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(C|Net)   Invisible cars are no longer a thing of the future   (news.cnet.com) divider line 21
    More: Spiffy, invisibility, Prius, digital recording, technology and society  
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21 Comments   (+0 »)
   

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2012-10-07 08:52:53 AM
Actually it was a thing of the yesterday.
 
2012-10-07 09:11:34 AM
If I had an invisible car I'd be one high toned son of a biatch.

Obscure?
 
2012-10-07 09:17:08 AM
No cure for tracks in snow, however
 
2012-10-07 09:29:46 AM
I always wondered why this wasn't a feature on Star Trek.

Bury the bridge way way down in the center decks, not on top of the saucer like a bullseye, and add this tech to the walls, floor and ceilings (save for consoles and readouts of course).
 
2012-10-07 09:34:59 AM
Considering how many assholes pull out right in front of me, I've always assumed that my car is intermittently invisible.
 
2012-10-07 09:46:39 AM
Maybe they shouldn't design cars for style and instead engineer them for safety. These 4" rear windows need to stop.

Or maybe teach people how to drive. That might work as well.
 
2012-10-07 09:46:57 AM

aimtastic: Considering how many assholes pull out right in front of me, I've always assumed that my car is intermittently invisible.


It took me a long time, but I finally figured out why that was happening to me when I had a Jeep. The headlights are closer together on a Jeep, which creates for a lot of people the optical illusion that the vehicle is further behind them than it is. Of course, it's not that factor alone; it helps a lot that a huge number of people are not very smart.
 
2012-10-07 09:50:13 AM

Vertdang: I always wondered why this wasn't a feature on Star Trek.

Bury the bridge way way down in the center decks, not on top of the saucer like a bullseye, and add this tech to the walls, floor and ceilings (save for consoles and readouts of course).


I get about half of that, in that moving the ship's central monitor, command, and control station away from the exterior seems like a very good idea. But I'm not sure what advantage transparent walls would bring after that. If you could only see into the next compartment, you'd first of all need a pretty good reason to want to do that, and second of all accept that you'd have more trouble seeing what's on your own walls, which presumably have some function other than being there. And if all the walls were transparent, I can't see it being any more useful than a glassful of transparent beads, since there's an awful lot of other walls and compartments and stuff on a ship that size.
 
2012-10-07 09:53:17 AM
Did anyone else notice that the video in TFA had a jazzed up Chrono trigger OST song?
 
2012-10-07 09:59:43 AM

ajgeek: Maybe they shouldn't design cars for style and instead engineer them for safety. These 4" rear windows need to stop.

Or maybe teach people how to drive. That might work as well.


As for the first, you *can* have both. It was done quite well, in my opinion, with the Bricklin.

As for the second, you are asking too much. I encourage you to read at least the first few chapters of Tom Vanderbilt's 'Traffic' for a discussion of the very real and serious physiological and mental limitations of humans as sole operators of high-speed vehicles. ("High-speed" here referring to anything moving faster than the highest speed of our evolutionary experience, which tops out around 25 mph.) It's simply a scientific fact that humans are not and probably never will be good drivers in the sense that we usually mean that phrase. Yes, when given enough support, such as extraordinarily good roads and vehicles, we can do quite well, though not for extended periods; professional competitive drivers really are athletes in that sense, statistical outliers that most of us can't and won't compare to. But the typical everyday driver is just a fool behind the wheel of a machine that does things we never evolved to deal with, and studies prove that we're mostly faking it, and mostly just getting away with it -- notwithstanding the few tens of thousands per year in our country who don't. As with aerospace and other exotic realms, driving of cars is best left to those statistically few outliers who are actually good at it -- and most of us are not, no matter how lucky we've been so far -- or to technical systems more properly equipped to handle it than we'll ever be.
 
2012-10-07 10:15:22 AM
Sylvia_Bandersnatch
2012-10-07 09:50:13 AM

Vertdang: I always wondered why this wasn't a feature on Star Trek.

Bury the bridge way way down in the center decks, not on top of the saucer like a bullseye, and add this tech to the walls, floor and ceilings (save for consoles and readouts of course).

I get about half of that, in that moving the ship's central monitor, command, and control station away from the exterior seems like a very good idea. But I'm not sure what advantage transparent walls would bring after that. If you could only see into the next compartment,
Thank you for saving me the time typing that. It's dumb idea.


you'd first of all need a pretty good reason to want to do that
I could see some pervs wanting to spy on people's holo-deck activities.
 
2012-10-07 10:16:17 AM
I did not see that coming
 
2012-10-07 10:28:16 AM
Can it allow you to see through the rug rats and their trash in the back seats?
 
2012-10-07 10:48:24 AM
I love how they have the asian woman there, actually looking over her shoulder as she backs up. You know, as opposed to just putting it in reverse and slamming on the gas.
 
2012-10-07 10:55:06 AM

OnlyM3: Sylvia_Bandersnatch
2012-10-07 09:50:13 AM

Vertdang: I always wondered why this wasn't a feature on Star Trek.

Bury the bridge way way down in the center decks, not on top of the saucer like a bullseye, and add this tech to the walls, floor and ceilings (save for consoles and readouts of course).

I get about half of that, in that moving the ship's central monitor, command, and control station away from the exterior seems like a very good idea. But I'm not sure what advantage transparent walls would bring after that. If you could only see into the next compartment, Thank you for saving me the time typing that. It's dumb idea.


you'd first of all need a pretty good reason to want to do thatI could see some pervs wanting to spy on people's holo-deck activities.


Not for looking into the next compartment, but for target tracking and stellar cartography. Put it all in the same place, right on the (now centralized bridge).
If you're gonna make a viewscreen, may as well make it the WHOLE ROOM.
 
2012-10-07 11:03:14 AM

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: aimtastic: Considering how many assholes pull out right in front of me, I've always assumed that my car is intermittently invisible.

It took me a long time, but I finally figured out why that was happening to me when I had a Jeep. The headlights are closer together on a Jeep, which creates for a lot of people the optical illusion that the vehicle is further behind them than it is. Of course, it's not that factor alone; it helps a lot that a huge number of people are not very smart.


I've had too many times where this has happened to me in my Liberty with some very close calls on the highway.

/transparent rear would have saved me from putting a hole in my bumper once. Some dude parked his truck and trailer behind me in the apartment complex parking lot in a no parking zone. I saw the corner post of the trailer and I had just enough room to back up... turns out he welded a big flat tray at the end of his trailer for lumber.
 
2012-10-07 11:13:35 AM

Mr. Titanium: Can it allow you to see through the rug rats and their trash in the back seats?


I'm guessing you're joking, but just in case, No: the technolgy doesn't actually make anything invisible or transparent. It's a flexible display screen connected to a series of very small cameras.
 
2012-10-07 11:15:41 AM

Summoner101: No cure for tracks in snow, however

  

vadakkus.com
 
2012-10-07 11:16:20 AM

Vertdang: OnlyM3: Sylvia_Bandersnatch
2012-10-07 09:50:13 AM

Vertdang: I always wondered why this wasn't a feature on Star Trek.

Bury the bridge way way down in the center decks, not on top of the saucer like a bullseye, and add this tech to the walls, floor and ceilings (save for consoles and readouts of course).

I get about half of that, in that moving the ship's central monitor, command, and control station away from the exterior seems like a very good idea. But I'm not sure what advantage transparent walls would bring after that. If you could only see into the next compartment, Thank you for saving me the time typing that. It's dumb idea.


you'd first of all need a pretty good reason to want to do thatI could see some pervs wanting to spy on people's holo-deck activities.

Not for looking into the next compartment, but for target tracking and stellar cartography. Put it all in the same place, right on the (now centralized bridge).
If you're gonna make a viewscreen, may as well make it the WHOLE ROOM.


Ah, now I get it. Yes, that does seem obvious now. Though I have to say, real-life space travel, especially interstellar, might not make that very useful or even wise. Most objects smaller than a planet will be well outside normal human viewing range most of the time, and some will be distracting or vexing to see, such as nearby stars. The effect should be highly adjustable, then.
 
2012-10-07 11:18:01 AM
why don't they just genetically engineer their women to drive better, more tentacles, larger eyes? pioretthize ewure in-vesh-tmhents, phrease!
 
2012-10-07 11:32:07 AM

Mr. Titanium: Can it allow you to see through the rug rats and their trash in the back seats?


You beat me too it. On here, at least. I made a similar comment a few days ago.

http://gistpodcast.com/2012/10/04/cloaking-devices-teleportation-and- m ore-bitlist/
 
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