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(Time)   "Businesses regard training of young people as their social responsibility"   (world.time.com) divider line 61
    More: Interesting, Swiss Federal Council, Companies of Switzerland, trade organization, Switzerland, apprenticeships, nonprofit research, collective responsibility  
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1557 clicks; posted to Business » on 05 Oct 2012 at 10:42 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-05 09:10:25 AM
Well, the school "aint" doing it.
 
2012-10-05 10:45:24 AM
Oh, in Switzerland.
I knew it wasn't about the US, or they were lying for the PR value.
 
2012-10-05 10:48:59 AM
Oh, wow.

Right...

This is laughable in the states.

Sergeant Grumbles: Oh, in Switzerland.
I knew it wasn't about the US, or they were lying for the PR value.


Oh, that's why.
 
2012-10-05 10:49:05 AM
Dear Businesses,


Younger people need to be trained in the real world application of knowledge. Not enough paid internships are around(and it needs to be paid, how do you expect people to make rent?) and you're getting far too picky with your hiring requirements, that'd be okay if it were humans sorting the applications, but since you have computers doing it, all you've taught us is to manipulate the "AI" in our favor, something we've been doing since we got our first Nintendo.
 
2012-10-05 10:50:36 AM

Sergeant Grumbles: Oh, in Switzerland.
I knew it wasn't about the US, or they were lying for the PR value.


Was it sad that my first thought was "I wonder which country this is?"?
 
2012-10-05 11:07:14 AM
Young people simply need to be beaten regularly.

For the sin of being young
 
2012-10-05 11:23:13 AM
It would be an unfair burden on American businesses to ask them to train their own employees in their tasks. That's the government's job. And those bastards keep increasing my taxes for some reason, probably to throw it down the educational union fatcat blackhole. I feel like I've been taxed enough on that end. We should really put a stop to that and cut all major sources of tax revenue, so those American businesses can create jobs and hire employees who they can't be expected to train.
 
2012-10-05 11:23:27 AM
The problem with the statement "education is the key to success" is not its accuracy: education is, in fact, the key to success. The problem is its precision: not all forms of education are the key to success. To succeed, you need a skill.

Almost any field of study can yield a skill, if approached in the right way. But the thing is, it requires a particular attitude: wanting knowledge because of what can be done with it, rather than knowing simply to know.

That attitude doesn't fly in contemporary American academic circles, particularly not in the liberal arts. This is not a condemnation of the liberal arts as fields of study: some journalism majors do indeed become journalists, some theater majors become actors, communications studies can yield skills valuable to almost any sort of work, and of course any field of study, combined with education courses, can yield a teacher in that field. The list goes on and on. But there is a prevailing attitude that this is not why people should study; that knowledge is important for the knowing, not for doing anything with that knowledge. That attitude gets passed down to the students, who come to dismiss doing as similarly unimportant, and you end up with large number of graduates who know a great deal about their field but not how to do anything with what they've learned. The barista jokes here on Fark exist for a reason.

Part of the problem is that in the liberal arts, this attitude goes back for literally thousands of years, to the very first curricula with that name. Indeed, the word "liberal" in this context goes straight back to Latin, where it means "suited for a free person": members of the nobility, people who wouldn't have to work for a living and could afford to be unskilled in ways that slaves, peasants, and even business owners never could. There's irony in the fact that many Occupier students are in courses of study designed for the 1%, and that many of the 1% don't study these fields so much anymore.

We don't live in those societies anymore. We also no longer live in a society where people can be expected to go into the same line of work as their parents and thus learn skills from them, or to apprentice themselves and learn skills that way. That responsibility falls to the schools nowadays, and that's an appropriate place. But it means that this long-cherished attitude no longer works, and the problems it's causing for our higher education system aren't going to be fixed until the schools realize that.
 
2012-10-05 11:25:08 AM
Happens here in the states too. At any given time I have at least 1 FTE who's doing nothing but learning how to do his job. We gladly pay him/her durring this period.

/we're foreign owned, so maybe that has something to do with it
//oh, and our local universities are worthless
 
2012-10-05 11:33:16 AM
but i thought young people should be happy to work for free for as long as an employer wants? the experience pays off eventually, Fark Independents told me so.
 
2012-10-05 11:33:21 AM
Well come on now, in the US they're perfectly willing to train prisoners because they have no choice but to work for 20 cents a day.

Lots of prisoners are young, so it's basically the same thing.
 
2012-10-05 11:53:03 AM

KyngNothing: Sergeant Grumbles: Oh, in Switzerland.
I knew it wasn't about the US, or they were lying for the PR value.

Was it sad that my first thought was "I wonder which country this is?"?


I was expecting it to be from the 1950's.

There's a DeVry commercial running where they claim there's millions of unfilled jobs because the skills sets haven't existed before. I've seen these jobs and I know they're thinly veiled attempts to get more H1B visas by advertising unfillable job requirements, then they'll hire a fresh grad from India who also lacks the advertised job requirements.
 
2012-10-05 12:03:43 PM

wildcardjack: KyngNothing: Sergeant Grumbles: Oh, in Switzerland.
I knew it wasn't about the US, or they were lying for the PR value.

Was it sad that my first thought was "I wonder which country this is?"?

I was expecting it to be from the 1950's.

There's a DeVry commercial running where they claim there's millions of unfilled jobs because the skills sets haven't existed before. I've seen these jobs and I know they're thinly veiled attempts to get more H1B visas by advertising unfillable job requirements, then they'll hire a fresh grad from India who also lacks the advertised job requirements.


Every time I see that commercial, I want to punch the T.V. As you said, they can't fill them because they don't want to fill them. They reject qualified American candidates and then request HB1 visas to allow a foreign national to take the job at greatly reduced salary.
 
2012-10-05 12:14:59 PM
But people that go to VoTec schools have to get their hands dirty and can't wear a sports coat and be cool hipsters on the off hours.
 
2012-10-05 12:25:53 PM
Dear Young People,

It's your job to give me a reason to hire you. It's not my obligation to hire you, no matter what your mommy says. Fix your attitude, comb your hair, and spell things right on your resume. At least pretend like you give a crap. Seriously, if you do that, you'll probably get a job offer. The labor pool is currently very thin.
 
2012-10-05 12:56:07 PM

RumsfeldsReplacement: Dear Young People,

It's your job to give me a reason to hire you. It's not my obligation to hire you, no matter what your mommy says. Fix your attitude, comb your hair, and spell things right on your resume. At least pretend like you give a crap. Seriously, if you do that, you'll probably get a job offer. The labor pool is currently very thin.


You know, I must say it takes alot of nerve for the parent generation to tell the children they raised that they were raised wrong.

also

fbcdn-sphotos-d-a.akamaihd.net

/oblig
 
2012-10-05 12:59:58 PM

RumsfeldsReplacement: Dear Young People,

It's your job to give me a reason to hire you. It's not my obligation to hire you, no matter what your mommy says. Fix your attitude, comb your hair, and spell things right on your resume. At least pretend like you give a crap. Seriously, if you do that, you'll probably get a job offer. The labor pool is currently very thin.


I meet the qualifications you requested.
My parents have no input on my job search
My attitude is that of confidence because I've worked with hundreds of clients that are happy with my past performance.
My hair is gelled and spiked for a more modern look.
My resume is impeccable.
I give a crap since I have a mortgage.


I get a job offer for every interview I go to. That isn't the problem, the problem is that employers are letting HR dictate who goes on to the interview stage. If I can get past HR and to the project manager, I know I'll get the job.

/fark HR
 
2012-10-05 01:02:34 PM

Girion47: RumsfeldsReplacement: Dear Young People,

It's your job to give me a reason to hire you. It's not my obligation to hire you, no matter what your mommy says. Fix your attitude, comb your hair, and spell things right on your resume. At least pretend like you give a crap. Seriously, if you do that, you'll probably get a job offer. The labor pool is currently very thin.

I meet the qualifications you requested.
My parents have no input on my job search
My attitude is that of confidence because I've worked with hundreds of clients that are happy with my past performance.
My hair is gelled and spiked for a more modern look.
My resume is impeccable.
I give a crap since I have a mortgage.


I get a job offer for every interview I go to. That isn't the problem, the problem is that employers are letting HR dictate who goes on to the interview stage. If I can get past HR and to the project manager, I know I'll get the job.

/fark HR


Yeah that's true. For all the morons that I interview that somehow HR let slip though, there must be at least an equal number of awesome people whose resumes were used as Peggy's napkin.
 
2012-10-05 01:33:06 PM

Girion47: I get a job offer for every interview I go to. That isn't the problem, the problem is that employers are letting HR dictate who goes on to the interview stage. If I can get past HR and to the project manager, I know I'll get the job.

/fark HR


I've NEVER gotten a job thru an HR department or a cold application, it's always been via somebody I've worked with before or from someone who gets a recommendation from somebody who knows me and my work. Networking is essential, as is getting a rep for showing up on time, not being difficult, and always delivering.
 
2012-10-05 01:34:26 PM

RumsfeldsReplacement: Dear Young People,

It's your job to give me a reason to hire you. It's not my obligation to hire you, no matter what your mommy says. Fix your attitude, comb your hair, and spell things right on your resume. At least pretend like you give a crap. Seriously, if you do that, you'll probably get a job offer. The labor pool is currently very thin.


Dear Old People,

respect is a two way street. Start showing some, and you'll start receiving some.

Additionally, once hired, if you're going to demand loyalty from the employees, you need to show some. A paycheck does not do this, but helping us to keep our skills sharp and to develop new ones as the business environment changes. These things help us to help your stay competitive. If that's too hard for you to figure out, then perhaps you need to be in a position where you can do less harm to the company, the other employees, and probably yourself.

/not a young person
//tired of hearing excuses and double-speak as to why businesses can't think long term
///has an MBA, and two graduate degrees (Engr and IS)
 
2012-10-05 01:51:49 PM

nmemkha: wildcardjack: KyngNothing: Sergeant Grumbles: Oh, in Switzerland.
I knew it wasn't about the US, or they were lying for the PR value.

Was it sad that my first thought was "I wonder which country this is?"?

I was expecting it to be from the 1950's.

There's a DeVry commercial running where they claim there's millions of unfilled jobs because the skills sets haven't existed before. I've seen these jobs and I know they're thinly veiled attempts to get more H1B visas by advertising unfillable job requirements, then they'll hire a fresh grad from India who also lacks the advertised job requirements.

Every time I see that commercial, I want to punch the T.V. As you said, they can't fill them because they don't want to fill them. They reject qualified American candidates and then request HB1 visas to allow a foreign national to take the job at greatly reduced salary.


The fix should be that you can hire an H1B if you can't find a qualified American candidate but you must pay them at a rate above what you would have had to pay the American. See how many H1Bs are hired then.
 
2012-10-05 01:56:52 PM

RumsfeldsReplacement: Girion47: RumsfeldsReplacement: Dear Young People,

It's your job to give me a reason to hire you. It's not my obligation to hire you, no matter what your mommy says. Fix your attitude, comb your hair, and spell things right on your resume. At least pretend like you give a crap. Seriously, if you do that, you'll probably get a job offer. The labor pool is currently very thin.

I meet the qualifications you requested.
My parents have no input on my job search
My attitude is that of confidence because I've worked with hundreds of clients that are happy with my past performance.
My hair is gelled and spiked for a more modern look.
My resume is impeccable.
I give a crap since I have a mortgage.


I get a job offer for every interview I go to. That isn't the problem, the problem is that employers are letting HR dictate who goes on to the interview stage. If I can get past HR and to the project manager, I know I'll get the job.

/fark HR

Yeah that's true. For all the morons that I interview that somehow HR let slip though, there must be at least an equal number of awesome people whose resumes were used as Peggy's napkin.


Those morons know how to put a 1 pixel box containing all the key words from your job posting, in the resume they submitted to HR's robo-scanner.

I don't do this, as I'm honest and am able to be employed upon my own merits.
 
2012-10-05 02:25:37 PM
Simple fix.

New Rule.

H1B visa workers have a new minimum wage of 50$ per hour. If the skill set is unavailable then clearly it must be unique and in demand. 50$ per hour is NOT a lot of money for a supposed in demand skill set.

IF what you TRUELY want is cheap labour? how about you start producing cheaper products, lower rent housing and gas that doesnt cost half a days pay just to get to work.

The work force is dynamic, the BUSINESSES are the ones lagging behind the inflationary times. They dont want to pay people what they deserve for their time based on quality of life.
 
2012-10-05 02:56:43 PM

poisonedpawn78: The work force is dynamic, the BUSINESSES are the ones lagging behind the inflationary times. They dont want to pay people what they deserve for their time based on quality of life.


This.
But the instant you mention what people "deserve" you're called a communist and told "You're lucky to have a job." followed with "If we could only get rid of the minimum wage..."
 
2012-10-05 03:12:23 PM

CujoQuarrel: The fix should be that you can hire an H1B if you can't find a qualified American candidate but you must pay them at a rate above what you would have had to pay the American. See how many H1Bs are hired then.


There's already a requirement that you must pay prevailing wages for the job. You have also paid quite a bit of money to file for and be granted the H1-B. I'm not saying the H1Bs actually get what they're supposed to, I couldn't say because I have no evidence one way or the other. But the rule does exist. As someone in an H1B heavy industry (software development) there's a SERIOUS lack of talent in the pool of candidates. Unemployment is about 2% in IT. There's practically no one else to hire.
 
2012-10-05 03:45:21 PM

meat0918: Oh, wow.

Right...

This is laughable in the states.

Sergeant Grumbles: Oh, in Switzerland.
I knew it wasn't about the US, or they were lying for the PR value.

Oh, that's why.


I spent a year in a swiss school. I can say this with certainty. swiss high school is more demanding than american college. It wasn't until grad school that I felt challenged like my year in a swiss college.
 
2012-10-05 03:46:34 PM

pute kisses like a man: my year in a swiss college.


farkk... high school (in my defense, it was called a college, though it taught at the high school level)
 
2012-10-05 04:17:09 PM

Sergeant Grumbles: Oh, in Switzerland.


Farking commies need to learn about personal responsibility.

/they're commies, right?
 
2012-10-05 04:23:52 PM
After watching my two kids go through what is supposedly the best public school in PA and then college... I have come to the following conclusion... we are all farked.
 
2012-10-05 04:33:52 PM

the_geek: CujoQuarrel: The fix should be that you can hire an H1B if you can't find a qualified American candidate but you must pay them at a rate above what you would have had to pay the American. See how many H1Bs are hired then.

There's already a requirement that you must pay prevailing wages for the job. You have also paid quite a bit of money to file for and be granted the H1-B. I'm not saying the H1Bs actually get what they're supposed to, I couldn't say because I have no evidence one way or the other. But the rule does exist. As someone in an H1B heavy industry (software development) there's a SERIOUS lack of talent in the pool of candidates. Unemployment is about 2% in IT. There's practically no one else to hire.


May be like the immigrant workers in my home town at a big chicken processing plant. If you want to work you have to do a kickback to the foreman (and I would assume that it goes up the chain from there). They have almost no local workers anymore -- not counting management.
 
2012-10-05 04:34:13 PM

The Stealth Hippopotamus: Well, the school "aint" doing it.


Schooling has never, ever, anywhere, effectively substituted for on-the-job training. This is why doctors go through the intern process. Engineers do EIT years. It's less formal, but goes all the way to mopping the floor at BK. Schooling is important. It is never a replacement.

wildcardjack: I've seen these jobs and I know they're thinly veiled attempts to get more H1B visas by advertising unfillable job requirements, then they'll hire a fresh grad from India who also lacks the advertised job requirements.


To be fair to the company, the fresh grad from India will absolutely blatantly lie about his experiences and qualifications. I've seen that over and over again. What's the worst that can happen to him if he's found out? Besides, if his employer has jumped through the H1B hoops, they don't want to have to do it again. Meanwhile, the tech-ish grads from small-town Iowa are reluctant to stretch the truth on their applications.
 
2012-10-05 04:44:52 PM
It isn't 1962 any more. You can't expect to do particularly well on a High School Education.

If you aren't going to a 4-year University, you go to the community college.
If you aren't going to the community college, you go to vo-tech college/schools.
If you aren't going vo-tech, you best join the military to school your ass.
 
2012-10-05 05:16:51 PM

RumsfeldsReplacement: Yeah that's true. For all the morons that I interview that somehow HR let slip though, there must be at least an equal number of awesome people whose resumes were used as Peggy's napkin.


I also agree with this sentiment. The less HR is involved in the hiring process, in general the better the hires are. HR's function is to reduce financial risk for the company, not to acquire high-quality people.
 
2012-10-05 05:37:01 PM

the_geek: CujoQuarrel: The fix should be that you can hire an H1B if you can't find a qualified American candidate but you must pay them at a rate above what you would have had to pay the American. See how many H1Bs are hired then.

There's already a requirement that you must pay prevailing wages for the job. You have also paid quite a bit of money to file for and be granted the H1-B. I'm not saying the H1Bs actually get what they're supposed to, I couldn't say because I have no evidence one way or the other. But the rule does exist. As someone in an H1B heavy industry (software development) there's a SERIOUS lack of talent in the pool of candidates. Unemployment is about 2% in IT. There's practically no one else to hire.


As an unemployed IT worker, I'm getting a kick out of this reply...

On the other hand it's my own fault. I found my previous employer insufferable enough to prefer the prospect of starvation to continuing to work for her and I'm not willing to relocate, so I have no right to complain about my status.

Still though, it's bizarre to watch experience levels rise in the job postings every year. Entry level positions that require 6-7 years experience? Help desk technician positions that require a Master's degree? I get this weird vibe of "Persons born after 1982 need not apply".

And many of the requirements are oddly specific. Example: "must have experience with PeopleSoft". What if the candidate has supported a similar CRM like Siebel? And the reality is that any developer who can tie their shoes can figure out everything they need to know about a canned product's API in less than six months so why bother making this an unnegotiable requirement in the first place?

I've seen this from the other side too. Someone in Nashville was recently very excited about my resume because I noted that I worked with a specific FTP client. It took me less than a day to learn that damned thing, but they said they couldn't find anyone in the country who had experience with it (I advised hiring any college graduate).

People get mad at HR but they're only taking what they receive from the hiring manager. Hiring managers, I suspect, who have a degree from clown college.

Switzerland's got the right idea. The US is a strange place these days.
 
2012-10-05 06:19:24 PM

MusicMakeMyHeadPound: Still though, it's bizarre to watch experience levels rise in the job postings every year. Entry level positions that require 6-7 years experience? Help desk technician positions that require a Master's degree? I get this weird vibe of "Persons born after 1982 need not apply".


You've also neglected to mention that said positions frequently still offer entry level wages. 6-7 years experience in multiple software applications and computing languages? $25k/yr.
I seriously came across a web developer job that paid minimum wage and demanded 1-2 years experience. fark. For the year and some change experience I had making cell phone interfaces (which was outsourced), I made $18/hr. How the holy hell can you justify paying less than half? How do you justify minimum wage for a college degree and a couple years' experience?
 
2012-10-05 06:38:38 PM

MusicMakeMyHeadPound: the_geek: CujoQuarrel: The fix should be that you can hire an H1B if you can't find a qualified American candidate but you must pay them at a rate above what you would have had to pay the American. See how many H1Bs are hired then.

There's already a requirement that you must pay prevailing wages for the job. You have also paid quite a bit of money to file for and be granted the H1-B. I'm not saying the H1Bs actually get what they're supposed to, I couldn't say because I have no evidence one way or the other. But the rule does exist. As someone in an H1B heavy industry (software development) there's a SERIOUS lack of talent in the pool of candidates. Unemployment is about 2% in IT. There's practically no one else to hire.

As an unemployed IT worker, I'm getting a kick out of this reply...

On the other hand it's my own fault. I found my previous employer insufferable enough to prefer the prospect of starvation to continuing to work for her and I'm not willing to relocate, so I have no right to complain about my status.

Still though, it's bizarre to watch experience levels rise in the job postings every year. Entry level positions that require 6-7 years experience? Help desk technician positions that require a Master's degree? I get this weird vibe of "Persons born after 1982 need not apply".

And many of the requirements are oddly specific. Example: "must have experience with PeopleSoft". What if the candidate has supported a similar CRM like Siebel? And the reality is that any developer who can tie their shoes can figure out everything they need to know about a canned product's API in less than six months so why bother making this an unnegotiable requirement in the first place?..


I'm having a similar problem with corporate finance positions. at my last job in banking I used industry specific programs and applications developed in house, with the exception of Business Objects. I've never touched SAP Analytics or Hyperion. I used other ERPs before without problems, but that's not good enough.

are SAP and Hyperion that difficult to learn?
 
2012-10-05 07:10:06 PM

Sergeant Grumbles: MusicMakeMyHeadPound: Still though, it's bizarre to watch experience levels rise in the job postings every year. Entry level positions that require 6-7 years experience? Help desk technician positions that require a Master's degree? I get this weird vibe of "Persons born after 1982 need not apply".

You've also neglected to mention that said positions frequently still offer entry level wages. 6-7 years experience in multiple software applications and computing languages? $25k/yr.
I seriously came across a web developer job that paid minimum wage and demanded 1-2 years experience. fark. For the year and some change experience I had making cell phone interfaces (which was outsourced), I made $18/hr. How the holy hell can you justify paying less than half? How do you justify minimum wage for a college degree and a couple years' experience?


I did bartending ages ago. 99.9% of the time people were pretty good, but every once in a while you get some raging douchebag who flashes a dollar and gets offended when you don't beg like a puppy for it.

What's worse is that you're usually better off not serving them at all. They're toxic customers and are going to be a bad day no matter what you do. Better to sink no lower than asking them to buzz off.

I've found that the same principle applies across the board, even in job searches. One person didn't understand why I repeatedly hung up on them after hearing a pitch about a major Java development project after which they offered $8/hr on a 1099 basis.

They say never to burn your bridges, but you're not the only one with matches and sometimes you'd prefer there to be a boundary between you and some people.

Dumbobruni
I'm having a similar problem with corporate finance positions. at my last job in banking I used industry specific programs and applications developed in house, with the exception of Business Objects. I've never touched SAP Analytics or Hyperion. I used other ERPs before without problems, but that's not good enough.

are SAP and Hyperion that difficult to learn?


Yeah, you corporate finance folks get the shaft about as bad as IT people. Makes sense, we're highly trained, mostly technical, non-management and not cheap. I would love to find out why there seems to be a concerted effort in job postings to pretend we can't reason our way out of a wet paper bag.
 
2012-10-05 07:31:53 PM
What culture doesn't believe this?

Oh right, Corporate America TM, where they all want GOD at minimum wage (and they will try to negotiate down). Also, 20 years experience in Windows 8.
 
2012-10-05 08:13:34 PM

MusicMakeMyHeadPound: They say never to burn your bridges, but you're not the only one with matches and sometimes you'd prefer there to be a boundary between you and some people.


I might have to steal that.

ajgeek: Also, 20 years experience in Windows 8.


Oh fark. You've just devised the plot of Looper 2.
 
2012-10-05 08:18:44 PM
What universe is this article describing? It ain't the 90s anymore.
 
2012-10-05 08:48:17 PM
On the job training? If a person doesn't come out of college with the exact set of skills and experience in proprietary software as a position requires, the company goes on and on about how there aren't any qualified applicants. Of course not! But if you trained them, they would be qualified. It seems so simple.
 
2012-10-05 09:17:38 PM

links136: RumsfeldsReplacement: Dear Young People,

It's your job to give me a reason to hire you. It's not my obligation to hire you, no matter what your mommy says. Fix your attitude, comb your hair, and spell things right on your resume. At least pretend like you give a crap. Seriously, if you do that, you'll probably get a job offer. The labor pool is currently very thin.

You know, I must say it takes alot of nerve for the parent generation to tell the children they raised that they were raised wrong.

also

[fbcdn-sphotos-d-a.akamaihd.net image 462x452]

/oblig


The most valuable thing I learned from public education (and college by extension) was a fancy title doesn't mean anything. Question authority, don't follow the status quo blindly just because someone has had been in a job for a long time or is your senior, and speak up when you see a potential problem coming.
Maybe I just lucked out, but I now have a job that requires working without an instruction manual and constantly questioning why things are done the way they are (app analyst)

/ I was not exactly loved by the school administrators - who as best I could tell were paid to play minesweeper and yell at teenagers all day
 
2012-10-05 10:23:31 PM
I WISH I could go to vocational school for my basic CIS classes (coding, database structure etc), but the only one around here offers classes in... email. And how to use Windows.

Sometimes living in the sticks drives me crazy, oh wait change that to 'often'.
 
2012-10-05 11:25:26 PM

ladyfortuna: I WISH I could go to vocational school for my basic CIS classes (coding, database structure etc), but the only one around here offers classes in... email. And how to use Windows.


You also have to wonder where the holy hell those people are going off to get jobs after learning "email".
 
2012-10-06 01:24:13 AM
Everyone should get a livible wage. A skill to operate within society should be learned, and more in demand skills should offer higher pay rates, but even the man who chooses to be a janitor should be able to raise a family on his wages.

It's sad, but by reading this article you would think that we have somehow become accustomed to the idea that the only path to a livable wage is to be a cubicle dweller and or work with computers.
 
2012-10-06 04:24:05 AM

Sergeant Grumbles: Oh, in Switzerland.
I knew it wasn't about the US, or they were lying for the PR value.


THIS. In the old days, when you walked in to your corporate job with your degree, the first thing your employer would do is send you to training. The education gave you the skills and basic knowledge. The training taught you what you needed to know to work at the specific company. In the past couple of decades, however, employers have cheaped out, slashing training budgets or even eliminating them altogether, and then they've turned around and blamed the colleges for not training their job candidates properly.

The truth is this: Employers don't want to pay for training any more. Period. They don't want loyal, long-term employees any more. They don't want to pay decent living wages any more. It's all about saving every last f*cking dime so that corporate bigshots can get bigger bonuses when stock prices go up. Training would just eat up some of that profit margin, and we can't have that.
 
2012-10-06 05:04:24 AM
Doesn't anyone else dislike work?

/deservedly poor
 
2012-10-06 06:16:43 AM
The world needs ditchdiggers, too Danny.
 
2012-10-06 08:32:14 AM

Fark Me To Tears: The truth is this: Employers don't want to pay for training any more. Period. They don't want loyal, long-term employees any more. They don't want to pay decent living wages any more. It's all about saving every last f*cking dime so that corporate bigshots can get bigger bonuses when stock prices go up. Training would just eat up some of that profit margin, and we can't have that.


Don't forget donating tens of millions to right-wing Super PACs so they can get their pro-business cronies into government for even more tax breaks, subsidies, a lower minimum wage, etc.
 
2012-10-06 08:50:01 AM

Bob The Nob: The world needs ditchdiggers, too Danny.


Today's 'ditch digger' needs to know how to operate a backhoe or other heavy machinery.

Danny best look in to the fine world of part-time food service employment.
 
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