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(Politic365)   Suburban restaurant chains, seeing dinner traffic erode due to recession and widespread foodie mockery, make renewed effort to lure lunch business from beaten-down office workers: "Things like going out to lunch are seen as less risky than before"   (politic365.com) divider line 198
    More: Obvious, Recession Proof, Mcdonald, casual dining, Hot Pockets, Great Recession  
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7566 clicks; posted to Main » on 06 Oct 2012 at 8:54 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-07 02:11:36 AM  

HotIgneous Intruder: What.
People still eat out?


Thats what I told my last ex-girlfriend.
 
2012-10-07 02:14:53 AM  

xl5150: unyon: FTFA: Nobody expects two week vacations anymore

Really? Is this now considered a luxury in the US? If so, that's pretty sad.

If someone was working for me and took two weeks off all at once, I would be sure to get rid of them at the next round of layoffs. If they're going to disappear for two weeks and leave the rest of us hanging, then that shows they're not devoted to the team and they can't be counted on. There are a lot of people out there looking for jobs and if someone isn't serious about their job it isn't hard to find someone who would take it seriously. If they take off for two weeks and things go smoothly while they're gone, then it's an indication that they're not that essential and there is no reason for them to be on the payroll since we can function just fine without them.


Ouch. 10/10.
 
2012-10-07 02:32:51 AM  

Fell In Love With a Chair: Imagine even getting enough time off to have a surgery without getting fired. I feel bad that these are my hopeful daydreams.


I can now.

My last job (for a f--king union, who were awfully hypocritical w their own employees) didn't fire me... but I got an official warning for calling into work at 7 instead of 9 AM when management was in. After spending 12 hrs in the ER, full of morphine, and after I managed that slurred call I slept for 18 more hours. Got denied a promotion too.

By the book that was my local management being incompetent douchebags but I had no energy to fight.

My roommate had the job I have now with my current employer (went back to grad school) and got a month off, mostly paid, when she needed emergency surgery. It's nice to know that it's guaranteed both in practice and on the books should I need it...
 
2012-10-07 02:51:20 AM  

StreetlightInTheGhetto: Fell In Love With a Chair: Imagine even getting enough time off to have a surgery without getting fired. I feel bad that these are my hopeful daydreams.

I can now.

My last job (for a f--king union, who were awfully hypocritical w their own employees) didn't fire me... but I got an official warning for calling into work at 7 instead of 9 AM when management was in. After spending 12 hrs in the ER, full of morphine, and after I managed that slurred call I slept for 18 more hours. Got denied a promotion too.

By the book that was my local management being incompetent douchebags but I had no energy to fight.

My roommate had the job I have now with my current employer (went back to grad school) and got a month off, mostly paid, when she needed emergency surgery. It's nice to know that it's guaranteed both in practice and on the books should I need it...


My job basically disappeared when I had a second abdominal surgery spring 2011... first one was exploratory, second one was a bit more complicated though still laparoscopy. Both made me incapable of hauling car parts or driving for a week minimum, IIRC it was more like two weeks. The second time around, I know it got kind of slow anyway in April, but after about five weeks off and them telling me again 'no work', I essentially quit and started my ebay thing. Sadly that hasn't gone as well as I'd hoped, compared to that measly paycheck, but the stress levels are WAY down when I'm doing work for that.

It was all unpaid by the company at any rate; I got a few disability checks but when they told me there was no work, those checks stopped coming. Wasn't worth fighting them for a couple hundred bucks when I was happy to just leave.
 
2012-10-07 02:58:09 AM  
Vacations are arranged ahead of time and there's NO reason why people can't get together and decide who will cover their colleague's responsibilities while they're away.

What's more problematic, actually, are sick days - I'm by no means saying that people shouldn't take them if necessary, and obviously you can't know ahead of time when you'll be ill - but especially in task-oriented workplaces, a worker suddenly deciding not to show up can certainly throw a wrench in things. More so when it's shift work and last-minute coverage requires juggling several people's schedules.
 
2012-10-07 05:03:21 AM  
Yeah, wrap your mind around the idea that bedroom communities are damn near empty during the days and blame corporate behavior trends. Meanwhile it's standing room only from 11 to 2 at the eateries in the city. Then go to lunch at one restaurant in the city and dinner out the the suburb only to find its the same waiter. Only he got to drive out at 3pm, before that rush hour traffic you spent an hour stationary in.

Meanwhile, back in the burbs, I can go to the gym at 2pm and be the only man under 60 in a gym full of desperate housewives.
 
2012-10-07 05:27:08 AM  
Hold onto any job with a death grip. I haven't worked in 16 months despite sending out hundreds and hundreds of resumes. Nobody is hiring, not in the DC area at least. Eat at your desk. I'll do anything if I could land employment.
 
2012-10-07 05:40:29 AM  

HotIgneous Intruder:
I had a Gannett job where we just wore catheters at our desks.


That's what you get for working for the Dark Side.

/might be obscure
 
2012-10-07 05:59:55 AM  

xl5150: unyon: FTFA: Nobody expects two week vacations anymore

Really? Is this now considered a luxury in the US? If so, that's pretty sad.

If someone was working for me and took two weeks off all at once, I would be sure to get rid of them at the next round of layoffs. If they're going to disappear for two weeks and leave the rest of us hanging, then that shows they're not devoted to the team and they can't be counted on. There are a lot of people out there looking for jobs and if someone isn't serious about their job it isn't hard to find someone who would take it seriously. If they take off for two weeks and things go smoothly while they're gone, then it's an indication that they're not that essential and there is no reason for them to be on the payroll since we can function just fine without them.


Cool!Mitt Romney is now posting on Fark! Hiya Mittens!
 
2012-10-07 06:46:38 AM  

Nogale: Vacations are arranged ahead of time and there's NO reason why people can't get together and decide who will cover their colleague's responsibilities while they're away.

What's more problematic, actually, are sick days - I'm by no means saying that people shouldn't take them if necessary, and obviously you can't know ahead of time when you'll be ill - but especially in task-oriented workplaces, a worker suddenly deciding not to show up can certainly throw a wrench in things. More so when it's shift work and last-minute coverage requires juggling several people's schedules.


Here's a good observation: Many of our less-fortunate citizens work in minimum wage, fast-food work. It is a health department violation to employ people who are contagiously sick. These same jobs have no sick time and often, if you call in sick it is a demerit or a firing offense (it was in college at a certain fast food chain I worked for). So, you have the unfortunate fact that sick people come to work and working with your food (happens in nicer restaurants, too, and not just fast food joints).

Sleep tight!
 
2012-10-07 06:55:31 AM  
stfu gbtw
 
2012-10-07 07:18:26 AM  
I've got a two-week vacation scheduled to start in a week, so I'm getting a kick out of this thread.

/ and then I take another week-long vacation in the spring/early summer.
 
2012-10-07 08:21:01 AM  
My insane boss HATES it when he sees people taking lunch outside the office. One time, he actually blew up in the company meeting about how he "wants to see people at desks, not empty desks!!!!" (despite the fact we are due a one hour lunch in his own employee handbook) It's all about appearances to his business-owner mind.

He lost the respect of most of the employees during that meeting.

I take my full hour every single day without fail.
 
2012-10-07 08:41:39 AM  
I work 7 days on/7 off, so when I take a week off, I'm off for 3 weeks. Get 120 hrs vacation plus 40 personal. I end up taking 2 three week vacations every year, not to mention the week off I have every other week. The nice thing too, is I can pretty much take all the unpaid TO I want, so long as I give a decent heads up and they find someone willing to cover my shift.

/work for one of countries largest pharmacies
//at work now
 
2012-10-07 10:41:17 AM  
Hmm wow. I work in shiatty retail buuuut I have over 2 weeks worth of vacation saved up. And I could take off for weeks and use the entirety of that paid vacation time all in one shot. In the meantime I just chip off little bits at a time, write down a few hours of "vacation" for one of the days off I already had so that I can bump myself to 40 hours a week if I happen to fall short. Of course the one downfall is I hardly make anything. But of course I should be grateful for even a paltry sum, it's not like I need to save up money to go to school to better myself or anything.
 
2012-10-07 10:47:12 AM  

seadoo2006: These same jobs have no sick time and often, if you call in sick it is a demerit or a firing offense (it was in college at a certain fast food chain I worked for).


Don't forget that even if an employee has a human being for a manager and is given the opportunity to call out sick, there's a good chance they still won't do it. Calling out sick means losing out on hours. Losing out on hours means money literally out of your pocket, if you're especially sick it might be half a paycheck or even the whole damn thing. Depending on the wage slavery, it might mean losing out on your benefits because you worked n-10 hours instead of the n hours required to maintain your health insurance (you know, the thing you need to help your sick ass!) So these people, instead of going home and resting, drudge into work and cough and sneeze and get vomit or diarrhea-covered hands all over product and food which is thereby served to the eager unsuspecting customer, and makes other employees sick which further complicates THEIR lives and throws more wrenches into the scheduling. And of course the original sick employee probably gets even sicker, and I've seen friends do this and get so sick that they end up having to go to the ER (and end up with massive medical debt) because they overstressed their bodies instead of resting. But of course the typical non-answer to this problem is "If ya don't like it then don't work there!" Durrrr.
 
2012-10-07 10:47:21 AM  

bingethinker: If I'm so valuable that you can't live a week without me, then you should pay me way more.

/I love how the most "important" people spend six weeks in Florida every year and things go on without a hitch.


Where I work, I'm pretty sure if middle management disappeared for a year, life would go on. OTOH, if certain key Engineers or Equipment Technicians go away for a week, things start turning to shiat.

Why is there so much useless fat at big corporations? I thought the "free market" was supposed to cull that sort of thing...
 
2012-10-07 10:59:25 AM  

Forbidden Doughnut: I thought the "free market" was supposed to cull that sort of thing...


No, it is only used to justify when business is allowed to act in un-American or worker-hostile ways.
 
2012-10-07 11:14:09 AM  

Le Bomb Suprize: xl5150: unyon: FTFA: Nobody expects two week vacations anymore

Really? Is this now considered a luxury in the US? If so, that's pretty sad.

If someone was working for me and took two weeks off all at once, I would be sure to get rid of them at the next round of layoffs. If they're going to disappear for two weeks and leave the rest of us hanging, then that shows they're not devoted to the team and they can't be counted on. There are a lot of people out there looking for jobs and if someone isn't serious about their job it isn't hard to find someone who would take it seriously. If they take off for two weeks and things go smoothly while they're gone, then it's an indication that they're not that essential and there is no reason for them to be on the payroll since we can function just fine without them.

I'm with ya on this one. And lets not forget bathroom breaks too. If you can't count on your employee to use the bathroom before they leave the house I doubt they have the discipline to to their job properly. In fact, I'm all for reducing or eliminating bathrooms in the workplace in favor of adding in another cubicle or two and increasing production.


And don't even get me started on this whole idea of "lunch breaks"! I mean, I understand that many states "require" them after a certain number of hours worked, but is it really that hard to take care of your nutritional needs on your own time? Try waking up a few minutes earlier, since we'll still need you to start at 8am sharp. In fact, it would be best if you came in a few minutes early so you don't have to waste precious minutes on the clock doing things like "logging in" and so forth.

Nutrition is a matter of personal responsibility, and you can't simply expect everyone from your boss to the CEO to cater to YOUR needs... I mean, do you even want to move up in this company?
 
2012-10-07 11:30:52 AM  

xl5150: If someone was working for me and took two weeks off all at once, I would be sure to get rid of them at the next round of layoffs. If they're going to disappear for two weeks and leave the rest of us hanging, then that shows they're not devoted to the team and they can't be counted on. There are a lot of people out there looking for jobs and if someone isn't serious about their job it isn't hard to find someone who would take it seriously. If they take off for two weeks and things go smoothly while they're gone, then it's an indication that they're not that essential and there is no reason for them to be on the payroll since we can function just fine without them.


You would attract a real quality work force with an attitude like that
 
2012-10-07 11:43:13 AM  

xl5150: unyon: FTFA: Nobody expects two week vacations anymore

Really? Is this now considered a luxury in the US? If so, that's pretty sad.

If someone was working for me and took two weeks off all at once, I would be sure to get rid of them at the next round of layoffs. If they're going to disappear for two weeks and leave the rest of us hanging, then that shows they're not devoted to the team and they can't be counted on. There are a lot of people out there looking for jobs and if someone isn't serious about their job it isn't hard to find someone who would take it seriously. If they take off for two weeks and things go smoothly while they're gone, then it's an indication that they're not that essential and there is no reason for them to be on the payroll since we can function just fine without them.


nope. the engineers I work with are critical to our company. some are from other countries and need two weeks to visit family. they arrange for their projects to have plans during their vacation and all goes well. an important employee isn't disposable even if he's gone for two weeks. now excuse me while I have this hook removed from my mouth.
 
2012-10-07 11:46:55 AM  

AllUpInYa: My company has a chef on staff to provide breakfast and lunch ... it's pretty nice.

Also down the street from a very good bbq rest..


we have a really great cafeteria AND a coffee shop. I never want to work somewhere else.
 
2012-10-07 01:13:18 PM  
Here's a little story about being afraid to take time off from work. I've told it on Fark before, and got some. . .interesting. . .replies.

It was about 5 years ago. I was desperate for a job, and despite my degree the only job I could get was working in a warehouse. It was barely above minimum wage, 10 hour shifts, 6 days a week. 60 hour work-weeks. After two months of those 60 hour weeks, struggling to make high performance quotas (where if you have a bad day at work and underperform, you might get fired), I was tired, sore and sick. I was in no shape to work even at a desk job, much less a warehouse.

I had bruises, sprains, strains, and a lingering cough from the unheated warehouse. 10 hour workdays, combined with an hour-long commute each way meant I only barely had enough time to sleep, eat my food, bathe, then go back to work. The strain on my relationship with my fiancee was terrible on top of it all. My one day a week off was spent trying to rest and recover, and I was so exhausted I didn't have the energy to even do much with her. Not to mention that the job paid so little that we could barely pay the rent and afford food.

Every single non-management worker there was officially a temp. Thus us warehouse workers got no healthcare plan, no vacation time, no sick time, and were generally scared of calling in for any reason, and there was turnover rate that could only be called alarming. Well, the warehouse had a demerit-based attendance policy. Get too many and you're fired. I'd never called in, never been late to work, never left early, I'd always had 0 demerits.

I realized I could call in for a day or two, sandwich those two days between my scheduled day off, and try to take a few days to rest and recover, and maybe heal up some. A few hours before my shift was due to start, I called the call-in hotline and left my name, employee number and told them I was sick and couldn't be at work today.

I got a callback promptly, about 10 minutes later. Firing me. They said that I wouldn't be needed anymore, since other things in my life obviously meant more to me than work. I told them I had 0 attendance demerits and was sick enough that if I came in to work that day, I would not be able to make my quota between limping from sprains and bruises, and having to be in the bathroom so often hacking up phlegm due to my respiratory infection. They said that I was At-Will employee, so attendance points don't matter, I was fired, that's that.

The whole experience of those 2 months in that warehouse left me with a sharp appreciation of the plight of the working man and the working poor in America.

Last year, around this time, I told this story in a discussion thread involving OWS. Certain individuals jumped on to say that vacation time and sick leave are socialism and unfair to employers because why should people get paid for not working, and I was right to be fired because anybody who ever calls in to work before 90 days on the job should be fired immediately (never mind the 60+ hour workweeks for months on end and their physical toll). Basically I got misanthropic sociopaths like xl5150 saying that I was the bad guy for not working myself to death for the good of the company and being an obedient wage-slave.

That's where I went from sympathizing with the working man, to hating corporate management with zeal and passion.
 
2012-10-07 01:34:28 PM  

unyon: FTFA: Nobody expects two week vacations anymore

Really? Is this now considered a luxury in the US? If so, that's pretty sad.


Employers are looking for any excuse to fire people to lower their costs or to raise their stock price or both.
"AT WILL" employment is the base cause of all this stress... they can let you go for any reason they want, any time they want, and don't have to tell you why. It's in the contract you signed when you went to work there.

Which is why unions still have a purpose, and what bugs the hell out of me when morans dog these unions for preventing the people who belong to them fired because their boss didn't have sugar for their coffee that morning. Used to be a time when even in non-union places there were procedures for dismissal, hearings or meetings where the accused employee was allowed to present their side of the story for whatever incident occurred that resulted in their impending dismissal, and before any judgement was made.

That sh*t is over. You get called into the office, handed your ass, and marched out by security. You can come back to the lobby tomorrow and pick up the sh*t from your desk, and your last check will be in the mail.

This is why people don't take real vacations anymore.
 
2012-10-07 01:57:29 PM  

seadoo2006: Jesus, there are still people afraid of losing their jobs or not getting a promotion because they go out to eat lunch? Cripes, where do you poor souls work and WHY do you still work under those conditions???


They work everywhere. And they work under those conditions because they like to eat and live indoors.
Those of us who are fortunate enough to be in positions as secure as yours seems to be have forgotten that.
 
2012-10-07 02:03:56 PM  

rewind2846: Used to be a time when even in non-union places there were procedures for dismissal, hearings or meetings where the accused employee was allowed to present their side of the story for whatever incident occurred that resulted in their impending dismissal, and before any judgement was made.

That sh*t is over. You get called into the office, handed your ass, and marched out by security


THIS.

I can't tell you how much I tripped out when I (a non-union worker) couldn't help but notice the "union bulletin board" at a place I was recently working at.

Specifically, the poster advising a worker of his Weingarten rights.

/yeah, I've run into "At-Will Dictators" a few times
//even WAS the 'security guard' a few times
 
2012-10-07 02:12:46 PM  

rewind2846: They work everywhere. And they work under those conditions because they like to eat and live indoors.
Those of us who are fortunate enough to be in positions as secure as yours seems to be have forgotten that.


It sounds like half the problem (if not all of it) is the lack of established benefits up front. Decent jobs have a fixed amount of vacation hours/days, known to everyone ahead of time, that you can use whenever you want so long as you clear the timing with your manager ahead of time. The number of days you are given could be tiny or large, depending on how cushy a gig it is, but the point is that it's not a surprise. Your manager could reject your leave requests, but he/she should be required to suggest alternate days that work.

Now, I realize that for situations like Silverstaff's, the benefits WERE established up front--there were none. This is retarded on the part of the company because turnover ALWAYS involves some cost and risk. For a warehouse job, these could be very small because the skill set isn't exactly scarce, but they still exist. For this reason, all companies should be willing to offer at least some slack, for their own sake. If they don't, they're being short-sighted and probably need some regulations to save them from themselves.
 
2012-10-07 02:19:45 PM  

Yankees Team Gynecologist: If they don't, they're being short-sighted and probably need some regulations to save them from themselves.


And before some Randian dick takes issue with this sentence because it's supposedly at odds with the capitalist notion of letting poorly run business fail, that's pretty much true of most regulations. The key factor is whether others can get hurt in the process. A drug manufacturer that makes a dangerous pill will probably go out of business without the FDA once there are headlines about a bunch of people dying, but we don't want that to happen in the first place. Needless and inefficient turnover, while not as bad as people dropping dead, is still harmful to workers and the economy.
 
2012-10-07 03:04:30 PM  
If you are a manager and cannot have a worker leave for a few weeks that means you have terrible processes in place. A properly managed workplace will have contingencies plans in place to shift work around.
 
2012-10-07 03:27:41 PM  
Was it like this before integration?
 
2012-10-07 04:34:46 PM  

AlgertMan: The only problem I ever see is places without lunch menus. Your average person doesn't want to spend $20 bucks on lunch.


I've never understood lunch menu's. The same dish costs $2 more at dinnertime than it does at lunch?

If you're selling me the same thing, the price shouldn't change. If you're selling a larger portion vs a smaller portion, then the customer should be able to order the large or small regardless of whether it's lunchtime or dinnertime.
 
2012-10-07 05:47:29 PM  

HotIgneous Intruder: Le Bomb Suprize: I'm with ya on this one. And lets not forget bathroom breaks too. If you can't count on your employee to use the bathroom before they leave the house I doubt they have the discipline to to their job properly. In fact, I'm all for reducing or eliminating bathrooms in the workplace in favor of adding in another cubicle or two and increasing production.

I had a Gannett job where we just wore catheters at our desks.


This is what us Pro's use.

i45.tinypic.com

Women are kind of SOL, though. Not that you want to hide a bag of piss under a skirt or skinny jeans.
 
2012-10-07 07:26:42 PM  

Silverstaff: Here's a little story about being afraid to take time off from work. I've told it on Fark before, and got some. . .interesting. . .replies.

It was about 5 years ago. I was desperate for a job, and despite my degree the only job I could get was working in a warehouse. It was barely above minimum wage, 10 hour shifts, 6 days a week. 60 hour work-weeks. After two months of those 60 hour weeks, struggling to make high performance quotas (where if you have a bad day at work and underperform, you might get fired), I was tired, sore and sick. I was in no shape to work even at a desk job, much less a warehouse.

I had bruises, sprains, strains, and a lingering cough from the unheated warehouse. 10 hour workdays, combined with an hour-long commute each way meant I only barely had enough time to sleep, eat my food, bathe, then go back to work. The strain on my relationship with my fiancee was terrible on top of it all. My one day a week off was spent trying to rest and recover, and I was so exhausted I didn't have the energy to even do much with her. Not to mention that the job paid so little that we could barely pay the rent and afford food.

Every single non-management worker there was officially a temp. Thus us warehouse workers got no healthcare plan, no vacation time, no sick time, and were generally scared of calling in for any reason, and there was turnover rate that could only be called alarming. Well, the warehouse had a demerit-based attendance policy. Get too many and you're fired. I'd never called in, never been late to work, never left early, I'd always had 0 demerits.

I realized I could call in for a day or two, sandwich those two days between my scheduled day off, and try to take a few days to rest and recover, and maybe heal up some. A few hours before my shift was due to start, I called the call-in hotline and left my name, employee number and told them I was sick and couldn't be at work today.

I got a callback promptly, about 10 minutes later. Firing me. They said that I wouldn't be needed anymore, since other things in my life obviously meant more to me than work. I told them I had 0 attendance demerits and was sick enough that if I came in to work that day, I would not be able to make my quota between limping from sprains and bruises, and having to be in the bathroom so often hacking up phlegm due to my respiratory infection. They said that I was At-Will employee, so attendance points don't matter, I was fired, that's that.

The whole experience of those 2 months in that warehouse left me with a sharp appreciation of the plight of the working man and the working poor in America.


I feel your pain. I was in a similar position, fresh out of college with an engineering degree but no entry level engineering jobs in the area, so I ended up working a temp service in an electronics factory floor / warehouse. It was advertised as a 3rd shift $10 / Hr, temp-to-hire job but after I was hired I found out that they have no intentions of hiring temps and skirt the issue by laying you off after you put a full year in (after some lawsuit). But to make it worse, if you were late, left early, or called off they docked your pay 50 cents/hr for the entire week. Their justification is that it was really a $9.50/hr job with a 50 cent "incentive", despite the original ad stating $10/hr. Of course as a temp there was no health care, sick days, vacation, holidays, or job security. 6 days / week was mandatory.

It was when the day manager brought us in the break room and told us in no plain words "what's what" when I knew I had to leave. It included a few shiatty nuggets like "your 2 10 minute breaks and 30 minute lunch are a luxury not a right"; "You are to clean up your station only after the break and lunch bells sound and we expect you back at your station at least 5 minutes before the end-of-lunch bell sounds"; and the best was "For whatever reason if you take off, leave early or are late once in a thirty day period you get a warning, twice (for whatever reason) you have to go to 'counseling', three times, you are automatically fired." To make it worse, being night-shift, if it snowed you were screwed because there were no snow trucks out at night to plow and salt the roads. That year we had a terrible blizzard and two bad snow storms. I couldn't call off so I had to trek to work in the damn snow in a car without heat. During that winter, I slid down an icy hill into a snowbank, nearly got stranded on an iced-over road, and nearly got stranded when my car slid into a ditch. The third one I was thankfully rescued by some families that were playing in the snow with their kids and a cop who was passing by. I am a very cautious driver so it wasn't reckless driving, it is the damn hilly back roads.

I stayed on for my year but needless to say I will never do another night shift position if I can help it. I sure as hell won't drive on snow covered roads unless it is an emergency. I am definitely not going to risk my life for $9.50 / hr plus a 50 cent "incentive". It was a bad job but at least it was a learning experience. I learned that I value myself enough to not put up with that shiat again.
 
2012-10-07 07:36:42 PM  

Silverstaff: Here's a little story about being afraid to take time off from work. I've told it on Fark before, and got some. . .interesting. . .replies.

It was about 5 years ago. I was desperate for a job, and despite my degree the only job I could get was working in a warehouse. It was barely above minimum wage, 10 hour shifts, 6 days a week. 60 hour work-weeks. After two months of those 60 hour weeks, struggling to make high performance quotas (where if you have a bad day at work and underperform, you might get fired), I was tired, sore and sick. I was in no shape to work even at a desk job, much less a warehouse.

I had bruises, sprains, strains, and a lingering cough from the unheated warehouse. 10 hour workdays, combined with an hour-long commute each way meant I only barely had enough time to sleep, eat my food, bathe, then go back to work. The strain on my relationship with my fiancee was terrible on top of it all. My one day a week off was spent trying to rest and recover, and I was so exhausted I didn't have the energy to even do much with her. Not to mention that the job paid so little that we could barely pay the rent and afford food.

Every single non-management worker there was officially a temp. Thus us warehouse workers got no healthcare plan, no vacation time, no sick time, and were generally scared of calling in for any reason, and there was turnover rate that could only be called alarming. Well, the warehouse had a demerit-based attendance policy. Get too many and you're fired. I'd never called in, never been late to work, never left early, I'd always had 0 demerits.

I realized I could call in for a day or two, sandwich those two days between my scheduled day off, and try to take a few days to rest and recover, and maybe heal up some. A few hours before my shift was due to start, I called the call-in hotline and left my name, employee number and told them I was sick and couldn't be at work today.

I got a callback promptly, about 10 minutes lat ...


Was this by any chance one of the Amazon distribution centers?
 
2012-10-07 08:13:21 PM  

ladyfortuna: Was this by any chance one of the Amazon distribution centers?


Uh, actually, yes, yes it was.

How did you know?
 
2012-10-07 09:30:57 PM  
Ya know... this whole thread make me appreciate being in the military. Yes, you have to do annoying things from time to time. Yes, there are deployments, exercises, etc. But the way people get treated (at least in the Air Force) is simply better than the garbage I'm reading in this thread.

If people are sick, unless there is something crucial to do that day, they get sent home or to sick-call for medical care. If my supervisees are sick, I send them home, because I don't need them making everyone else sick, and I need them to be on their game when they're at work. We support each other - being so "crucial" that you can't miss miss a pre-planned block of leave means you haven't coordinated with your colleagues. You should always have communication so that the mission continues when individuals are away for whatever reason.

We had a person in the hospital recently, followed by several weeks on convalescent leave (sick leave, basically). No threats, no scoffing. Several of us dropped by to check on her at home, mowed her lawn. Various folks checked on her at the hospital. The biggest drama was several higher ups being upset that they weren't made aware soon enough so that they could call and check on her.

I'm not going to lie and say that it's a wonderful workplace every hour, or that it's the perfect fit for everyone. There are things about it that genuinely suck. We don't necessarily like each other, as in any work environment. People sometimes get back-stabby or step on each others toes. But ya know what, we do work to ensure that people are taken care of, and this thread make the civilian world sound like absolute hell.

I've seen some pretty awesome support of others. Passing the hat to get flowers and cards when someone has a new family member, or loses a dear relative. Various service organizations (Top-3) raising money to provide lower ranking members with families and limited means full thanks giving dinners. An attitude that nobody should spend holidays such as Thanksgiving and Christmas alone, opening their homes to singles who live far from family and can't make it home.

I was going through a divorce a few years back. My supervisor knew something wasn't right with me, pulled me aside for a chat. He was annoyed that I hadn't told him what was going on, told me to let him know if I needed to adjust my hours to deal with appointments, trips to the county courthouse during business hours, etc.

Again, USAF, so others armed forces experience may vary.
 
2012-10-07 09:42:51 PM  

Mr. Chainsaw: Gov't employee, so I earn 12 hours of annual leave and 8 hours of sick leave every month, but I'm well into the triple digits on both. Why? Because taking a vacation means a nightmare of backlog waiting for you when you get back. Actually, the longer the vacation the better, because if you're gone for a week you're going to plan ahead and work with your boss to farm out the work for others to cover. Whereas if it's only a couple of days, you're kind of on your own. Even though we're perfectly within our rights to take time off, we're not encouraged to do so, and the workload scares people off from doing it.
/I usually only take a day or two here and there, but I take close to two weeks for Christmas


Also a government worker. I get four hours of annual and sick every two weeks. I can bank 240 hours, after which it becomes use-it-or-lose-it by December 31st. We're not discouraged from it, but my division does huge, long-lasting legal cases, so any given week is likely low in importance. Others are less fortunate.

I don't take time off much. (Just took my first sick day in 2 and a half years last week, and I haven't gone on vacation in about a year.) Well into triple digits banked after just over two years, and I financed the move to FL to take this job with the hours I saved with the Feds in DC over a three-year period.

My colleague, who's European (naturalized US citizen), takes a couple weeks to go home each year. Nobody bats an eye, because we can cover anything she might miss, and our managers aren't assholes. When people want to take their kids out of state to see grandparents, nobody cares.

The result is people are happy, rarely miss work, and things get done.
 
2012-10-07 09:51:11 PM  

spentmiles: If you are doing what you love, then you don't need time off. I work with the mentally handicap at a state run facility here in Nevada. Today I gave a forty three year old man enough electric shock therapy to eject three fillings from his mouth. I don't need a vacation.


Sweet Jesus, that's beautiful.
 
2012-10-07 09:54:28 PM  

xl5150: unyon: FTFA: Nobody expects two week vacations anymore

Really? Is this now considered a luxury in the US? If so, that's pretty sad.

If someone was working for me and took two weeks off all at once, I would be sure to get rid of them at the next round of layoffs. If they're going to disappear for two weeks and leave the rest of us hanging, then that shows they're not devoted to the team and they can't be counted on. There are a lot of people out there looking for jobs and if someone isn't serious about their job it isn't hard to find someone who would take it seriously. If they take off for two weeks and things go smoothly while they're gone, then it's an indication that they're not that essential and there is no reason for them to be on the payroll since we can function just fine without them.


Good luck keeping happy employees. Some time is needed to work for assholes.
 
2012-10-07 09:55:47 PM  
RickyWilliams'sBong:

Also a government worker........
.
.
The result is people are happy, rarely miss work, and things get done. a giant, money-sucking inefficient bureaucracy that is run like a joke and would never survive in the private sector since its revenue is received from taxes. 

FTFY
 
2012-10-07 09:58:13 PM  
I get "180 vacation" days a year (weekends and summer included). I've accrued 135 sick days (13 years). Vacation is really needed to cool down.
 
2012-10-07 10:09:37 PM  

xl5150: RickyWilliams'sBong:

Also a government worker........
.
.
The result is people are happy, rarely miss work, and things get done. a giant, money-sucking inefficient bureaucracy that is run like a joke and would never survive in the private sector since its revenue is received from taxes. 

FTFY


Yeah, about that: Our revenue is received from winning cases for the state. We bring in millions more than we spend, and those millions go back to the taxpayers.

Nice try, slick.
 
2012-10-07 10:12:12 PM  

xl5150: RickyWilliams'sBong:

Also a government worker........
.
.
The result is people are happy, rarely miss work, and things get done. a giant, money-sucking inefficient bureaucracy that is run like a joke and would never survive in the private sector since its revenue is received from taxes. 

FTFY


Ah, wait, you're a University of Spoiled Children alumnus, I see. So you've never actually had a job without your parents setting it up for you.
 
2012-10-08 12:27:44 AM  

xl5150: unyon: FTFA: Nobody expects two week vacations anymore

Really? Is this now considered a luxury in the US? If so, that's pretty sad.

If someone was working for me and took two weeks off all at once, I would be sure to get rid of them at the next round of layoffs. If they're going to disappear for two weeks and leave the rest of us hanging, then that shows they're not devoted to the team and they can't be counted on. There are a lot of people out there looking for jobs and if someone isn't serious about their job it isn't hard to find someone who would take it seriously. If they take off for two weeks and things go smoothly while they're gone, then it's an indication that they're not that essential and there is no reason for them to be on the payroll since we can function just fine without them.


You, as a decision maker or troll, have taken this into account but I will flesh it out for the elfs. If you have a white guy and a black guy both taking two weeks off and you are silly enough to lay off the white guy shortly after, are you ready to explain your actions to the Rev's (RB)? Those gentlemen will demand to know why you didn't lay off the Brother. Did you not think he was worthy of being dropped and capable of finding gainful employment elsewhere? The outrage (tm) of your callousness is explained by Romney.
 
2012-10-08 12:56:34 AM  
FOXCONN!
 
2012-10-08 03:23:46 AM  

seadoo2006: Jesus, there are still people afraid of losing their jobs or not getting a promotion because they go out to eat lunch? Cripes, where do you poor souls work and WHY do you still work under those conditions???


Last job I worked there was absolutely NO ONE who could go out to eat lunch except the highest ranking person who didn't have to report to anyone in the office. Some days I would take 1/2 hour to eat lunch that I brought, but usually that was a working lunch. Technically I was permitted to come and go as I wished, but no way could I leave for lunch, because there was too much to do and too many people looking for me. Most people ate a snack for 5 minutes or less and went back to work so they could get it all done and leave in time to get home for dinner. They still worked 10 hours for every 8 that they got paid. Productivity requirements are a biatch, but they aren't easy to sidestep when that's how your pay is calculated. I almost always brought both lunch and dinner with me and usually worked 10-12 hours, sometimes more, while being paid for 7-8 hours.

The job was in, let's call it, health care. The reason that people continue to work under those conditions is either (A) They can't find a better paying job, (B) They can't find another decent job close to home, or (C) They believe that they have to put in that amount of effort to do a conscientious job, and in medicine/healthcare, it frequently is literally a matter of life and death (or is it?). For most of my co-workers, it was a combination of those factors, but heavily weighted toward C because they believed what they were doing was important and necessary for the health and well-being of others.

In summary, the options are not myriad for most people - they have a limited area of expertise and limited opportunities based on their choice of career. Some people also attempt to do a conscientious job despite the fact that employers have different priorities than they do.
 
2012-10-08 03:39:29 PM  

some_beer_drinker: spentmiles: If you are doing what you love, then you don't need time off. I work with the mentally handicap at a state run facility here in Nevada. Today I gave a forty three year old man enough electric shock therapy to eject three fillings from his mouth. I don't need a vacation.

oh my god that horrible! what kind of sadistic creep are you? i should call the internet police on you right now, so some of those fat guys in pseudo-military uniforms come over there are shoot paintballs at each other until someone gets hospitalized.


I believe he's referencing this infamous thread

http://www.fark.com/comments/3276148/Prank-caller-tricks-mental-healt h -facility-into-activating-patients-remote-controlled-shock-devices-Mil gram-wanted-for-questioning

That was won by Dr. Funkenstein in 12 posts (winning post printed here, which cost me a monitor, cup of coffee, keyboard, clean underwear, workplace dignity, etc.)

DF:

What kind of dumbasses do they have working there? Doesn't sound like much of a prank.

[ring, ring, ring]
School Guy> Hello. This is Tard Shockin' School. How can I help you?

Prankster> Hello. Would you please shock some tards?

School Guy> I need proper authorization for that.

Prankster> OK, I'm the boss. Now get to shocking.

School Guy> Right away, sir.

Tard> I like pie...rawr...[ZAP]
 
2012-10-09 02:47:44 AM  

Silverstaff: ladyfortuna: Was this by any chance one of the Amazon distribution centers?

Uh, actually, yes, yes it was.

How did you know?


Last summer I believe it was, my cousin who lives in Seattle linked a story about the one in PA and how OSHA had been called in about the conditions, which were exacerbated by that long heat wave in July. People dropping left and right and getting fired because they couldn't work fast enough.

I love Amazon's service but that story put a bad taste in my mouth. They've gone semi-corporate evil, that's for sure.

/friend's husband worked there
//til he got let go for falling behind on his work
///because he was doing everyone else's job too
 
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