If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Daily Mail)   Man loses 100lbs in four months after cutting out "white food." That's racist   (dailymail.co.uk) divider line 110
    More: Interesting  
•       •       •

16945 clicks; posted to Main » on 06 Oct 2012 at 6:12 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



110 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all
 
2012-10-06 03:13:40 PM

AngryDragon: ExperianScaresCthulhu: 100 pounds in four months means something else was happening -- and it wasn't exercise. that is too fast of a weight loss, unless he had surgery and/or a liquid diet under a physician's care. half the time, now a days, there's surgery involved, but you don't find that out until the bottom of the story, or the follow up.

No. I lost 40 pounds in 2 months doing something very similar. No surgery, No starving myself. I've since decided that starches and carbohydrates (especially sugar) are simply not meant to be a large part of the human diet. I've cut out rice, potatoes, starchy vegetables, sugar, and breads. I take in 2500 calories a day of fat, protein, and "good carbs" (leafy veggies, avocado, etc.). My blood work is normal across the board and I've never felt healthier.

I think we're on to something.


I've done the same thing. I've dropped from 213 to 177 and do not count calories or use any conscious 'portion control'. I just don't eat more than 20 grams of carbs a day (avoiding all 'white carbs') and of the rest of my calories I eat about 2/3 fat and 1/3 protein.

The high fat content stimulates my hypothalmus' leptin receptors, suppressing my appetite naturally. The lack of carbs reduces the insulin in my blood, leading to less food being sequestered in fat cells as well as making me more leptin sensitive. It's a win-win for my weight and ultimately for my overall health.

Also, exercise generally leads to weight gain, not loss. That's because exercise is an appetite stimulant by itself, as well as builds muscle mass. When people like this guy start exercising, it's because they've already started losing weight and feel human again. Exercise is very good for you, but by itself won't help you lose weight.

The bottom like is that if you want to lose weight and avoid becoming a Big Food casualty of type 2 diabetes, cut the white food out of your diet. It's as simple as that.
 
2012-10-06 03:25:11 PM

Magorn: Thermodynamics has ZERO to do with nutrition and weight loss. Right now you could eat 10,000 calories everyday, do zero exercise, and starve to death. All it would take is for the bacteria in your gut to die and not be replaced


Just because the mechanism for digesting food and taking in nutrients isn't there doesn't mean that when it is there a thermodynamic process isn't taking place.

You're arguing about apples using oranges. Stop it; you look like a moron when you do.
 
2012-10-06 03:40:24 PM
Nobody ever got fat eating fruits and vegetables.
 
2012-10-06 05:22:08 PM

StoneColdAtheist: AngryDragon: ExperianScaresCthulhu: 100 pounds in four months means something else was happening -- and it wasn't exercise. that is too fast of a weight loss, unless he had surgery and/or a liquid diet under a physician's care. half the time, now a days, there's surgery involved, but you don't find that out until the bottom of the story, or the follow up.

No. I lost 40 pounds in 2 months doing something very similar. No surgery, No starving myself. I've since decided that starches and carbohydrates (especially sugar) are simply not meant to be a large part of the human diet. I've cut out rice, potatoes, starchy vegetables, sugar, and breads. I take in 2500 calories a day of fat, protein, and "good carbs" (leafy veggies, avocado, etc.). My blood work is normal across the board and I've never felt healthier.

I think we're on to something.

I've done the same thing. I've dropped from 213 to 177 and do not count calories or use any conscious 'portion control'. I just don't eat more than 20 grams of carbs a day (avoiding all 'white carbs') and of the rest of my calories I eat about 2/3 fat and 1/3 protein.

The high fat content stimulates my hypothalmus' leptin receptors, suppressing my appetite naturally. The lack of carbs reduces the insulin in my blood, leading to less food being sequestered in fat cells as well as making me more leptin sensitive. It's a win-win for my weight and ultimately for my overall health.

Also, exercise generally leads to weight gain, not loss. That's because exercise is an appetite stimulant by itself, as well as builds muscle mass. When people like this guy start exercising, it's because they've already started losing weight and feel human again. Exercise is very good for you, but by itself won't help you lose weight.

The bottom like is that if you want to lose weight and avoid becoming a Big Food casualty of type 2 diabetes, cut the white food out of your diet. It's as simple as that.


By using diet alone to lose weight, it is possible that you have burned away a decent amount of muscle mass and have become fatter (according to body fat% or body composition) even when the numbers on the scale are going down. There's a tiny chance your high protein diet has helped stifle some of that muscle loss, but the best way to prevent muscle loss is through exercise. Exercise PLUS diet if you want to make sure you lose FAT...no one says diet is unnecessary for weight loss. Saying that exercise stimulates appetite is just an excuse for poor self control. Hungry from running? Eat more fruit and veggies.

Incidentally, exercise is also probably the best way to treat and prevent diabetes (ask any doctor about exercise and diabetes).

No matter how much sugar and how many carbs you put in your body, using those carbs while they are in the blood stream and is infinitely better at fixing a person's metabolism than just starving away the problem. Skinny people get type 2 diabetes too.
 
2012-10-06 06:12:59 PM

StoneColdAtheist: Also, exercise generally leads to weight gain, not loss. That's because exercise is an appetite stimulant by itself, as well as builds muscle mass.


Atheists believe the weirdest things. 

Aerobic Exercise Suppresses Appetite.

Link

Link

Link 

No one here is suggesting you get ripped and shredded with 30 inch bulging vein biceps. We are suggesting going for a walk or a run.
 
2012-10-06 06:30:05 PM

elysive: By using diet alone to lose weight, it is possible that you have burned away a decent amount of muscle mass and have become fatter (according to body fat% or body composition) even when the numbers on the scale are going down. There's a tiny chance your high protein diet has helped stifle some of that muscle loss, but the best way to prevent muscle loss is through exercise. Exercise PLUS diet if you want to make sure you lose FAT...no one says diet is unnecessary for weight loss. Saying that exercise stimulates appetite is just an excuse for poor self control. Hungry from running? Eat more fruit and veggies.

Incidentally, exercise is also probably the best way to treat and prevent diabetes (ask any doctor about exercise and diabetes).

No matter how much sugar and how many carbs you put in your body, using those carbs while they are in the blood stream and is infinitely better at fixing a person's metabolism than just starving away the problem. Skinny people get type 2 diabetes too.



I'm curious about your background, I've seen someone write so authoritatively about something they we so utterly wrong about, One of the advantages of a high-protein/low carb diet is that you burn ONLY fat and neither muscle or bone mass unlike conventional diets. The key is the lowered insulin production. Your body cannot convert dietary fat into body fat without a key microhormone created when insulin is dominant in the body. When insulin's opposite, glucagon is dominant, a fat burning micro-hormone is active instead. This is why the amount of dietary fat consumed in a low carb diet is irrelevant to weight loss (and why all the idiot engineers in this thread who keep saying "thermodynamics" are so very wrong) . Meanwhile, keeping your dietary protein high ensures that the body's famine switch never gets turned on, so the body does not scavenge muscle or bone mass to keep going
 
2012-10-06 08:04:37 PM
I didn't realize this was an option, I didn't think anyone had shipped bandersnatchi to Earth yet.
 
2012-10-06 09:16:10 PM
Anyone who eats sugar, salt and flour in the first place, is gay!
 
2012-10-06 11:01:34 PM
That's it. I'm starting my diet tomorrow.

/actually, tomorrow looks bad. Perhaps Monday. No, Mondays are terrible for me. I'll pencil this in for Wednesday. Maybe Thursday.
 
2012-10-08 12:23:25 AM

Magorn: I'm curious about your background, I've seen someone write so authoritatively about something they we so utterly wrong about, One of the advantages of a high-protein/low carb diet is that you burn ONLY fat and neither muscle or bone mass unlike conventional diets. The key is the lowered insulin production. Your body cannot convert dietary fat into body fat without a key microhormone created when insulin is dominant in the body. When insulin's opposite, glucagon is dominant, a fat burning micro-hormone is active instead. This is why the amount of dietary fat consumed in a low carb diet is irrelevant to weight loss (and why all the idiot engineers in this thread who keep saying "thermodynamics" are so very wrong) . Meanwhile, keeping your dietary protein high ensures that the body's famine switch never gets turned on, so the body does not scavenge muscle or bone mass to keep going


I'm not quite sure what you claim I am trying to speak authoritatively on, but I stated that there is a chance you or other low carb dieters could lose muscle without exercise. I still stand by that. Also, you ask for my credentials without providing any of yours...apparently in all your expertise you never learned about ketosis or protein metabolism? Oddly this post sounds word for word like some argument I've heard in another thread...copy pasta?

I already told you I'm a personal trainer. Incidentally I am a published researcher and am trained in physiology and sports nutrition. I am familiar with much of the research on nutrition and low carb dieting (which is poorly defined and in the literature can include up to 40% carb intake, hardly affecting insulin metabolism at all). I have not put much effort into reviewing Atkins claims and supporting research because exercise can generally improve any health condition Atkins claims to treat (cholesterol, insulin sensitivity, overweight/obesity) and such diets that encourage minimal safe carb consumption are wholly unsustainable. Unless you can sustain a healthy diet or life change, it is pretty useless to most people because the effects will be largely reversed when the person reverts to old habits. I actually currently eat my own version of a "low carb" diet but your posts just sound pants on head, exercise discouraging, ignorant.

By the way, carb consumption is not the only time that the body produces insulin. It is silly to suggest that a person cannot gain fat on a protein and fat diet. An easy example of why this is incorrect is that the Inuit eat a diet composed predominately of animal meat and fat, yet they manage to store a lot of body fat. Their survival often relies on it. The human body is extremely well adapted to store energy. I could go on and explain, but I think it would fall on deaf ears.
 
Displayed 10 of 110 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report