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(Daily Herald)   Government files discrimination lawsuit against recreation association after they refuse to give medicine to epileptics. Fark: Rectally   (dailyherald.com) divider line 111
    More: Stupid, lawsuit claims, McHenry County, tonic-clonic seizure, recreation, alumni associations, discrimination, epilepsy, medications  
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5282 clicks; posted to Main » on 05 Oct 2012 at 1:12 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-06 04:42:26 AM

BronyMedic: These are the pictoral instructions.


Looks less scary than my auto-injectors(extra-large epi-pen that goes into the thigh). They specifically tell us that if you do it wrong and hit the bone - it'll

BolloxReader: Those signed slips like they have in school for field trips where the parents promise not to sue if something happens?

Worthless in a court of law.


I wouldn't say that they're worthless, it's just that they can't be used to disclaim liability for gross misconduct. Your kid doing something stupid on their own without the supervision doing something very wrong, it's still useful. In this case

Securitywyrm: The criminal accusation is just to stir up publicity, then you make the civil claim. Insurance company settles rather than let it risk going to court due to it already being tried in the 'court of public opinion.' Easy payout.


Not once the lawyer gets to see me or my personality profile. 'Aggressive' doesn't quite cover it. Basically, I'm one of the percent of the population willing to accept greater expense in order to see that they don't profit from such a dick move than to just bend and take it. As such I'm not considered a good target.
 
2012-10-06 11:34:31 AM

Whiskey Pete: Spirit Hammer: I can't imagine why a youth oriented organization would be hesitant to allow its non-medically trained employees to pull down a minor child's pants and insert something in their anus.


I was wondering.....leaving satisfied.
 
2012-10-06 01:56:58 PM

Duke Phillips' Singing Bears: There is bound to be a few people in the world for whom shoving stuff up other people's butts is recreation. They just need to find them and add them to their association.


I think they're called Tennessee frat brothers.
 
2012-10-06 05:57:43 PM

BronyMedic: What makes these asshats think they can't, again?


Because poo is icky, and they're asshats
 
2012-10-06 06:11:12 PM

Matthew Keene: I like to shove various things up my own butt, however, I am sure as hell not going to shove things up other people's butts. Seizure on bro.


I'll give you a fresh $100 if you put things in people's butts.
 
2012-10-06 06:12:05 PM

Jument: In the butt??? WTF? Why can't they do it with an injectable pen?


"I question everything I don't understand, because I'm a moran. Can anyone tell?"
 
2012-10-06 06:13:04 PM

Nina_Hartley's_Ass: BenJammin: Problem was that they had to rule out those who seemed to eager to volunteer.

[theoriginalgreenwichdiva.com image 300x387]


Too soon.
 
2012-10-06 06:38:33 PM

quietwalker: My wife was chuckling about how her sister saw a naked 3 year old kid run down the middle of her street. She believed that the kid might have come from a house at the end of her block, but she wasn't sure what to do.

While ethically, the right thing to do would be to remove the kid from danger, and then find it's parents, doing so is a legally dangerous thing.

Any adult interacting with a naked child in public is in immediate legal danger, especially when they're effectively a stranger. Bringing them to your house is probably worse, especially if you're seen. Bringing them to the right house could expose you to physical or legal attacks by the parent who thinks you STOLE their child, and I don't have to tell you that the WRONG house would be pretty bad too. Hell, just keeping an eye on them from a distance could land you in jail, especially if you're male. Calling the police but doing nothing at all in the meanwhile might get you in trouble for taking no action in a situation that was potentially harmful to the child.

Attacked, sued, fined, imprisoned, losing job, relationships, families from social stigmas associated with the aforementioned penalties?

There's no public phones anymore, so it'd be rough to report in anonymously - most businesses will have video cameras and memories, and when it comes to threats against children, some folks will stop at nothing to criminalize all those involved.

I thought about it for a bit, and I decided the only safe thing to do was to pretend it never happened - you never saw the kid, and therefore, you're off the hook.

That's where we're at with today's society. I don't think this is a cowardly move, or lazy, or corrupt. It's simply a result of our current culture of excessive legislation.

What ever happened to the kid that ran down the street? Dunno. Probably the parents eventually noticed he was missing. I mean, parents notice those things. Sure it was just outside of Gary, Indiana, a horrific area for crime, but I'm sure ...


I can only speak for myself, but I don't stop to think about what it might cost me personally, if I see an obvious and urgent need. I stop to help lost and hurt pets. I pull over and remove obstacles from the road. I ask people who look lost or confused if they need help. If I see a kid and I suspect they've been separated from their parents, I ask them directly where their parents are, and if they don't know, bring the kid to a local authority for help. And mind you I don't even like people, especially kids, and I'm not a dog person. But need is need, and trumps all else. In my own mind, anyone who doesn't see that has their priorities backwards. And looking around me, it's clear that a lot of people do.

Are there potential consequences? Yes, of course. Do they matter? If we think they do, then they don't, because a world like that is not a world worth living in anyway. I'd rather take the chance and know I did the right thing, then always wonder if I made the right choice by focusing on my own interests. Children and pets are homeless. So are many elderly and demented people, those on drugs, or other persons separated from the personal capabilities most of us take for granted. These interventions are often lengthy and inconvenient, and can be frustrating and annoying. (Like the family who couldn't be bothered to buy a $2 tag with a phone number for their dog, but showed up in a nice, late-model car. And yes, I gave them a few parting words after saving their dog, though the dog might be better off with someone else.) But none of that matters. Doing the right thing matters. Nothing else does.

In TFA, even routine excuses don't fly. These people aren't random strangers, but self-appointed custodians who have accepted responsibility for the welfare of minors. They are free to exclude those they feel they can't safely or appropriately accommodate, but accepting them and then refusing to do what has been clearly dictated as medically necessary is just bullshiat.
 
2012-10-06 06:39:53 PM

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: Children and pets are homeless.


Urgh, "helpless," I meant. HELPLESS

/duhr
 
2012-10-06 09:29:15 PM

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: I can only speak for myself, but I don't stop to think about what it might cost me personally, if I see an obvious and urgent need. I stop to help lost and hurt pets. I pull over and remove obstacles from the road. I ask people who look lost or confused if they need help. If I see a kid and I suspect they've been separated from their parents, I ask them directly where their parents are, and if they don't know, bring the kid to a local authority for help. And mind you I don't even like people, especially kids, and I'm not a dog person. But need is need, and trumps all else. In my own mind, anyone who doesn't see that has their priorities backwards. And looking around me, it's clear that a lot of people do.

Are there potential consequences? Yes, of course. Do they matter? If we think they do, then they don't, because a world like that is not a world worth living in anyway. I'd rather take the chance and know I did the right thing, then always wonder if I made the right choice by focusing on my own interests. Children and pets are homeless. So are many elderly and demented people, those on drugs, or other persons separated from the personal capabilities most of us take for granted. These interventions are often lengthy and inconvenient, and can be frustrating and annoying. (Like the family who couldn't be bothered to buy a $2 tag with a phone number for their dog, but showed up in a nice, late-model car. And yes, I gave them a few parting words after saving their dog, though the dog might be better off with someone else.) But none of that matters. Doing the right thing matters. Nothing else does.

In TFA, even routine excuses don't fly. These people aren't random strangers, but self-appointed custodians who have accepted responsibility for the welfare of minors. They are free to exclude those they feel they can't safely or appropriately accommodate, but accepting them and then refusing to do what has been clearly dictated as medically necessary is just bullshiat


Wisdom.
 
Me
2012-10-08 10:43:58 AM

quietwalker: Con Fabulous: Fine, I'll be the first to say it. If an 8 year old is seizing in front of you and you hide behind some policy to protect your legal liability rather than give them their medication, you are scum.

On the other hand, it does show you're reasonably intelligent.

Do it wrong, do it without the proper training, do it without being the right gender, or without supervision, do it to a minor, etc: These are all things that could result in anything from destroyed life to federal prison.

My wife was chuckling about how her sister saw a naked 3 year old kid run down the middle of her street. She believed that the kid might have come from a house at the end of her block, but she wasn't sure what to do.

While ethically, the right thing to do would be to remove the kid from danger, and then find it's parents, doing so is a legally dangerous thing.

Any adult interacting with a naked child in public is in immediate legal danger, especially when they're effectively a stranger. Bringing them to your house is probably worse, especially if you're seen. Bringing them to the right house could expose you to physical or legal attacks by the parent who thinks you STOLE their child, and I don't have to tell you that the WRONG house would be pretty bad too. Hell, just keeping an eye on them from a distance could land you in jail, especially if you're male. Calling the police but doing nothing at all in the meanwhile might get you in trouble for taking no action in a situation that was potentially harmful to the child.

Attacked, sued, fined, imprisoned, losing job, relationships, families from social stigmas associated with the aforementioned penalties?

There's no public phones anymore, so it'd be rough to report in anonymously - most businesses will have video cameras and memories, and when it comes to threats against children, some folks will stop at nothing to criminalize all those involved.

I thought about it for a bit, and I decided the only safe thing to do w ...


Wow, you're a terrible human being. So, your first thought when seeing a vulnerable child in a dangerous situation is how to protect yourself?
 
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