Do you have adblock enabled?
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Time)   "Businesses regard training of young people as their social responsibility"   (world.time.com) divider line 8
    More: Interesting, Swiss Federal Council, Companies of Switzerland, trade organization, Switzerland, apprenticeships, nonprofit research, collective responsibility  
•       •       •

1559 clicks; posted to Business » on 05 Oct 2012 at 10:42 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Archived thread
2012-10-05 10:45:24 AM  
2 votes:
Oh, in Switzerland.
I knew it wasn't about the US, or they were lying for the PR value.
2012-10-06 04:24:05 AM  
1 votes:

Sergeant Grumbles: Oh, in Switzerland.
I knew it wasn't about the US, or they were lying for the PR value.


THIS. In the old days, when you walked in to your corporate job with your degree, the first thing your employer would do is send you to training. The education gave you the skills and basic knowledge. The training taught you what you needed to know to work at the specific company. In the past couple of decades, however, employers have cheaped out, slashing training budgets or even eliminating them altogether, and then they've turned around and blamed the colleges for not training their job candidates properly.

The truth is this: Employers don't want to pay for training any more. Period. They don't want loyal, long-term employees any more. They don't want to pay decent living wages any more. It's all about saving every last f*cking dime so that corporate bigshots can get bigger bonuses when stock prices go up. Training would just eat up some of that profit margin, and we can't have that.
2012-10-05 07:31:53 PM  
1 votes:
What culture doesn't believe this?

Oh right, Corporate America TM, where they all want GOD at minimum wage (and they will try to negotiate down). Also, 20 years experience in Windows 8.
2012-10-05 02:25:37 PM  
1 votes:
Simple fix.

New Rule.

H1B visa workers have a new minimum wage of 50$ per hour. If the skill set is unavailable then clearly it must be unique and in demand. 50$ per hour is NOT a lot of money for a supposed in demand skill set.

IF what you TRUELY want is cheap labour? how about you start producing cheaper products, lower rent housing and gas that doesnt cost half a days pay just to get to work.

The work force is dynamic, the BUSINESSES are the ones lagging behind the inflationary times. They dont want to pay people what they deserve for their time based on quality of life.
2012-10-05 12:56:07 PM  
1 votes:

RumsfeldsReplacement: Dear Young People,

It's your job to give me a reason to hire you. It's not my obligation to hire you, no matter what your mommy says. Fix your attitude, comb your hair, and spell things right on your resume. At least pretend like you give a crap. Seriously, if you do that, you'll probably get a job offer. The labor pool is currently very thin.


You know, I must say it takes alot of nerve for the parent generation to tell the children they raised that they were raised wrong.

also

fbcdn-sphotos-d-a.akamaihd.net

/oblig
2012-10-05 12:25:53 PM  
1 votes:
Dear Young People,

It's your job to give me a reason to hire you. It's not my obligation to hire you, no matter what your mommy says. Fix your attitude, comb your hair, and spell things right on your resume. At least pretend like you give a crap. Seriously, if you do that, you'll probably get a job offer. The labor pool is currently very thin.
2012-10-05 11:23:27 AM  
1 votes:
The problem with the statement "education is the key to success" is not its accuracy: education is, in fact, the key to success. The problem is its precision: not all forms of education are the key to success. To succeed, you need a skill.

Almost any field of study can yield a skill, if approached in the right way. But the thing is, it requires a particular attitude: wanting knowledge because of what can be done with it, rather than knowing simply to know.

That attitude doesn't fly in contemporary American academic circles, particularly not in the liberal arts. This is not a condemnation of the liberal arts as fields of study: some journalism majors do indeed become journalists, some theater majors become actors, communications studies can yield skills valuable to almost any sort of work, and of course any field of study, combined with education courses, can yield a teacher in that field. The list goes on and on. But there is a prevailing attitude that this is not why people should study; that knowledge is important for the knowing, not for doing anything with that knowledge. That attitude gets passed down to the students, who come to dismiss doing as similarly unimportant, and you end up with large number of graduates who know a great deal about their field but not how to do anything with what they've learned. The barista jokes here on Fark exist for a reason.

Part of the problem is that in the liberal arts, this attitude goes back for literally thousands of years, to the very first curricula with that name. Indeed, the word "liberal" in this context goes straight back to Latin, where it means "suited for a free person": members of the nobility, people who wouldn't have to work for a living and could afford to be unskilled in ways that slaves, peasants, and even business owners never could. There's irony in the fact that many Occupier students are in courses of study designed for the 1%, and that many of the 1% don't study these fields so much anymore.

We don't live in those societies anymore. We also no longer live in a society where people can be expected to go into the same line of work as their parents and thus learn skills from them, or to apprentice themselves and learn skills that way. That responsibility falls to the schools nowadays, and that's an appropriate place. But it means that this long-cherished attitude no longer works, and the problems it's causing for our higher education system aren't going to be fixed until the schools realize that.
2012-10-05 10:49:05 AM  
1 votes:
Dear Businesses,


Younger people need to be trained in the real world application of knowledge. Not enough paid internships are around(and it needs to be paid, how do you expect people to make rent?) and you're getting far too picky with your hiring requirements, that'd be okay if it were humans sorting the applications, but since you have computers doing it, all you've taught us is to manipulate the "AI" in our favor, something we've been doing since we got our first Nintendo.
 
Displayed 8 of 8 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
Advertisement
On Twitter






In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report