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(LA Times)   California: We'll give you a nickel deposit for every can you return for recycling. Nevada and Arizona: Hey, look, California's giving out free nickels   (latimes.com) divider line 143
    More: Asinine, California, recycling  
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20391 clicks; posted to Main » on 07 Oct 2012 at 6:15 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-07 07:10:41 PM
My very first job was in the bottle room of Fred Meyer (@1987 or so). Customers would bring in carts full of black garbage bags. We had to count them and then sort them by company. The worst were always the folks just back from a camping trip. The containers would be covered with dirt and crawling with earwigs (for beer) or ants (for soda). I'd come home from work and clean my arms with a cotton pad and Sea Breeze (do they even make that anymore?). It would take two or three passes on each arm before the pads weren't COMPLETELY black from grime.

/csb
 
2012-10-07 07:13:44 PM
I'm from a bit south of the NY/PA border and one of my high school friends had a typical college party house after we graduated. He'd save up all of the empties throughout the year that were purchased in PA and drive over the border to collect the deposit. I made the mistake of joining him on one of those trips and learned what 9 months worth of beer cans smell like if you don't rinse them.
 
2012-10-07 07:18:19 PM

tenpoundsofcheese: This maybe having an impact, but it is a drop in the bucket of things that are "draining California cash"


Was about to say... yeah, illegal recycling is why CA has problems.

And unemployment is down, too. Tell me another one.
 
2012-10-07 07:25:15 PM

fusillade762: Bathia_Mapes: Meh. Oregon passed the Bottle Bill in 1971. Most stores have bottle return centers nowadays and you must redeem the deposit chit the machine dispenses the same day and at the same store.

Yeah, I was thinking "Good luck processing a semi trailer full of cans and bottles with one of these"

[insidescoopsf.sfgate.com image 600x448]

But I'm guessing CA doesn't make you do it yourself.


And there's also a limit to how many cans/bottles you can redeem too.

From the Oregon Bottle Bill pdf:

How many containers can I redeem each day?

Retailers of 5,000 square feet or more can limit the amount of containers a consumer can redeem
to a maximum of 144 containers per person per day.
Retailers under 5,000 square feet can limit the number of containers to a maximum of 50 per
person per day.
 
2012-10-07 07:26:09 PM
Thought of it first

images2.wikia.nocookie.net

/ hot
 
2012-10-07 07:28:09 PM
brainsyndicate.files.wordpress.com
R.I.P FINALLY!
 
2012-10-07 07:29:54 PM
I like CRV. It means I can put a recyclable can or bottle anywhere -- from the top of Mount Everest to the bottom of the Mariana Trench -- and some hobo will manage to find it and recycle it for me.
 
2012-10-07 07:32:36 PM
Deposits used to be built in the prices of soda sold in glass bottles. It wasn't a law here but it was always that way for as long I could remember. It was only when 'no deposit/return' bottles where introduced some states started making laws about bottle returns.

You'd take the empties back to the supermarket and they'd give a few cents for the bottle (I think it was 25 cent for case)..The distributor would pick them up and return to the bottling plant where they where cleaned, refilled and capped. It wasn't a law it just something you did..like saving you empty glass milk bottles for pickup.
 
2012-10-07 07:33:09 PM

Aussie_As: Salmon: It's a dime here in Canada but please take our Nickleback.

Salmon, that's farking brilliant.

But seriously, as a resident in the Australian state with a great and effective recycling program (which is still largely rejected by other Australian states despite its popularity among my local population), surely California is a significantly major economy that it could insist on labeling laws which states 'this product was sold in California and its container is good for recycling in California or a state with equivalent laws' and that would be the end of the story. I'm pretty sure the state of Califonia's population is roughly the same as that of my entire continent.


The cost of putting a sticker on it to say it was sold in South Australia drives up the prices unless it is something major. That is why many things are just not sold there. There is also the problem that many truck drivers from Melbourne tend to have friends who collect lots of cans. I know one guy who ends up with a garage full nearly ever other month before they get trucked to Adelaide.

The contract between the local council and the recycler is void if the state or federal government starts a container deposit law. Without the cans and bottles, it is simply not worth it to recycle. Which is why SA has the lowest rate of recycling in the country (except for Victorian cans and bottles they count as their own)
 
2012-10-07 07:35:12 PM

bwilson27: Employees were so lazy at the Lincoln City, OR Safeway that all you would have to do is throw your bag of empty cans in a bin in the back room and tell them how much you had. I always had 15.00 more than I thought I had, imagine that!


I've shopped there!!

/and yes... very lazy.
 
2012-10-07 07:41:37 PM

DON.MAC: Aussie_As: Salmon: It's a dime here in Canada but please take our Nickleback.

Salmon, that's farking brilliant.

But seriously, as a resident in the Australian state with a great and effective recycling program (which is still largely rejected by other Australian states despite its popularity among my local population), surely California is a significantly major economy that it could insist on labeling laws which states 'this product was sold in California and its container is good for recycling in California or a state with equivalent laws' and that would be the end of the story. I'm pretty sure the state of Califonia's population is roughly the same as that of my entire continent.

The cost of putting a sticker on it to say it was sold in South Australia drives up the prices unless it is something major. That is why many things are just not sold there. There is also the problem that many truck drivers from Melbourne tend to have friends who collect lots of cans. I know one guy who ends up with a garage full nearly ever other month before they get trucked to Adelaide.

The contract between the local council and the recycler is void if the state or federal government starts a container deposit law. Without the cans and bottles, it is simply not worth it to recycle. Which is why SA has the lowest rate of recycling in the country (except for Victorian cans and bottles they count as their own)


Whoa, care to cite your claim about SA's recycling rate? It's second only to the ACT. And here's a cite:
Link

SA may not be as great as its residents claim but talking BS about its recycling scheme just makes us mad!!
 
2012-10-07 07:41:39 PM

bwilson27: Employees were so lazy at the Lincoln City, OR Safeway that all you would have to do is throw your bag of empty cans in a bin in the back room and tell them how much you had. I always had 15.00 more than I thought I had, imagine that!


Counting cans is likely to be more expensive than trusting their customers.
 
2012-10-07 07:43:01 PM
Prime suspect:

www.certsoft.com

/too obscure?
 
2012-10-07 07:54:59 PM

Mad Scientist: I used to play that scam when I lived in Michigan many years ago. Back then, it was a dime per can or bottle. I'd gather them up when I visited family in Chicago, and net a few buck bringing them back home. But then the grocery store went to automatic machines, and would reject containers with the wrong bar code, or brands they didn't sell.

The state of Michigan still made millions off unclaimed deposits, but I couldn't return Old Style cans in Ann Arbor.


I've never seen Old Style sold here, and I'm 40.

/used to rock a trunk full off cans back myself when I came home before the machines
 
2012-10-07 07:56:37 PM

Bathia_Mapes: Meh. Oregon passed the Bottle Bill in 1971. Most stores have bottle return centers nowadays and you must redeem the deposit chit the machine dispenses the same day and at the same store.


So I have to return the bottles the same day I buy them?
 
2012-10-07 08:06:51 PM
Just over 8.5 billion recyclable cans were sold in California last year. The number redeemed for a nickel under California's recycling law: 8.3 billion.

That's a return rate of nearly 100%.


1 reporter was too lazy to type some numbers into the calculator program on their computer.

That's a dumbass rate of nearly 100%.

//97.64%
 
2012-10-07 08:08:10 PM
That tells me that there's a demand for this in Nevada and Arizona. Those states should get on it.
 
2012-10-07 08:13:12 PM

moothemagiccow: Just over 8.5 billion recyclable cans were sold in California last year. The number redeemed for a nickel under California's recycling law: 8.3 billion.

That's a return rate of nearly 100%.

1 reporter was too lazy to mathphobic to know he could just type some numbers into the calculator program on their computer.

That's a dumbass rate of nearly 100%.

//97.64%


FTFY

And I've taught "future journalists" how to do this, and done it it an empowering (don't let them(tm) screw you over by assuming you won't check their numbers) way for exactly this reason.
/Of course, they all graduated in the last 10 years, so none of them actually have journalism jobs....
 
2012-10-07 08:14:31 PM
FTA: Last summer, the state Department of Food and Agriculture counted all vehicles driving into the state with used beverage containers through 16 border stations.

This leads me to believe that CA has something resembling customs like when entering a different country.
 
2012-10-07 08:18:49 PM

MrEricSir: bwilson27: Employees were so lazy at the Lincoln City, OR Safeway that all you would have to do is throw your bag of empty cans in a bin in the back room and tell them how much you had. I always had 15.00 more than I thought I had, imagine that!

Counting cans is likely to be more expensive than trusting their customers.


Dunno. When I counted cans I got pretty damned fast at it.
 
2012-10-07 08:19:04 PM

hackhix: [xeround.com image 399x305]


Just maki!ng sure, good onya
 
2012-10-07 08:21:21 PM

RussianPooper: Bathia_Mapes: Meh. Oregon passed the Bottle Bill in 1971. Most stores have bottle return centers nowadays and you must redeem the deposit chit the machine dispenses the same day and at the same store.

So I have to return the bottles the same day I buy them?


No. In fact you don't even have to redeem them at the store you bought them from anymore, thanks to a tweak in the Bottle Bill. Used to be that if you bought store brand soft drinks you also had to redeem them at one of their stores (Safeway brand at a Safeway store, Fred Meyer brand at a Fred Meyer store, etc.). Nowadays you can redeem any brand at any store that has a bottle/can return area, but the container must have the OR 5¢ on its label.
 
2012-10-07 08:21:25 PM

Lattices aren't Distributive: moothemagiccow: Just over 8.5 billion recyclable cans were sold in California last year. The number redeemed for a nickel under California's recycling law: 8.3 billion.

That's a return rate of nearly 100%.

1 reporter was too lazy to mathphobic to know he could just type some numbers into the calculator program on their computer.

That's a dumbass rate of nearly 100%.

//97.64%

FTFY

And I've taught "future journalists" how to do this, and done it it an empowering (don't let them(tm) screw you over by assuming you won't check their numbers) way for exactly this reason.
/Of course, they all graduated in the last 10 years, so none of them actually have journalism jobs....


As a science grad, the highly predictable failures of journalists to grasp basic maths and science is extremely disappointing.

The worst example I recall reading in recent years was an awesome (now sadly deceased) Australian journo called Matt Price (I won't say he was Australia's answer to Hunter S Thompson but he could write about politics as if it was sport and sport as if it was politics in a manner which prompted the reader to recall HST) bemoaning how politically unsexy the issue of ethanol subsidies was. He suggested it would be a much better issue if ethanol was something the public could relate to in any way. He completely failed to understand that ethanol is the correct name for the alcohol we drink in beer, wine and spirits, and as a member of the national press gallary it is simply impossible to believe he was not frequently pissed.
 
2012-10-07 08:22:04 PM
If only there was some way to place some kind of mark on a container that indicated that it was bought in a location that collected the deposit. Possibly like a state abbreviation or something. That would show them.
 
2012-10-07 08:22:42 PM

craxyd: FTA: Last summer, the state Department of Food and Agriculture counted all vehicles driving into the state with used beverage containers through 16 border stations.

This leads me to believe that CA has something resembling customs like when entering a different country.


Most states in the western half of the country (possibly more - I have little experience with this in the east) have a "port of entry" at the nearest town to the border on the interstate. Commercial vehicles have to stop, pay the taxes, get inspected, check the commercial driver's licence, make sure that the weight complies with state law.
 
2012-10-07 08:24:33 PM

Aussie_As: Whoa, care to cite your claim about SA's recycling rate? It's second only to the ACT. And here's a cite:
Link


I don't see anything in that cite about trucks from Melbourne full of cans and bottles. This is the same problem that the article talks about is the sand in the head approach to the stats of which both California and South Australia governments are very guilty of. Start looking at the rates for other things like food cans and glossy cardboard and you may find a shocking amount of it is not recycled at all. Do you even have one of the new auto sort plants in the state since there wasn't one last year? The SA government likes to throw money at some recycling efforts but independent recycling investment is much lower in your area due to the fact that there is no money in the cans and bottles which subsidizing all the cool new technology even though more of your councils are now doing the 3 bin thing.
 
2012-10-07 08:25:03 PM

Lattices aren't Distributive: meanmutton: APE992: Aluminum isn't ending up in landfills, that is all I care about.

It's funny that you think a landfill is a black hole, out of which nothing will ever come.

Give it 20 or so years and the cities will be making money off of companies mining landfills for metal, plastic, and rare earth elements.

That sounds like a shiatty job. (and I mean that literally - think about all the disposable diapers they'll be sorting through. Sure, metal detectors will help, but if you're looking for plastics?)


Someone will come up with a machine to do it for them. It would never be profitable if they were sorting it by hand.
 
2012-10-07 08:25:29 PM

pla: FTA: "Just over 8.5 billion recyclable cans were sold in California last year. The number redeemed for a nickel under California's recycling law: 8.3 billion."

Waitasec here - Now, I realize they want to encourage recycling in California. But they get a farking nickle for every one of those cans. So the problem here has nothing to do with "fraud", so much as "we hoped, like every scammy rebate offer ever, to actually make money off morons not getting their money back".

Can you hear the violins?



/ Yes, the next paragraph talks about a 104% rate on plastic, admittedly a problem, but up to 100%, you don't get to biatch, revenue-whores. Recycling affects the whole world, not just your corner of it.


Mmmm hmmm...

given the numbers... my private school math makes it a 10 million dollar surplus. The State is getting RAPED!
 
2012-10-07 08:27:47 PM

Aussie_As: Salmon: It's a dime here in Canada but please take our Nickleback.

Salmon, that's farking brilliant.

But seriously, as a resident in the Australian state with a great and effective recycling program (which is still largely rejected by other Australian states despite its popularity among my local population), surely California is a significantly major economy that it could insist on labelling laws which states 'this product was sold in California and its container is good for recycling in California or a state with equivalent laws' and that would be the end of the story. I'm pretty sure the state of Califonia's population is roughly the same as that of my entire continent.


They already do that...

upload.wikimedia.org 

In Michigan, we have machines you have to put your bottles back in. They scan the bottles and if it's an out-of-state bottle, it gets rejected.
 
2012-10-07 08:29:28 PM

ZAZ: One part of the alleged scheme, he said, was pretending that cans it had picked up from commercial and residential customers had actually been turned in to its recycling center; the state often provides bigger reimbursements when materials are acquired that way.

Here we have scavengers picking through municipal recycling bins to find redeemable cans and bottles. Technically that might be theft; it is in some jurisdictions. The effort of returning cans is worth more than 5 cents to anybody with a good job, so they go into the trash.


Yen cents here. Most people save theirs.
 
2012-10-07 08:31:28 PM
Note that on bottles/cans CA is explicitly different: cash refund.
 
2012-10-07 08:32:36 PM

dahmers love zombie: Ultimately, the owner of Ace Recycling, Michael Barshak, and several others pleaded guilty to grand theft and unlawful recycling.

What is this I don't even.


Yeah, if this is even a crime, your recycling scheme was ill-conceived and has failed utterly.
 
2012-10-07 08:37:56 PM

DON.MAC: Aussie_As: Whoa, care to cite your claim about SA's recycling rate? It's second only to the ACT. And here's a cite:
Link

I don't see anything in that cite about trucks from Melbourne full of cans and bottles. This is the same problem that the article talks about is the sand in the head approach to the stats of which both California and South Australia governments are very guilty of. Start looking at the rates for other things like food cans and glossy cardboard and you may find a shocking amount of it is not recycled at all. Do you even have one of the new auto sort plants in the state since there wasn't one last year? The SA government likes to throw money at some recycling efforts but independent recycling investment is much lower in your area due to the fact that there is no money in the cans and bottles which subsidizing all the cool new technology even though more of your councils are now doing the 3 bin thing.


...and here's another cite which disagrees with you. Do you care to back up a single one of your claims? I'll happily be corrected, but I'd rather it was with hard facts than statements of opinion.
 
2012-10-07 08:38:39 PM

craxyd: FTA: Last summer, the state Department of Food and Agriculture counted all vehicles driving into the state with used beverage containers through 16 border stations.

This leads me to believe that CA has something resembling customs like when entering a different country.


They do, actually.

http://www.cdfa.ca.gov/plant/pe/ExteriorExclusion/borders.html (pop s)
 
2012-10-07 08:46:18 PM

Lattices aren't Distributive: craxyd: FTA: Last summer, the state Department of Food and Agriculture counted all vehicles driving into the state with used beverage containers through 16 border stations.

This leads me to believe that CA has something resembling customs like when entering a different country.

Most states in the western half of the country (possibly more - I have little experience with this in the east) have a "port of entry" at the nearest town to the border on the interstate. Commercial vehicles have to stop, pay the taxes, get inspected, check the commercial driver's licence, make sure that the weight complies with state law.


I think California takes this a bit further in their own special way. Truck scales are everywhere, sure, but CA actually has everyone pass through their inspection stations as close as possible to the state line, as in the entire freeway diverts through them, not some optional thing only for commercial vehicles. I have Nevada plates on my car so they normally just wave me through before I can manage to come to a stop, but if not, the worst case is they stop you and ask where you're coming from. Or if you have a boat they'll go through it and make sure it isn't carrying anything they don't want to see. I suppose if it looked like you were transporting a lot of stuff they'd check that out, too.
 
2012-10-07 08:49:12 PM

Lattices aren't Distributive: craxyd: FTA: Last summer, the state Department of Food and Agriculture counted all vehicles driving into the state with used beverage containers through 16 border stations.

This leads me to believe that CA has something resembling customs like when entering a different country.

Most states in the western half of the country (possibly more - I have little experience with this in the east) have a "port of entry" at the nearest town to the border on the interstate. Commercial vehicles have to stop, pay the taxes, get inspected, check the commercial driver's licence, make sure that the weight complies with state law.


Agricultural checkpoints... they "stop" every vehicle coming into the State... "Where are you coming from? Any fruits or vegetables?" And they will search campers and shiat.
 
2012-10-07 08:55:14 PM
I worked in a beer distributor when I was in high school. I hate returns.
 
2012-10-07 08:58:59 PM

Glendale: craxyd: FTA: Last summer, the state Department of Food and Agriculture counted all vehicles driving into the state with used beverage containers through 16 border stations.

This leads me to believe that CA has something resembling customs like when entering a different country.

They do, actually.

http://www.cdfa.ca.gov/plant/pe/ExteriorExclusion/borders.html (pop s)


How the farkin is that legal?
 
2012-10-07 09:00:41 PM

optikeye: Deposits used to be built in the prices of soda sold in glass bottles. It wasn't a law here but it was always that way for as long I could remember. It was only when 'no deposit/return' bottles where introduced some states started making laws about bottle returns.

You'd take the empties back to the supermarket and they'd give a few cents for the bottle (I think it was 25 cent for case)..The distributor would pick them up and return to the bottling plant where they where cleaned, refilled and capped. It wasn't a law it just something you did..like saving you empty glass milk bottles for pickup.


Yep, the days when reuse was an economic necessity rather than a dirty hippy slogan in a land of conspicuous waste. Sometimes I get the feeling that there's an unspoken competition over how much people can afford to throw out, rather than just afford to buy. Those returned bottles did tend to get chipped up a lot more, though.

Of course, some things really are counter-intuitive now, like those extra-thin plastic bags at grocery stores having a significantly smaller environmental impact than paper bags. Especially now that most are made of biodegradable plastics and sometimes PLA, which is made from corn or sugar waste, like ethanol.
 
2012-10-07 09:06:53 PM

Glendale: I think California takes this a bit further in their own special way. Truck scales are everywhere, sure, but CA actually has everyone pass through their inspection stations as close as possible to the state line, as in the entire freeway diverts through them, not some optional thing only for commercial vehicles. I have Nevada plates on my car so they normally just wave me through before I can manage to come to a stop, but if not, the worst case is they stop you and ask where you're coming from. Or if you have a boat they'll go through it and make sure it isn't carrying anything they don't want to see. I suppose if it looked like you were transporting a lot of stuff they'd check that out, too.


That's odd, because my experience is this:

Pray 4 Mojo: Agricultural checkpoints... they "stop" every vehicle coming into the State... "Where are you coming from? Any fruits or vegetables?" And they will search campers and shiat.


They are pressured by the DEA to at least do a look-see inside for drugs, but yeah, they always ask about food. Flying into CA airports from international will ask the same thing, but not from other states, oddly. If you are bringing food, it has to be a one-day's supply; a box of oranges will get seized, as my mom found out coming from Oregon one time. Not sure about cheese, but we spent so much money on our cheese in Holland that we said nothing to get through.
 
2012-10-07 09:08:16 PM

Aussie_As: ...and here's another cite which disagrees with you. Do you care to back up a single one of your claims? I'll happily be corrected, but I'd rather it was with hard facts than statements of opinion.


Did you read that? 29% of your tonnage of "recycling" is concrete. Other states don't count that do they?

How about the "Cardboard & waxed cardboard, 162,000t , 6%"
There is zero market in Australia for recycled waxed cardboard. That stuff all gets landfilled. And it gets landfilled in Victoria since that is where most of your cardboard gets processed.

What is your wine bottle recycling rate?

An empty truck or container going to SA can take 10 tons of cans or many times more in glass bottles. Are they counted? Why no... or are they?

Your cite shows 57 ktons of glass vs 18 ktons of Aluminium. So some how SA managed to recycle 40% of the aluminiums 44.1 ktons of cans sold in Australia in a given year. See why I don't think the numbers are quite right?

http://www.aluminium-cans.com.au/Facts.html
 
2012-10-07 09:17:51 PM
Why don't they just act normal, and make it so easy to recycle that most just do it by default, even without getting a nickel. I have two large trash cans. One for trash, one for recycling, plus they give you free inside recycling cans. So even people who don't care, recycle. Because it's just as easy.

Oh, because it was really to generate revenue, not actually encourage recycling.
 
2012-10-07 09:19:26 PM

meanmutton: Glendale: craxyd: FTA: Last summer, the state Department of Food and Agriculture counted all vehicles driving into the state with used beverage containers through 16 border stations.

This leads me to believe that CA has something resembling customs like when entering a different country.

They do, actually.

http://www.cdfa.ca.gov/plant/pe/ExteriorExclusion/borders.html (pop s)

How the farkin is that legal?


Same way this is legal: 

farm4.static.flickr.com 

Border Patrol Checkpoint at the San Diego/Orange county line.
 
2012-10-07 09:20:41 PM

optikeye: Deposits used to be built in the prices of soda sold in glass bottles. It wasn't a law here but it was always that way for as long I could remember. It was only when 'no deposit/return' bottles where introduced some states started making laws about bottle returns.

You'd take the empties back to the supermarket and they'd give a few cents for the bottle (I think it was 25 cent for case)..The distributor would pick them up and return to the bottling plant where they where cleaned, refilled and capped. It wasn't a law it just something you did..like saving you empty glass milk bottles for pickup.


Those bottles were cleaned and then refilled. Modern ones are remelted and remade into new bottles. This is from two major reasons, one is there was a tylenol copycat who was trying to put stuff in cleanable bottles and the liability from chipped bottles is just too high. Add in the extra costs of dealing with heavier bottles so they could deal with years of transport and extra weight, it was just cheaper to remelt them. For what it is worth, modern bottle recycling did start from the bottles rejected or broken in the cleaning and refilling process of the old returnables. Currently most glass production is done using base load power so the energy cost isn't that high. I expect that as the base load problem gets solved, glass bottles will go away.
 
2012-10-07 09:22:16 PM

meanmutton: APE992: Aluminum isn't ending up in landfills, that is all I care about.

It's funny that you think a landfill is a black hole, out of which nothing will ever come.

Give it 20 or so years and the cities will be making money off of companies mining landfills for metal, plastic, and rare earth elements.


THIS.
Trash miner will be a occupation in the near future.
/ I've been saying this for years.
 
2012-10-07 09:32:30 PM
Yeah, I used to do the recycling thing. I soon figured out it was taking two days to collect one days worth of beer drinking so I stopped.
 
2012-10-07 09:35:24 PM

Ringo48: What's the problem?

Wasn't the goal to encourage recycling to save the environment? Isn't that what's happening?


I'm a California tax payer and I approve this message.
 
2012-10-07 09:40:52 PM

NIXON YOU DOLT!!!!!: ArcadianRefugee: Pfft. Bring 'em to Michigan.


[images.mentalfloss.com image 500x368]

This. Have a snowbird in the family. They would literally keep huge trash bags of crushed cans they accumulated while at their winter home, and bring them back to Michigan to cash in. Used to cover the cost of gas of the trip before gas prices went insane.


Yeah, and thanks to nonsense like this, it takes me 3x as long to return bottles and cans at Meijer since the new read-if-it's-got-a-Michigan-bought-mark on it machines like to not read certain cans that were damn skippy sure bought in Michigan.

Eh, whatever.

MI's 10 cent deposit law, last I heard, was *the* most successful recycling program in the country. Considering it was started as an anti-littering thing, that's pretty effing awesome. (I still have friends who pick up an easy $30-$50 for an hour or two of work on football Saturdays just from deposits. If you toss it, *someone* will find it and get the effing dime).
 
2012-10-07 09:43:21 PM
I don't know what spot prices are for bricked beverage cans, but it's about 30 cans to the pound. So it costs about $1.50 a pound to buy them back for recycling. If they get 85 cents per pound it might not cost them anything to operate after they get the deposits.
 
2012-10-07 09:43:58 PM

DON.MAC: optikeye: Deposits used to be built in the prices of soda sold in glass bottles. It wasn't a law here but it was always that way for as long I could remember. It was only when 'no deposit/return' bottles where introduced some states started making laws about bottle returns.

You'd take the empties back to the supermarket and they'd give a few cents for the bottle (I think it was 25 cent for case)..The distributor would pick them up and return to the bottling plant where they where cleaned, refilled and capped. It wasn't a law it just something you did..like saving you empty glass milk bottles for pickup.

Those bottles were cleaned and then refilled. Modern ones are remelted and remade into new bottles. This is from two major reasons, one is there was a tylenol copycat who was trying to put stuff in cleanable bottles and the liability from chipped bottles is just too high. Add in the extra costs of dealing with heavier bottles so they could deal with years of transport and extra weight, it was just cheaper to remelt them. For what it is worth, modern bottle recycling did start from the bottles rejected or broken in the cleaning and refilling process of the old returnables. Currently most glass production is done using base load power so the energy cost isn't that high. I expect that as the base load problem gets solved, glass bottles will go away.


I still pay for a deposit on glass bottles from a local dairy. Of course, the bottles are freaking awesome and sturdy as hell, so I don't necessarily return them all that often, even though it's a $1.50 deposit.
 
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