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(WTKR)   Trucker: God is my co-pilot. Train engineer: Darwin is mine   (wtkr.com) divider line 11
    More: Fail, co-pilot, railroad engineers, semi-trailer trucks, CSX, trains  
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10936 clicks; posted to Main » on 05 Oct 2012 at 9:37 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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Xai
2012-10-05 11:05:50 AM
3 votes:

phyrkrakr: buzzcut73: One year, a teacher explained that when the engineer applies the emergency brakes all the wheels on the train wear down unevenly and have to be replaced. He showed the math and told us that we weren't worth all the damage that happens when a train has to do an emergency stop.

That's probably a little exaggerated.

If you ever hear a rail car going through a town and banging like crazy (a repeated whomp-whomp-whomp sound) like once every second or less, that's from a flat spot on the wheel. When they brake them super hard, the wheels lock up and just grind on the rails, which does make a flat spot. I would guess that it's got to be a really hardcore emergency stop on a fully loaded car going pretty fast before something like that happens, but it does happen.


you're a little out dated but technically correct.

While they are still called 'flats' the wheels are made of a harder steel than the rails these days, the flat spots are created when the wheels lock up and the metal from the rail is ground off by friction and adheres itself to the wheel, flattening the section and crating a lump of metal on the wheel. The wheels have to be re-profiled on a wheel lathe to remove this metal when the train goes in for servicing.

Also trains do emergency brake if they are going to hit something but it can take well over a mile, sometimes several, to stop - even in emergency.
2012-10-05 10:59:19 AM
2 votes:

buzzcut73: One year, a teacher explained that when the engineer applies the emergency brakes all the wheels on the train wear down unevenly and have to be replaced. He showed the math and told us that we weren't worth all the damage that happens when a train has to do an emergency stop.

That's probably a little exaggerated.


If you ever hear a rail car going through a town and banging like crazy (a repeated whomp-whomp-whomp sound) like once every second or less, that's from a flat spot on the wheel. When they brake them super hard, the wheels lock up and just grind on the rails, which does make a flat spot. I would guess that it's got to be a really hardcore emergency stop on a fully loaded car going pretty fast before something like that happens, but it does happen.
2012-10-05 10:29:03 AM
2 votes:

Harry Freakstorm: Growing up in Chicago in the 60's, we got a once a year class in railroad safety from Illinois Central. Pretty much the standard stuff: Look both ways. Cross at the crossing. Don't walk on the tracks.

There was also something about kids finding devices along the tracks and taking them. This was a big no no according to the IC guys. Supposedly, they could explode if you hit them with a hammer. I don't remember what it did but I spent a lot of time looking for one.


That would be a Torpedo They are pretty damn cool.

One year, a teacher explained that when the engineer applies the emergency brakes all the wheels on the train wear down unevenly and have to be replaced. He showed the math and told us that we weren't worth all the damage that happens when a train has to do an emergency stop.

That's probably a little exaggerated.
2012-10-05 11:45:12 AM
1 votes:
When I was around 11 years old I got to ride in the driver's cab of a freight train, blow the whistle, all that. At one crossing we barely hit the rear end of a car that tried to beat us through a crossing. The collision caused the car to fishtail out of control and it slammed into a telephone pole, and since they had sped up to beat us they were going pretty fast. We didn't feel a thing in the train and the conductor didn't even apply the brakes - he just called it in and kept going. As far as I remember the injuries to the driver and passengers in the car were only minor.
Xai
2012-10-05 10:21:29 AM
1 votes:

prjindigo: I know what caused the accident.

#1. A single locomotive is limited to 30mph at all times.
#2. A single locomotive and two loaded cars is "not a train" according to the crossing arm sensors. It must stop and make sure the arms go and the bells clang.
#3. Some shiathead omnommed that truck and had to be doing something in the range of FIRED WITHOUT PENSION in order to carry it that far down the tracks.


1) Locomotives may be speed restricted on certain lines, but that is a local issue, not a national rule.
2) Given that the locomotive was pulling 4 cars this renders your point 1 and 2 invalid. Also given that there are NO crossing arms or bells at this crossing (google maps) then this point is also invalid.
3) The stopping distance of a locomotive is considerably longer than you might expect. I have known it to take over half a mile to stop from 30mph (890 yards at 33mph) and given that the driver of the truck died instantly, your point is also invalid.

Where is that hair is a bird picture when you need it...
2012-10-05 10:17:42 AM
1 votes:
Trains and Pedestrians have the right of way. Trains, because if they hit you, game over man, game over, and if you hit the Pedestrian, you're going to wish a train had hit you instead.
2012-10-05 10:05:16 AM
1 votes:

wraithmare: UberDave: [s11.postimage.org image 500x375]

Love those!

Physics is a biatch. When I used to commute on the train, at least once a year we'd have to stop for 45 minutes due to a suicide by train. The worst one was the guy on the bicycle as we heard it go underneath our car. I can't imagine being the engineer and facing that. Stat I heard was every engineer in their career will be involved in at least one fatal collision.


Yea, its believed to be true. My cousin has been an Amtrak engineer for about 25 years, and he's been involved in two fatalities, and he says that every other engineer he knows has been involved in at least one. He says its terrible, because you're helpless to stop in time, you know beforehand that someone is about to die.
2012-10-05 10:01:20 AM
1 votes:

prjindigo: #2. A single locomotive and two loaded cars is "not a train" according to the crossing arm sensors. It must stop and make sure the arms go and the bells clang.


WTF? I've seen the arms go down for a single locomotive.
2012-10-05 09:59:31 AM
1 votes:

prjindigo: I know what caused the accident.

#1. A single locomotive is limited to 30mph at all times.
#2. A single locomotive and two loaded cars is "not a train" according to the crossing arm sensors. It must stop and make sure the arms go and the bells clang.
#3. Some shiathead omnommed that truck and had to be doing something in the range of FIRED WITHOUT PENSION in order to carry it that far down the tracks.


Still, one of the first things they teach you in driver's ed is to look when you cross the tracks. A train absolutely always has the right of way.

It looks like he missed his Last Clear Chance.
2012-10-05 09:49:46 AM
1 votes:

UberDave: [s11.postimage.org image 500x375]


Love those!

Physics is a biatch. When I used to commute on the train, at least once a year we'd have to stop for 45 minutes due to a suicide by train. The worst one was the guy on the bicycle as we heard it go underneath our car. I can't imagine being the engineer and facing that. Stat I heard was every engineer in their career will be involved in at least one fatal collision.
2012-10-05 09:42:17 AM
1 votes:
Yet another case of Trains blindly roaming the countryside smashing into unsuspecting motorists. When will the government mandate trains stay on a per-determined path so we know where they will cross the road.
 
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