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(NBC News)   "Once I caught a group of tourists who set a table on the Spanish Steps, with table cloth and cutlery. This has to stop"   (worldnews.nbcnews.com) divider line 81
    More: Dumbass, Spanish Steps, food cart, NBC News  
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10797 clicks; posted to Main » on 06 Oct 2012 at 12:10 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



81 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2012-10-06 12:13:43 PM  
"Most of them are foreigners, so I doubt they will pay the ticket before they go back to their countries," the officer said. "It's more likely they'll keep it as a souvenir."

It's all part of the charm of southern Italy. :)
 
2012-10-06 12:16:29 PM  
The mayor of the "eternal city" has made it illegal to eat snacks and junk food on or around its monuments.

i.imgur.com
 
2012-10-06 12:19:33 PM  
That truly is an Italian way of doing things...
 
2012-10-06 12:19:40 PM  
wallet-stealing gypsies, still permitted at the monuments.
 
2012-10-06 12:21:47 PM  
Both a Chinese tourist eating ice cream from a cup and a Romanian digging from a bag of chips while admiring the sunset over Via Condotti pointed out that there were no signs explaining the new law and asked how were they supposed to know about the rule.

When asked about this complaint, three local policemen patrolling the area told NBC News that there was no need for a sign.

"It's common sense," one officer said, wearing a designer Rolex watch. "You can't dirty such a beautiful and historical monument with ice cream and bread crumbs just because you can sit on it. So we give them a ticket. However, since most of them are foreigners, we offer to take care of the formalities if they simply give us cash in the amount of the ticket. Otherwise, we might have to take them to jail. So far, most people have been quite compliant."
 
2012-10-06 12:22:23 PM  

Tax Boy: wallet-stealing gypsies, still permitted at the monuments.


My friend saw one of them doing the "please give me money for my baby" routine, then saw her pass off the baby to another gypsy when her shift was over.
 
2012-10-06 12:23:22 PM  
I'm ok with this.
imageshack.us
 
2012-10-06 12:23:45 PM  

Tax Boy: wallet-stealing gypsies, still permitted at the monuments.


My mom did a tour of Egypt, Israel and Rome with a church group. Rome was the only place they warned about thieves.

/it probably makes up a big part of the economy.
 
2012-10-06 12:24:40 PM  
I never set up a table but my friends and I quickly realized that a nice bottle of wine was 5 euros (no excise tax!) and the random people at the Spanish Steps or Piazza Navona were more fun than the denizens of most of the bars and clubs.

If they're going to call the carabinieri on friendly drunk 20 year olds with terrible Italian, that's just awful. People from all over the world putzing around these monuments are a part of the monument.
 
2012-10-06 12:26:55 PM  

whither_apophis: Tax Boy: wallet-stealing gypsies, still permitted at the monuments.

My mom did a tour of Egypt, Israel and Rome with a church group. Rome was the only place they warned about thieves.

/it probably makes up a big part of the economy.


Cops gotta eat, too.
 
2012-10-06 12:27:31 PM  
When asked about this complaint, three local policemen patrolling the area told NBC News that there was no need for a sign.
"It's common sense," one officer said.


This is the way I see a lot of officials in other countries.
"You're ignorant, so I'll punish you."
/ya, here in the US too.
 
2012-10-06 12:27:58 PM  

NexusSix: I never set up a table but my friends and I quickly realized that a nice bottle of wine was 5 euros (no excise tax!) and the random people at the Spanish Steps or Piazza Navona were more fun than the denizens of most of the bars and clubs.

If they're going to call the carabinieri on friendly drunk 20 year olds with terrible Italian, that's just awful. People from all over the world putzing around these monuments are a part of the monument.


Makes you wonder why the hell Facismo was born in Italy, no less.
 
2012-10-06 12:28:03 PM  
Italian people problems.
 
2012-10-06 12:29:38 PM  

Theaetetus: "You can't dirty such a beautiful and historical monument with ice cream and bread crumbs just because you can sit on it.


Acidic pigeon poop, still permitted.
 
2012-10-06 12:29:39 PM  
Not bombing Rome and Vienna flat was a sentimental mistake by the Allies.
 
2012-10-06 12:30:08 PM  
"It's common sense," one officer said. "You can't dirty such a beautiful and historical monument with ice cream and bread crumbs just because you can sit on it."

Right, so I can't drop a breadcrumb on them, but walking on them, that's fine? Sounds to me more like the Roman Restauranteur and Cafe Association is bankrolling the mayor. Get people to stop eating on the steps and they'll have to start eating at cafes instead.

Here's how you treat tourists messing things up: you clean it, because a few extra euros spend on cleaning up the crap is much cheaper than driving tourists away by being dicks to them.
 
2012-10-06 12:30:42 PM  
Sounds like they'll waste more money giving out tickets than they'll get from the fines, and no one seems to care anyway.
 
2012-10-06 12:31:36 PM  

whither_apophis: Tax Boy: wallet-stealing gypsies, still permitted at the monuments.

My mom did a tour of Egypt, Israel and Rome with a church group. Rome was the only place they warned about thieves.

/it probably makes up a big part of the economy.


On my last trip to Paris I was warned several times by various hotel staff, restaurant staff, cab drivers, etc about pickpockets. It seemed like everybody had something to say about them. Never had a mention of them in the rest of France, Switzerland, or Germany.
 
2012-10-06 12:31:37 PM  
ytrewq.com

/oblig
 
2012-10-06 12:31:46 PM  

TheOther: Not bombing Rome and Vienna flat was a sentimental mistake by the Allies.


Hey, Vienna is a great city.
 
2012-10-06 12:32:53 PM  
2.bp.blogspot.com

This is possibly the most generous representation of tourist behavior in Rome. 


3.bp.blogspot.com

This is a generous representation of a typical aftermath.


Yes, yes it all sounds draconian, until you have seen it.
 
2012-10-06 12:33:49 PM  
And then, there's the asshole tourists that actively pollute the place (put water bottles on cracks, paint on the walls, that sort of thing), but those days are going away as we become a bit more aware that being an asshole does not pay off, unless you have money or power.
 
2012-10-06 12:34:15 PM  
They shoved away a group of young Dutch tourists who sat next to the Colosseum to enjoy their pizzas. "Go, go," Adib told the bemused boys, who didn't know which crime they had committed.

There are two kinds of people I can't stand in this world. People who are intolerant of other people's cultures, and the Dutch.
 
2012-10-06 12:34:50 PM  
If they wanted to fix the problem, theyd set up tables and trash cans. Theyd rather bully people, squeeze them for cash and make visiting their country even less appealing.
 
2012-10-06 12:34:58 PM  
Maybe the US should bomb them back to freedom.
 
2012-10-06 12:36:37 PM  
Stupid law, typical of bureaucracies and government out of control with too much power.

Just because something happened once doesn't mean you need to legislate against it.

In addition, they have generic vagrancy and loitering laws. The cops have the power to make those tourists picnicing to move on, without having to have a second, redundant law, against one specific thing which is already covered by the generic law. This law was totally unnecessary.
 
2012-10-06 12:49:40 PM  
Yes Rome, destroy your tourist industry because I'm sure your exports of boy-fiddling religous figures will certainly keep that economy in the black.
 
2012-10-06 12:49:57 PM  
This is what the new austerity measures have led to
 
2012-10-06 12:50:43 PM  
It's full of food carts around here ... where am I supposed to eat?

I think I may have identified an inconsistency in the law.
 
2012-10-06 12:53:29 PM  

red5ish: It's full of food carts around here ... where am I supposed to eat?

I think I may have identified an inconsistency in the law.


That's how they get you. It's a trap!
 
2012-10-06 12:55:15 PM  
That's totally going to encourage tourism.
 
2012-10-06 01:03:00 PM  
dammit. Guess I might as well uninstall the upskirt-cam now.
 
2012-10-06 01:09:43 PM  

thamike: This is a generous representation of a typical aftermath.

imageshack.us

I have lived most of my life in towns that would be classified as tourist or honeymoon destinations and I have seen this sort of thing first hand on a daily basis during the season. Local merchants as well as the local government have to make a concerted effort to provide trash bins and clean up after the tourists. If tourism is your major industry then it is in your best interests to make the effort to keep things clean and make things nice for the tourists. Selling tourists food and beverages then ticketing them for eating and drinking is, frankly, bull exhaust.
 
2012-10-06 01:17:17 PM  
i1.ytimg.com

Trigger Happy TV
did it better. Right proper, they did.
 
2012-10-06 01:21:03 PM  
Screw Italy, go visit another country. Tourism is about all they had left to destroy in their economy. Mission accomplished.
 
2012-10-06 01:24:18 PM  

red5ish: thamike: This is a generous representation of a typical aftermath.
[imageshack.us image 550x320]

I have lived most of my life in towns that would be classified as tourist or honeymoon destinations and I have seen this sort of thing first hand on a daily basis during the season. Local merchants as well as the local government have to make a concerted effort to provide trash bins and clean up after the tourists. If tourism is your major industry then it is in your best interests to make the effort to keep things clean and make things nice for the tourists. Selling tourists food and beverages then ticketing them for eating and drinking is, frankly, bull exhaust.


shop.hylyte.com

Well there's plenty of places you can go which state "no food or drinks". It's called a "sign", or a guide stopping people at the entrance. Hey look at that- pictograms and everything, language-independent.

You don't wait for them to violate an unstated law and then ticket them.

Tourists bring IN money. Into your entire farking economy. Don't kill your golden goose.
 
2012-10-06 01:24:40 PM  

MisterLoki: TheOther: Not bombing Rome and Vienna flat was a sentimental mistake by the Allies.

Hey, Vienna is a great city.


I blame the Austrians for WWI and do you know who else was Austrian? F*ck Austria.
 
2012-10-06 01:26:22 PM  

red5ish: thamike: This is a generous representation of a typical aftermath.
[imageshack.us image 550x320]

I have lived most of my life in towns that would be classified as tourist or honeymoon destinations and I have seen this sort of thing first hand on a daily basis during the season. Local merchants as well as the local government have to make a concerted effort to provide trash bins and clean up after the tourists. If tourism is your major industry then it is in your best interests to make the effort to keep things clean and make things nice for the tourists. Selling tourists food and beverages then ticketing them for eating and drinking is, frankly, bull exhaust.


I agree but leaving a corpse is a little much, no?
 
2012-10-06 01:29:50 PM  
Meh, fark Rome. It was the most disappointing part of my trip to Italy. The place had some of the most overpriced, substandard food I had in the country. Actually, just about everything was overpriced, even when in comparison to Florence or Venice. The city is horribly filthy. Some monuments were homes to huge colonies of feral cats and the smell of urine was overpowering. And it is a pain to get around because the subway sucks and street signs are a PITA to see.

I enjoyed the smaller towns like Livorno and Lucca. Awesome food, great prices, smaller crowds.
 
2012-10-06 01:29:58 PM  

TheOther: red5ish: thamike: This is a generous representation of a typical aftermath.
[imageshack.us image 550x320]

I have lived most of my life in towns that would be classified as tourist or honeymoon destinations and I have seen this sort of thing first hand on a daily basis during the season. Local merchants as well as the local government have to make a concerted effort to provide trash bins and clean up after the tourists. If tourism is your major industry then it is in your best interests to make the effort to keep things clean and make things nice for the tourists. Selling tourists food and beverages then ticketing them for eating and drinking is, frankly, bull exhaust.

I agree but leaving a corpse is a little much, no?


Especially an unreasonable British corpse that wouldn't even fit into the trashcan that is obviously right there in the photo.
 
2012-10-06 01:31:20 PM  

spawn73: "Most of them are foreigners, so I doubt they will pay the ticket before they go back to their countries," the officer said. "It's more likely they'll keep it as a souvenir."

It's all part of the charm of southern Italy. :)


guess it could turn into a collection! collect one at every site!
 
2012-10-06 01:33:25 PM  

thamike: [2.bp.blogspot.com image 850x637]
This is possibly the most generous representation of tourist behavior in Rome. 
[3.bp.blogspot.com image 550x320]
This is a generous representation of a typical aftermath.
Yes, yes it all sounds draconian, until you have seen it.


Just from looking at the picture in the news story, I agree with this. It looks like a very busy place, not somewhere to plop your fat ass down and dine. Maybe it is hard to find a place to sit down and have a snack, but I bet that 90% of those people didn't need anything to eat anyway.

Just because you bring your money doesn't mean you own the place. I have also lived in a town that was totally tourism based, and most people spread their trash around as freely as their money. After all, they're leaving soon and don't have to worry about it.
 
2012-10-06 01:33:33 PM  

red5ish: I have lived most of my life in towns that would be classified as tourist or honeymoon destinations and I have seen this sort of thing first hand on a daily basis during the season.


Rome is having trouble with their tourists who aren't honeymooning or touring as much as fighting and puking. There is litter, then there is how the Brits treat the Spanish Steps. This law is silly, but not because it's draconian. It's silly because, much like the no littering/vandalism laws, it is barely enforceable just from the sheer numbers of overwhelming douchebags.
 
2012-10-06 01:36:07 PM  

Dinjiin: Meh, fark Rome. It was the most disappointing part of my trip to Italy. The place had some of the most overpriced, substandard food I had in the country. Actually, just about everything was overpriced, even when in comparison to Florence or Venice. The city is horribly filthy. Some monuments were homes to huge colonies of feral cats and the smell of urine was overpowering. And it is a pain to get around because the subway sucks and street signs are a PITA to see.

I enjoyed the smaller towns like Livorno and Lucca. Awesome food, great prices, smaller crowds.


My rule to judge a tour destination in Europe: how many movies took place there in the late 40s through mid 60s? The more, the worse the city is nowadays for tourism.

Eastern Europe for capital cities, sleepy countryside towns for much of western Europe. (Scandanavia is big city only as it is Europe's suburb).
 
2012-10-06 01:37:25 PM  

TheOther: I agree but leaving a corpse is a little much, no?


They should have put up a sign. 
imageshack.us
 
2012-10-06 01:51:39 PM  

thamike: red5ish: I have lived most of my life in towns that would be classified as tourist or honeymoon destinations and I have seen this sort of thing first hand on a daily basis during the season.

Rome is having trouble with their tourists who aren't honeymooning or touring as much as fighting and puking. There is litter, then there is how the Brits treat the Spanish Steps. This law is silly, but not because it's draconian. It's silly because, much like the no littering/vandalism laws, it is barely enforceable just from the sheer numbers of overwhelming douchebags.


When faced with overwhelming douchebaggery it may be time to be draconian. I understand that vandalism in Singapore is almost non-existent. :)

I am not against laws proscribing people from acting like pigs. I am just pointing out that they are selling tourists food and beverages then ticketing them for eating and drinking. They have, in effect, turned their plazas into lunch courts and are simultaneously trying to keep people from eating there. "We want your money but get the fark out" in essence. If they are selling food and drink, not posting the laws, then ticketing people for eating and drinking then the douchebags are the Italians doing this.
 
2012-10-06 01:52:27 PM  
I live and work in Vacationland. Some of our visitors do have a huge sense of entitlement. Van pulls up, family gets out, walks across a parking lot into the back yard of a private home, and unpack as tho they are at a National Park.. which by the way, is 4 miles up the road. When asked to leave, the vacationing picnic table squatters got mouthy and angrily packed up and left.
And this is not a property that could be mistaken for a park. This is a house, with a shed, garage, driveway etc.. in a neighborhood.
 
2012-10-06 02:09:04 PM  

santadog: I live and work in Vacationland. Some of our visitors do have a huge sense of entitlement. Van pulls up, family gets out, walks across a parking lot into the back yard of a private home, and unpack as tho they are at a National Park.. which by the way, is 4 miles up the road. When asked to leave, the vacationing picnic table squatters got mouthy and angrily packed up and left.
And this is not a property that could be mistaken for a park. This is a house, with a shed, garage, driveway etc.. in a neighborhood.


Depending on what state you are in, sounds like a good time to call upon "Castle doctrine". ;)
 
2012-10-06 02:11:18 PM  
TheOther: I blame the Austrians for WWI and do you know who else was Austrian?

Crocodile Dundee?
 
2012-10-06 02:19:45 PM  
I live in a seriously touristic area. It's okay because the officials have a lid on things. The price of everything stays the same - expensive as hell.
Well that and there really isn't much to do here but historical stuff (usually means kids) Yachting (not the same as boating - more $$$) Sailing (owners say it's "different" - we just call it too cheap to buy fuel or tip) and of course sex.

"It's nice to see 'em come and it's nice to see 'em go"

By tourist season everyone's tired of everyone else and fresh faces are nice. By the time the leaves are gone everyone's pretty tired of the whining about prices, lack of accommodations, roads, weather, their bad manners and snotty kids, you name it.

All in all, it's not bad. It's not paradise but then again who would live there?
 
2012-10-06 02:20:58 PM  

Barricaded Gunman: TheOther: I blame the Austrians for WWI and do you know who else was Austrian?

Crocodile Dundee?


Mel Gibson.
 
2012-10-06 02:23:58 PM  

Virulency: spawn73: "Most of them are foreigners, so I doubt they will pay the ticket before they go back to their countries," the officer said. "It's more likely they'll keep it as a souvenir."

It's all part of the charm of southern Italy. :)

guess it could turn into a collection! collect one at every site!


Thanks to you, I now understand where those damn collectable flags in Assassin's Creed came from.
 
2012-10-06 02:38:21 PM  
The thread was over before it started.

"Most of them are foreigners, so I doubt they will pay the ticket before they go back to their countries," the officer said. "It's more likely they'll keep it as a souvenir."
 
2012-10-06 02:38:25 PM  
FTA:

When asked about this complaint, three local policemen patrolling the area told NBC News that there was no need for a sign.

"It'$ common $ense," one officer said.
 

No signage makes its appear like they want to milk clueless tourists with bullshiat fines.
 
2012-10-06 02:39:26 PM  

TheOther: Barricaded Gunman: TheOther: I blame the Austrians for WWI and do you know who else was Austrian?

Crocodile Dundee?

Mel Gibson.


Mel Gibson was born and raised in New York he moved to Argentina when he was 15 after his dad won some money on Jeopardy.
 
2012-10-06 02:40:38 PM  

TheOther: MisterLoki: TheOther: Not bombing Rome and Vienna flat was a sentimental mistake by the Allies.

Hey, Vienna is a great city.

I blame the Austrians for WWI and do you know who else was Austrian? F*ck Austria.


Falco?
 
2012-10-06 02:49:43 PM  

Dinjiin: Meh, fark Rome. It was the most disappointing part of my trip to Italy. The place had some of the most overpriced, substandard food I had in the country. Actually, just about everything was overpriced, even when in comparison to Florence or Venice. The city is horribly filthy. Some monuments were homes to huge colonies of feral cats and the smell of urine was overpowering. And it is a pain to get around because the subway sucks and street signs are a PITA to see.

I enjoyed the smaller towns like Livorno and Lucca. Awesome food, great prices, smaller crowds.


Lucca is great--- no tourists at all . I worked on a project there.
 
2012-10-06 02:50:30 PM  

MisterLoki: TheOther: MisterLoki: TheOther: Not bombing Rome and Vienna flat was a sentimental mistake by the Allies.

Hey, Vienna is a great city.

I blame the Austrians for WWI and do you know who else was Austrian? F*ck Austria.

Falco?


Nena?
 
2012-10-06 03:04:51 PM  

thamike: [2.bp.blogspot.com image 850x637]

This is possibly the most generous representation of tourist behavior in Rome. 


[3.bp.blogspot.com image 550x320]

This is a generous representation of a typical aftermath.


Yes, yes it all sounds draconian, until you have seen it.


I have to say, the issue here isn't the cops or city of Rome being douchebags...it's the tourists who seem to think that because they're in ROME they should be ALLOWED to be douchebags. Setting up a table? Chopping watermelon? Come ON people. You're the reason the rest of us can't have nice things.

Then the problem becomes the law has to be even-handedly (if heavy-handedly) enforced, because these same douchebags will be the first to whine as soon as they're forced to pack up their seven-course picnic lunch "But what about that woman over there? She's sitting down eating a bag of chips! Why are you picking on us?" And since nobody can explain to idiots like this there's a difference between a quick handful of chips and an entire luncheon, everyone has to get a ticket.
 
2012-10-06 03:07:19 PM  
So it's not littering that's the problem it is crumbs and ice cream.

stone monuments that have stood for 2,000 years brought to an end by ice cream.

If I was there I'd love to eat a nice juicy hot dog and let the hot dog juices just flow onto the ground where the Caesars once walked.
 
2012-10-06 03:07:42 PM  
someone should 'shop this with Italian cops:
us11.memecdn.com

/hot
 
2012-10-06 03:15:39 PM  

TheOther: MisterLoki: TheOther: Not bombing Rome and Vienna flat was a sentimental mistake by the Allies.

Hey, Vienna is a great city.

I blame the Austrians for WWI and do you know who else was Austrian? F*ck Austria.


What did Crocodile Dundee ever do to you?
 
2012-10-06 03:21:10 PM  

thamike: red5ish: I have lived most of my life in towns that would be classified as tourist or honeymoon destinations and I have seen this sort of thing first hand on a daily basis during the season.

Rome is having trouble with their tourists who aren't honeymooning or touring as much as fighting and puking. There is litter, then there is how the Brits treat the Spanish Steps. This law is silly, but not because it's draconian. It's silly because, much like the no littering/vandalism laws, it is barely enforceable just from the sheer numbers of overwhelming douchebags.


And srsly, who cuts up a watermelon in a public fountain?!
 
2012-10-06 03:21:45 PM  

CygnusDarius: NexusSix: I never set up a table but my friends and I quickly realized that a nice bottle of wine was 5 euros (no excise tax!) and the random people at the Spanish Steps or Piazza Navona were more fun than the denizens of most of the bars and clubs.

If they're going to call the carabinieri on friendly drunk 20 year olds with terrible Italian, that's just awful. People from all over the world putzing around these monuments are a part of the monument.

Makes you wonder why the hell Facismo was born in Italy, no less.


You can find out. Start with reading up on the modernismo movement.
 
2012-10-06 03:34:25 PM  

Teknowaffle: My rule to judge a tour destination in Europe: how many movies took place there in the late 40s through mid 60s? The more, the worse the city is nowadays for tourism.

Eastern Europe for capital cities, sleepy countryside towns for much of western Europe. (Scandanavia is big city only as it is Europe's suburb).


I dunno. I still like Paris. You have to avoid the Champs-Elysee, go shopping in Samaritaine rather than Lafayette, hang out on the left bank, St Germain and Les Halles, DEFINITELY avoid the area around Sacre Couer (pastiche bohemian art community) go to the d'Orsay rather than the Louvre, and you'll be fine.

The problem of all tourism is that once people realise something is interesting looking, they go, and to some extent, ruin it. I live near Bath in the UK and it's got beautiful architecture, but in the summer it's full of groups of marauding teenagers on international trips damaging any atmosphere. Not only that, you then get shops that pander to tourists, like crappy souvenir and gift shops.
 
2012-10-06 03:40:34 PM  

Soymilk: thamike: red5ish: I have lived most of my life in towns that would be classified as tourist or honeymoon destinations and I have seen this sort of thing first hand on a daily basis during the season.

Rome is having trouble with their tourists who aren't honeymooning or touring as much as fighting and puking. There is litter, then there is how the Brits treat the Spanish Steps. This law is silly, but not because it's draconian. It's silly because, much like the no littering/vandalism laws, it is barely enforceable just from the sheer numbers of overwhelming douchebags.

And srsly, who cuts up a watermelon in a public fountain?!


A person that trusts the quality of the water, or of the public healthcare.
 
2012-10-06 03:44:21 PM  

farkeruk: I dunno. I still like Paris. You have to avoid the Champs-Elysee, go shopping in Samaritaine rather than Lafayette, hang out on the left bank, St Germain and Les Halles, DEFINITELY avoid the area around Sacre Couer (pastiche bohemian art community) go to the d'Orsay rather than the Louvre, and you'll be fine.

The problem of all tourism is that once people realise something is interesting looking, they go, and to some extent, ruin it. I live near Bath in the UK and it's got beautiful architecture, but in the summer it's full of groups of marauding teenagers on international trips damaging any atmosphere. Not only that, you then get shops that pander to tourists, like crappy souvenir and gift shops.


When in San Francisco, avoid Pier 39 it's a hell hole and no locals go there for any reason as all the restaurants are horrible and don't have to compete for keeping regular customers. It's filled with homeless people begging for handouts or "artists" mugging for tips.

The Castro is a ghetto now. The bridge and tunnel crowd and the street urchins from The Haight have taken it over by camping on the streets in their own filth begging for drugs and cash.

The Haight is a Yuppified Disney version of what it once was. Costly boutiques and run-down bars.

Just stay away.

Maybe a downturn in tourism will get the city supervisors to start cleaning the place up.
 
2012-10-06 04:02:14 PM  
This probably has as much to do with the restaurants and cafes that are on the piazzas and near monuments as the littering problem. A good example is Piazza di Rotonda and Piazza St. Eustachio. They're linked by a small street and packed with caffes (thecaffe IMHO St. Eustachio) gelaterias, pizzerias, restaurants and a very good deli/salumeria. (Oh and fecking McDonalds anchoring the north end of di Rotonda). Some of the places have outdoor seating and some don't and the litter can pile up on a busy day. The places with seating hate the people who walk around eating and frankly, after eating a sandwich from the deli a few times in front of the fountain in di Rotonda I realized it wasn't cool and took my food back to my apartment around the corner like a local.
 
2012-10-06 04:11:12 PM  
Rome declares 'War on the Sandwich'

F*cking Fascist Pigs!!!
 
2012-10-06 05:12:50 PM  

Gyrfalcon: thamike: [2.bp.blogspot.com image 850x637]

This is possibly the most generous representation of tourist behavior in Rome. 


[3.bp.blogspot.com image 550x320]

This is a generous representation of a typical aftermath.


Yes, yes it all sounds draconian, until you have seen it.

I have to say, the issue here isn't the cops or city of Rome being douchebags...it's the tourists who seem to think that because they're in ROME they should be ALLOWED to be douchebags. Setting up a table? Chopping watermelon? Come ON people. You're the reason the rest of us can't have nice things.

Then the problem becomes the law has to be even-handedly (if heavy-handedly) enforced, because these same douchebags will be the first to whine as soon as they're forced to pack up their seven-course picnic lunch "But what about that woman over there? She's sitting down eating a bag of chips! Why are you picking on us?" And since nobody can explain to idiots like this there's a difference between a quick handful of chips and an entire luncheon, everyone has to get a ticket.


The problem isn't the food ban. The problem is that they do not make the food ban known, so that people have a chance to obey the law.

They do not want the tourists to obey the law. It's a cash grab.
 
2012-10-06 05:50:03 PM  
just empty your wallets and leave. thank you. we want the prosperity you bring without any of the headaches that accompanies it.

when in Rome, piss on the Romans.
 
2012-10-06 05:58:19 PM  

lohphat: When in San Francisco, avoid Pier 39 it's a hell hole and no locals go there for any reason as all the restaurants are horrible and don't have to compete for keeping regular customers. It's filled with homeless people begging for handouts or "artists" mugging for tips.

The Castro is a ghetto now. The bridge and tunnel crowd and the street urchins from The Haight have taken it over by camping on the streets in their own filth begging for drugs and cash.

The Haight is a Yuppified Disney version of what it once was. Costly boutiques and run-down bars.


The Moulin Rouge. Was once a place for guys to pick up hookers who did the can-can (quite slowly). It then became a little more dignified and more of a show (but with girls flashing their hoo-hahs and also still lots of whoring). Today, it's a sanitised shows for tourists with a lot of money. You want to buy into what the Moulin Rouge was? Go round the corner into Pigalle and find a sex show that costs about half the price.
 
2012-10-06 06:14:07 PM  

pedobearapproved: So it's not littering that's the problem it is crumbs and ice cream.
stone monuments that have stood for 2,000 years brought to an end by ice cream.
If I was there I'd love to eat a nice juicy hot dog and let the hot dog juices just flow onto the ground where the Caesars once walked.


Sure you would. You're one of those dick tourists. You want a cookie with that?
 
2012-10-06 06:17:47 PM  
But they used to let lions eat in the Colosseum.
 
2012-10-06 07:03:51 PM  

Kuroshin: The problem isn't the food ban. The problem is that they do not make the food ban known, so that people have a chance to obey the law.

They do not want the tourists to obey the law. It's a cash grab.


Oh definitely. I was just pointing out the tourist problem, not implying that the Italians would react even remotely ethical about it. Italy gave in to a klepto-fascist just to make the trains run on time, and they didn't even run on time.
 
2012-10-06 07:20:30 PM  

thamike: Kuroshin: The problem isn't the food ban. The problem is that they do not make the food ban known, so that people have a chance to obey the law.

They do not want the tourists to obey the law. It's a cash grab.

Oh definitely. I was just pointing out the tourist problem, not implying that the Italians would react even remotely ethical about it. Italy gave in to a klepto-fascist just to make the trains run on time, and they didn't even run on time.


Oh yeah, totally. Like I said, this is a very Italian way of doing things. Not doubting the problems in the slightest. I farking hate tourists, and when I am away from my home I make damn sure that I do not look or behave like those tools. Fat bastards in loud clothing, leaving garbage all over the place while shouting to their relatives about nothing in particular (or gawping at "sights").

I agree with the ban. I simply do not agree with their implementation. Not that Italy gives a fark what I think. :D
 
2012-10-06 08:25:32 PM  

farkeruk: The Moulin Rouge. Was once a place for guys to pick up hookers who did the can-can (quite slowly). It then became a little more dignified and more of a show (but with girls flashing their hoo-hahs and also still lots of whoring). Today, it's a sanitised shows for tourists with a lot of money. You want to buy into what the Moulin Rouge was? Go round the corner into Pigalle and find a sex show that costs about half the price.


I have. Ever been to "The Loving Chair" I have a great story about a colleague and I there in 1997

/lived in the 4th 1996-98
 
2012-10-06 09:31:29 PM  

farkeruk: Teknowaffle: My rule to judge a tour destination in Europe: how many movies took place there in the late 40s through mid 60s? The more, the worse the city is nowadays for tourism.

Eastern Europe for capital cities, sleepy countryside towns for much of western Europe. (Scandanavia is big city only as it is Europe's suburb).

I dunno. I still like Paris. You have to avoid the Champs-Elysee, go shopping in Samaritaine rather than Lafayette, hang out on the left bank, St Germain and Les Halles, DEFINITELY avoid the area around Sacre Couer (pastiche bohemian art community) go to the d'Orsay rather than the Louvre, and you'll be fine.

The problem of all tourism is that once people realise something is interesting looking, they go, and to some extent, ruin it. I live near Bath in the UK and it's got beautiful architecture, but in the summer it's full of groups of marauding teenagers on international trips damaging any atmosphere. Not only that, you then get shops that pander to tourists, like crappy souvenir and gift shops.


You see, it's off-the-cuff advice like this that keeps me coming back to Fark. And France.
 
2012-10-06 10:05:46 PM  

lohphat: I have. Ever been to "The Loving Chair" I have a great story about a colleague and I there in 1997


Aren't you going to tell us?
 
2012-10-06 10:06:12 PM  

Allen. The end.: And France.


When I first went to Europe, I was expecting France to be the worst country on the trip. My time in Paris was actually some of the best.

Three simple rules to enjoy yourself in Paris:
1) don't be an a-hole; be patient, be courteous
2) learn some common phrases and how to count in French; most of them can speak basic English and some can speak German, but it is rude to assume (see rule 1)
3) they hate the Chinese tourists more than they'll hate you, so see rules 1 & 2 to keep it that way 

I really have to emphasize rule 2. If you take the time to learn a few words of their lingo, they tend to treat you better (you upgrade from rude to big city indifferent). Food related phrases are most helpful. Oh, and bring a canvas shopping bag. Most of western Europe charges for bags at the supermarket.
 
2012-10-07 08:57:03 AM  

spawn73: It's all part of the charm of southern Italy. :)


Rome's not in southern Italy; it's central Italy. Southern Italy begins somewhere south of Lazio.

Naples is southern Italy. Likewise, northern Italy begins somewhere south of Florence.

/Rome is a nice balance between the two.
 
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