If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Des Moines Register)   Making a high school athlete run extra laps as a form of discipline is now considered as evil as paddling. "I think youth sports are in trouble"   (desmoinesregister.com) divider line 121
    More: Silly, school bullying, National Occupational Standards, Bear Bryant, Iowa Department of Education, corporal punishments, Education Act 1696, Bobby Knight, physical education  
•       •       •

4454 clicks; posted to Main » on 06 Oct 2012 at 6:30 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



121 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all
 
2012-10-07 01:10:38 AM

bVork: Maybe you idiots, and subby, should actually read the PDF about the incident before jumping to conclusions. But I guess that's too much to ask.


he had to repeat some comments he made about the varsity team *to* the varsity team, when they got overly agitated the coach said "enough" and it was "done", which I interpret to mean that he was restraining the varsity players from making further threats. He still hadn't actually apologized so he then had to run for about 20-25 minutes and all told ran less than three miles, that is *not* what I'd call intense, even with hill sprints thrown in. A high school athlete should have been fine. He then went home and told his mother he had been running for 2 hours, video evidence disproved this. He also had a running partner, a varsity player doing extra conditioning because he was overweight. The overweight student said that the complainant was much faster than him and they had breaks between runs, the only even slightly troubling bit is that over the course of no more than a half an hours running he may or may not have had a water break.

The complainant stopped running at some point and was told by the coach that this was his conditioning and if he didn't want to continue he should turn in his pads. The horror. He ended up walking off the field and dis-enrolling from the school a few days later.

There is a bit where he is accused of knowing about a hazing incident and other student misconduct and glossing over it, that is pretty unprofessional, but everything else seems to fall within the purview of using naughty language and hurting peoples feelings.

This is the coach of a sport dedicated to young men punishing themselves physically for a delighted crowd, one so violent that the players must wear protective armor to play, and we are worried about the coaches potty mouth? Or that some weak willed kid who made public comments disparaging his own team and then quit because he had to run a couple of miles?
 
HBK
2012-10-07 01:11:17 AM
If you're talking about this pdf, I really don't see the problem with having a kid run an extra 30 minutes (with breaks) after practice.
 
2012-10-07 01:15:02 AM

qualtrough: I went to an overseas British boarding school run on stern lines. For the slightest infraction students were given black marks. Accumulate 3 and you had 3 punishment laps. That is what they were called, as they were intended as punishment. The course was up and down hills, through streets, it was exhausting. Typically I had to do 12 laps by Saturday afternoon. It is a testament to my innately poor physique that I did not develop into a great cross-country athlete. Went back for a reunion 3 years ago, all were disappointed to learn that laps had been dropped some time ago. If this trend keeps up there may come a time when geriatrics who grew up under harsher regimes are a match for teenagers.


Well, with your handle, you're lucky you're not doing time on the gallows for murdering Dr. Crippen's wife...
 
2012-10-07 02:02:09 AM

HBK: If you're talking about this pdf, I really don't see the problem with having a kid run an extra 30 minutes (with breaks) after practice.


That is some of the dumbest crap I have ever read.

The kid insulted the varsity team and before anything got out of hand the coach stepped in and made the kid own up to his actions in front of the people he offended, then gave the people he offended a chance to let him know how they felt, told everybody it was over and then punished him for it. That sounds to me like a very good teaching moment for the kid.
 
2012-10-07 02:09:27 AM
Except for the part where he punished the kid to a far greater degree than players who had actually gotten arrested or assaulted people. And the part where the punishment only ended because the kid walked off the field. And the part where he refused to allow the kid water during the punishment. This wasn't a teaching moment. This was sadism and petty vengeance.
 
2012-10-07 03:20:10 AM

bVork: Except for the part where he punished the kid to a far greater degree than players who had actually gotten arrested or assaulted people. And the part where the punishment only ended because the kid walked off the field. And the part where he refused to allow the kid water during the punishment. This wasn't a teaching moment. This was sadism and petty vengeance.


Welcome to my favorites list.

/and not the good one.
 
2012-10-07 03:34:23 AM
The military has stopped using physical training as punishment, and they only deal with adults. They're typically ranked fairly high with respect to pragmatic discipline. You might want to ask them why they don't think it's it's a good idea before you apply the method to children.
 
2012-10-07 03:35:58 AM

swingerofbirches: You can't make someone run.


James Byrd, Jr. agrees
 
2012-10-07 03:40:23 AM

MaxSupernova: all the girls told the coaches bye, hugged them and all the things you would do towards a person you like


That's exactly what you'd expect from a person that was abused and then manipulated into believing that abuse is a consequence of love.

I'm not saying discipline is abuse, but let's not pretend that hugs and social niceties are evidence that abuse has not occurred.
 
2012-10-07 03:42:47 AM
Am I the only one concerned by attorney's statement that there are different standards for what constitutes corporal punishment based on the gender of the students involved?
 
2012-10-07 04:13:10 AM
You can't make someone run.


Yeah, I never get that one either. Sure he can say you bad, you now do 15 laps. But after I do a halfassed half lap and then sit down, what now?

/I guess supension is the answer
//which I would take anytime over laps
///pussys indeed
 
2012-10-07 07:54:47 AM
Way to go Libs.

You are getting what you want.
 
2012-10-07 08:23:28 AM
"I am not punishing you; but I have traded you to the cross country team for the afternoon."
 
2012-10-07 09:21:57 AM

profplump: The military has stopped using physical training as punishment, and they only deal with adults. They're typically ranked fairly high with respect to pragmatic discipline. You might want to ask them why they don't think it's it's a good idea before you apply the method to children.


Pragmatic discipline isn't necessarily a benign process. The team member or soldier does have to have his sense of self-worth cut down to the level of the organization, because that organization has to know he can be counted on to act as a machine under threat and stress.

Whatever damage might be done to the individual psychically is always an acceptable risk - just like physical damage. The difference is that physical injury never makes the individual more useful to the team, whereas without some level of psychic injury, he cannot be useful at all.

It's better than it was pre-Vietnam, when you had to undergo this kind of conditioning or society didn't consider you a man at all. There are other ways to grow up today, altho I imagine the ex-athletes on here might not agree.
 
2012-10-07 09:48:49 AM

profplump: MaxSupernova: all the girls told the coaches bye, hugged them and all the things you would do towards a person you like

That's exactly what you'd expect from a person that was abused and then manipulated into believing that abuse is a consequence of love.


I'm not saying discipline is abuse, but let's not pretend that hugs and social niceties are evidence that abuse has not occurred.


Oh geez man.....we're talking about practice not some battered women and children here. A three to five hour weekly "relationship" between coaches and kids in the public vs a family behind closed doors id not even comparable situations.

The handful of abused people I knew did not act any one way so I'd be very hesitant to use the phrase "exactly what you would expect"....they were much more reserved and stand offish usually.
 
2012-10-07 12:50:20 PM
What a lot you are refusing to recognize is that to a lot of your friends and neighbors, ends justify means. If it takes abuse to create winning teams, effective fighting units, competitive individuals, then that abuse ought not be treated as abuse.

It used to be that these were the values of all society, more important than any individual. A lot of your friends and neighbors still understand that and still believe.
 
2012-10-07 02:50:05 PM
Eponymous: lemme guess, you were a piccolo player in the band?

No, I wasn't in band.
 
HBK
2012-10-08 01:06:08 AM
There sure are a lot of bleeding heart pussies in here. If you don't want to run the laps, just quit. Which is what this kid did, after less than thirty minutes of exercise.

Then, this kid was such a pussy that instead of go home and lick his wounds, he and his mommy got litigious.

What a sad path this country is heading down.
 
2012-10-08 04:16:46 AM

MaxSupernova: Oh geez man.....we're talking about practice not some battered women and children here. A three to five hour weekly "relationship" between coaches and kids in the public vs a family behind closed doors id not even comparable situations.


How many hours a week does someone have to be abused and manipulated before it counts?

Like I said, I'm not arguing that discipline is abuse, but I refuse to believe that social nicety among the participants is evidence that abuse did not take place, which is the argument you're putting forth.
 
2012-10-08 04:20:08 AM

i upped my meds-up yours: Pragmatic discipline isn't necessarily a benign process.


I agree. And I'm not saying the military is the end-all-be-all of discipline, or that high-school sports require or should even strive for the same time of discipline. All I'm saying is the same folks who think physical training is good for discipline would typically consider the armed forces to be an example of a well-disciplined organization, and as such they should give serious weight to the rules used in that organization when forming rules for their own, including the rules that prohibit the use of physical training for disciplinary purposes.
 
2012-10-08 10:26:32 PM

profplump: MaxSupernova: Oh geez man.....we're talking about practice not some battered women and children here. A three to five hour weekly "relationship" between coaches and kids in the public vs a family behind closed doors id not even comparable situations.

How many hours a week does someone have to be abused and manipulated before it counts?

Like I said, I'm not arguing that discipline is abuse, but I refuse to believe that social nicety among the participants is evidence that abuse did not take place, which is the argument you're putting forth.


Social niceties where all activities are in public view.....yeah that's pretty much proof that no "abuse" is taking place. You are applying broad generalizations to a scenario you know nothing about.
 
Displayed 21 of 121 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report