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(Daily Herald)   Government files discrimination lawsuit against recreation association after they refuse to give medicine to epileptics. Fark: Rectally   (dailyherald.com) divider line 44
    More: Stupid, lawsuit claims, McHenry County, tonic-clonic seizure, recreation, alumni associations, discrimination, epilepsy, medications  
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5281 clicks; posted to Main » on 05 Oct 2012 at 1:12 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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Archived thread
2012-10-05 01:44:03 PM
3 votes:

khyberkitsune: Apparently these assholes don't realize that a rectal administration of drugs is a HEAVILY medically-regulated thing due to quick and easy absorbtion into the bloodstream.

farking morons are going to lose, fast, because the camp likely can't afford an actual qualified doctor to handle that.


Shouldn't take a doctor. LPNs administer these meds all the time. They just need to report off on their actions to an RN supervisor- who doesn't even have to be on-site.

Like I said, if they are discriminating against all narcs, they are golden. If they just got the heebies about the rectal business, I think they'll lose. In a camp full of handicapped kids the employees are screened and already doing things like changing depends.

/pediatric home care manger
2012-10-05 01:33:20 PM
3 votes:
I have clients on diastat rectal, clonazepam po and midazolam nasal spray. The biggest problem isn't administration- it's securing the meds. This is valium. They probably don't want the liability. Even if they had diastat, by the time they found the narc keys the ambulance would be there.

Midazolam nasal spray is fantastic for interruping a seizure. Too bad it is nasal versed. Party time!

They may be in trouble from this lawsuit if they are willing to give narcs to other campers. The rectal route is one of the safest- unless you are using Franzia. Then no route is safe.
2012-10-05 01:18:07 PM
3 votes:
They get government funding.

It's a reasonable accomodation.

I'm OK with this.
2012-10-05 03:17:33 PM
2 votes:

pdee: How many kids wont be able to go to camp because 75k of their budget has to be diverted to pay for the nurse for 2 kids who will probably will never need the services of said nurse?


The argument is that it's a camp for disabled kids; the nurse would be there for a lot more stuff, there might even be a dedicated medical staff. Also, it wouldn't be $75k, more like $4k for a week long camp. 

Of course, I think we need to grow a spine when it comes to medically necessary drugs. Don't lock them up excessively, administer the dang things. As long as the staff are given simple, clear directions on when to give the drugs, they should be in the clear. If the instructions aren't sufficiently clear, decline while stating 'Sorry, but that's too complex for our non-medically trained staff'.

Siezure(and here's signs of a seizure; subtle it ain't): Administer X rectally. :( Call the ambulance just as a backup.
2012-10-05 03:05:34 PM
2 votes:

Con Fabulous: Fine, I'll be the first to say it. If an 8 year old is seizing in front of you and you hide behind some policy to protect your legal liability rather than give them their medication, you are scum.


On the other hand, it does show you're reasonably intelligent.

Do it wrong, do it without the proper training, do it without being the right gender, or without supervision, do it to a minor, etc: These are all things that could result in anything from destroyed life to federal prison.

My wife was chuckling about how her sister saw a naked 3 year old kid run down the middle of her street. She believed that the kid might have come from a house at the end of her block, but she wasn't sure what to do.

While ethically, the right thing to do would be to remove the kid from danger, and then find it's parents, doing so is a legally dangerous thing.

Any adult interacting with a naked child in public is in immediate legal danger, especially when they're effectively a stranger. Bringing them to your house is probably worse, especially if you're seen. Bringing them to the right house could expose you to physical or legal attacks by the parent who thinks you STOLE their child, and I don't have to tell you that the WRONG house would be pretty bad too. Hell, just keeping an eye on them from a distance could land you in jail, especially if you're male. Calling the police but doing nothing at all in the meanwhile might get you in trouble for taking no action in a situation that was potentially harmful to the child.

Attacked, sued, fined, imprisoned, losing job, relationships, families from social stigmas associated with the aforementioned penalties?

There's no public phones anymore, so it'd be rough to report in anonymously - most businesses will have video cameras and memories, and when it comes to threats against children, some folks will stop at nothing to criminalize all those involved.

I thought about it for a bit, and I decided the only safe thing to do was to pretend it never happened - you never saw the kid, and therefore, you're off the hook.

That's where we're at with today's society. I don't think this is a cowardly move, or lazy, or corrupt. It's simply a result of our current culture of excessive legislation.

What ever happened to the kid that ran down the street? Dunno. Probably the parents eventually noticed he was missing. I mean, parents notice those things. Sure it was just outside of Gary, Indiana, a horrific area for crime, but I'm sure it was okay. They could tell he didn't have his wallet on him!
2012-10-05 02:52:14 PM
2 votes:
So if I got this right, you see an 8 year old girl having a seizure you are supposed to pull her pants down, and stick a plastic syringe up her ass? And somehow avoid jail?
2012-10-05 02:41:33 PM
2 votes:
Fine, I'll be the first to say it. If an 8 year old is seizing in front of you and you hide behind some policy to protect your legal liability rather than give them their medication, you are scum.
2012-10-05 02:27:25 PM
2 votes:

Jument: In the butt??? WTF? Why can't they do it with an injectable pen?


Intramuscular injections of that drug don't work. I'm assuming that its the same stuff that we were given to administer to our service users in the event of a seizure that went on for too long. Prolonged seizures can cause brain damage, so the rectal drug can prevent that. I had to administer it on several occasions. We got to practice on the bottom part of a resuscitation doll :-)
2012-10-05 01:54:50 PM
2 votes:

bugmn99: Trying to come up with a greased epileptic anus joke but I'm drawing a blank at the moment.

I turn to you for help, Fark community.


"OK so this last summer I was at the beach working on my tan. It was getting really good. I could have put Leather Mom to shame. I just finished putting on an entire bottle of babby oil when I guess the heat started getting to me. I felt kind of weird...and then things went black. My buddy told me afterwards that I was seizing like a fish flopping around on a hot sidewalk. it must have been extra bad because the spasms were so severe that it produced a condition known to me later as prolapsed anus. That's something you dopn't want to Google, trust me....so anyway, my buddy tells me it looked like a flesh doughnut poking it's way out of my mankini, and he just stood there in shock. I mean what are you going to do, make a fist and then jam it back in my pelvic cavity while I'm doing the shimmy shimmy coco bop in the sand?? Hell no, I mean we're friends but we're not THAT good friends. (Is anyone?!?!) So the real joke here is that you're still reading this and you have a vision of fisting a greased, sandy, prolapsed anus in your head and I WIN!@! Yay!!"

/tah dah...that's how it's done.
2012-10-05 01:35:28 PM
2 votes:
I can't imagine why a youth oriented organization would be hesitant to allow its non-medically trained employees to pull down a minor child's pants and insert something in their anus.
2012-10-05 01:18:44 PM
2 votes:
i194.photobucket.com
2012-10-06 09:29:15 PM
1 votes:

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: I can only speak for myself, but I don't stop to think about what it might cost me personally, if I see an obvious and urgent need. I stop to help lost and hurt pets. I pull over and remove obstacles from the road. I ask people who look lost or confused if they need help. If I see a kid and I suspect they've been separated from their parents, I ask them directly where their parents are, and if they don't know, bring the kid to a local authority for help. And mind you I don't even like people, especially kids, and I'm not a dog person. But need is need, and trumps all else. In my own mind, anyone who doesn't see that has their priorities backwards. And looking around me, it's clear that a lot of people do.

Are there potential consequences? Yes, of course. Do they matter? If we think they do, then they don't, because a world like that is not a world worth living in anyway. I'd rather take the chance and know I did the right thing, then always wonder if I made the right choice by focusing on my own interests. Children and pets are homeless. So are many elderly and demented people, those on drugs, or other persons separated from the personal capabilities most of us take for granted. These interventions are often lengthy and inconvenient, and can be frustrating and annoying. (Like the family who couldn't be bothered to buy a $2 tag with a phone number for their dog, but showed up in a nice, late-model car. And yes, I gave them a few parting words after saving their dog, though the dog might be better off with someone else.) But none of that matters. Doing the right thing matters. Nothing else does.

In TFA, even routine excuses don't fly. These people aren't random strangers, but self-appointed custodians who have accepted responsibility for the welfare of minors. They are free to exclude those they feel they can't safely or appropriately accommodate, but accepting them and then refusing to do what has been clearly dictated as medically necessary is just bullshiat


Wisdom.
2012-10-06 06:38:33 PM
1 votes:

quietwalker: My wife was chuckling about how her sister saw a naked 3 year old kid run down the middle of her street. She believed that the kid might have come from a house at the end of her block, but she wasn't sure what to do.

While ethically, the right thing to do would be to remove the kid from danger, and then find it's parents, doing so is a legally dangerous thing.

Any adult interacting with a naked child in public is in immediate legal danger, especially when they're effectively a stranger. Bringing them to your house is probably worse, especially if you're seen. Bringing them to the right house could expose you to physical or legal attacks by the parent who thinks you STOLE their child, and I don't have to tell you that the WRONG house would be pretty bad too. Hell, just keeping an eye on them from a distance could land you in jail, especially if you're male. Calling the police but doing nothing at all in the meanwhile might get you in trouble for taking no action in a situation that was potentially harmful to the child.

Attacked, sued, fined, imprisoned, losing job, relationships, families from social stigmas associated with the aforementioned penalties?

There's no public phones anymore, so it'd be rough to report in anonymously - most businesses will have video cameras and memories, and when it comes to threats against children, some folks will stop at nothing to criminalize all those involved.

I thought about it for a bit, and I decided the only safe thing to do was to pretend it never happened - you never saw the kid, and therefore, you're off the hook.

That's where we're at with today's society. I don't think this is a cowardly move, or lazy, or corrupt. It's simply a result of our current culture of excessive legislation.

What ever happened to the kid that ran down the street? Dunno. Probably the parents eventually noticed he was missing. I mean, parents notice those things. Sure it was just outside of Gary, Indiana, a horrific area for crime, but I'm sure ...


I can only speak for myself, but I don't stop to think about what it might cost me personally, if I see an obvious and urgent need. I stop to help lost and hurt pets. I pull over and remove obstacles from the road. I ask people who look lost or confused if they need help. If I see a kid and I suspect they've been separated from their parents, I ask them directly where their parents are, and if they don't know, bring the kid to a local authority for help. And mind you I don't even like people, especially kids, and I'm not a dog person. But need is need, and trumps all else. In my own mind, anyone who doesn't see that has their priorities backwards. And looking around me, it's clear that a lot of people do.

Are there potential consequences? Yes, of course. Do they matter? If we think they do, then they don't, because a world like that is not a world worth living in anyway. I'd rather take the chance and know I did the right thing, then always wonder if I made the right choice by focusing on my own interests. Children and pets are homeless. So are many elderly and demented people, those on drugs, or other persons separated from the personal capabilities most of us take for granted. These interventions are often lengthy and inconvenient, and can be frustrating and annoying. (Like the family who couldn't be bothered to buy a $2 tag with a phone number for their dog, but showed up in a nice, late-model car. And yes, I gave them a few parting words after saving their dog, though the dog might be better off with someone else.) But none of that matters. Doing the right thing matters. Nothing else does.

In TFA, even routine excuses don't fly. These people aren't random strangers, but self-appointed custodians who have accepted responsibility for the welfare of minors. They are free to exclude those they feel they can't safely or appropriately accommodate, but accepting them and then refusing to do what has been clearly dictated as medically necessary is just bullshiat.
2012-10-06 04:42:26 AM
1 votes:

BronyMedic: These are the pictoral instructions.


Looks less scary than my auto-injectors(extra-large epi-pen that goes into the thigh). They specifically tell us that if you do it wrong and hit the bone - it'll

BolloxReader: Those signed slips like they have in school for field trips where the parents promise not to sue if something happens?

Worthless in a court of law.


I wouldn't say that they're worthless, it's just that they can't be used to disclaim liability for gross misconduct. Your kid doing something stupid on their own without the supervision doing something very wrong, it's still useful. In this case

Securitywyrm: The criminal accusation is just to stir up publicity, then you make the civil claim. Insurance company settles rather than let it risk going to court due to it already being tried in the 'court of public opinion.' Easy payout.


Not once the lawyer gets to see me or my personality profile. 'Aggressive' doesn't quite cover it. Basically, I'm one of the percent of the population willing to accept greater expense in order to see that they don't profit from such a dick move than to just bend and take it. As such I'm not considered a good target.
2012-10-05 06:10:38 PM
1 votes:

mikaloyd: If any of y'all think Im having a seizure just let me have the seizure, you do NOT have permission to shove drugs up my ass. No matter how much you want to help.Just move sharp objects away and thatll be enough.
Thanks in advance.


In this case, the anal drugs have been specifically prescribed to them.


pdee: o the kid is shaking and you whip down their pants and shove the meds up her bum. Only the then denies she was having a seizure or does not remember having a seizure or another kids tell their parents you had her pants down too long or any of 1,000,000 other things and you get prison time or at least accused of being a sex offender.


Only if she's a total asswipe, and most people aren't when you treat their potentially life threatening medical condition. CPR *WILL* break ribs. I'm trained to put tourniquets on.

Oh, and 'shaking' isn't a seizure, and while she won't have memory of the seizure itself, the *effects* of such an event she's going to be feeling for a while. She'll also recognize them as it's happened to her before. In my case, I'd have the used syringe in hand.

Securitywyrm: You're well-versed in the condition, medication and associated aspects. Someone seeking a payout makes a sexual misconduct accusation and all a jury hears is "Pulled down a child's pants in public and stuck a device into the rectum." What camp counselor, who is neither a 'highly trained medical professional' nor a 'highly paid individual' is going to take the risk of a life-destroying accusation in order to administer the medication?


It's not going to be 'all that a jury hears'. I'm not a defense attorney, but:
1. This would belong in *criminal* court, not civil. As a result, no payout opportunity. If it DOES go to a civil court, the question of why charges weren't pressed would be asked.
2. I'd pull in the prescribing doctor, provide the documentation that: this was prescribed for her, it's a valid treatment, and witnesses show the conditions for use of said medication in the prescribed fashion were met.
3. Typically speaking, judges and juries aren't sympathetic to people looking to get money from somebody who was only trying to help, not to mention doing what you asked them to do.
2012-10-05 04:56:43 PM
1 votes:
Rectal Diastat is so easy that a parent can learn to give it after a five minute class.

What makes these asshats think they can't, again?
2012-10-05 04:40:53 PM
1 votes:

abrannan: My son has epilepsy, and uses Diastat gel, so I'm getting a kick, etc. etc.

When he was first diagnosed earlier this year, we provided his preschool with a complete guide to his seizures and their progression, when to start timing the 5 minutes, when and how to administer the medication, etc. The school then went one step further and brought in a health adviser from the county education department who held a training for every teacher and administrator who dealt with my son on any sort of regular basis on seizures and proper medication administration techniques. We've sent him to day camp over the summer, had him sleep over at friend's houses, left him with a babysitter, etc. and every time we have to hand over the medication and give whoever is in charge the whole rundown on when and how to use it. When he started public school they were more concerned that every piece of medical paperwork was signed by the same doctor, despite the fact that he sees a neurology specialist for the epilepsy and his pediatrician for his vaccines. We've never had a problem thus far, and fortunately, we've never had to administer the medication.

pdee: So the kid is shaking and you whip down their pants and shove the meds up her bum. Only the then denies she was having a seizure or does not remember having a seizure

A) Not all seizures are grand mal "shakey" seizures, that's only one fraction of all the different types of seizures. The parents should be expected to provide at least a basic explanation of how to tell if their child is having a seizure.

B) Almost no Epileptic remembers having the seizure. Your brain is going haywire with random electrical impulses, so much so that it interrupts basic level functioning like blinking, balance, etc. Little details like short term memory tend to not work so well in those cases.

C) Diastat is to be used when the seizure exceeds 5 minutes in length, most seizures only last a couple of minutes, so there shouldn't be much question of ...


You're well-versed in the condition, medication and associated aspects. Someone seeking a payout makes a sexual misconduct accusation and all a jury hears is "Pulled down a child's pants in public and stuck a device into the rectum." What camp counselor, who is neither a 'highly trained medical professional' nor a 'highly paid individual' is going to take the risk of a life-destroying accusation in order to administer the medication?
2012-10-05 04:27:38 PM
1 votes:

authorizeduser: Hot Panda Milk: It can be difficult to start an IV during a seizure.

I can't imagine delivering a suppository is a real breeze either.


Easier than starting an IV. But you wouldn't start an IV when someone is convulsing violently anyway.
Diastat is given post-ictal to prevent another seizure. It's not common to have this prescribed and is only done so when patients have history of status epilepticus. IV diazepam is given during an active seizure if the patient has already had one, or if they are in status epilepticus.

It comes down to the fact that it's prescribed by a doctor for a specific condition, and as an employee they have to give the patients their medications. This does not look good for the refusers, as icky as it may sound.

//protocols may vary.
2012-10-05 04:18:13 PM
1 votes:

mikaloyd: Tyrosine: Baelz: So if I got this right, you see an 8 year old girl having a seizure you are supposed to pull her pants down, and stick a plastic syringe up her ass? And somehow avoid jail?

quod est necessarium est licitum (what is necessary is lawful)

Sorry judge I thought he was having a seizure. I didnt know about gangnam style.


I laughed way too hard at this.
2012-10-05 03:40:02 PM
1 votes:
If any of y'all think Im having a seizure just let me have the seizure, you do NOT have permission to shove drugs up my ass. No matter how much you want to help.Just move sharp objects away and thatll be enough.
Thanks in advance.
2012-10-05 03:32:37 PM
1 votes:

Firethorn: pdee: How many kids wont be able to go to camp because 75k of their budget has to be diverted to pay for the nurse for 2 kids who will probably will never need the services of said nurse?

The argument is that it's a camp for disabled kids; the nurse would be there for a lot more stuff, there might even be a dedicated medical staff. Also, it wouldn't be $75k, more like $4k for a week long camp. 

Of course, I think we need to grow a spine when it comes to medically necessary drugs. Don't lock them up excessively, administer the dang things. As long as the staff are given simple, clear directions on when to give the drugs, they should be in the clear. If the instructions aren't sufficiently clear, decline while stating 'Sorry, but that's too complex for our non-medically trained staff'.

Siezure(and here's signs of a seizure; subtle it ain't): Administer X rectally. :( Call the ambulance just as a backup.


So the kid is shaking and you whip down their pants and shove the meds up her bum. Only the then denies she was having a seizure or does not remember having a seizure or another kids tell their parents you had her pants down too long or any of 1,000,000 other things and you get prison time or at least accused of being a sex offender. So you want to avoid that liability by getting a witness to your administering the kids meds then you are accused of exposing the kid's genitals to another pervert and both of you go down or you get sued because you delayed treatment too long while seeking a witness.

No matter how careful you are or what precautions you take this is liability nightmare. I wish it was not so but common sense has no place in our legal system any more.

Also while some here argue that the nurse wont cost them so much that it keeps kids out of the program I have little doubt the ADA law suit will and if it does not then the inevitable liability law suit will probably be costly enough to kill the entire program. But at least when the camps are not more then there will be no discrimination because no one will be going camp at all.
2012-10-05 03:31:49 PM
1 votes:

Tyrosine: Baelz: So if I got this right, you see an 8 year old girl having a seizure you are supposed to pull her pants down, and stick a plastic syringe up her ass? And somehow avoid jail?

quod est necessarium est licitum (what is necessary is lawful)


Sorry judge I thought he was having a seizure. I didnt know about gangnam style.
2012-10-05 03:29:10 PM
1 votes:

Baelz: So if I got this right, you see an 8 year old girl having a seizure you are supposed to pull her pants down, and stick a plastic syringe up her ass? And somehow avoid jail?


quod est necessarium est licitum (what is necessary is lawful)
2012-10-05 03:27:41 PM
1 votes:

pdee: As you point out laws to protect children now put children in danger.


Britain's struggling with this after a kid ended up drowning and came up with half a dozen witnesses who were all afraid of being labled a perv.

I've actually received intervention training(get off your butt and HELP!), but that's not common yet.

In the case of the nude kid, despite being male, I'm calling 911 first, then securing the tot*, then putting at least a t-shirt(a male large shirt will cover everything) on them, getting a trustworthy female to *HELP* watch. All while still on the phone with 911. I'm not turning the kid over to anybody but medical/police/CPS at that point.

*depending on conditions: A good part of the year here a kid could be suffering from hypothermia within minutes without proper protection.
2012-10-05 03:27:14 PM
1 votes:
This needs to be a parks and recreation episode.
2012-10-05 03:25:29 PM
1 votes:
shove something up an epileptics ass? Thats like truying to thread a needle while standing on a paint shaker
2012-10-05 03:22:01 PM
1 votes:
Anything you can take orally, you can take rectally and it works faster and is absorbed better.
Please go back to the whole "butt chugger" discussion last week.
2012-10-05 03:06:41 PM
1 votes:

Craptastic: Felgraf: Craptastic: I can understand both sides of this argument, and I don't really have a big disagreement with either side. That said, if I had to stick something in a kid's ass to save their life, I'd do it no matter how uncomfortable it made me feel.

Perhaps if the parents signed a waiver for the kids who are "at risk"...?

I dunno, but let me put it this way:

At the girlscout camp I volunteer at, we had a child this year who, if she hit her head IN ANY WAY, we had to call an ambulance so she could go get CAT scanned-She had a super-low platlet disorder, so any blow to the head could cause cerebral hemmoraging. Thankfully, she was in the age range where she knew she needed to tell us if she smacked her head, even if it meant missing a chunk of the camp (I think she was.. 14, 15ish?), which made the whole thing *slightly* less terrifying.
/And she made it until the *last day* until she ran headlong into a dayshade. Argh. She was fine, at least!
//That is nowhere near the most terrifying camp story, though admittedly some of the scarrier ones are from before I began volunteering.

Ha! I used to volunteer at a Boy Scout camp. Worst thing that happened there was some kid surrendering his pinky toe to a snapping turtle while he was swimming in the lake. That was gruesome.


Yikes. We haven't had any missing body parts, but we did have one scare where someone prooobabbblly would have died (HOORAY UNDOCUMENTED ALLERGIES), if our volunteering staff nurse wasn't an EMT. (Well, *was* an EMT. She's a full-fledged ER doctor now.)
2012-10-05 02:54:27 PM
1 votes:

hdhale: JackieRabbit: I don't blame them. I'd not be administering any seizure medication to a kid either. If you administer the drug and something goes wrong, and you are a medical professional or have received training in said administration, you are liable. The law suit is an inevitability. I think they were probably acting on advice of counsel. The US attorney's probably going to lose this one. They did not say that epileptics couldn't participate in activities, but only that they would call 911 instead of administering drugs.

I realize we live in the land of lawyers and bureaucrats now, not the United States of America, and common sense hopped on the last plane to Costa Rica a few years ago, but...

Wouldn't have made sense to have a nurse on staff that was qualified to handle all this stuff? That and a waiver form stating that "we will have a professional nurse on the premises at all times and they will be available to render medical assistance...blah blah blah...you can't sue them or us if the nurse makes a good faith effort to render aid....so on and and so on. A good lawyer could bullet proof that pretty effectively and if the parent refuses to sign, no camp for kiddy.


I wish it were that simple. They should have a nurse, of course. But he or she would be at great risk for malpractice. A nurse hold a medical license and any malpractice attorney will tell you that a waiver is not worth the paper it is printed on. The truth is that you, with no training, could administer that medication and not have to worry about a law suit, as you would be covered under the Good Samaritan statute. But medical professionals are precluded from the statute. Believe it or not, lawyers aren't really the problem (well, maybe the ambulance chasers). It's people. Everyone's looking for an angle. While many malpractice suits are justified, the vast majority are nothing more than a shakedown to get the health care worker's insurance company to settle. People go looking for the lawyers.

I hold a medical license, even though it is not active. And I know that every time I have assisted a accident victim or performed CPR on someone, I have put myself at risk to be sued, regardless of the outcome.
2012-10-05 02:54:15 PM
1 votes:
I doubt the problem is they are squeamish. And its not the liability of administering the drug it the liability of having to play with the ass of under age girls.
2012-10-05 02:52:16 PM
1 votes:

Felgraf: Craptastic: I can understand both sides of this argument, and I don't really have a big disagreement with either side. That said, if I had to stick something in a kid's ass to save their life, I'd do it no matter how uncomfortable it made me feel.

Perhaps if the parents signed a waiver for the kids who are "at risk"...?

I dunno, but let me put it this way:

At the girlscout camp I volunteer at, we had a child this year who, if she hit her head IN ANY WAY, we had to call an ambulance so she could go get CAT scanned-She had a super-low platlet disorder, so any blow to the head could cause cerebral hemmoraging. Thankfully, she was in the age range where she knew she needed to tell us if she smacked her head, even if it meant missing a chunk of the camp (I think she was.. 14, 15ish?), which made the whole thing *slightly* less terrifying.
/And she made it until the *last day* until she ran headlong into a dayshade. Argh. She was fine, at least!
//That is nowhere near the most terrifying camp story, though admittedly some of the scarrier ones are from before I began volunteering.


Ha! I used to volunteer at a Boy Scout camp. Worst thing that happened there was some kid surrendering his pinky toe to a snapping turtle while he was swimming in the lake. That was gruesome.
2012-10-05 02:41:44 PM
1 votes:

JackieRabbit: I don't blame them. I'd not be administering any seizure medication to a kid either. If you administer the drug and something goes wrong, and you are a medical professional or have received training in said administration, you are liable. The law suit is an inevitability. I think they were probably acting on advice of counsel. The US attorney's probably going to lose this one. They did not say that epileptics couldn't participate in activities, but only that they would call 911 instead of administering drugs.


It's a program for disabled kids. They most certainly have medical staff, and it's probably not even the most critical drug they might have to administer.
2012-10-05 02:39:09 PM
1 votes:

JackieRabbit: I don't blame them. I'd not be administering any seizure medication to a kid either. If you administer the drug and something goes wrong, and you are a medical professional or have received training in said administration, you are liable. The law suit is an inevitability. I think they were probably acting on advice of counsel. The US attorney's probably going to lose this one. They did not say that epileptics couldn't participate in activities, but only that they would call 911 instead of administering drugs.


I realize we live in the land of lawyers and bureaucrats now, not the United States of America, and common sense hopped on the last plane to Costa Rica a few years ago, but...

Wouldn't have made sense to have a nurse on staff that was qualified to handle all this stuff? That and a waiver form stating that "we will have a professional nurse on the premises at all times and they will be available to render medical assistance...blah blah blah...you can't sue them or us if the nurse makes a good faith effort to render aid....so on and and so on. A good lawyer could bullet proof that pretty effectively and if the parent refuses to sign, no camp for kiddy.
2012-10-05 02:30:51 PM
1 votes:
17 year old girl. Grand mal seizure. Drugs administered rectally. I say give me the syringe and baby shake dat ass.
2012-10-05 02:30:30 PM
1 votes:
I don't blame them. I'd not be administering any seizure medication to a kid either. If you administer the drug and something goes wrong, and you are a medical professional or have received training in said administration, you are liable. The law suit is an inevitability. I think they were probably acting on advice of counsel. The US attorney's probably going to lose this one. They did not say that epileptics couldn't participate in activities, but only that they would call 911 instead of administering drugs.
2012-10-05 02:08:08 PM
1 votes:

Contrabulous Flabtraption: buttholes! hahaha, i like talking about them


upload.wikimedia.org
2012-10-05 01:54:30 PM
1 votes:

Craptastic: I can understand both sides of this argument, and I don't really have a big disagreement with either side. That said, if I had to stick something in a kid's ass to save their life, I'd do it no matter how uncomfortable it made me feel.

Perhaps if the parents signed a waiver for the kids who are "at risk"...?


I dunno, but let me put it this way:

At the girlscout camp I volunteer at, we had a child this year who, if she hit her head IN ANY WAY, we had to call an ambulance so she could go get CAT scanned-She had a super-low platlet disorder, so any blow to the head could cause cerebral hemmoraging. Thankfully, she was in the age range where she knew she needed to tell us if she smacked her head, even if it meant missing a chunk of the camp (I think she was.. 14, 15ish?), which made the whole thing *slightly* less terrifying.
/And she made it until the *last day* until she ran headlong into a dayshade. Argh. She was fine, at least!
//That is nowhere near the most terrifying camp story, though admittedly some of the scarrier ones are from before I began volunteering.
2012-10-05 01:43:23 PM
1 votes:
People act like they are being compassionate, when the reality is folks just want someone else to wipe the asses of our elderly amd infirm.

I was hospititalized for pnemonia (sp) a couple years back. It got so bad i had the attentive nurse give me an enima. After she asked ifi was feeling better and i told her i felt fine before actually, i was just bored. Didnt see her after that.

True story...or not.
2012-10-05 01:42:17 PM
1 votes:
Spirit Hammer:

i.imgur.com

/can't believe you people. You're slipping.  
2012-10-05 01:38:59 PM
1 votes:
Apparently these assholes don't realize that a rectal administration of drugs is a HEAVILY medically-regulated thing due to quick and easy absorbtion into the bloodstream.

farking morons are going to lose, fast, because the camp likely can't afford an actual qualified doctor to handle that.
2012-10-05 01:38:04 PM
1 votes:

Spirit Hammer: I can't imagine why a youth oriented organization would be hesitant to allow its non-medically trained employees to pull down a minor child's pants and insert something in their anus.


i1162.photobucket.com
2012-10-05 01:26:51 PM
1 votes:
I like to shove various things up my own butt, however, I am sure as hell not going to shove things up other people's butts. Seizure on bro.
2012-10-05 01:26:28 PM
1 votes:
If this kid can get epileptics to the promised land of speedier care, then she will be kind of a Grand Mal Moses.
2012-10-05 01:24:54 PM
1 votes:
It can be difficult to start an IV during a seizure.
 
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