If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Daily Mail)   A 12-year-old schoolgirl has been accepted into Mensa after discovering she is brainier than both Albert Einstein and Stephen Hawking   (dailymail.co.uk) divider line 51
    More: Cool  
•       •       •

18273 clicks; posted to Main » on 06 Oct 2012 at 2:04 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Archived thread
2012-10-06 02:31:40 AM
6 votes:
verydemotivational.files.wordpress.com
2012-10-06 02:19:10 AM
5 votes:
I'd be willing to bet a good chunk of change that this is the last the world hears of her.

My brother outscored me on IQ testing when we were kids. I'm a doctor; he's a barista. He's still unbelievably brilliant, and I'm certain that he is smarter than me, but brilliance does not equal motivation.
2012-10-06 02:13:38 AM
4 votes:
Mensa isn′t even the most exclusive intellectual society. It′s actually one of the least exclusive. You only need to be in the top 2%, which means that out of the ~300 million people in the USA, about six million would qualify. Big whoop.

The Four Sigma Society, for instance, requires that you be a minimum of four standard deviations to the right of the mean. And they′re not the most exclusive either.

Mensa ― where you have to be smart enough to score reasonably high on an I.Q. test, yet stupid enough to plunk down annual dues for little more than what basically amounts to bragging rights.
2012-10-06 01:49:26 AM
4 votes:
IQ scores are skewed in the early years because, if I'm not mistaken, age is factored in.
2012-10-06 02:50:14 AM
3 votes:
Every couple of years they come out with these stories...like the kid who will be the 'next Mozart'! And you never farking hear from them again.
2012-10-06 02:16:46 AM
3 votes:
It's not how smart you are, it is how you are smart.
2012-10-06 12:14:45 PM
2 votes:
Einstein never took an IQ test.
2012-10-06 06:08:06 AM
2 votes:
Is this where I get to both brag and bring about a measure of normality to the argument?

Okay:

I had an IQ (then in 1998, when I was 15) of 156

I *have* an IQ (now as of 2009) of 171.

I didn't get smarter, they just rewrote the definitions.

The only thing it's really made me aware of is that I know more than the gross majority of people when it comes to rational, down-to-earth things.

I can't fix a nuclear submarine, but I can tell you how it works. I can't do brain surgery, but I can tell you what part they're operating on based on what part of the brain they're focusing.

I have nothing more than pattern recognition and eidetic memory to thank for that, if I read something I will remember (even if it's a fleeting glance) 70-90% of it, compared to the "average" (always be dubious of this term when you hear it) of 35-45%.

What did I do with all of this knowledge, nascent ability and gifted-ness?

Not much. I woodwork, am employed at a pizza joint (for now) and play strategy games.

BUT; when it comes to cognitive ability - I will wipe the floor with a good nine-tenths of the people in the world.

HOWEVER; I work at a pizza joint.

TL;DR IQ is just a number. You can be smart as HELL, and still be nothing more than a contemporary to your contemporaries... but if you do what makes you happy; you are officially smarter than that same "90%". There are a number of literal honest-to-God geniuses in the world (as *I* call them) who have figured out how to do nothing but what they love... and are both more successful and  happy than the guys who make three times as much.

Remember Office Space? At the end? When the smartest guy in the company realizes that doing dirty, sweaty construction is better than air-conditioned Hell? I'm that guy.

/Fishing. Beer. Wood. Strategy games. Video games. Making pizza. = happiness.

//'Damn it feels good to be a gangsta'.
2012-10-06 03:49:09 AM
2 votes:
The majority of successful business people are just average intelligence. Making money doesn't take brains, just work. The majority of intelligent people don't get satisfaction from making a lot of money. That's why you usually see them as researchers or scientists relying on grant money and professorships.
2012-10-06 03:32:24 AM
2 votes:

Lionel Mandrake: Well, then. I look forward to reading her groundbreaking work in the coming years. Or not.


Exactly, give me a call when she does something that surpasses Einsteins or Hawkings contributions, Einstein in particular with general and special relativity stands as the greatest mind since Newton.
Probably the highlight of her career will be: she develops a technique for extracting more money from the general public for a major corporation.
2012-10-06 03:14:40 AM
2 votes:

jeremie: jeremie: You mean like in his secret lair?

more like he found out that the rat race to make a lot of money is not worth it


Maybe, or maybe he found out that putting your mind to work is a lot harder than putting your body to work, at least in the short term. Also you don't have to chase a dollar to put your mind to work. I bet you could think of a few occupations which benefit from high intelligence yet garner low pay.


You've never done physical labor for 8 hours a day, have you? I would much rather sit in my office that think through things than have to say, bail hay all day.
2012-10-06 02:49:08 AM
2 votes:

FishyFred: IQ scores are skewed in the early years because, if I'm not mistaken, age is factored in.


Well, not in theory, at least. I wouldn't say so much that they're skewed as potentially less accurate.

Originally, IQ was supposed to be the ratio of a person's "mental age" to their "chronological age," so if Johnny was only 10 years old but could think and reason about as well as the average 14-year-old, he had an IQ score of 140 (14/10*100). But people quickly realized that that definition got very silly once a person reached adulthood. Would a twenty-year old who had the "mental age" of a 40-year-old have an IQ score of 200? And what does 'the "mental age" of a 40-year-old' even mean? We don't percieve the average 40-year-old to be "twice as smart as" the average 20-year-old the same way we perceive the average 14-year-old to be "twice as smart as" the average 7-year-old. Intelligence just doesn't progress that linearly.

So they gave up on "mental age" and redefined the IQ score as a measure of deviation from the mean intelligence, given the principle that intelligence is normally distributed (like a bell curve).

upload.wikimedia.org

So a person with an IQ score of 115 is one standard deviation above the average for their age group, a person with a score of 130 is two standard deviations above. It is supposed to be adjusted for age group so that someone who has an IQ of 120 when they're 13 will still have an IQ of 120 when they're 33 (baring unforseen events such as brain damage, disease, injury, etc).

In theory, then, IQ scores are not skewed in the early years precisely because age is factored in. The system is designed such that, if everything works correctly and it's accurate and it's precise, your IQ is the same forever. But that only works because you're not so much measuring what the kids' IQ really is NOW so much as PREDICTING what it will be in adulthood, which adds another measure of uncertainty to the process.

(It's a little bit like issuing a speeding ticket based on a radar measurement of what your speed was 3 miles back and assuming that you didn't hit the brakes or stomp on the accelerator since then.)

I'm not sure that "skewed" is the right word for it, though, because that suggests a bias in one particular direction and I think it's more like imprecision.
2012-10-06 02:42:01 AM
2 votes:
Keep in mind that the margin of error on any IQ test varies from 5 to 55% with most being around 28%.

I'll let you figure out WHY.

Or I can tell you.
Social environmental bias.
Error in selection.
Multiple correct answers without postulates known.
Stupid questions.
Education, religion and grammar.

HotWingAgenda Sounds like one wanted to be Righteous, the other has fantasies about authority and you just said "I wanna be happy."
2012-10-06 02:24:15 AM
2 votes:
Uh, 162 is not better than Stephen Hawking. Also, Mensa is not some hoity toity club. It's just a club full of socially awkward autistic nerds.
2012-10-06 02:21:09 AM
2 votes:
My parents were throwing a big Christmas party one year, invited lots of people and friends of friends and so on.
One guy showed up at the door and asked, "Is this the Mensa meeting?"
My parents thought he was joking and played along.

Poor guy didn't realize he was at the wrong place until much, much later in the evening.

So I'm kind of left with my doubts about Mensa.
2012-10-06 02:09:50 AM
2 votes:

knoxvelour: but is she hot?


Since neither the president or Clint Eastwood is here, you have your choice of three seats. They're all over there.
2012-10-05 11:57:53 PM
2 votes:
Well, then. I look forward to reading her groundbreaking work in the coming years. Or not.
2012-10-07 09:02:53 PM
1 votes:

dannysauer: Mock26: aearra: 162 is brainier than Einstein and Hawkings? Interesting. My son is higher IQ than that and my daughter is higher than my son (by 20 points). Strange they aren't interested in mensa.

Probably because you have not yet told them that you made up their IQ scores.

They probably heard about the membership fee, and were smart enough to say "screw that; I can make my own friends without paying some elitists $63/year to let me into their club."

At least, that's why I didn't join Mensa. That, and bragging about IQ is pointless. Smart actions matter, while smart potential is just unused potential. I don't want to pay to be a member of a group of people who don't realize that.


Besides, all an IQ test really does is tell how good you are at taking an IQ test.
2012-10-06 01:17:03 PM
1 votes:
Teacher and club organiser Stacey Meighen joked: 'We have given her extra work to do and will now want to know why she's not getting As in everything.'

F*ck you. The girl does not need extra work but differentiated work which increases complexity, depth, or pace of material. Further, low scores, lack of completion on assignments, etc., are common amongst gifted students because the material is not appropriate to them and is therefore boring and worthless. What this tells me is she is kept on grade level work with the assumption she will flourish as a result of generating an identity of achievement which is counter to what we know about gifted social and emotional development.

Being a Mensa club organizer means you should know something about this. Being a teacher means you should know something about this. Why don't you?

Hawnkee: Typical farking freeloader dregs of society. Always some monkey trying to leech off of her abilities. I hope she can get away from there as soon as possible.


This is probably pressed a little by the teacher, too. Teachers frequently exploit the abilities of students in teaching or reteaching concepts to other students rather than enriching or extending or otherwise accelerating the content.

Aquapope: a penchant for young Asian girls dressed up like cats and a deep-seated fear of mimes.


How to dress up in a fear of mimes?
2012-10-06 12:31:56 PM
1 votes:

cryinoutloud: Why is it that every IQ thread around here seems to touch a great many nerves? My mother was right--she never told me my IQ score. Said it wouldn't be good for my head. All these years later, I'm glad I don't know. No, I've never been tested since I was an adult.

/Not going to tell my son what his is either.


It's a method of telling some people they are innately 'better' than other people. It SHOULD rile people up. Considering it seems to have no real world evidence, it also needs to be ridiculed.
2012-10-06 12:25:29 PM
1 votes:
IQ huh?

I'll save my kudos for people who invent, discover or organize things that help humanity.

I could give a crap about some dumbass test a bunch of self appointed 'geniuses' put together.
2012-10-06 11:24:37 AM
1 votes:
If she is so smart why is she carrying that huge stack of books, and not having some guy do it for her, in fact what the hell is she doing with books anyway in the information age not smart enough to get a kindle?
2012-10-06 10:42:16 AM
1 votes:
Kind of weird that the Daily Fail chooses two scientists who, although they were certainly very bright, and brighter than most, were examples of extreme application of their intelligence versus innate ability.

Isn't there that guy with a 206 IQ that works for NASA and nobody bothers to remember his name because he hasn't done anything standout yet?
2012-10-06 09:50:07 AM
1 votes:
check out her stack of books...


...witches?
2012-10-06 08:41:08 AM
1 votes:
4.bp.blogspot.com

Lets see it looks like she'll be pretty and intelligent so....
2012-10-06 05:10:30 AM
1 votes:
Not impressed. My little brother scored a 172.

/He dropped out of college
//Now deals drugs
2012-10-06 04:02:38 AM
1 votes:

intelligent comment below: LeafyGreens: You've never done physical labor for 8 hours a day, have you? I would much rather sit in my office that think through things than have to say, bail hay all day.


The difference between those jobs is a physical job leaves your mind free to think and relax while the desk job is tons of stress that leaves your mind in a vegetable state. I came across a few very smart people who enjoyed physical jobs because they could go home and not be zombies after work.


That's because people shoot for the stars and get in over their heads, another effect of what I mentioned above. SO MANY applicants, the actually capable ones are hard to locate or simply not applying to that job.
2012-10-06 03:54:10 AM
1 votes:

LeafyGreens: You've never done physical labor for 8 hours a day, have you? I would much rather sit in my office that think through things than have to say, bail hay all day.



The difference between those jobs is a physical job leaves your mind free to think and relax while the desk job is tons of stress that leaves your mind in a vegetable state. I came across a few very smart people who enjoyed physical jobs because they could go home and not be zombies after work.
2012-10-06 03:50:34 AM
1 votes:

doglover: mr lawson: The best thing a parent can teach their kid is the scientific method.

It's really not.

Science is cool and all, but it's tediously boring and not at all the fastest or the best way to approach many things.

A far better piece of advice would be "Do what you love." Far better to be happy than anything else.


Still, our populace is so devoid of logic that it's now almost incapable of doing what it takes to be happy for a large amount of people. It's depressing when viewed on scale.

Teaching hard logic and doing what you love are not two things exclusive to eachother. Society and the individual would be better off with a good education and a dash of hippy plattitudes. If you don't raise them to be intelligent beings, you stave off their ultimate happiness because they will always have unrealistic goals and dreams because they don't know better. That basketweaving diploma will do them no good in life, no matter how much they thought it guaranteed they'd never be sewer workers and would have a nice desk job managing some company.

A less sarcastic look:

Trade skill jobs are important, but not fashionable. Everyone gets educated to do more fashionable things, many of those people end up on unemployment or worse, because they didn't have realistic expectations of what reality really is. An over abundance of people for X duty, and no one doing Y duty. Bad for society as a whole and for large numbers of individuals.

Thanks but no thanks, I'd rather educate and teach my child that it's good to be educated and to find a job that they like.
2012-10-06 03:41:07 AM
1 votes:
Steven Hawking's IQ has not been measured as 160; it's been estimated as being "over 160." When asked, he said he had no idea what it was, and that "people who boast about their IQ are losers."
2012-10-06 03:40:36 AM
1 votes:
One of the many problems with IQ tests is that memory alone can score really high(which is probably a large part of the case here) but not really be all that functionally intelligent(we'll know in a few years if that's the case here).

My computer's hard drive has an excellent memory, and like some autistic people, isn't very functional when you tell it to tie its shoes or walk and chew bubble gum at the same time.

LeafyGreens: You've never done physical labor for 8 hours a day, have you? I would much rather sit in my office that think through things than have to say, bail hay all day.


As someone with a moderately high intelligence(I can walk and chew gum at the same time, heh, I'd say more but bragging about IQ on fark is pointless, especially after I slam the rating system), I'm a janitor(farking life choices, how do they work?) who works 8 hours a day at a school, and I'm probably more intelligent than the the lion's share of the teachers(granted it's k-8 where religion > science in some things(native american school), but still) and staff(especially the administration actually).

I may be the odd bird in that case, but really, most working folks would say the same, and most would also think they're smarter than the staff, never you mind that they never finished the 8th grade and that third digit in their IQ is non-existant.


Seriously though, you don't throw out your back from doing a job that requires intelligence, and you certainly don't break a leg during a complicated chess move if you're a functional and rational human being. (shouldn't be obscure on fark)

OK, so much for being serious.

Our education system is a bit of a joke, as is its standard measuring stick. Really, it's a sad reflection of society at large. Whatever some scheister can sway the populace to vote for is what we do, regardless of his intent or the actual repercussions. Schoolboards to our governing body.
2012-10-06 03:34:21 AM
1 votes:

mr lawson: The best thing a parent can teach their kid is the scientific method.


It's really not.

Science is cool and all, but it's tediously boring and not at all the fastest or the best way to approach many things.

A far better piece of advice would be "Do what you love." Far better to be happy than anything else.
2012-10-06 03:11:32 AM
1 votes:

ciberido: FishyFred: IQ scores are skewed in the early years because, if I'm not mistaken, age is factored in.

Well, not in theory, at least. I wouldn't say so much that they're skewed as potentially less accurate.

Originally, IQ was supposed to be the ratio of a person's "mental age" to their "chronological age," so if Johnny was only 10 years old but could think and reason about as well as the average 14-year-old, he had an IQ score of 140 (14/10*100). But people quickly realized that that definition got very silly once a person reached adulthood. Would a twenty-year old who had the "mental age" of a 40-year-old have an IQ score of 200? And what does 'the "mental age" of a 40-year-old' even mean? We don't percieve the average 40-year-old to be "twice as smart as" the average 20-year-old the same way we perceive the average 14-year-old to be "twice as smart as" the average 7-year-old. Intelligence just doesn't progress that linearly.

So they gave up on "mental age" and redefined the IQ score as a measure of deviation from the mean intelligence, given the principle that intelligence is normally distributed (like a bell curve).

[upload.wikimedia.org image 325x163]

So a person with an IQ score of 115 is one standard deviation above the average for their age group, a person with a score of 130 is two standard deviations above. It is supposed to be adjusted for age group so that someone who has an IQ of 120 when they're 13 will still have an IQ of 120 when they're 33 (baring unforseen events such as brain damage, disease, injury, etc).

In theory, then, IQ scores are not skewed in the early years precisely because age is factored in. The system is designed such that, if everything works correctly and it's accurate and it's precise, your IQ is the same forever. But that only works because you're not so much measuring what the kids' IQ really is NOW so much as PREDICTING what it will be in adulthood, which adds another measure of uncertainty to the process.

(It's a little bit like issuing a speeding ticket based on a radar measurement of what your speed was 3 miles back and assuming that you didn't hit the brakes or stomp on the accelerator since then.)

I'm not sure that "skewed" is the right word for it, though, because that suggests a bias in one particular direction and I think it's more like imprecision.


This.

The imprecision comes from the fact that most of the verbal IQ score is based on basic knowledge questions. In a very literal sense, memorizing Trivial Pursuit answer cards can boost your IQ, but it probably isn't associated with a greater likelihood of success later in life.
2012-10-06 03:03:41 AM
1 votes:
Standardized testing flaws? Check. Freaks in Mensa who are just misfits looking to excuse their condition with some bullshiat about intelligence? Also check.

Only thing I can add is anecdotal: I had a crush on a woman with a Ph.D once, and whenever I would try to engage her in conversation about some subjects, it would immediately become a contest about how much more she knew about a certain subject than I did. Brain chemistry? Sure, she knew it. Linux? She had built farms of machines, ready for use! Various other geekish things? Oh yeah. And while I was blinded to her behavior at first, I slowly realized that she had some issues of her own. Namely, the inability to really deal with people as people. Everything was a competition she had to win first, and the sense of being recognized as perfect in anything she touched was of prime importance.

And I think that's what fuels organizations like Mensa as well: the sense of being the top of the field, utterly perfect, and without flaw. Americans love the idea of being better than everybody else to the point where it's a mental illness. It's odd that an organization--an entity dedicated to meeting people and interacting with them--is dedicated to the idea of being anti-people, anti-socializing, and so utterly and painfully dedicated to acting as proxy self-esteem. Dedication to a subject has its benefits, but at some point it was taken too far.
2012-10-06 03:01:16 AM
1 votes:

Rockstone: Actually, I just looked at that, it's summation, not integration...


basic calculus
2012-10-06 02:56:21 AM
1 votes:

Rockstone: Her math is just integration. Anyone can do integration. I could teach a 6th grader integration. You really don't even need algebra.


Err..photo shoot dude. But the cameraman prob was very confused and impressed.
2012-10-06 02:54:33 AM
1 votes:
I can't help but notice that the math she is doing is really not that complicated.
I've seen younger people do more interesting math. Her math is just integration. Anyone can do integration. I could teach a 6th grader integration. You really don't even need algebra.
2012-10-06 02:52:49 AM
1 votes:

FishyFred: IQ scores are skewed in the early years because, if I'm not mistaken, age is factored in.


Also, kids are smart. Adults find answers and put them together, but for solving new problems even scientists start to get sucky over time, and they have a system to follow.

Kids have nothing to go on but a tiny pool of experience, so their brains are REALLY good at dealing with new information and they can apply it outside of the normal ways as they don't even know what the normal ways are.
2012-10-06 02:52:48 AM
1 votes:

mr lawson: jeremie: You mean like in his secret lair?

more like he found out that the rat race to make a lot of money is not worth it


i.imgur.com
2012-10-06 02:45:13 AM
1 votes:
At 12 years of age I was still stamp collecting and haphazardly gluing model aeroplanes together. I was bookish and was considered one of the smart ones amongst my peers. Six years later when I reached university, I had dropped to being a solid B student, coasting along when I could. Things change. I hope this girl lives up to her potential, but it's not the worst thing in the world if she ends up focusing on other stuff.
2012-10-06 02:41:13 AM
1 votes:
Our local MENSA guy mows lawns for a living. Having a great a great mind means nothing if you're not smart enough to harness it.
2012-10-06 02:38:40 AM
1 votes:
Came to see people pointing out that standardized test scores don't accurately measure human intelligence. Leaving happy.

My tested IQ is higher than either of my siblings. One of them is a lawyer, the other analyzes financial institutions. I'm just a paralegal.
2012-10-06 02:37:29 AM
1 votes:
IQ tests are different for adults and children. A child can score above 200, an adult cannot. Different scoring system.

/or was back when they had me take them
2012-10-06 02:31:09 AM
1 votes:
She'll make a fine wife one day.

Bieng so smart, she'll know when it's an appropriate time to speak.
Zon
2012-10-06 02:26:49 AM
1 votes:

clyph: COMALite J: Mensa ― where you have to be smart enough to score reasonably high on an I.Q. test, yet stupid enough to plunk down annual dues for little more than what basically amounts to bragging rights.

THIS. Got in at 16. Stopped paying dues at 18. Never gone back in 25+ years.


And all that tells me is that you were stupid enough to join.

It's almost as stupid as COMALite suggesting the exclusivity is somehow better.
2012-10-06 02:25:28 AM
1 votes:
2012-10-06 02:16:04 AM
1 votes:

COMALite J: Mensa ― where you have to be smart enough to score reasonably high on an I.Q. test, yet stupid enough to plunk down annual dues for little more than what basically amounts to bragging rights.


THIS. Got in at 16. Stopped paying dues at 18. Never gone back in 25+ years.
2012-10-06 02:12:34 AM
1 votes:
Wait, let me guess: the Daily Mail is about to compare IQ values from different age groups straight up, 1:1.

*clicks*

Ah, so they did. Predictably stupid.
2012-10-06 12:23:41 AM
1 votes:

Lionel Mandrake: Well, then. I look forward to reading her groundbreaking work in the coming years. Or not.


I look forward to the strides that will be made in sandwich preparation techniques and technology thanks to her work.
2012-10-06 12:14:48 AM
1 votes:

beantowndog: Online iq tests don't count


www.puppetmastertrading.com
2012-10-06 12:11:41 AM
1 votes:
Online iq tests don't count
 
Displayed 51 of 51 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report