirement that any kids, pets or whatever be otherwise occupied while you're at work. So whether your kids are in school, are at daycare, or have a nanny, you basically aren't allowed to watch your kids and your office work at the same time. There's just no way you can do one or the other well while trying to do both at the same time.

3. Some requirement that you show up at an office from time to time. In one shop, my wife (and everyone else) each got a telecommute day, and the option of a four-day workweek if they put in extra time on those four days. But everybody had to be in the office at the same time once a week to handle any weekly meetings or whatnot, or just so everybody saw each other at least once.

Now, my wife's current company has her as a one-person remote division far off company HQ, and they have her travel to town (with other telecommuters) about every six weeks and work for a couple days from there. The nice thing is that usually the company has some sort of event planned while they're in town, so it's more than just showing up to work the mines two days a month.
 
2012-10-08 05:11:46 PM  
All this way down the thread and not ONE of you posted the "Fat Homer using stick on computer" pic??

Sigh. Kids these days.

legalproductivity.rocketmatter.com
 
2012-10-08 05:16:14 PM  
Because I don't want my clients in my house?
 
2012-10-08 05:17:13 PM  
Because our boss still wishes the engineering department looked like this:

umhistory.dc.umich.edu

Hot hot HOT!

Oh and:

Slives: Sometimes there are personal reasons for choosing to not telecommute. In my case, I could be 100% work at home, but with a stay at home wife and 2 kids in the house, it is not a good work environment.
With kids that want to check in on dad all the time and a wife that has admitted she gets frustrated when watching the kids while I 'just sit up there on the computer' while working.

So it is a lot safer for me and my marriage to get out of the house to work.


After my wife got ill I telecommuted so I could take care of her, but I was DAMN glad to get back to work and away from the "Oh, since you're home, why don't we go do something?" and "The kids both missed the bus again, can you take them to school?"
 
2012-10-08 05:28:36 PM  
How am I going to root through the fridge at night eating everyone else's leftovers from home, braniac?
 
2012-10-08 05:28:48 PM  

Aarontology: Generation_D: Aarontology: A couple of lots laptops with sensitive information on them put a halt to that real damn quick here.

Must suck your corporate IT security allowed that fail to happen. Have you considered hiring a security consultant?

It was less about IT security as it was about some dumbass leaving the company laptop at a cafe. No information got out as far as I know, but they got super paranoid after that.


I've been that dumbass except it was a NYC taxi. The cabbie actually found my home address in Brooklyn and brought it back to me the next day. He refused to take the $100 I offered him as a reward.

I would have been toast. I probably would have been canned or at the very least would have lost my regional job and would have got stuck in corporate HQ. The boss never found out and I sure as shiat never brought it up. I've never bad mouthed a cabbie since.
 
2012-10-08 05:32:05 PM  

dittybopper: Angry Drunk Bureaucrat: As much as I'd rather telecommute, there are some advantages to being on site for me:

(1) it drags my ass out of the house daily and forces a disciplined schedule on me.
(2) Sadly, we're not a paperless office, so I still need access to the physical files sometimes.
(3) Coworkers do, in fact, make one's brain think about things you wouldn't think about if you weren't physically present. Sure, the chairwhale in the next cube may be droning on and on about jellybeans, but that can strangely spur your brain to remember the update the TPS report.
(4) And sometimes the chairwhale does have good ideas that you wouldn't have otherwise have heard if you weren't nearby.

Whatever, though: I just want to nap at the office and maybe bring my cat.

That's why I like a mix of telecommuting and physical presence. I get the benefits of both.


This. My job is essentially paper shuffling, with some legal analysis and some contact with outside firms and the general public. I telecommuted for 2 weeks while they renovated our offices. While I don't think I'd want to do it full-time, it'd be nice to be able to do it maybe once or twice per week. save commute time, gas, etc.
 
2012-10-08 05:32:46 PM  

JolobinSmokin: Richelieu: JolobinSmokin: ... camera that could take 26 pic's.

...Really took off when i could just ...

...until around 2pm when i check my fancy P.O. box address that actually says suite # instead of P.O. box because for some reason banks liked to see that and i didn't want angry customer's showing up to my house...

... take some photo's for new construction on a lake in oklahoma, then drive back to tulsa inspect a forelcosed duplex...

...Tomorrow, i'll leave the house... they don't really move to quickly ...

...Then on Wednesday & thursday i'll sit at home all day typing listening to music drinking beer and smoking pot, and when i'm finished with the reports I...

...It's beautiful and i love it...

...6 figures a year while your in your underwear...

You're claiming to earn a 6-figure salary based solely on your ability to communicate online, and you don't understand basic capitalization or how to use apostrophes and commas? I question your credibility.

Lol, I was unaware fark comment section was an official transcript that needed correct punctuation.

You make me laugh, and the fact that you know nothing of the real estate appraisal business or how it works makes me laugh.

I type up reports and I punctuate and engrishify them up as much as needed and most our reports are typed in all caps because of the form and formats of the software.

Your ignorance or the industry and its standards is only as laughable as your trying to check my punctuation.

You sound mad that you don't get paid as much for more work than I do, but be happy that you'll never be an appraiser because noone will ever take you as an apprentice even if you get your degree and take the extra 300 hours of appraisal school no one will ever allow you to gain the experience to become one us of,

So I would be mad too if I were u, B-)


Why do you need a degree to appraise real estate?
 
2012-10-08 05:37:20 PM  
I could do my entire job remotely, but corporate doesn't want to give access to some information to people who are off site. I started off doing a small part of my current job remotely, and then was asked into the office when a position opened up. The pay and perks are better now, but my commute is a biatch.
 
2012-10-08 05:46:01 PM  
You know if we don't need you in the office we don't need you in this country. Hello low pay China and India.
 
2012-10-08 05:49:13 PM  

mrlewish: You know if we don't need you in the office we don't need you in this country. Hello low pay China and India.


who do such shiat work that if you look at any thing further out than a quarter it isn't worth it.
 
2012-10-08 06:03:39 PM  
Fark_Guy_Rob: I worked at a company that used to allow telecommuting. But lazy people ruined it. Far too many people abused the system. They stayed home and did nothing.

That

It goes through cycles, they enable telecommuting, some dick abuses the system, they clamp down on telecommuting.

// Seems to be a 5 year cycle here

// 1 day / week would be fine and dandy for me (one day of not having to wake up early to avoid traffic, one day of eating an actual breakfast, one day of not driving with the retards, one day of not fighting for parking in an overcrowded lot). I would pick Wednesday for a mid week refresh.
 
2012-10-08 06:08:45 PM  
dittybopper: I'm pretty paranoid about my work laptop.

I have a desktop (soon to be two if I start linux programming) and a laptop.

The laptop was used equipment (from some other group), it's a generation or two behind but it does exactly what I need it to do (present crap at meetings). And the hit to the dept budget was a fraction of what a new 'desktop replacement' style laptop would have cost.

My real work gets done on the desktop, the work laptop is essentially a dumb terminal.

// the work laptop stays at work, when I get home, I can fire up the VPN and remote desktop to the work desktop from my home desktop or home laptop ... bonus, not lugging equipment between work/home.
 
2012-10-08 06:30:33 PM  

unyon: Mr. Coffee Nerves: The thrill of furtively masturbating under my desk while staring at the cleaning lady is sharply reduced whem I'm at home.

At home I get to bang the cleaning lady.


At home, I also get to bang your cleaning lady.
 
2012-10-08 06:48:27 PM  

Fark_Guy_Rob: Most people are lazy sobs.

I worked at a company that used to allow telecommuting. But lazy people ruined it. Far too many people abused the system. They stayed home and did nothing.

The truth is, I'd be willing to take a significant pay cut (and the company would save on equipment/office space) if I could telecommute 100% of the time. The real benefit (for me anyway) would be going to the middle of Montana and buying a nice house with lots of land for 150k with low, low property tax and a 0% sales tax. I could still work for the same Chicago-based company, but instead of feeling poor with my 80k salary, I could live like a king with my 60k salary.

// If anyone is hiring....let me know ;)


The head engineer at a previous job moved to Montana and telecommuted from there. He was let go because he didn't get any of his work done and spent all his time farming dental floss.
 
2012-10-08 07:00:02 PM  
8-10 years ago my wifes employer had all the folks in her department set up home offices. they tossed either 2K or 2,500.oo at each employ for expenses, equipment. went through all that work and nothing ever came of it.

--one of her bosses was very strange & cruel. human resources did nothing about the complaints. boss lady finally snapped and was taken out strapped down by ambulance people.
 
2012-10-08 07:02:19 PM  

lewismarktwo: JolobinSmokin: Richelieu: JolobinSmokin: ... camera that could take 26 pic's.



Why do you need a degree to appraise real estate?



Why do you need a degree to appraise real estate?

Long answer

Well it isn't as easy as walking up to someone's house and saying $250,000 or $1,200 000.

There is alot of small scale statistical modeling you have to do for your neighborhood, town, city and expand that onto seperate trends of growth, decline, revitalization and their affect on value.
You have to search for alot of data pick out the best that supports the market value and include that into a well written report to have to be understandable to regular people by law. You need computer skills, allgebra, small amounts of Trig and Geometry and even though i don't really need it I use Calculus a few times a day.

So there are many standard we have to meet and you have to be able to do all this with a small amount of information(town of 5-10K) or with large amount of info, large city like Tulsa or OKC.
Small amounts of data are harder to follow trends. Large amounts of Data are harder because there are so many trends.

This new house that sold for 100K, but a house sold just like it across the street for $98,750, that % change in value of say a seven month period, you have to calculate the difference and add that or subtract that value from your comparable sales depending on if it's a stable/declining/increasing market. All of which has to be studied and calculated on a individual basis per each house.
Plus alot more math and other stuff i don't really care to explain right now.

Short Answer

Step 1. Require new appraisers to have a Bach. Degree.

Step. 2 Require new appraisers to have 2-300 hours of specific appraisal classes pluss be an apprentice for a minimum of 2 years with 2-3000 hours of experience, i.e. each house worth 6-8 hours and additional 1500 hours of non-residential/commercial work for higher Appraiser designation.

Step. 3 Don't hire any new trainee's and only hire inhouse staff support so as no new appraisers are being trained and all the older one's are dieing off.

Step 4. Your one of only a few appraiser's left with no new real competition coming anytime soon because you have to sign off on your competition, therefore profit.

I't s license to steel,

You need an appraisal to Foreclose on a house.

You need an appraisal to buy a house with a loan

You need an appraisal to refinance your mortgage.

I hope that answers your question, it's great business if you can get into it.

I know alot of people who have spent thousands of dollars on appraisal classes, but can't find anyone to sign off for them.

I ignore their calls.
 
2012-10-08 07:05:12 PM  
I'll admit, I don't do much when I'm telecommuting. Well, no actual work, anyway. Like others have mentioned, the wife was always quick to ask me to do the chores or errands. Plus, I'd usually get high in the morning and play xbox.

I'm not really interested. I need time outside of the house. There are lots of days I don't want to come in to work, but the commute isn't the problem.
 
2012-10-08 07:08:23 PM  
And, this blog was written by an idiot. He really couldn't envision any types of employment except an office?
 
2012-10-08 07:09:30 PM  
because of all the 50+ year olds that can't afford to retire and can't tell the difference between a USB, ethernet and power cable.
 
2012-10-08 07:36:27 PM  
We had a central office in a small rural oklahoma town, while i had the big office in Tulsa.

In the old days of going to the actual county courthouse to get assessor information that was a good idea.

Now, I shut down the offices everyone does their work from home and send it to me for review.

If they don't get it to me by the due date, they don't get anymore work.

Everyone meet's their due date and have as much flexibility as they want or need.

The fact that by law we can't contact banks or lenders about our appraisal orders and can't give any information by law to realtors and actually, I couldn't even tell my best friend a value of his house without having all the proper files and back up to support that value or he could legally sue me and justly so.

It's complicated mess made more complicated by the Saving & Loan scandle under Reagan and the recent Financial melt down under Bush W.

I voted many times republican, but because of what i see the republican party becoming I'm a libby lib who loves libbing all the lib time.

It used to be if you wanted to live like a republican you voted like a democrat.

That was when republicans were elite Northeastern business types, now they are fat stupid rednecks and i'm related to so many of them i'm allowed to call them that, because i'm speaking as an Okie from experience.
 
2012-10-08 07:37:06 PM  
I would be single and out-of-work in a month if I were allowed to work from home, with only my blistered palms to keep me company.

//fapfapfap
 
2012-10-08 08:50:50 PM  
Whether I work from home or not has a lot to do with what I need to accomplish that day and whether I feel the need to make appearances.

Prepping lecture notes? I usually do that during my underutilized office hours. Grading? That's usually at IHOP or a brewpub, sometimes at home or the office.

Meetings? About half of them are off-campus, so it depends. Usually I'll try to balance out a marathon day so I can stop at home and check on my pets, take a breather, etc.

Working on a manuscript? I'm at home. Running the stats for said manuscript? I'm at the office.

I usually get at least 10-15 hours a week on campus, but I easily work 50-60 hours a week, because academia is a lifestyle.

/first night without an impending deadline since the school year started
//I even managed not to work this weekend, woo!
 
2012-10-08 09:33:42 PM  

Bonkthat_Again: I think he nailed it right on the head.


He could have summed it up in 3 words, "Bosses are assholes"
 
2012-10-08 09:36:51 PM  
I would love to telecommute except for the pesky bits about it being illegal and my work computer costs more than I make in several months
 
2012-10-08 09:38:55 PM  
For people who work in call centers (a job that could easily, and less expensively, be done from home), the answer is simple: the Communication Workers of America. It's a lot harder to unionize people who work at home than those who have to get together in a cubicle farm every day.
 
2012-10-08 10:21:06 PM  
Working from home is one of the most overrated things ever. I did it for about two years and I never will again.
 
2012-10-08 10:21:43 PM  
Telecommuting for ... a year? More? Drove me pretty much insane. I sat with my computer in the concrete box of my apartment bedroom. I was starved for human contact, rarely bothered with clothing, kept nothing resembling a schedule and was sad all the time.

When I got my new job with a real office, people asked me how I liked it. My honest, earnest answer was "I get to wear pants!".
 
2012-10-08 10:36:09 PM  
I work about 45 minutes from my home (and longer if traffic is backed up, as it often is in St. Louis around the bridges). Working from home is the best option for me, especially since we use Google Apps and Dropbox for pretty much everything except our phones.

What's more, since I'm the director of a small firm, I can do so anytime I want. I've also empowered my staff to do the same.

And yet neither I nor my staff work from home regularly. We take the time to get dressed up and commute in, we waste time chattering, we eat out for lunch or settle for food that we can store in the micro-fridge and make in the microwave. Rarely do any of us actually need to interact in person, and on the rare occasion when someone needs to be shown something, there's no reason we couldn't do so through a Google Hangout.

I asked my staff members why they don't like to telecommute and they all confessed that they hate telephones and video chats. They prefer the in-person experience, despite the fact that we're researchers and hardly the sorts of people who crave social attention. Which makes me think that our desire to be social animals is a big part of why working from home isn't for everyone.
 
2012-10-08 10:54:09 PM  
This is one of the reasons my company is implementing VDI (since I'm the one implementing VMware View...it's job security). It isn't that it's less expensive (it isn't despite all the rage about TCO and hardware refreshes)...it just tends to be more secure (if the security guy is doing his job). Users store their sensitive/secret data on the corporate share. Users have to VPN in, then login again to connect to the VDI session where they can access their data. It's a biatch for those that don't have a good network connection (or connect via cellular), but it works for most of our consultants.
 
2012-10-09 12:04:06 AM  
I've been working from home for the last five years since they closed our field office. My company is based in Connecticut; I live in Chicago. I've loved it.

Recently, my wife and I were presented with the opportunity to move to California, where all of my family lives. I put together a whole proposal and started pitching it to my boss during our weekly call.

Before I could get through the first point, he interrupted me and said "Sure. I don't give a fark where you work. Move now before your kids are old enough to be in school".

It's nice to have job security that you can take around the country with you.
 
2012-10-09 12:40:54 AM  
I work for a national consulting firm, and they figured out a while ago that if you put consultants in the field closer to the clients, its cheaper to have them work from home than open regional offices. So my "office" is my home and my commute is 20 feet, or its out to an airport and over to another city. I get reimbursed for those. Last filled my car's tank in .. August I think. Live downtown (condo) and walk everywhere for daily life.

WFH used to be a weird thing and there was an adjustment period, now I can't imagine going back to an office and dealing with all the crap. Working from home is a lot easier to focus and just get sh*t done.
 
2012-10-09 01:04:08 AM  
Envy me. It's a 10-minute walk to my workplace. I'm $120.00 a month ahead on gas I'm not buying anymore. No more commuting.

Not to mention the additional 45 minutes of sleep I get.
 
2012-10-09 01:16:12 AM  

Strongbeerrules: Envy me. It's a 10-minute walk to my workplace. I'm $120.00 a month ahead on gas I'm not buying anymore. No more commuting.

Not to mention the additional 45 minutes of sleep I get.


Ten minutes? When I work from home it's about 3 steps from the bed to the computer.
 
2012-10-09 01:41:37 AM  
I'm home officed (field engineer) and my boss is about 4.5 hours away by car. I probably do about twice as much work as I did when I worked in a lab, and I'm now spending several hours a day on the road between jobs.

I've never met my boss in person. Just last week, I finally met the fourth person that does the same job I do for this area.

I REALLY love my current job ;)
 
2012-10-09 02:05:21 AM  

Hopman: There are some jobs that just can't be done by telecomuting Like mine for instance.

I drive a truck delivering sheet metal parts to job sites. Despite what many people think, there are STILL jobs out there that require a human to do physical labor!


Yeah, I asked about the whole "telecommute thing", but the school district is pretty insistent on having an adult actually be in the drivers seat of the school bus.

/At least I have a lot of pretty buttons to push.
 
2012-10-09 02:24:21 AM  

CujoQuarrel: Strongbeerrules: Envy me. It's a 10-minute walk to my workplace. I'm $120.00 a month ahead on gas I'm not buying anymore. No more commuting.

Not to mention the additional 45 minutes of sleep I get.

Ten minutes? When I work from home it's about 3 steps from the bed to the computer.


3 steps. Hah. I just lift up my head.

/College Student in a dorm room. Isn't any room left, and it's too cold to get out of bed and still be in the room. So I stay in bed cozy warm, and my computer loves sitting in 20C ambient.
 
2012-10-09 02:34:24 AM  
Hoes in different area codes.
 
2012-10-09 03:05:37 AM  
Careful what you wish for:

If your job can be done from home, it can be done from India.
 
2012-10-09 03:57:01 AM  
I was able to work from home (write articles) for the first four months of 1987 - yes, 25 years ago - thanks to a modem, some floppy discs and a Commodore 64 with a COLOR monitor.

Then a new editor came on board and he was a classically insecure managerial type. Haven't routinely worked at home since.
 
2012-10-09 04:21:40 AM  

Slives: Sometimes there are personal reasons for choosing to not telecommute. In my case, I could be 100% work at home, but with a stay at home wife and 2 kids in the house, it is not a good work environment.
With kids that want to check in on dad all the time and a wife that has admitted she gets frustrated when watching the kids while I 'just sit up there on the computer' while working.

So it is a lot safer for me and my marriage to get out of the house to work.


I finally had to really lay it down that I'm not just farking around in my office all day, I'm earning my paycheck. No, I can't stop and do the dishes and no I can't stop and vacuum because you feel overworked while I "just play on that damn computer all day." If I do, it'll be a late night of working to make that time up since my pay is based on deliverables, plus I'm not working any less than she is and she was expecting me to take on part of her workload because of that weird perception that people get of telecommuters. I set office hours (8-6 with no distractions except for my lunch hour) and explained that 6-7 was the "drive home" decompress time that couldn't be interrupted with chores. There's certain circumstances, just like any job, where I'll have to take the morning or the day or whatever to attend to something that can't be handled at any other time, but it has to be treated the same: either I make it up later or lose the pay. She seems to finally get it.
 
2012-10-09 04:23:18 AM  

stiletto_the_wise: Careful what you wish for:

If your job can be done from home, it can be done from India.


My job requires that I actually touch the things I'm working on, hence the fact that I actually have a job here in Texas.

On the other hand, somebody believed that taking the calls for said work and dispatching me to the customers could be done from India, hence the fact that I'm often dispatched to places like Pasadena, California, rather than Pasadena, Texas. And I'm often expected to be in two places that are 100 miles apart, since they look so close on a map ;)
 
2012-10-09 05:19:18 AM  

JolobinSmokin: lewismarktwo: JolobinSmokin: Richelieu: JolobinSmokin: ... camera that could take 26 pic's.

Why do you need a degree to appraise real estate?

Long answer

Well it isn't as easy as walking up to someone's house and saying $250,000 or $1,200 000.

There is alot of small scale statistical modeling you have to do for your neighborhood, town, city and expand that onto seperate trends of growth, decline, revitalization and their affect on value.
You have to search for alot of data pick out the best that supports the market value and include that into a well written report to have to be understandable to regular people by law. You need computer skills, allgebra, small amounts of Trig and Geometry and even though i don't really need it I use Calculus a few times a day.

So there are many standard we have to meet and you have to be able to do all this with a small amount of information(town of 5-10K) or with large amount of info, large city like Tulsa or OKC.
Small amounts of data are harder to follow trends. Large amounts of Data are harder because there are so many trends.

This new house that sold for 100K, but a house sold just like it across the street for $98,750, that % change in value of say a seven month period, you have to calculate the difference and add that or subtract that value from your comparable sales depending on if it's a stable/declining/increasing market. All of which has to be studied and calculated on a individual basis per each house.
Plus alot more math and other stuff i don't really care to explain right now.


As a CA licensed broker I've highlighted the blatant horseshiat for those outside the industry. Unless clownshoes is doing commercial real estate BPOs - then he's not doing high volume - he's doing residential, which pays $50-$75 a pop.

So unless he's doing 2000-3000 BPOs a year he ain't making 150k. 

And he's chock fulla writing errors. I'm drunk and could be doing this in French and do better. Dude got no degree.
 
2012-10-09 05:20:47 AM  
Late to this party but I don't, and won't work from home more than 1 or 2 days a week because:

a) I work in a lab, special circumstances obviously needing me to be with specialist equipment that my mad scientist cave doesn't have yet.

b) My home is my home. It isn't very big, it isn't very nice, but it is where I like to be to relax. If it was also where I had the stresses/frustrations of work then I'd want out my house as much as I'd want in it. The separation gives a clear ability for me to leave a bad day in the lab behind, regroup and move on. I just can't do that if I work from home.

And yes, I tried when writing my PhD Thesis. It pretty much killed home as a nice place or killed productivity. I chose my office after a week of trying.

I might be wired old-fashioned but I need a workspace and a homespace and some distance between them.
 
2012-10-09 06:45:09 AM  

thomps: for a lot of new guys, we're just a pay check and if a better one comes along that still lets you stay at home, they'll take it.


I'm having a hard time feeling sympathetic. Why should an employee not take a better paying job?
 
2012-10-09 09:01:00 AM  

DrPainMD: For people who work in call centers (a job that could easily, and less expensively, be done from home), the answer is simple: the Communication Workers of America. It's a lot harder to unionize people who work at home than those who have to get together in a cubicle farm every day.


Well I would think it has more to do with how hard and pressed most call center jobs are. Most call centers are so ridiculously micromanaged that there too much time spent on disciplining those going to the bathroom and taking over a minute per shift than some grand union stopping people from working.
 
2012-10-09 09:17:35 AM  

casual disregard: thomps: for a lot of new guys, we're just a pay check and if a better one comes along that still lets you stay at home, they'll take it.

I'm having a hard time feeling sympathetic. Why should an employee not take a better paying job?


i'm not really asking for sympathy. if we haven't shown value to an employee outside of salary, then that employee should take the better-paying job. most people will tell you, though, that salary only gets you so far in terms of job satisfaction. if we can provide value in the form of quality of life, social inclusion, career development, etc, then most people will take that into consideration when presented with the opportunity to jump into a meat grinder for a 20% pay increase.
 
2012-10-09 09:27:39 AM  
I think the hybrid approach is probably best. It also depends on what industry you work in. I work in software. Enterprise applications. My team travels 50% of the time, so they're not in the office every day anyway. Our CEO (my boss) is a little old school and not into telecommuting, and I tend to agree with some of the early comments about corporate culture.

Maybe the answer is to define the days a week people have to be in the office (if they're not on site) and then let people work from home if they choose. For people whose lives are spent with laptops, what difference does it make where they are? And, with Skype, I can talk face to face with anyone on my team (in multiple time zones and at great distances) and it feels different than just a phone call or email.

I work from home probably 1 day every other week. I get as much work done from home. In fact, I tend to spend less time on Fark.
 
2012-10-09 09:36:17 AM  

El Pachuco: JolobinSmokin: lewismarktwo: JolobinSmokin: Richelieu: JolobinSmokin: ... camera that could take 26 pic's.

Why do you need a degree to appraise real estate?

Long answer

Well it isn't as easy as walking up to someone's house and saying $250,000 or $1,200 000.

There is alot of small scale statistical modeling you have to do for your neighborhood, town, city and expand that onto seperate trends of growth, decline, revitalization and their affect on value.
You have to search for alot of data pick out the best that supports the market value and include that into a well written report to have to be understandable to regular people by law. You need computer skills, allgebra, small amounts of Trig and Geometry and even though i don't really need it I use Calculus a few times a day.

So there are many standard we have to meet and you have to be able to do all this with a small amount of information(town of 5-10K) or with large amount of info, large city like Tulsa or OKC.
Small amounts of data are harder to follow trends. Large amounts of Data are harder because there are so many trends.

This new house that sold for 100K, but a house sold just like it across the street for $98,750, that % change in value of say a seven month period, you have to calculate the difference and add that or subtract that value from your comparable sales depending on if it's a stable/declining/increasing market. All of which has to be studied and calculated on a individual basis per each house.
Plus alot more math and other stuff i don't really care to explain right now.


As a CA licensed broker I've highlighted the blatant horseshiat for those outside the industry. Unless clownshoes is doing commercial real estate BPOs - then he's not doing high volume - he's doing residential, which pays $50-$75 a pop.

So unless he's doing 2000-3000 BPOs a year he ain't making 150k. 

And he's chock fulla writing errors. I'm drunk and could be doing this in French and do better. Dude got no degree.


Sorry bro. But I'm not doing BPO's, I'm doing actual real estate appraisals at $500 a pop & also commercial real estate appraisals from $1500 to $5000 a pop depending on the complexity of the property.

Thanks for showing realtors/brokers are even dumber than the average person about the real estate appraisal industry.

BPO's what appraiser does those?

Who gives a shiate about my fark writing errors, it's not like I don't have autocorrect.

He'll, it's 20 years since I've seen the inside of an English class, blow me down the river.


CA brokers are as dumb as Okies brokers.

Thanks for clearing that up. No need to worry about red state blue state, brokers live in a perpetual retarded state it seems.
 
2012-10-09 09:49:47 AM  

Slives: Sometimes there are personal reasons for choosing to not telecommute. In my case, I could be 100% work at home, but with a stay at home wife and 2 kids in the house, it is not a good work environment.
With kids that want to check in on dad all the time and a wife that has admitted she gets frustrated when watching the kids while I 'just sit up there on the computer' while working.

So it is a lot safer for me and my marriage to get out of the house to work.


Subtract one kid from the equation and that's my situation exactly.
 
2012-10-09 10:43:57 AM  

JolobinSmokin: He'll, it's 20 years since I've seen the inside of an English class, blow me down the river.


I don't know fark all about real estate appraisals, but if you want to be taken seriously in life, I strongly suggest you learn to use an apostrophe properly.

Or go on being proud of your ignorance.

/Either way...whatever works for you
 
2012-10-09 10:52:39 AM  

Lt. Col. Angus: JolobinSmokin: He'll, it's 20 years since I've seen the inside of an English class, blow me down the river.

I don't know fark all about real estate appraisals, but if you want to be taken seriously in life, I strongly suggest you learn to use an apostrophe properly.

Or go on being proud of your ignorance.

/Either way...whatever works for you


i'f y'ou 'hink t'hat m'y f'ark 'p'o's't re'flecl't m'y igno'rance 't'th'at is r'e'a'l'l'y funny 'to me,

I had no idea how many grammer nazi's existed in fark thread's.

Has anybody seen kyle.

Lt. Col. Angus is looking for Kyle, he's about this tall, 'seen kyle
 
2012-10-09 12:21:16 PM  
A couple of factors at play:
1) having some form of separation between "work-life" and "home-life" is healthy and normal.
2) management and performance tracking has not kept pace with the technology that allows work-from-home to be possible.
3) a bunch of folks are slackers even when they are at work - bosses don't trust them unsupervised.
4) once work-from-home is perfected, a whole range of middle-managers become useless - they don't want to lose their jobs.
 
2012-10-09 01:59:44 PM  

JolobinSmokin: I had no idea how many grammer nazi's existed in fark thread's.


You ain't been around long, have you?
 
2012-10-09 02:16:16 PM  
I have been doing it for 3 years. I have only been to the office 4 times in that period. I am on my computer at 7 am every day and only leave it to make lunch which I then eat at the computer. I am done at 3 but have many times stayed later when the need arose. I do miss the human contact sometimes but otherwise it is great.
 
2012-10-09 02:16:45 PM  
Reading it for years, but posting only recently yes.

I thought you had to e a totalfarker to post.

I just recently leaner end how to post pic's an links.

I'm a little older not to old, but from rural Oklahoma so I may not be as savy as some others.

My points about this article was also as an employer and not an employee.

It seems many who have written against me, did not see that distinction or did and that is why they went grammar nazi on me.
 
2012-10-09 02:20:35 PM  

Richelieu: JolobinSmokin: I had no idea how many grammer nazi's existed in fark thread's.

You ain't been around long, have you?


Reading it for years, but posting only recently yes.

I thought you had to e a totalfarker to post.

I just recently leaner end how to post pic's an links.

I'm a little older not to old, but from rural Oklahoma so I may not be as savy as some others.

My points about this article was also as an employer and not an employee.

It seems many who have written against me, did not see that distinction or did and that is why they went grammar nazi on me.


Also posting on an iPhone there is this thing called autocorrect that may write a word I didn't want it to and I could care less if its punctuated correctly on a fark comment section.


But super thank for noticing, but I've got to be at the gym in 26 minutes.
 
2012-10-09 03:17:57 PM  

JolobinSmokin: There is alot of small scale statistical modeling you have to do for your neighborhood, town, city and expand that onto seperate trends of growth, decline, revitalization and their affect on value.
You have to search for alot of data pick out the best that supports the market value and include that into a well written report to have to be understandable to regular people by law. You need computer skills, allgebra, small amounts of Trig and Geometry and even though i don't really need it I use Calculus a few times a day.



You are not using algebra, trigonometry, geometry and calculus "a few times a day." At best you're using a computer program that may contain those sort of calculations, but you aren't doing them.

At $400-500 a pop you'd have to be the busiest appraiser in the entire country to make six figures, but anything's possible.

Your writing makes you sound uneducated. You'd get eaten alive in CA. Stay in OK with your fantasies.
 
2012-10-09 03:52:42 PM  

El Pachuco: JolobinSmokin: There is alot of small scale statistical modeling you have to do for your neighborhood, town, city and expand that onto seperate trends of growth, decline, revitalization and their affect on value.
You have to search for alot of data pick out the best that supports the market value and include that into a well written report to have to be understandable to regular people by law. You need computer skills, allgebra, small amounts of Trig and Geometry and even though i don't really need it I use Calculus a few times a day.


You are not using algebra, trigonometry, geometry and calculus "a few times a day." At best you're using a computer program that may contain those sort of calculations, but you aren't doing them.

At $400-500 a pop you'd have to be the busiest appraiser in the entire country to make six figures, but anything's possible.

Your writing makes you sound uneducated. You'd get eaten alive in CA. Stay in OK with your fantasies.


I could use a computer program to calculate complicated lot sizes that are irregular but I don't, I sit down with a pencil paper and a TI-83 since most counties in Oklahoma don't have that info readily available.

I could care less what you think of my writing. In California I would be just as successful as I am Oklahoma, but keep up your little fantasy.

10 appraisals a week x 52 weeks @ $500 = $260,000 per year, of course I take 2-3 weeks vacation and have a tiny bit of overhead since I no longer need an office.

And I'm not even including the $1500-$5000 a pop as you put it on the commercial appraisals I do.


You've been pwnd by a country Oklahoma appraiser who is more educated than you and makes more money than you.

And by the way I do more than 10 appraisal a week. I've done 5 today with 2 more to inspect before 6pm.

I just thought your so stupid you may need some perspective.
 
2012-10-09 05:12:50 PM  
Well, I'm not commuting subby. I'm permanent WFH and I come into the office when I'm needed for meetings. Since my team is spread out over four states, it really works out well for us.
 
2012-10-09 07:13:45 PM  

thomps: dittybopper: Where I work, you aren't eligible to telecommute for the first 6 months or so. After that, you can telecommute up to 2 days a week. That still puts you physically here for meetings and such most days of the week, so you can schedule for those, but you still get a significant savings on things like gas and commute time.

yeah our telecommuting is more a function of our hiring outside of chicago and SF, where we have offices. we have people fly in and work from the office each quarter and are really active with an internal social network, but for a lot of new guys, we're just a pay check and if a better one comes along that still lets you stay at home, they'll take it.


Why wouldn't they? Loyalty is a two way street, and very few large companies offer it to their employees in this day and age.
 
2012-10-09 08:42:02 PM  

thomps: Bonkthat_Again: Well, we're a non-telecommuting company, so I have a different perspective.
I'm more annoyed at our unnecessary facility costs.

As for the company culture....I think a requirement for new hires to work at least a year in the office before telecommuting, would be reasonable.

yeah, we're just finishing up an extended period of really aggressive scaling and telecommuting has been a big part of that strategy, partly because we just couldn't keep expanding physically enough to keep up with our headcount growth. i'm a proponent of telecommuting, just wanted to point out an issue we've had with it that doesn't include management egos.


What industry are you in? Vague will do, I'm so glad to hear it.
 
2012-10-10 03:51:48 AM  
Some attention has been given recently to the correlation between efficient, driven managers and their propensity to be psychopaths. Besides money, one of the biggest rewards for them is to practice their sadism on their employees. While one can certainly torment others over the Internet, there's no substitute for the hell of a typical office lifestyle, especially when it's needlessly imposed on employees who would like to telecommute. So, no telecommuting.
 
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