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(Marketwatch)   Supreme Court to decide whether or not you're allowed to resell your own stuff   (marketwatch.com) divider line 269
    More: Asinine, U.S. Supreme Court, iPhone, John Wiley & Sons, friend of the courts, Association of Colleges, American Library Association, Georgetown University Law School  
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25831 clicks; posted to Main » on 06 Oct 2012 at 8:36 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-07 01:26:47 AM

gremlin1: If I take all my raggedy old t-shirts and cut them up and sew them into a quilt . Would I be allowed to sell that or would the t-shirts and thread be considered resale items.


That's technically illegal already. By modifying the copyrighted works, you are creating a "derivative work", which can't be sold without permission.
 
2012-10-07 01:27:36 AM

DamnYankees:
It's called arbitrage. Good for this kid for figuring it out. The idea that doing this would become illegal, assuming we have a freed trade agreement with the other country, it utterly biatchcakes.


Grey imports of jeans into the EU were banned under copyright law.
 
2012-10-07 01:53:18 AM
Can you imagine using Silk Road and bitcoins to buy old paperbacks and used CDs instead of LSD and fake IDs? I'd chuckle at that.
 
2012-10-07 01:57:00 AM

cman: There aint no way in hell SCOTUS would overturn the 1908 precedent. That would cause extreme chaos within our country and its economic system. SCOTUS wouldn't dare to do something that drastic


It upheld Obamacare. Nothing is safe any more.
 
2012-10-07 02:01:22 AM

Fissile: Right. I understand that I purchased a license to install one copy of the software. That copy had been uninstalled. A new version of that software had been installed in its place, and the license fee for that new version was was paid.


If you bought the machine with Windows and Office already on it, what happened was that the manufacturer of your PC purchased OEM licenses of Windows and Office, which under the terms of the license were transferred to you when you bought the machine. The key thing to note here is that Microsoft's OEM licenses are sold for about half the price of their retail licenses in compensation for the loss of the right to install them on another machine, which effectively means you can't resell them either. For instance, at Newegg I can get a (non-transferable) Windows 7 Pro OEM license for $139.99, but if I want a (transferable) full retail license, it jumps to $274.99.  If you keep your machine until the software is obsolete it's a great deal, but not so much if you upgrade your hardware fairly often. Microsoft would do well to remove a lot of the confusion regarding how they license their products.
 
2012-10-07 02:07:27 AM

Esn: ZeroCorpse: Here's my answer:

Stop me.


No, really. I dare you. Stop me.

Not just me. Stop the millions of other Americans selling their stuff on Craigslist, or in the classifieds, or by putting up a sign in the local grocery store.

Stop us. We double-dog dare you.

Honestly... What are you going to do? Have cops follow up on fliers, classified ads, garage sales, yard sales, resale shops, Goodwill stores, and used book stores?

Are you going to have resale gestapo locking people up or fining us for selling "contraband" iPods and textbooks and Xbox 360s?

Do you remember the "war on drugs" and how that worked out for the justice system and prison system?

Yeah... So I f♥cking DARE you to stop me from selling my PSP or my copy of Red Dead Redemption or my Android phone. Try it. See how much of a mess you get on your hands.

You don't know the history of the Soviet legal system, I see. The principle is as follows: make unenforceable laws that make just about every citizen a criminal. Of course nobody is going to take them seriously, neither the police nor the public. But if there is somebody who you want "disappeared", you have a legal reason to put them in jail.

That's how this is going to work.


Yeah hows about I fix that for you to reflect reality.
We have these anti-drug laws that are bullshiat. Also these anti-terror measures are bullshiat too. Not to mention 'piracy'. But these things are wearing thin and people are expressing displeasure at the heinous over-extension of Gov't authority. These laws don't cover enough of us to cull the trouble makers. If you don't proudly wear the shackle of American "Freedom" you will be forced at gunpoint to wear the irons of American "Justice"

That's how this already works.
 
2012-10-07 02:07:49 AM

ZeroCorpse: Yeah... So I f♥cking DARE you to stop me from selling my PSP or my copy of Red Dead Redemption or my Android phone. Try it. See how much of a mess you get on your hands.


Esn: You don't know the history of the Soviet legal system, I see. The principle is as follows: make unenforceable laws that make just about every citizen a criminal. Of course nobody is going to take them seriously, neither the police nor the public. But if there is somebody who you want "disappeared", you have a legal reason to put them in jail.

That's how this is going to work.


Did you really think we want those laws observed? said Dr. Ferris. We want them to be broken. You'd better get it straight that it's not a bunch of boy scouts you're up against... We're after power and we mean it... There's no way to rule innocent men. The only power any government has is the power to crack down on criminals. Well, when there aren't enough criminals one makes them. One declares so many things to be a crime that it becomes impossible for men to live without breaking laws. Who wants a nation of law-abiding citizens? What's there in that for anyone? But just pass the kind of laws that can neither be observed nor enforced or objectively interpreted - and you create a nation of law-breakers - and then you cash in on guilt. Now that's the system, Mr. Reardon, that's the game, and once you understand it, you'll be much easier to deal with. ('Atlas Shrugged', 1957)

/Damnit, I just quoted Ayn Rand
//I feel so dirty
 
2012-10-07 02:17:45 AM
There are actually a lot of other, better articles out there about this, thought they don't seem to agree on the overall impact of this case in the end.

Frankly I still think it's crap even if it is decided it's only on goods purchased outside the country. If I want to resell a book I bought while I was in England twelve years ago, now I won't be able to? Horse shiat. I've owned it for a third of my life, whatever British publisher sold it to the store I bought it from should NOT get a say in what I do with it now.

Plus, over time copies of books, music, games, whatever deteriorate or get damaged, reducing the overall number of them in the world. There has to be some consideration of the cultural value of such items if it ends up there are only a few left over time. Look how many items even from WWI-WWII are considered rare and valuable enough to display in museums like the Smithsonian, because while they were common place when made, most of them are gone now.
 
2012-10-07 02:41:11 AM
Mike_LowELL 2012-10-06 09:08:44 PM

I am simply stating the things that are necessary to save this country. I can only hope that we ban the resale of everything, before it is too late.

MIKE DANG IT, HERE IS MY WHOLE FRiKKIN TRUCKLOAD OF HALLUCINOGENIC JELLY BEANS.

farm6.static.flickr.com

EAT THESE AND QUIT HUFFING YOUR MICROSCOPIC IRREGULAR SCREWS. 
 
2012-10-07 02:42:55 AM
For Sale:

Blank sheet of printer paper.
(Will throw in for free an out of print copy of
The Hobbit from Unwin Press.)


Price: $15.00 
 
2012-10-07 02:43:50 AM

Grand_Moff_Joseph: Considering that 9/10 items on store shelves in America (including virtually 100% of electronic/technology related products) are made outside the USA, customers here would be unable to resell nearly everything they ever buy.


Hey, sounds like a great way to jump start the economy!

:-D
 
Esn
2012-10-07 02:52:06 AM

simon_bar_sinister: Yeah hows about I fix that for you to reflect reality.
We have these anti-drug laws that are bullshiat. Also these anti-terror measures are bullshiat too. Not to mention 'piracy'. But these things are wearing thin and people are expressing displeasure at the heinous over-extension of Gov't authority. These laws don't cover enough of us to cull the trouble makers. If you don't proudly wear the shackle of American "Freedom" you will be forced at gunpoint to wear the irons of American "Justice"

That's how this already works.


I'm not disagreeing with you there. The US already has the highest proportion of its population in jail in the world (out of the countries that give out that data, anyway), so it's well on the way.

The only way to fix this is to decentralize the distribution of power. This is something that both Occupy and the Teabaggers agree on, but they have different opinions about the way to get there, and think that the solutions of the other guys will have exactly the opposite effect.
 
2012-10-07 02:55:06 AM

ZAZ: AssAsInAssassin: Wow, that's Farked up. At first, I could barely believe an appellate court would side with a foreign interest over an American citizen, in defiance of the well-established case law regarding Fair Use.

No fair use here. The defendant made about a million dollars importing foreign textbooks and reselling them. The reason you pick your Supreme Court challenges carefully is this guy doesn't get a bit of sympathy if he steps a micron outside the letter of the law. If you're eBay trying to set a favorable precedent you would rather the case involve a starving grad student selling one copy of last year's textbook which he imported because his stipend was cut. Technically it's the same legal question.


The defendent engaged in the act of capitalism. Buy low sell high. It's a basic premise of the free market
 
2012-10-07 03:03:42 AM
Because high tariffs are no longer enough to keep the comatose US economy on life support.
 
2012-10-07 03:11:58 AM

cman: DamnYankees: The case stems from Supap Kirtsaeng's college experience. A native of Thailand, Kirtsaeng came to the U.S. in 1997 to study at Cornell University. When he discovered that his textbooks, produced by Wiley, were substantially cheaper to buy in Thailand than they were in Ithaca, N.Y., he rallied his Thai relatives to buy the books and ship them to him in the U.S.

He then sold them on eBay, making upwards of $1.2 million, according to court documents.

It's called arbitrage. Good for this kid for figuring it out. The idea that doing this would become illegal, assuming we have a freed trade agreement with the other country, it utterly biatchcakes.

If it were a case about pharmaceuticals and chemicals there would be a valid point as those should be held at a higher standard. But books?


the first sale doctrine shouldn't apply to things you are personally concerned about, like drugs and patented chemicals?
that's an interesting argument for distinguishing between legally protected products that and adding proprietary protections that don't actually even exist in this country. I'd like to call you a moron.
 
2012-10-07 03:23:32 AM
I say (in the wise words of comedian Ralphie May's 2yr. old son August)

"F... IT"

Keep things simple.

Just OUTLAW ALL TEXTBOOKS!

The "ability to think" has been being "discouraged" for quite some time now.

That frog's been being brought to a boil since they stopped teaching Logic in schools.

Why continue to pretend otherwise? 
 
2012-10-07 03:56:35 AM
From the actual case:

JOHN WILEY SONS INC v. KIRTSAENG

JOHN WILEY & SONS, INC., Plaintiff-Appellee, v. Supap KIRTSAENG, doing business as Bluechristine99, Defendant-Appellant.

Docket No. 09-4896-cv.

Argued: May 19, 2010. -- August 15, 2011

The principal question presented in this appeal is whether the first sale doctrine, 17 U.S.C. § 109(a), applies to copyrighted works produced outside of the United States but imported and resold in the United States. Under another basic copyright statute, it is ordinarily the case that "mportation into the United States, without the authority of the owner of copyright under [the Copyright Act], of copies ․ of a work that have been acquired outside the United States is an infringement of the [owner's] exclusive right to distribute copies․"

Seems that the real issue was the wholesale importation of the books.
 
2012-10-07 04:16:03 AM
Isn't it generally the copyright holder's responsibility to make a claim for copyright violation? If so, this is mostly going to affect people who deal in high volume or high priced merchandise. Selling your foreign purchased items on eBay might become difficult if your description tips off their magical detection software, but no one is going to stop you having a yardsale. Too difficult and costly to bring suit against a thousand different people selling one item each. Also doesn't do much for your company's goodwill.
 
2012-10-07 04:54:40 AM
OUTLAW EVERYTHING!
 
2012-10-07 05:28:23 AM

dustman81: cman: There aint no way in hell SCOTUS would overturn the 1908 precedent. That would cause extreme chaos within our country and its economic system. SCOTUS wouldn't dare to do something that drastic

Even, if they did, which is unlikely, I don't see how it could be enforced. Not to mention companies like eBay and Craigslist would be destroyed.


It's not about enforcing it on anyone who violates it. It's about having something on the books that makes all of us guilty, and arresting whoever they feel like.

SCOTUS is a kangaroo court, so expect anything and everything from them.
 
2012-10-07 05:34:06 AM

Esn: simon_bar_sinister: Yeah hows about I fix that for you to reflect reality.
We have these anti-drug laws that are bullshiat. Also these anti-terror measures are bullshiat too. Not to mention 'piracy'. But these things are wearing thin and people are expressing displeasure at the heinous over-extension of Gov't authority. These laws don't cover enough of us to cull the trouble makers. If you don't proudly wear the shackle of American "Freedom" you will be forced at gunpoint to wear the irons of American "Justice"

That's how this already works.

I'm not disagreeing with you there. The US already has the highest proportion of its population in jail in the world (out of the countries that give out that data, anyway), so it's well on the way.

The only way to fix this is to decentralize the distribution of power. This is something that both Occupy and the Teabaggers agree on, but they have different opinions about the way to get there, and think that the solutions of the other guys will have exactly the opposite effect.


I disagree with them both.
1) Permanently remove ALL current "leadership".
2) Start over with the original documents. NO legalese definitions. You want to go tailor definitions to your advantage? You will have to change the language, get those changes into common use.
3) Any one who tries to advance a hyper-lib or neo- con agenda, when judged by random citizens will be publicly vivisected.

Results guaranteed and will remain in public memory longer than Paine's Common Sense.
 
2012-10-07 05:34:36 AM

Esn: ZeroCorpse: Here's my answer:

Stop me.


No, really. I dare you. Stop me.

Not just me. Stop the millions of other Americans selling their stuff on Craigslist, or in the classifieds, or by putting up a sign in the local grocery store.

Stop us. We double-dog dare you.

Honestly... What are you going to do? Have cops follow up on fliers, classified ads, garage sales, yard sales, resale shops, Goodwill stores, and used book stores?

Are you going to have resale gestapo locking people up or fining us for selling "contraband" iPods and textbooks and Xbox 360s?

Do you remember the "war on drugs" and how that worked out for the justice system and prison system?

Yeah... So I f♥cking DARE you to stop me from selling my PSP or my copy of Red Dead Redemption or my Android phone. Try it. See how much of a mess you get on your hands.

You don't know the history of the Soviet legal system, I see. The principle is as follows: make unenforceable laws that make just about every citizen a criminal. Of course nobody is going to take them seriously, neither the police nor the public. But if there is somebody who you want "disappeared", you have a legal reason to put them in jail.

That's how this is going to work
.


Bingo!
 
2012-10-07 05:36:26 AM

iollow: dustman81: cman: There aint no way in hell SCOTUS would overturn the 1908 precedent. That would cause extreme chaos within our country and its economic system. SCOTUS wouldn't dare to do something that drastic

Even, if they did, which is unlikely, I don't see how it could be enforced. Not to mention companies like eBay and Craigslist would be destroyed.

It's not about enforcing it on anyone who violates it. It's about having something on the books that makes all of us guilty, and arresting whoever they feel like.

SCOTUS is a kangaroo court, so expect anything and everything from them.


If they uphold the ruling then that means that if you call up your friend in the United Kingdom and have him ship you 100 copies of the Hobbit by Unwin Press and sell them here in the U.S. you would then be in violation of the law. If, however, you purchased a copy from someone over there, read it, and then resold it on e-Bay you would not be in violation of the law. It was the importation with the distribution of the books. He really was not reselling it the same way someone sells on old, unwanted book or DVD on ebay or even clears out their collection of imported LPs and sells them in a yard sale.

Also, care to give some examples of the Supreme Court being a kangaroo court making everyone guilty just so they can arrest whoever they feel like?
 
2012-10-07 05:48:07 AM
Speaking as somebody who wrote a 15 page paper critisizing the second circuit's decision in this case while getting my GED in law last year, the woman who wrote that article has no idea what the fark she is talking about.
 
2012-10-07 05:49:54 AM

crabsno termites: cedarpark:

/Unless textbooks have suddenly got batshait expensive.

Where you been? 1975 I paid $120 for "Radioisotope Methodology" by Chase and Rabinowitz.


At first I was going to call bullshiat on this one given that you paid an equivalent of around $520. Then I saw this article on the most expensive college textbooks in America.  At the top is a philosophy text for $1450. $500 for grad-level chemistry is at number 13.
 
Esn
2012-10-07 05:55:38 AM

simon_bar_sinister: Esn: simon_bar_sinister: Yeah hows about I fix that for you to reflect reality.
We have these anti-drug laws that are bullshiat. Also these anti-terror measures are bullshiat too. Not to mention 'piracy'. But these things are wearing thin and people are expressing displeasure at the heinous over-extension of Gov't authority. These laws don't cover enough of us to cull the trouble makers. If you don't proudly wear the shackle of American "Freedom" you will be forced at gunpoint to wear the irons of American "Justice"

That's how this already works.

I'm not disagreeing with you there. The US already has the highest proportion of its population in jail in the world (out of the countries that give out that data, anyway), so it's well on the way.

The only way to fix this is to decentralize the distribution of power. This is something that both Occupy and the Teabaggers agree on, but they have different opinions about the way to get there, and think that the solutions of the other guys will have exactly the opposite effect.

I disagree with them both.
1) Permanently remove ALL current "leadership".
2) Start over with the original documents. NO legalese definitions. You want to go tailor definitions to your advantage? You will have to change the language, get those changes into common use.
3) Any one who tries to advance a hyper-lib or neo- con agenda, when judged by random citizens will be publicly vivisected.

Results guaranteed and will remain in public memory longer than Paine's Common Sense.


By "all current leadership", are you arguing for confiscating the wealth of the most wealthy and redistributing it?

Because, see, the Occupy folks would say that extreme wealth allows people to have extreme influence on society, so they would include those people among the "leaders".
 
Esn
2012-10-07 06:02:23 AM
...and they would say that you cannot remove those people from power unless you remove their wealth, because wealth is what allows them to influence the lives of other people - which is the same thing as leadership.
 
2012-10-07 06:13:33 AM

Esn: ...and they would say that you cannot remove those people from power unless you remove their wealth, because wealth is what allows them to influence the lives of other people - which is the same thing as leadership.


Nope I don't care if they hide their wealth in a hollow mountain. Just PERMANENTLY remove them. If one facilitated the nation bankrupting schemes, executed them or was a direct beneficiary, remove them. Hold them up to the future as the prime example of why this should never be attempted again.
 
Esn
2012-10-07 06:19:32 AM

simon_bar_sinister: Esn: ...and they would say that you cannot remove those people from power unless you remove their wealth, because wealth is what allows them to influence the lives of other people - which is the same thing as leadership.

Nope I don't care if they hide their wealth in a hollow mountain. Just PERMANENTLY remove them. If one facilitated the nation bankrupting schemes, executed them or was a direct beneficiary, remove them. Hold them up to the future as the prime example of why this should never be attempted again.


OH! You mean KILL them. Okay.
 
2012-10-07 07:15:27 AM
Fissile:

I don't know why you think I'm arguing with you about whether or not software licensing sucks, I was just explaining that it's an entirely different thing from the subject at hand. I also don't know why you think your inability to re-sell something makes it okay to steal all of your software from here on out either, but hey, whatever.
 
2012-10-07 07:21:47 AM

Mrbogey: Lanctwa: The odd thing is that the US government is supporting the publisher, and wants the court of appeals decision to be affirmed.

Really? What clown is in charge of that organization?


forums.pelicanparts.com
 
2012-10-07 07:55:24 AM
The appellate court ruling sucks for anyone wanting to re-sale items....but good in a way that it would pretty much kill Free Trade....which has been an abject failure.

I am sure those with their Milton Friedman-fetish will whine and cry...but there is no evidence that Free Trade works....no one can ever quote you 'Facts"...just rehashed theory.

This ruling by SCOTUS could totally kill foreign goods sold in America...which would put millions of Americans back to work as manufacturing would return to the US
 
2012-10-07 07:56:06 AM
So basically it's this: I buy from Amazon this imported projector:
ecx.images-amazon.com

It retails for $200 approximately, comes with an extra bulb, and all the fixings that a $700-1000 projector has. Say it comes to end-of-life for me, and decide to sell it on Ebay, even at a resale price ($100). If this law passes, it might be considered a "first-sale" since I imported the item, and cannot even give it away? Fark that with a 10-meter cattleprod!

/owns two of them, fun times.
 
2012-10-07 07:59:18 AM
Way back when it looked like HIllary might become President, I said, "Let her win and she will destroy the Democrat Party."
Instead obama won and hes doing it. Passing this law will provoke the Second Revolutionary War.
 
2012-10-07 08:14:19 AM

BarkingUnicorn: After Citizens United and the Obamacare "it's a tax, stupid" rulings, nothing this court does would surprise me.


fark, Bush v. Gore ring a bell???

Short attention spanned motherfarkers...
 
2012-10-07 08:14:28 AM
When you make it illegal to sell things that have a high demand only two things happen: You create a black market, and a shiat load of violence.
 
2012-10-07 08:15:48 AM

brewswane: Way back when it looked like HIllary might become President, I said, "Let her win and she will destroy the Democrat Party."
Instead obama won and hes doing it. Passing this law will provoke the Second Revolutionary War.


You're an idiot, and your lack of grammatical skills automatically invalidates anything you say, dumbass.
 
2012-10-07 08:16:02 AM
If you outlaw flea markets, only outlaws will have flea markets.
 
2012-10-07 08:46:47 AM
Couldn't the court rule that the sales are first sales since the books were imported for the purpose of selling them and making a profit? They were brand new still, not used. Could a line be drawn between this and buying your own textbook overseas, using it for your class, then selling it as used when you are done with it?
 
2012-10-07 08:52:19 AM

ZAZ: If the article is accurate, the court could duck the issue by looking to the place of first sale rather than the place of manufacture. Buy textbooks in Thailand, you're a smuggler. Go to Best Buy in New York and buy a camera made in China, you own it.


Great idea. Nobody buys anything from overseas, do they? Oh wait, eBay...

Why isn't anybody talking about the environmental impact? All that perfectly good kit going into landfill, and everybody having to buy new, when they'd be happy with used? Not pretty.
 
2012-10-07 08:56:49 AM
Never in the history of ever have so many people so thoroughly misunderstood anything.
 
2012-10-07 08:59:02 AM

Fissile: Right. I understand that I purchased a license to install one copy of the software. That copy had been uninstalled. A new version of that software had been installed in its place, and the license fee for that new version was was paid.

Now let's say my employer had purchased a new computer for me that came bundled with Office 2003. Let's further assume that I retained my old computer which came bundled with Office 2000. Both licenses allowed for installation of one copy of the respective software. In this case, two copies of software were paid for, and two copies were installed.

That's not what happened. My employer paid for only a new copy of Office, not a new computer. The old copy of Office....license fee paid....was uninstalled, and the new copy....license fee paid.... was installed. In this case, I had two paid copies of Office, but only one was installed and being used. Now if I had sold that disc to someone else, it would have been the same for Microsoft. They received payment for one copy of Office 2000, and only one copy was installed under that license. They received payment for one copy of Office 2003 and only one copy was installed under that license. The only difference under this scenario is that I would have received a partial reimbursement for the license fee that I paid to Microsoft from the new license holder. No, you can't assume that the person who would have purchased the copy of Office 2000 would have purchased a Office 2003 if they were unable to obtain a copy of an older version.

The above is an example of pure greed on the part of Gates, and it's that petty corporate greed which pushed me over to the dark side of software piracy. I have no regrets. Fark 'em.


The truth is, there's no way for Ebay to tell if you resold it or not. Since most people DO install software they own at some point, its safe to assume that it has been.
 
2012-10-07 09:08:26 AM

Grand_Moff_Joseph: Also, consider that estate sales would be banned too. WTF do you do with a house full of 70 year old furniture from Aunt Sally?


Give it away - 1 item per person but charge $250 admission to come in the house to choose.
 
2012-10-07 09:47:03 AM
Silverstaff: Who has to give permission, especially in cases of things made from component parts? Let's say I buy a custom-built computer from a local store. The case, motherboard, hard drive, memory, CPU, ect. are all different brands and makers.If I want to resell the computer, do I have to get permission from that store, or from each company that made component parts? What happens if that store closes?

It's like the "grandma's furniture" problem noted in TFA: who the heck would you go to even for permission? A house full of furniture bought in the 1940's and 1950's, who the heck knows where that furniture was bought, if those places even exist, and who would even own the "copyright" on that furniture to allow for resale?

What about houses? Do you get permission from the contractor that built it? The architect that designed it?

Basically it would ban eBay, Craigslist, every single used car lot in the country, every flea market/peddler's mall, yard sales, all clothing consignment/secondhand stores (goodbye Goodwill/Salvation Army stores), and pawn shops.

Yeah, that would be mayhem.


And that no man might buy or sell, save he that had the mark, or the name of the beast, or the number of his name. Ok yeah, this shiat is going down, it has been foreseen biatches
 
2012-10-07 09:48:10 AM

dustman81: cman: There aint no way in hell SCOTUS would overturn the 1908 precedent. That would cause extreme chaos within our country and its economic system. SCOTUS wouldn't dare to do something that drastic

Even, if they did, which is unlikely, I don't see how it could be enforced. Not to mention companies like eBay and Craigslist would be destroyed.


Yeah, changing this rule would be a serious threat to the entire industrialized world. Half of the retail sector would immediately go black market overnight. It would kill IRS revenue, cripple China's industrial capability and result in several million theft charges a day. The Supreme court would never do that.
 
2012-10-07 10:03:16 AM
Coming soon from the mind of Scalia: Transfer of any currency or items between individuals is illegal without expressed written consent from a major corporation. Violation of this law will result in immediate forfeiture of all possessions and 10 years prison labor in the state-run Burger Kings.
 
2012-10-07 10:23:24 AM

simrobert2001:

The truth is, there's no way for Ebay to tell if you resold it or not. Since most people DO install software they own at some point, its safe to assume that it has been.


=================

I included a picture of the disc in my auction. The pictures clearly showed that the disc came bundled with a Dell computer.....the disc sleeves were marked as such. I also stated that this product had been uninstalled, and was not currently installed on any computer, which was the truth. I'm guessing that Microsoft has employees who do nothing except troll auction sites for such things, and then send off complaints to the respective sites demanding removal of the item. Just amazing. MS is so paranoid about their licensing agreements, they will go after people who attempt to get a few bucks back on something they bought for a home computer. By checking my feedback, they could have seen that I was not in the business of selling computer stuff. Just really, really petty on the part of Gates.
 
2012-10-07 10:44:30 AM
Amusing how often big business tries to claim that the "free market" does not apply to individuals.
 
2012-10-07 11:35:21 AM
So, realistically, if the SCOTUS rules on this measure.

What does that mean? Is this kind of law going to be totally unenforceable or what?

Cops showing up at garage sales? I mean, really.
 
2012-10-07 12:25:50 PM
So no more Pawn Stars?

spacebison.com
 
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