If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Yahoo! health)   What are the 8 cruelest foods you can eat? And just when are we going to rename eggs "chicken abortions"?   (health.yahoo.net) divider line 389
    More: Interesting  
•       •       •

17790 clicks; posted to Main » on 08 Oct 2012 at 10:41 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



389 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | » | Last | Show all
 
2012-10-08 12:38:38 PM
3.bp.blogspot.com

Mother and Child Hot Tub Reunion
 
2012-10-08 12:38:45 PM
A lot of this can be avoided just by shopping at local farmer markets (if someone there sells meat). You are supporting the local economy of small scale farmers, and getting the meat (or eggs) of animals you know have been treated humanely before they hit your table.
 
2012-10-08 12:40:04 PM

thecpt: Cold_Sassy: Food, Inc

Thats the one I watched. Its on Netflix streaming and for a documentary, its pretty good at just presenting fact without manipulation


It's a propaganda film that twisted the facts as much as it could.
 
2012-10-08 12:41:00 PM

WhippingBoy: And you don't want anyone to remind you that you're not as moral as you'd like to think you are.


I never said I was morally superior. You just can't stop with the argumentative fallacies, can you? Just because I don't adopt a special needs kid, that does not make me immoral or negate my right to speak about this topic.

You can't even argue the topic, you just have to keep launching these B.S. accusations.
 
2012-10-08 12:41:14 PM

Clockwork Kumquat: Cruel food? Saw a clip on some bizarre-video show on TV a couple or a few years ago. Chef in some Asian restaurant is preparing what is apparently a sought-after delicacy in this particular farked-up gastronomic circle. Takes a live fish and holds it down flapping and gasping on the counter. Doesn't kill the fish. Scrapes the scales off, slits and guts it, mostly, slaps it into the hot frying pan positioned so that the back end of the fish gets cooked while the head remains alive. Takes it on a plate to the table, fish's body is fried through, head is still gulping air convulsively as the customer digs in. I am unprepared, and have retreated over the back of my chair and backward across the room shaking my head and saying no no no until I am stopped by the wall. FARK YOU, humanity.


Think I remember seeing a Ripley's years ago kinda like that; a lobster is basically opened up, the tail halved, and then served to a customer raw and kicking.

/looked yummy
//you wanna talk fresh?
 
2012-10-08 12:42:30 PM

ronaprhys: Not that much of a choice, honestly. If I happened to get to the grocery first and snagged the good stuff - yay me. If not, I'm stuck going with something else. The over-capacity doesn't exist to the point that we've got completely free choice. At best we can favor the more humane facilities.


Uhm, I was not talking about what meat you get, but where it comes from and how it is processed.

If you have a local farmer market, you have some choices.
 
2012-10-08 12:42:30 PM
I'm against animal cruelty, but I have to eat and I have to be able to afford the food.

The majority of these practices came about because of supply and demand. Farmers and ranchers had to keep up with the demand from an exploding population for meat and had to compensate for diminishing available farm lands.

The cruelest nations for meat tend to be Asian, where they have no problem gulping down live critters, slicing open live snakes to drain their blood to mix with booze and developed a way of deep frying a fish, so it's served alive and gasping at the table. (They fillet everything from the head down after quickly gutting, dip the raw flesh in batter and quick fry it, leaving the attached head out. Imagine massive road rash with hot sauce poured on it. That's how it must feel to the fish.)

Balute, the duck eggs, is simply disgusting, IMO. That guy from Bizarre Foods tried one and found it was awful yet the locals love them.

Massive demand for cheap meats led to changes in how they're raised. More product had to be produced in the same available space. Time could not be wasted chasing thousands of free range chickens down and the Environmental Protection Agencies were growling about runoff from ranches and farms heavily laden with manure.

Confining the animals to smaller spaces made it easier to direct the effluent to holding ponds and to round them up. Naturally, they took this to extremes. Advances in feed allowed animals to gain more weight for market while not adding on just loads of useless fat. Plus, the feed made the animal healthier and the meat better.

Confining them to small pens kept them from running the weight off and being exposed to various diseases. However, it wasn't pleasant for the animal.

But developers were buying up thousands of acres of rich farm land and turning them into developments, the government was restricting the planting and sales of product to regulate the prices and at the same time, major agriculture companies were (1) buying up every independent farmer they could get, (2) supplying great genetically enhanced see that would NOT yield additional seed at maturity, something farmers traditionally gathered to cut planting costs and retailers were manipulating the cost of product in stores for major profits.

Things got out of hand.

BTW. My physicians have recommended I take fish oil to help my damaged heart. When I suggested Flax Oil, they said no. It's not as good. We're omnivorous, meaning we can and must eat more than roughage and weeds growing in a field.

I don't hunt. I don't like to see animals suffer. I know hunters who attempt clean quick kills, but many don't always go as planned. However, I know the value of hunter types, who technically provide meat for those of us too squeamish to kill our own.

They transfer down to ranchers and farmers who raise and butcher the meat on your plate where you don't have to see it done. The majority do it in humane ways.

The drive to feed a nation which popped up from roughly 2 million in the 50's to over 6 million now and which is busily paving over thousands of acres of land while polluting everything just by trying to live creates some staggering problems.

However, everyone likes to eat. They must eat. Even without the corporate demands, farms and ranches can be pushed to produce, which creates more problems. Plus, their labor saving equipment now costs hundreds of thousands of dollars and thousands of acres of naturally rich land has been paved over and developed, meaning poor land has to be enhanced.

In this confusing mess, there will be those who don't give a krap about the animals just so long as they turn a profit. Plus humans are somewhat sadistic over some foods. The famous 'Pressed Duck' served in high end restaurants usually requires a live duck to be strangled before preparation. Then there's that demand for caviar , which to me is nothing but salty, reeking fish eggs and now the consumption of some seafood raw and kicking. BTW. Slurping down a live octopus to die slowly in the acids of your stomach means you don't actually TASTE it. You don't chew it. All you taste is the dipping sauce and get a vicarious thrill knowing you just gulped down something live, which will writhe in searing agony for a time in your gut.

There are psycho-sexual connotations to things like that, but that's best explained another time.
 
2012-10-08 12:42:54 PM

Aarontology: I only eat chicken abortions if they're a product of chicken-rape or chicken-incest or if the life of the chicken is in danger.


okay I LoL'ed big time
 
2012-10-08 12:42:56 PM

indylaw: I think the "animal rights" movement and ethical vegetarianism largely stem from the fact that most people are resigned about the fact that humans are shiatty to other humans. We are, after all, animals and nature is cruel. So we project our feelings onto animals and fetishize them in order to try to prove that we really are noble. Even people who are not vegetarians or animal nutters play this game and benefit from a sort of willful ignorance about where their food comes from...

How do we know that plants don't have some sort of consciousness that we just can't perceive, and that when we harvest plants in these giant machines we're causing them unimaginable suffering? We are not comfortable with the fact that we are living creatures and that our survival depends on our destroying other living creatures and consuming them for fuel.


You know, that's actually interesting--some research on plants actually DOES suggest that plants are at least capable of feeling sensation analogous to pain in animals, enough that when predated on by insects that they chemically "scream" to warn other plants (which in turn make higher doses of natural insecticides). There's also some VERY interesting research that shows that at least some species of plants may be capable of at least "self-recognition" or "similar clone recognition" via the same mechanisms. The REALLY interesting thing is that this happens without a central nervous system or analogous structure save if we consider the roots the "brains" of a plant...

Interestingly, we don't notice it too much because plants don't move around (save for those species that predate on insects like Venus flytraps) and--much like ants--most plant communication is via chemicals that we can't sense without special equipment.

And of possibly disturbing implications for vegans, some of the plants that have the BEST evidence for communication are in fact crops of commerce--corn plants are among those known not only to communicate via chemical signals but via plant-generated clicking sounds at 220Hz at the roots and the brassica family (including cabbage) are among those plants known to chemically "scream" (considering that a lot of brassica-family plants are eaten raw and harvested by cutting off the flowering sections, this does give some deep thought for "plant welfare").

I think the most sensible thing to do is to realise that all life, on some level, feeds on life (yes, even plants, they receive nutrients from animal and vegetable life that has been fed on by bacteria) and to try to do good by the life you have to take in to live--animal OR vegetable--and that includes raising it and harvesting it in a way where you're not an asshole doing it. (No, I'm not a Jainist and not saying we all need to convert to Jainism. Just be mindful of your food and be thankful to the life that sacrificed itself so you can live.)
 
2012-10-08 12:43:25 PM

indylaw: KiplingKat872: The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated" ~Gandhi

"We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant

"Anyone who has accustomed himself to regard the life of any living creature as worthless is in danger of arriving also at the idea of worthless human life". ~ Albert Schweitzer

Wow, I've heard of those people; therefore they must be right!



These people think they are:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/religion/religions/jainism/living/ahimsa_1.shtml
 
2012-10-08 12:46:01 PM

Clockwork Kumquat: Cruel food? Saw a clip on some bizarre-video show on TV a couple or a few years ago. Chef in some Asian restaurant is preparing what is apparently a sought-after delicacy in this particular farked-up gastronomic circle. Takes a live fish and holds it down flapping and gasping on the counter. Doesn't kill the fish. Scrapes the scales off, slits and guts it, mostly, slaps it into the hot frying pan positioned so that the back end of the fish gets cooked while the head remains alive. Takes it on a plate to the table, fish's body is fried through, head is still gulping air convulsively as the customer digs in. I am unprepared, and have retreated over the back of my chair and backward across the room shaking my head and saying no no no until I am stopped by the wall. FARK YOU, humanity.


live lobster sashimi

ya know, i like lobster, i like sashimi but i don't really like eating my meat while the head of it's moving around
 
2012-10-08 12:46:28 PM

Langdon_777: indylaw: Langdon_777: our cousins.

B*tch please. Then again, I've come to expect nothing but sentimental bullshiat from the PETA tards.

I am not really a supporter or follower, though we may be aiming for similar targets - that said NUDE PROTESTS - what is your problem?!?!


Chasing after PETA girls, like joining PETA in general, involves eating lots of vegetables.
 
2012-10-08 12:48:41 PM

TheHappyDrinker: thecpt: Cold_Sassy: Food, Inc

Thats the one I watched. Its on Netflix streaming and for a documentary, its pretty good at just presenting fact without manipulation

It's a propaganda film that twisted the facts as much as it could.


Which facts were it twisting? They'd say an event, show its consequence, and move on. The only people I can find in a search who dispute it are the companies (Monsanto) who were in it, and the random line "but how will we feed everyone?"which really isn't a valid argument because the film argued that we need better transparency, and less government corn funding. Not for everyone to convert to a Vegan.
 
2012-10-08 12:53:00 PM

Coco LaFemme: My boyfriend makes a mean portobella mushroom burger. We're not vegetarians, but we do like vegetarian/vegan foods, and eat them often. I can enjoy both tofu AND a steak. Anyway, my boyfriend marinates the mushroom caps in a balsamic vinaigrette, grills them up, sticks them between two toasted ciabatta rolls, and they're divine. I like a little lettuce and tomato on mine. It's just as good as a hamburger made with meat, and it's healthier.

If you watch cooking shows on Food Network, you'll see a lot of chefs using portobella mushroom caps as replacements for steak strips, hamburgers, and other like products in vegetarian recipes. It's not ridiculous, nor unheard of. Expand your culinary palates.


I can't help but think vegetarian food would be a lot more successful if they stopped trying to pretend it wasn't vegetarian food. Tofu "burger," black-bean "burger," portobello "burger," etc. They're always marketed as substitutes. I mean, I like tofu; but if I get tofu when I wanted a burger, I am going to be disappoint.

That's why Indian food does vegetarian right: they give the ingredients some credit of their own and don't use them as close-enough stand-ins for meat in existing dishes.

/Veggie sausages are a crime against everyone
//End rant
 
2012-10-08 12:53:50 PM

loonatic112358: Clockwork Kumquat: Cruel food? Saw a clip on some bizarre-video show on TV a couple or a few years ago. Chef in some Asian restaurant is preparing what is apparently a sought-after delicacy in this particular farked-up gastronomic circle. Takes a live fish and holds it down flapping and gasping on the counter. Doesn't kill the fish. Scrapes the scales off, slits and guts it, mostly, slaps it into the hot frying pan positioned so that the back end of the fish gets cooked while the head remains alive. Takes it on a plate to the table, fish's body is fried through, head is still gulping air convulsively as the customer digs in. I am unprepared, and have retreated over the back of my chair and backward across the room shaking my head and saying no no no until I am stopped by the wall. FARK YOU, humanity.

live lobster sashimi

ya know, i like lobster, i like sashimi but i don't really like eating my meat while the head of it's moving around


I'm just curious, but how dead is an oyster that's shucked and immediately eaten?
 
2012-10-08 12:55:08 PM

thomps: why would we rename them "chicken abortions," subby? the eggs we eat (with a few disgusting exceptions) are unfertilized. they are cruel because of the abhorrent living conditions of most egg-producing chickens. maybe instead, we should name them "chicken torture nuggets."


Because once people become fanatically devoted to a cause, they find it increasingly easy to ignore facts or science that does not line up with their ideology. Sometimes people go so far overboard that they start accusing other people of "lying" for presenting basic information, or claiming that every source of information beyond their own network of like-minded individuals has a "bias."

If you're interested in whether or not lobsters suffer when boiled, here is one look at the question. 

CSS: I had a friend in high school who was pretty stereotypically a "granola girl." She was a vegetarian, among other "granola-like" attributes. One time at lunch she mentioned having eggs for breakfast.

"But you're a vegetarian!" I exclaimed.

"That's ok," she replied. "I believe in abortion."
 
2012-10-08 12:55:32 PM

indylaw: Langdon_777: indylaw: Langdon_777: our cousins.

B*tch please. Then again, I've come to expect nothing but sentimental bullshiat from the PETA tards.

I am not really a supporter or follower, though we may be aiming for similar targets - that said NUDE PROTESTS - what is your problem?!?!

Chasing after PETA girls, like joining PETA in general, involves eating lots of vegetables.


My mind suddenly went down the gutter with that statement, LOL! I can't thank you enough ;)
 
2012-10-08 12:56:21 PM

Rik01: BTW. My physicians have recommended I take fish oil to help my damaged heart. When I suggested Flax Oil, they said no. It's not as good. We're omnivorous, meaning we can and must eat more than roughage and weeds growing in a field.


You should know that hemp seeds have the perfect balance of Omega 3 and 6 (my gosh the Mother provides - also has more protein than meat). In my neck of the woods you cannot buy the seeds for human consumption, but low and behold you can for animal consumption ;)

There is a reason why it is called The Sacred Herb (and the only other plant in its genus is Hops *picture of a light*
 
2012-10-08 12:56:21 PM

thecpt: TheHappyDrinker: thecpt: Cold_Sassy: Food, Inc

Thats the one I watched. Its on Netflix streaming and for a documentary, its pretty good at just presenting fact without manipulation

It's a propaganda film that twisted the facts as much as it could.

Which facts were it twisting? They'd say an event, show its consequence, and move on. The only people I can find in a search who dispute it are the companies (Monsanto) who were in it, and the random line "but how will we feed everyone?"which really isn't a valid argument because the film argued that we need better transparency, and less government corn funding. Not for everyone to convert to a Vegan.


Here's a start: Link

* "Organic" farming is horribly inefficient when compared to modern practices, meaning costs for so-called organic foods would be (and are) higher

Actually, I don't really need to say much more about it than that. The whole "oh, but modern practices are bad for us" argument doesn't really hold much water since human life expectancy continues to increase despite this alleged issue.
 
2012-10-08 12:56:43 PM

TheHappyDrinker: thecpt: Cold_Sassy: Food, Inc

Thats the one I watched. Its on Netflix streaming and for a documentary, its pretty good at just presenting fact without manipulation

It's a propaganda film that twisted the facts as much as it could.


Your trolling skills are seriously lacking, my friend.
 
2012-10-08 12:56:43 PM

mafiageek1980: AllUpInYa: Coco LaFemme: My boyfriend makes a mean portobella mushroom burger. We're not vegetarians, but we do like vegetarian/vegan foods, and eat them often. I can enjoy both tofu AND a steak. Anyway, my boyfriend marinates the mushroom caps in a balsamic vinaigrette, grills them up, sticks them between two toasted ciabatta rolls, and they're divine. I like a little lettuce and tomato on mine. It's just as good as a hamburger made with meat, and it's healthier.

If you watch cooking shows on Food Network, you'll see a lot of chefs using portobella mushroom caps as replacements for steak strips, hamburgers, and other like products in vegetarian recipes. It's not ridiculous, nor unheard of. Expand your culinary palates.

I've tried them. Portabella mushrooms are a WISHFUL replacement for meat, much like a tofu dog.
But really, if you can't tell the difference between something that has meat juices and fat, and something that doesn't,
you must have a cold or not have any taste buds left.

Portabella mushroom burgers are GOOD, but If I want a real "beefy" taste (burger wise) without the blood/having to eat faux meats, my go-to is a "burger" made with chickpeas or another similar bean. Hell, throw a couple of drops of "liquid smoke"/right seasonings/veggies/good BBQ sauce, throw that bad boy on the grill, and you got yourself a tasty bean-burger! If I want fries, I make my own. If I want mac and cheese, I make my own (Nutritional yeast is a Vegan's best friend if you want a chessy taste, fark those fake vegan cheeses), etc.


I expect to see your vegan mac and cheese recipe on the thursday food thread. (And hope you will be posting it)

Tried to find a decent recipe for something cheesy-tasting.. have yet to find something that comes anywhere close.

The only time I have really been taken aback by how my food was killed was when I got a whole chicken that had broken legs, one wing had the lowest segment cut off and the body was bruised. That lil sucker must have fought like hell for her life or really pissed a butcher off. I sat there and stared at it for a long time, wondering what happened. Then I cut it up, fried it, baked it to crispy goodness and ate it. Mmm fried/baked chicken..
 
2012-10-08 12:56:55 PM

pute kisses like a man: I'm just curious, but how dead is an oyster that's shucked and immediately eaten?


wiki says oysters must be eaten alive or cooked alive

but I don't like oysters, so that's not a quandy i've pondered until now

still ain't planning on eating those snotballs
 
2012-10-08 12:57:53 PM

indylaw: Langdon_777: indylaw: Langdon_777: our cousins.

B*tch please. Then again, I've come to expect nothing but sentimental bullshiat from the PETA tards.

I am not really a supporter or follower, though we may be aiming for similar targets - that said NUDE PROTESTS - what is your problem?!?!

Chasing after PETA girls, like joining PETA in general, involves eating lots of vegetables.


OK I laughed out loud *shameful face*
 
2012-10-08 12:58:25 PM

Beanlet: mafiageek1980: AllUpInYa: Coco LaFemme: My boyfriend makes a mean portobella mushroom burger. We're not vegetarians, but we do like vegetarian/vegan foods, and eat them often. I can enjoy both tofu AND a steak. Anyway, my boyfriend marinates the mushroom caps in a balsamic vinaigrette, grills them up, sticks them between two toasted ciabatta rolls, and they're divine. I like a little lettuce and tomato on mine. It's just as good as a hamburger made with meat, and it's healthier.

If you watch cooking shows on Food Network, you'll see a lot of chefs using portobella mushroom caps as replacements for steak strips, hamburgers, and other like products in vegetarian recipes. It's not ridiculous, nor unheard of. Expand your culinary palates.

I've tried them. Portabella mushrooms are a WISHFUL replacement for meat, much like a tofu dog.
But really, if you can't tell the difference between something that has meat juices and fat, and something that doesn't,
you must have a cold or not have any taste buds left.

Portabella mushroom burgers are GOOD, but If I want a real "beefy" taste (burger wise) without the blood/having to eat faux meats, my go-to is a "burger" made with chickpeas or another similar bean. Hell, throw a couple of drops of "liquid smoke"/right seasonings/veggies/good BBQ sauce, throw that bad boy on the grill, and you got yourself a tasty bean-burger! If I want fries, I make my own. If I want mac and cheese, I make my own (Nutritional yeast is a Vegan's best friend if you want a chessy taste, fark those fake vegan cheeses), etc.

I expect to see your vegan mac and cheese recipe on the thursday food thread. (And hope you will be posting it)

Tried to find a decent recipe for something cheesy-tasting.. have yet to find something that comes anywhere close.

The only time I have really been taken aback by how my food was killed was when I got a whole chicken that had broken legs, one wing had the lowest segment cut off and the body was bruised. That lil s ...


Alright, you got yourself a deal. But if you want the recipe now...I will be happy to provide it now and later :)
 
2012-10-08 12:58:37 PM

MycroftHolmes: Aarontology: I only eat chicken abortions if they're a product of chicken-rape or chicken-incest or if the life of the chicken is in danger.

My understanding is that in cases of legitimate chicken rape, the chicken's body has ways of preventing an egg.


Who knew humans and chickens were so similar?
 
2012-10-08 12:58:45 PM

ciberido: "That's ok," she replied. "I believe in abortion."


Lacto-Ovo vegetarians are the most common. Since the eggs you buy in the supermarket are not fertilized, they are not killing an animal to eat it. If they go with free range eggs, they're all good.
 
2012-10-08 12:59:14 PM

ProfessorOhki: Coco LaFemme: My boyfriend makes a mean portobella mushroom burger. We're not vegetarians, but we do like vegetarian/vegan foods, and eat them often. I can enjoy both tofu AND a steak. Anyway, my boyfriend marinates the mushroom caps in a balsamic vinaigrette, grills them up, sticks them between two toasted ciabatta rolls, and they're divine. I like a little lettuce and tomato on mine. It's just as good as a hamburger made with meat, and it's healthier.

If you watch cooking shows on Food Network, you'll see a lot of chefs using portobella mushroom caps as replacements for steak strips, hamburgers, and other like products in vegetarian recipes. It's not ridiculous, nor unheard of. Expand your culinary palates.

I can't help but think vegetarian food would be a lot more successful if they stopped trying to pretend it wasn't vegetarian food. Tofu "burger," black-bean "burger," portobello "burger," etc. They're always marketed as substitutes. I mean, I like tofu; but if I get tofu when I wanted a burger, I am going to be disappoint.

That's why Indian food does vegetarian right: they give the ingredients some credit of their own and don't use them as close-enough stand-ins for meat in existing dishes.

/Veggie sausages are a crime against everyone
//End rant


agreed.

I remember going to a vegan cook-out once (I'm not vegan). I brought all these peppers, squashes and mushrooms. all stuff that's great on the grill.

everyone else brought some variation of a tofu dog or a vegan burger. (anecdotal) proof that vegans and vegetarians are just people who hate food.
 
2012-10-08 12:59:57 PM

loonatic112358: pute kisses like a man: I'm just curious, but how dead is an oyster that's shucked and immediately eaten?

wiki says oysters must be eaten alive or cooked alive

but I don't like oysters, so that's not a quandy i've pondered until now

still ain't planning on eating those snotballs


the whole oyster thing as well as the deal with Honey is a bit of a grey area in the Vegan world. Me, I won't eat oysters, but I am pretty neutral on the honey thing.
 
2012-10-08 01:00:57 PM

ciberido: thomps: why would we rename them "chicken abortions," subby? the eggs we eat (with a few disgusting exceptions) are unfertilized. they are cruel because of the abhorrent living conditions of most egg-producing chickens. maybe instead, we should name them "chicken torture nuggets."

Because once people become fanatically devoted to a cause, they find it increasingly easy to ignore facts or science that does not line up with their ideology. Sometimes people go so far overboard that they start accusing other people of "lying" for presenting basic information, or claiming that every source of information beyond their own network of like-minded individuals has a "bias."

If you're interested in whether or not lobsters suffer when boiled, here is one look at the question. 

CSS: I had a friend in high school who was pretty stereotypically a "granola girl." She was a vegetarian, among other "granola-like" attributes. One time at lunch she mentioned having eggs for breakfast.

"But you're a vegetarian!" I exclaimed.

"That's ok," she replied. "I believe in abortion."


It's the people that claim to be vegetarian "...but I eat fish" (I have even heard someone claim to be vegetarian but they eat chicken) that are unclear on the concept.
 
2012-10-08 01:01:57 PM
Then they should have no issues with me hunting right? I mean here is a deer, living in the woods, coming in to my pasture and eating our horses hay. Then in September, I climb in to my tree stand and wait. When they come walking down the same path they do every day, not paying attention. An arrow travels through their body striking the heart. A few seconds later, it's all over. I have venison to feed my family. No hormones, 100% natural, the animal lived his or her life in the woods, so it's free range. There should be no issues right? I
 
2012-10-08 01:02:13 PM

pute kisses like a man: loonatic112358: Clockwork Kumquat: Cruel food? Saw a clip on some bizarre-video show on TV a couple or a few years ago. Chef in some Asian restaurant is preparing what is apparently a sought-after delicacy in this particular farked-up gastronomic circle. Takes a live fish and holds it down flapping and gasping on the counter. Doesn't kill the fish. Scrapes the scales off, slits and guts it, mostly, slaps it into the hot frying pan positioned so that the back end of the fish gets cooked while the head remains alive. Takes it on a plate to the table, fish's body is fried through, head is still gulping air convulsively as the customer digs in. I am unprepared, and have retreated over the back of my chair and backward across the room shaking my head and saying no no no until I am stopped by the wall. FARK YOU, humanity.

live lobster sashimi

ya know, i like lobster, i like sashimi but i don't really like eating my meat while the head of it's moving around

I'm just curious, but how dead is an oyster that's shucked and immediately eaten?


I don't know but when I was growing up in sw La., thousands of them died lingering deaths in my stomach over the years. We would go get them fresh from the oyster farmers, take them home and just "shuck and eat" rinse and repeat.
 
2012-10-08 01:02:29 PM

mafiageek1980: the whole oyster thing as well as the deal with Honey is a bit of a grey area in the Vegan world. Me, I won't eat oysters, but I am pretty neutral on the honey thing.


Honey I eat, used to help my grandfather harvest it at one time

but then i'm just a guy who eats what he likes what he likes

seriously though oysters look like snotballs

/i do purchase local honey though, mostly cause hey the guys sort of my neighbor
//really could go for some hummus and pita chips right about now
///or an iraqi kabob
 
2012-10-08 01:03:18 PM

ProfessorOhki: Coco LaFemme: My boyfriend makes a mean portobella mushroom burger. We're not vegetarians, but we do like vegetarian/vegan foods, and eat them often. I can enjoy both tofu AND a steak. Anyway, my boyfriend marinates the mushroom caps in a balsamic vinaigrette, grills them up, sticks them between two toasted ciabatta rolls, and they're divine. I like a little lettuce and tomato on mine. It's just as good as a hamburger made with meat, and it's healthier.

If you watch cooking shows on Food Network, you'll see a lot of chefs using portobella mushroom caps as replacements for steak strips, hamburgers, and other like products in vegetarian recipes. It's not ridiculous, nor unheard of. Expand your culinary palates.

I can't help but think vegetarian food would be a lot more successful if they stopped trying to pretend it wasn't vegetarian food. Tofu "burger," black-bean "burger," portobello "burger," etc. They're always marketed as substitutes. I mean, I like tofu; but if I get tofu when I wanted a burger, I am going to be disappoint.

That's why Indian food does vegetarian right: they give the ingredients some credit of their own and don't use them as close-enough stand-ins for meat in existing dishes.

/Veggie sausages are a crime against everyone
//End rant


This as well. :D

Cannot stand veggie burgers unless they're the sort that are identifiably veggie patties (and are pretty much veggie casserole on a bun).

Indian vegetarian stuff, though...I can eat me the HELL out of some Indian (Naan-bread, in this case), and (ha ha only serious) have stated if I ever had to go ovolacto-vegetarian for some reason I could happily live on various versions of aloo and paneer dishes :D

/then again, I probably don't have to specify "Naan-bread Indian" because "Frybread NDN" food sure as hell ain't vegetarian :D Lean game, sure, but not vegetarian
 
2012-10-08 01:03:26 PM

pute kisses like a man: ProfessorOhki: Coco LaFemme: My boyfriend makes a mean portobella mushroom burger. We're not vegetarians, but we do like vegetarian/vegan foods, and eat them often. I can enjoy both tofu AND a steak. Anyway, my boyfriend marinates the mushroom caps in a balsamic vinaigrette, grills them up, sticks them between two toasted ciabatta rolls, and they're divine. I like a little lettuce and tomato on mine. It's just as good as a hamburger made with meat, and it's healthier.

If you watch cooking shows on Food Network, you'll see a lot of chefs using portobella mushroom caps as replacements for steak strips, hamburgers, and other like products in vegetarian recipes. It's not ridiculous, nor unheard of. Expand your culinary palates.

I can't help but think vegetarian food would be a lot more successful if they stopped trying to pretend it wasn't vegetarian food. Tofu "burger," black-bean "burger," portobello "burger," etc. They're always marketed as substitutes. I mean, I like tofu; but if I get tofu when I wanted a burger, I am going to be disappoint.

That's why Indian food does vegetarian right: they give the ingredients some credit of their own and don't use them as close-enough stand-ins for meat in existing dishes.

/Veggie sausages are a crime against everyone
//End rant

agreed.

I remember going to a vegan cook-out once (I'm not vegan). I brought all these peppers, squashes and mushrooms. all stuff that's great on the grill.

everyone else brought some variation of a tofu dog or a vegan burger. (anecdotal) proof that vegans and vegetarians are just people who hate food.


or that they are just idiots who don't know how/are too lazy to make the shiat themselves. Trust me, there are TONS of vegan cookbooks out there with recipes for the same stuff WITHOUT using tofu/fake meats. The one I've enjoyed the most is "The sexy Vegan cookbook". No snooty-ass-stereotypical-hippie-shiat in that book.

I try to avoid tofu as much as I can unless I'm really craving a scrambled-egg type dish.
 
2012-10-08 01:03:46 PM

KiplingKat872: ronaprhys: Not that much of a choice, honestly. If I happened to get to the grocery first and snagged the good stuff - yay me. If not, I'm stuck going with something else. The over-capacity doesn't exist to the point that we've got completely free choice. At best we can favor the more humane facilities.

Uhm, I was not talking about what meat you get, but where it comes from and how it is processed.

If you have a local farmer market, you have some choices.


Yes - you have some choices, until demand overtakes said local farmer's markets (which, by the way, does happen to sit right down the street from me - at leat for veggies) and then you're forced back to the big markets. The problem really is supply and demand. Like I said, I'm all for humane practices and when unhumane ones are identified, I'll switch around accordingly. Mostly because I can. However, if it came down to need I'm honest enough to say that I'd do what I need to in order keep my wife and I fed.
 
2012-10-08 01:04:01 PM

Flipper47465: Then they should have no issues with me hunting right? I mean here is a deer, living in the woods, coming in to my pasture and eating our horses hay. Then in September, I climb in to my tree stand and wait. When they come walking down the same path they do every day, not paying attention. An arrow travels through their body striking the heart. A few seconds later, it's all over. I have venison to feed my family. No hormones, 100% natural, the animal lived his or her life in the woods, so it's free range. There should be no issues right? I


I don't have any issues with it. I actually find hunting (for food, not for sport) to be far preferable from how removed society has become from where our meat comes from.
 
2012-10-08 01:04:37 PM

Flipper47465: Then they should have no issues with me hunting right? I mean here is a deer, living in the woods, coming in to my pasture and eating our horses hay. Then in September, I climb in to my tree stand and wait. When they come walking down the same path they do every day, not paying attention. An arrow travels through their body striking the heart. A few seconds later, it's all over. I have venison to feed my family. No hormones, 100% natural, the animal lived his or her life in the woods, so it's free range. There should be no issues right? I


venison jerky *homer drool*
 
2012-10-08 01:05:09 PM

KiplingKat872: A lot of this can be avoided just by shopping at local farmer markets (if someone there sells meat). You are supporting the local economy of small scale farmers, and getting the meat (or eggs) of animals you know have been treated humanely before they hit your table.


And how do you know they were treated humanely?
 
2012-10-08 01:05:46 PM

loonatic112358: pute kisses like a man: I'm just curious, but how dead is an oyster that's shucked and immediately eaten?

wiki says oysters must be eaten alive or cooked alive

but I don't like oysters, so that's not a quandy i've pondered until now

still ain't planning on eating those snotballs


thanks (I probably could have looked that up, but I was lazy)...

well, I'm not going to force oysters down your throat, but I love them. and I don't mind that they're alive. there are times where I've just bought a sack of them, taken a knife and gone to town... it was awesome.
 
2012-10-08 01:07:16 PM

loonatic112358: mafiageek1980: the whole oyster thing as well as the deal with Honey is a bit of a grey area in the Vegan world. Me, I won't eat oysters, but I am pretty neutral on the honey thing.

Honey I eat, used to help my grandfather harvest it at one time

but then i'm just a guy who eats what he likes what he likes

seriously though oysters look like snotballs

/i do purchase local honey though, mostly cause hey the guys sort of my neighbor
//really could go for some hummus and pita chips right about now
///or an iraqi kabob


I ate my first oyster about 6 months before I went vegan. I went vegan in baby steps, so when I had my first oyster I was a pescatarian (fish-eating vegetarian). Once you get past the snot-texture it's pretty good. Then again, I am originally from South Louisiana so I've ate some crazy shiat in my lifetime. Anyway, you have a good point about local honey. I didn't think there was much of a difference until very recently when my husband bought a jar. Man, it's so damn good!
 
2012-10-08 01:07:40 PM

ArcadianRefugee: thecpt: TheHappyDrinker: thecpt: Cold_Sassy: Food, Inc

Thats the one I watched. Its on Netflix streaming and for a documentary, its pretty good at just presenting fact without manipulation

It's a propaganda film that twisted the facts as much as it could.

Which facts were it twisting? They'd say an event, show its consequence, and move on. The only people I can find in a search who dispute it are the companies (Monsanto) who were in it, and the random line "but how will we feed everyone?"which really isn't a valid argument because the film argued that we need better transparency, and less government corn funding. Not for everyone to convert to a Vegan.

Here's a start: Link

* "Organic" farming is horribly inefficient when compared to modern practices, meaning costs for so-called organic foods would be (and are) higher

Actually, I don't really need to say much more about it than that. The whole "oh, but modern practices are bad for us" argument doesn't really hold much water since human life expectancy continues to increase despite this alleged issue.


Whilst everything else around us fast approached extinction (cept the tasty things, which we will genetically mangulate to make easier to make a buck off of.)
 
2012-10-08 01:09:09 PM

Endive Wombat: Lobsters do not have a Central Nervous System. They have Ganglia. Lobsters do not have a brain, per se, so, simply put - they lack the "processing power" to even register pain.


To be more precise, lobsters absolutely do respond to stimuli that, from a scientific point of view, can be labeled "pain." The real question is whether lobsters have the self-awareness to process that pan as "suffering."

If you'll forgive me for repeating a link, here is one attempt to address the question.

Wikipedia also has an article, though it doesn't make the distinction --- important, in my opinion --- between "pain" and "suffering."
 
2012-10-08 01:09:57 PM

mafiageek1980: Beanlet: mafiageek1980: AllUpInYa: Coco LaFemme: My boyfriend makes a mean portobella mushroom burger. We're not vegetarians, but we do like vegetarian/vegan foods, and eat them often. I can enjoy both tofu AND a steak. Anyway, my boyfriend marinates the mushroom caps in a balsamic vinaigrette, grills them up, sticks them between two toasted ciabatta rolls, and they're divine. I like a little lettuce and tomato on mine. It's just as good as a hamburger made with meat, and it's healthier.

If you watch cooking shows on Food Network, you'll see a lot of chefs using portobella mushroom caps as replacements for steak strips, hamburgers, and other like products in vegetarian recipes. It's not ridiculous, nor unheard of. Expand your culinary palates.

I've tried them. Portabella mushrooms are a WISHFUL replacement for meat, much like a tofu dog.
But really, if you can't tell the difference between something that has meat juices and fat, and something that doesn't,
you must have a cold or not have any taste buds left.

Portabella mushroom burgers are GOOD, but If I want a real "beefy" taste (burger wise) without the blood/having to eat faux meats, my go-to is a "burger" made with chickpeas or another similar bean. Hell, throw a couple of drops of "liquid smoke"/right seasonings/veggies/good BBQ sauce, throw that bad boy on the grill, and you got yourself a tasty bean-burger! If I want fries, I make my own. If I want mac and cheese, I make my own (Nutritional yeast is a Vegan's best friend if you want a chessy taste, fark those fake vegan cheeses), etc.

I expect to see your vegan mac and cheese recipe on the thursday food thread. (And hope you will be posting it)

Tried to find a decent recipe for something cheesy-tasting.. have yet to find something that comes anywhere close.

The only time I have really been taken aback by how my food was killed was when I got a whole chicken that had broken legs, one wing had the lowest segment cut off and the body was bruised. That lil s ...

Alright, you got yourself a deal. But if you want the recipe now...I will be happy to provide it now and later :)


We bookmark the food link =) it would just get lost here, but thank you! I will look forward to seeing and trying it out.

Off to eat, all this yummy animal torture talk has made me hungry. Let's see... chicken abortion or grain that has chopped up mouse parts in it.. hard choice!
 
2012-10-08 01:10:05 PM

TheHappyDrinker: And how do you know they were treated humanely?


How many industrial farm let you tour their facilities? The farm that sells beef at the farmers market is also where locals can go pick strawberries, and yes, they do give tours including their corrals and barns.

Most small scale farmers simply do not have the money to invest in the facilities large scale farms do, so yeah, the beef on the hoof is wandering around a pasture.
 
2012-10-08 01:10:39 PM

mafiageek1980: pute kisses like a man: ProfessorOhki: Coco LaFemme: My boyfriend makes a mean portobella mushroom burger. We're not vegetarians, but we do like vegetarian/vegan foods, and eat them often. I can enjoy both tofu AND a steak. Anyway, my boyfriend marinates the mushroom caps in a balsamic vinaigrette, grills them up, sticks them between two toasted ciabatta rolls, and they're divine. I like a little lettuce and tomato on mine. It's just as good as a hamburger made with meat, and it's healthier.

If you watch cooking shows on Food Network, you'll see a lot of chefs using portobella mushroom caps as replacements for steak strips, hamburgers, and other like products in vegetarian recipes. It's not ridiculous, nor unheard of. Expand your culinary palates.

I can't help but think vegetarian food would be a lot more successful if they stopped trying to pretend it wasn't vegetarian food. Tofu "burger," black-bean "burger," portobello "burger," etc. They're always marketed as substitutes. I mean, I like tofu; but if I get tofu when I wanted a burger, I am going to be disappoint.

That's why Indian food does vegetarian right: they give the ingredients some credit of their own and don't use them as close-enough stand-ins for meat in existing dishes.

/Veggie sausages are a crime against everyone
//End rant

agreed.

I remember going to a vegan cook-out once (I'm not vegan). I brought all these peppers, squashes and mushrooms. all stuff that's great on the grill.

everyone else brought some variation of a tofu dog or a vegan burger. (anecdotal) proof that vegans and vegetarians are just people who hate food.

or that they are just idiots who don't know how/are too lazy to make the shiat themselves. Trust me, there are TONS of vegan cookbooks out there with recipes for the same stuff WITHOUT using tofu/fake meats. The one I've enjoyed the most is "The sexy Vegan cookbook". No snooty-ass-stereotypical-hippie-shiat in that book.

I try to avoid tofu as much as I can un ...


i knew they were just idiots, hence my (anecdotal) parenthetical. I used to live by a hare krishna center that gave out a free dinner on sundays. those guys knew how to make vegetables worth eating.
 
2012-10-08 01:10:41 PM

ArcadianRefugee: Here's a start: Link

* "Organic" farming is horribly inefficient when compared to modern practices, meaning costs for so-called organic foods would be (and are) higher

Actually, I don't really need to say much more about it than that. The whole "oh, but modern practices are bad for us" argument doesn't really hold much water since human life expectancy continues to increase despite this alleged issue.


Oh bs. I like how that article only picks one chicken and will use the words "some" when trying to discredit Food Inc's findings. That was an awful read, most of the "facts" (which are facts) had nothing to do with what the film was saying.

They're not saying don't eat meat, they're saying do you really need so much of it and if so could we mandate better conditions and transparency.

And about life expectancy, it couldn't possibly be going up because of other things like a better health system, could it? Come on.
 
2012-10-08 01:11:30 PM

thomps: why would we rename them "chicken abortions," subby? the eggs we eat (with a few disgusting exceptions) are unfertilized. they are cruel because of the abhorrent living conditions of most egg-producing chickens. maybe instead, we should name them "chicken torture nuggets."


Chicken menstruation is more accurate.
 
2012-10-08 01:11:50 PM

Beanlet: mafiageek1980: Beanlet: mafiageek1980: AllUpInYa: Coco LaFemme: My boyfriend makes a mean portobella mushroom burger. We're not vegetarians, but we do like vegetarian/vegan foods, and eat them often. I can enjoy both tofu AND a steak. Anyway, my boyfriend marinates the mushroom caps in a balsamic vinaigrette, grills them up, sticks them between two toasted ciabatta rolls, and they're divine. I like a little lettuce and tomato on mine. It's just as good as a hamburger made with meat, and it's healthier.

If you watch cooking shows on Food Network, you'll see a lot of chefs using portobella mushroom caps as replacements for steak strips, hamburgers, and other like products in vegetarian recipes. It's not ridiculous, nor unheard of. Expand your culinary palates.

I've tried them. Portabella mushrooms are a WISHFUL replacement for meat, much like a tofu dog.
But really, if you can't tell the difference between something that has meat juices and fat, and something that doesn't,
you must have a cold or not have any taste buds left.

Portabella mushroom burgers are GOOD, but If I want a real "beefy" taste (burger wise) without the blood/having to eat faux meats, my go-to is a "burger" made with chickpeas or another similar bean. Hell, throw a couple of drops of "liquid smoke"/right seasonings/veggies/good BBQ sauce, throw that bad boy on the grill, and you got yourself a tasty bean-burger! If I want fries, I make my own. If I want mac and cheese, I make my own (Nutritional yeast is a Vegan's best friend if you want a chessy taste, fark those fake vegan cheeses), etc.

I expect to see your vegan mac and cheese recipe on the thursday food thread. (And hope you will be posting it)

Tried to find a decent recipe for something cheesy-tasting.. have yet to find something that comes anywhere close.

The only time I have really been taken aback by how my food was killed was when I got a whole chicken that had broken legs, one wing had the lowest segment cut off and the body ...


LMFAO!!!! See, the stereotype about Vegans dictates that I shouldn't laugh at that. But, I am.

/Loves the show "Duck Dynasty", despite the hunting stuff.
//2nd season starts Weds. Happy! Happy! Happy!
 
2012-10-08 01:14:44 PM

Cold_Sassy: TheHappyDrinker: thecpt: Cold_Sassy: Food, Inc

Thats the one I watched. Its on Netflix streaming and for a documentary, its pretty good at just presenting fact without manipulation

It's a propaganda film that twisted the facts as much as it could.

Your trolling skills are seriously lacking, my friend.


Who's trolling? Did you grow up on a farm?
 
2012-10-08 01:16:13 PM

mafiageek1980: I ate my first oyster about 6 months before I went vegan. I went vegan in baby steps, so when I had my first oyster I was a pescatarian (fish-eating vegetarian). Once you get past the snot-texture it's pretty good. Then again, I am originally from South Louisiana so I've ate some crazy shiat in my lifetime. Anyway, you have a good point about local honey. I didn't think there was much of a difference until very recently when my husband bought a jar. Man, it's so damn good!


the major brand stuff is mixed, while local honey will have more wildflowers

also wasn't there a fark link regarding honey being cut with corn syrup?
 
Displayed 50 of 389 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report