If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Yahoo)   Humans stopped having sex with Neanderthals after discovering Eurasia, yellow fever   (news.yahoo.com) divider line 72
    More: Interesting, Eurasia, Neanderthals, PLoS Genetics, genetic variants, Eurasian, genetic recombination, egg cells, stone tools  
•       •       •

4228 clicks; posted to Geek » on 05 Oct 2012 at 11:39 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



72 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2012-10-05 08:35:41 AM
In 2010, scientists completed the first sequence of the Neanderthal genome using DNA extracted from fossils, and an examination of the genetic material suggested that modern humans' ancestors occasionally successfully interbred with Neanderthals. Recent estimates reveal that Neanderthal DNA makes up 1 percent to 4 percent of modern Eurasian genomes, perhaps endowing some people with the robust immune systems they enjoy today.

I could've sworn I've read studies that say modern humans have 0% neanderthal in them. Can we get some consensus here?
 
2012-10-05 08:39:21 AM

Rev. Skarekroe: In 2010, scientists completed the first sequence of the Neanderthal genome using DNA extracted from fossils, and an examination of the genetic material suggested that modern humans' ancestors occasionally successfully interbred with Neanderthals. Recent estimates reveal that Neanderthal DNA makes up 1 percent to 4 percent of modern Eurasian genomes, perhaps endowing some people with the robust immune systems they enjoy today.

I could've sworn I've read studies that say modern humans have 0% neanderthal in them. Can we get some consensus here?


It seems like ever since they actually got there hands on some Neanderthal DNA and sequenced it, they have been saying people outside of Africa have mixed with Neanderthals and share some DNA.
 
2012-10-05 08:39:57 AM
Their hands. Too early in morning. Ugh. I don't evolve before 9 AM.
 
2012-10-05 08:43:48 AM

WorldCitizen: Their hands. Too early in morning. Ugh. I don't evolve before 9 AM.


I'm usually homo-erectus until I get up to pee.
 
2012-10-05 08:48:22 AM
Speaking of homo-erectus, here's a picture of some homo-erectuses bullying a gigantopithecus.
It doesn't have anything to do with the article, I just like it.

www.cryptomundo.com
 
2012-10-05 08:54:35 AM
The last sex between Neanderthals and modern humans likely occurred as recently as 47,000 years ago

So you're saying that's when they got married.
 
2012-10-05 10:07:36 AM
i253.photobucket.com
 
2012-10-05 10:17:28 AM

Rev. Skarekroe: In 2010, scientists completed the first sequence of the Neanderthal genome using DNA extracted from fossils, and an examination of the genetic material suggested that modern humans' ancestors occasionally successfully interbred with Neanderthals. Recent estimates reveal that Neanderthal DNA makes up 1 percent to 4 percent of modern Eurasian genomes, perhaps endowing some people with the robust immune systems they enjoy today.

I could've sworn I've read studies that say modern humans have 0% neanderthal in them. Can we get some consensus here?


I'm a cultural anthropologist but I've been reading a lot about this subject because I'm a T.A. for a class on extinction and it seems as though people living in Eurasia have 1-4% Neanderthal DNA while those in Africa have none (mainly because Neanderthals were living in Eurasia when they interbred with humans). This article lays out that hypothesis pretty well: Link
 
vpb [TotalFark]
2012-10-05 10:34:01 AM

Rev. Skarekroe: gigantopithecus


So how much gigantopithecus DNA do we have? I'm guessing not much.
 
2012-10-05 10:58:57 AM
While it took a while for the DNA evidence to show the interbreeding, common sense would indicate ancient humanoids were boinking everything and anything. Much like their descendents.
 
2012-10-05 11:17:05 AM

catusr: While it took a while for the DNA evidence to show the interbreeding, common sense would indicate ancient humanoids were boinking everything and anything. Much like their descendents.


Well, right. I think the question was then just if reproduction was possible from the boinking.
 
2012-10-05 12:00:49 PM
No, it was when they discovered Eastasia.
 
2012-10-05 12:04:29 PM

WorldCitizen: Rev. Skarekroe: In 2010, scientists completed the first sequence of the Neanderthal genome using DNA extracted from fossils, and an examination of the genetic material suggested that modern humans' ancestors occasionally successfully interbred with Neanderthals. Recent estimates reveal that Neanderthal DNA makes up 1 percent to 4 percent of modern Eurasian genomes, perhaps endowing some people with the robust immune systems they enjoy today.

I could've sworn I've read studies that say modern humans have 0% neanderthal in them. Can we get some consensus here?

It seems like ever since they actually got there hands on some Neanderthal DNA and sequenced it, they have been saying people outside of Africa have mixed with Neanderthals and share some DNA.


And I thought we'd also conclusively confirmed the presence of Denisovan DNA in south pacific Islanders and Far east asian genomes, but oddly, nowhere else
 
2012-10-05 12:16:41 PM

Magorn: WorldCitizen: Rev. Skarekroe: In 2010, scientists completed the first sequence of the Neanderthal genome using DNA extracted from fossils, and an examination of the genetic material suggested that modern humans' ancestors occasionally successfully interbred with Neanderthals. Recent estimates reveal that Neanderthal DNA makes up 1 percent to 4 percent of modern Eurasian genomes, perhaps endowing some people with the robust immune systems they enjoy today.

I could've sworn I've read studies that say modern humans have 0% neanderthal in them. Can we get some consensus here?

It seems like ever since they actually got there hands on some Neanderthal DNA and sequenced it, they have been saying people outside of Africa have mixed with Neanderthals and share some DNA.

And I thought we'd also conclusively confirmed the presence of Denisovan DNA in south pacific Islanders and Far east asian genomes, but oddly, nowhere else


The article also indicates that Native Americans are now believed to have more Neanderthal DNA remnants than Eurasians. That's pretty crazy considering Neanderthals were European/Mid East located. The Native American anscestors must've hooked up with the Neanderthals and then hotfooted it across Asia without interbreeding with any other groups, or Neanderthals were spread much farther afield than we know.
 
2012-10-05 12:22:30 PM
The more interesting question is how much chicken DNA is in any given Farkers DNA?
 
2012-10-05 12:36:06 PM
The last sex between Neanderthals and modern humans likely occurred as recently as 47,000 years ago


They don't know about last Saturday night
 
2012-10-05 12:38:12 PM

cgraves67: Magorn: WorldCitizen: Rev. Skarekroe: In 2010, scientists completed the first sequence of the Neanderthal genome using DNA extracted from fossils, and an examination of the genetic material suggested that modern humans' ancestors occasionally successfully interbred with Neanderthals. Recent estimates reveal that Neanderthal DNA makes up 1 percent to 4 percent of modern Eurasian genomes, perhaps endowing some people with the robust immune systems they enjoy today.

I could've sworn I've read studies that say modern humans have 0% neanderthal in them. Can we get some consensus here?

It seems like ever since they actually got there hands on some Neanderthal DNA and sequenced it, they have been saying people outside of Africa have mixed with Neanderthals and share some DNA.

And I thought we'd also conclusively confirmed the presence of Denisovan DNA in south pacific Islanders and Far east asian genomes, but oddly, nowhere else

The article also indicates that Native Americans are now believed to have more Neanderthal DNA remnants than Eurasians. That's pretty crazy considering Neanderthals were European/Mid East located. The Native American anscestors must've hooked up with the Neanderthals and then hotfooted it across Asia without interbreeding with any other groups, or Neanderthals were spread much farther afield than we know.


I think it's been thought for many, many years now that Native Americans crossed over into the Americas across Siberia and Alaska. Once in awhile something comes out to question if others somehow got here first and now are gone, but I think the ones here now came from Asia.

So, really, it makes perfect sense. Humans come out of Africa. Find Neanderthals outside of Africa. Breed with Neanderthals. Spread on out through Europe, Australasia, and the Americas.
 
2012-10-05 12:53:47 PM
I welcome this ... yellow fever.

api.ning.com

/hot like a fever
 
2012-10-05 12:55:11 PM

WorldCitizen: I think it's been thought for many, many years now that Native Americans crossed over into the Americas across Siberia and Alaska. Once in awhile something comes out to question if others somehow got here first and now are gone, but I think the ones here now came from Asia.


The major point of contention is when Native Americans got to America; for a long time it was believed that the Clovis people were the first humans to reach the Western hemisphere, but in recent years the thinking has shifted and an earlier migration seems more likely. Serious researchers have generally not questioned that the first Americans were of Siberian and Northeast Asian origin, however- although there is some genetic evidence that there was also a migration from Europe around 15,000 years ago. The BBC did a documentary on it a few years ago, called Stone Age Columbus as I recall. Even in this model, the European genetic contribution is in addition to the Siberian; Native Americans are still primarily Asian.
 
2012-10-05 12:57:03 PM

WorldCitizen: cgraves67: Magorn: WorldCitizen: Rev. Skarekroe: In 2010, scientists completed the first sequence of the Neanderthal genome using DNA extracted from fossils, and an examination of the genetic material suggested that modern humans' ancestors occasionally successfully interbred with Neanderthals. Recent estimates reveal that Neanderthal DNA makes up 1 percent to 4 percent of modern Eurasian genomes, perhaps endowing some people with the robust immune systems they enjoy today.

I could've sworn I've read studies that say modern humans have 0% neanderthal in them. Can we get some consensus here?

It seems like ever since they actually got there hands on some Neanderthal DNA and sequenced it, they have been saying people outside of Africa have mixed with Neanderthals and share some DNA.

And I thought we'd also conclusively confirmed the presence of Denisovan DNA in south pacific Islanders and Far east asian genomes, but oddly, nowhere else

The article also indicates that Native Americans are now believed to have more Neanderthal DNA remnants than Eurasians. That's pretty crazy considering Neanderthals were European/Mid East located. The Native American anscestors must've hooked up with the Neanderthals and then hotfooted it across Asia without interbreeding with any other groups, or Neanderthals were spread much farther afield than we know.

I think it's been thought for many, many years now that Native Americans crossed over into the Americas across Siberia and Alaska. Once in awhile something comes out to question if others somehow got here first and now are gone, but I think the ones here now came from Asia.

So, really, it makes perfect sense. Humans come out of Africa. Find Neanderthals outside of Africa. Breed with Neanderthals. Spread on out through Europe, Australasia, and the Americas.


Yes. All that is pretty much the common theory. What I find surprising is that the NAs apparently have MORE Neanderthal DNA than the rest of us that came out of Africa. I would've expected it to be the same amount as all the other European and Asia groups. The implications are surprising. I had thought that the Native Americans were just a subdivision of the normal East Asia group, "Mongoloids", if that term is still applicable.

The ancestors of the Native Americans must've come out of Africa in their own wave, bred with Neanderthals to a greater extent than others, then went on to East Asia without interbreeding much with the groups that would remain in Eurasia then crossing the land bridge into the Americas, carrying the Neanderthal DNA and becoming isolated when the land bridge flooded. Either that, or Neanderthals existed in East Asia and the ancestors of Native Americans interbred with them for a longer time period than Eurasian groups before crossing into the Americas.
 
2012-10-05 12:57:17 PM

WorldCitizen: Rev. Skarekroe: In 2010, scientists completed the first sequence of the Neanderthal genome using DNA extracted from fossils, and an examination of the genetic material suggested that modern humans' ancestors occasionally successfully interbred with Neanderthals. Recent estimates reveal that Neanderthal DNA makes up 1 percent to 4 percent of modern Eurasian genomes, perhaps endowing some people with the robust immune systems they enjoy today.

I could've sworn I've read studies that say modern humans have 0% neanderthal in them. Can we get some consensus here?

It seems like ever since they actually got there hands on some Neanderthal DNA and sequenced it, they have been saying people outside of Africa have mixed with Neanderthals and share some DNA.


Huh. I wonder if this is why my family seems to have a stupidly powerful immune system.
/This sadly comes with the price of auto-immune issues later on.
//Please please please do not let me develop Celiac's like mom.
 
2012-10-05 12:59:48 PM

malaktaus: WorldCitizen: I think it's been thought for many, many years now that Native Americans crossed over into the Americas across Siberia and Alaska. Once in awhile something comes out to question if others somehow got here first and now are gone, but I think the ones here now came from Asia.

The major point of contention is when Native Americans got to America; for a long time it was believed that the Clovis people were the first humans to reach the Western hemisphere, but in recent years the thinking has shifted and an earlier migration seems more likely. Serious researchers have generally not questioned that the first Americans were of Siberian and Northeast Asian origin, however- although there is some genetic evidence that there was also a migration from Europe around 15,000 years ago. The BBC did a documentary on it a few years ago, called Stone Age Columbus as I recall. Even in this model, the European genetic contribution is in addition to the Siberian; Native Americans are still primarily Asian.


Honestly if you ask me, native american's seem mostly asian with a good chunk of african in them. And Nubia did rule for a period of time some thousands of years ago with egypt, I think.
 
2012-10-05 01:00:03 PM
I don't understand why subby isn't getting any Neaderthal love for the headline

+1

/not subby
 
2012-10-05 01:08:11 PM
images.huffingtonpost.com
Approves.
 
2012-10-05 01:17:53 PM
So this is what goes on at the pancake social?
 
2012-10-05 01:22:07 PM
How do scientists explain Jersey Shore?
 
2012-10-05 01:24:16 PM

cgraves67: The article also indicates that Native Americans are now believed to have more Neanderthal DNA remnants than Eurasians. That's pretty crazy considering Neanderthals were European/Mid East located. The Native American anscestors must've hooked up with the Neanderthals and then hotfooted it across Asia without interbreeding with any other groups, or Neanderthals were spread much farther afield than we know.


I could see it happening like this:
The first group out of Africa finds neanderthals, starts doing the nasty in the pasty.
Some of their descendants start walking towards Alaska, and not finding any other baseline homo sapiens in their path, keep the % of neanderthal DNA high.
Some of their descendants stop along the way, in Europe or Asia, and breed with later waves out of Africa, lowering their percentage.
The land bridge sinks, isolating the native american population from further breeding with more 'pure' human stock.
 
2012-10-05 01:28:55 PM

cgraves67: WorldCitizen: cgraves67: Magorn: WorldCitizen: Rev. Skarekroe: In 2010, scientists completed the first sequence of the Neanderthal genome using DNA extracted from fossils, and an examination of the genetic material suggested that modern humans' ancestors occasionally successfully interbred with Neanderthals. Recent estimates reveal that Neanderthal DNA makes up 1 percent to 4 percent of modern Eurasian genomes, perhaps endowing some people with the robust immune systems they enjoy today.

I could've sworn I've read studies that say modern humans have 0% neanderthal in them. Can we get some consensus here?

It seems like ever since they actually got there hands on some Neanderthal DNA and sequenced it, they have been saying people outside of Africa have mixed with Neanderthals and share some DNA.

And I thought we'd also conclusively confirmed the presence of Denisovan DNA in south pacific Islanders and Far east asian genomes, but oddly, nowhere else

The article also indicates that Native Americans are now believed to have more Neanderthal DNA remnants than Eurasians. That's pretty crazy considering Neanderthals were European/Mid East located. The Native American anscestors must've hooked up with the Neanderthals and then hotfooted it across Asia without interbreeding with any other groups, or Neanderthals were spread much farther afield than we know.

I think it's been thought for many, many years now that Native Americans crossed over into the Americas across Siberia and Alaska. Once in awhile something comes out to question if others somehow got here first and now are gone, but I think the ones here now came from Asia.

So, really, it makes perfect sense. Humans come out of Africa. Find Neanderthals outside of Africa. Breed with Neanderthals. Spread on out through Europe, Australasia, and the Americas.

Yes. All that is pretty much the common theory. What I find surprising is that the NAs apparently have MORE Neanderthal DNA than the rest of us that came out of A ...


Given that Neanderthals were far better adapted to the cold than modern humans, it wouldn't beterribly suprising that the migration of early humans wandering along the route that eventually led them to the Bering Land bridge ran into more Neanderthals that the average human of the time
 
2012-10-05 01:29:08 PM

kayanlau: I welcome this ... yellow fever.

[api.ning.com image 455x569]

/hot like a fever


Disappointed in this thread, until this picture.
 
2012-10-05 01:50:44 PM
I had sex with a neanderthal once, well she was as hairy as one any way. One of those drunken excapades from a mis-spent youth.
 
2012-10-05 02:06:07 PM

vpb: Rev. Skarekroe: gigantopithecus

So how much gigantopithecus DNA do we have? I'm guessing not much.


After that kind of treatment? They'd be lucky to get a handshake...
 
2012-10-05 02:14:49 PM

cgraves67: What I find surprising is that the NAs apparently have MORE Neanderthal DNA than the rest of us that came out of Africa.


This could just be genetic drift, though.
 
2012-10-05 02:27:51 PM

Sybarite: The last sex between Neanderthals and modern humans likely occurred as recently as 47,000 years ago

So you're saying that's when they got married.


I thought Eurasia was another word for marriage.
 
2012-10-05 02:56:14 PM

Karac: cgraves67: The article also indicates that Native Americans are now believed to have more Neanderthal DNA remnants than Eurasians. That's pretty crazy considering Neanderthals were European/Mid East located. The Native American anscestors must've hooked up with the Neanderthals and then hotfooted it across Asia without interbreeding with any other groups, or Neanderthals were spread much farther afield than we know.

I could see it happening like this:
The first group out of Africa finds neanderthals, starts doing the nasty in the pasty.
Some of their descendants start walking towards Alaska, and not finding any other baseline homo sapiens in their path, keep the % of neanderthal DNA high.
Some of their descendants stop along the way, in Europe or Asia, and breed with later waves out of Africa, lowering their percentage.
The land bridge sinks, isolating the native american population from further breeding with more 'pure' human stock.


Essentially...THIS. ^^^

But with two refinements. First, from the relative lack of genetic diversity and limited number of major language groups of modern Native Americans we know that the earliest Americans came here in very small numbers. The first waves may have been as few as several dozen to as many as a few hundred. What is for sure is that to carry that Neanderthal gene record here those handfuls of peoples were bonking Neanderthals within a relative few generations before crossing Beringia into NA.

Second, they HAD to have come here a lot earlier than Clovis time (~13kybp). After all, Clovis technology erupted out the clear blue sky as a fully mature, megafauna-hunting-optimized technology all over the southern half of North America in the blink of a geological eye. Moreover, just because Clovis is the first indisputable and sizable collection of Americans doesn't imply that it was the first...by any means. Furthermore, the Clovis technology had to have been maturing in situ here in NA for thousands of years, maybe 20,000 or even 30,000 years, among very small numbers of people who are not in the archeological record. Then its success allowed NA populations to suddenly soar, and spontaneously it seems like we see their remains everywhere.

Fascinating stuff.
 
2012-10-05 03:12:48 PM
Ya got any Neandethal in ya?

Ya want some?
 
2012-10-05 03:27:57 PM
Hah! Try telling that to Melanie Haber!



\ you may remember her as Audrey Farber
 
2012-10-05 03:32:00 PM

vpb: Rev. Skarekroe: gigantopithecus

So how much gigantopithecus DNA do we have? I'm guessing not much.



I'm guessing if gigantopithecus decided it wanted to give you some DNA, you'd be better off closing your eyes laying back and thinking about England.
 
2012-10-05 03:33:46 PM

StoneColdAtheist: Karac: cgraves67: The article also indicates that Native Americans are now believed to have more Neanderthal DNA remnants than Eurasians. That's pretty crazy considering Neanderthals were European/Mid East located. The Native American anscestors must've hooked up with the Neanderthals and then hotfooted it across Asia without interbreeding with any other groups, or Neanderthals were spread much farther afield than we know.

I could see it happening like this:
The first group out of Africa finds neanderthals, starts doing the nasty in the pasty.
Some of their descendants start walking towards Alaska, and not finding any other baseline homo sapiens in their path, keep the % of neanderthal DNA high.
Some of their descendants stop along the way, in Europe or Asia, and breed with later waves out of Africa, lowering their percentage.
The land bridge sinks, isolating the native american population from further breeding with more 'pure' human stock.

Essentially...THIS. ^^^

But with two refinements. First, from the relative lack of genetic diversity and limited number of major language groups of modern Native Americans we know that the earliest Americans came here in very small numbers. The first waves may have been as few as several dozen to as many as a few hundred. What is for sure is that to carry that Neanderthal gene record here those handfuls of peoples were bonking Neanderthals within a relative few generations before crossing Beringia into NA.

Second, they HAD to have come here a lot earlier than Clovis time (~13kybp). After all, Clovis technology erupted out the clear blue sky as a fully mature, megafauna-hunting-optimized technology all over the southern half of North America in the blink of a geological eye. Moreover, just because Clovis is the first indisputable and sizable collection of Americans doesn't imply that it was the first...by any means. Furthermore, the Clovis technology had to have been maturing in situ here in NA for thousands of years, maybe 20 ...


A settlement down in San Marcos is dated as to preceding the Clovis folks.
 
2012-10-05 03:36:21 PM
This thread is deficient in yellow fever.
Correcting.

dl.dropbox.com

dl.dropbox.com

dl.dropbox.com
 
2012-10-05 04:14:17 PM
I would say WWI and WWII managed to kill off much of our possible samples, particularly in France where you would think there would most likely be much residual Neanderthal DNA.
 
2012-10-05 04:24:56 PM

Jiro Dreams Of McRibs: I would say WWI and WWII managed to kill off much of our possible samples, particularly in France where you would think there would most likely be much residual Neanderthal DNA.


We're talking about looking for Neaderthal DNA in people, not in old bones. WW1 and 2 did kill a lot of French people, but not so much that it's impossible to find a Frenchman to take a sample from. The Neanderthal genetic sequence has already been done, so we don't need to keep looking for old bones.

Not to mention the people who inhabit modern France are not genetically relatable to the early humans who came into contact with Neanderthals there. Those people were not the same as the Celts, who migrated in from Asia or the Greeks or Phoenecians, who settled the Southern coast, or the Romans and their hodge podge of slaves from across their empire who came after that or the Franks who came later and gave the land its current name, or the Normans who settled the northern coast... and you get the idea.
 
2012-10-05 04:32:06 PM

johnny_stingray: Audrey Farber


I knew her as Nancy!

/Used to be a cock-teaser for Roosterrama.
//Enraged the bantams.
///Off to buy a chinchilla.
 
2012-10-05 04:36:20 PM

yanoosh: I had sex with a neanderthal once, well she was as hairy as one any way. One of those drunken excapades from a mis-spent youth.


Dad, stop posting while you're drunk.
 
2012-10-05 04:40:58 PM
To be fair, Orientals are mad fly.
 
2012-10-05 04:43:48 PM

happydude45: StoneColdAtheist: Moreover, just because Clovis is the first indisputable and sizable collection of Americans doesn't imply that it was the first...by any means.

A settlement down in San Marcos is dated as to preceding the Clovis folks.


Was that this one?

The challenge, of course, is that we will never find remains of the oldest Americans for the simple reason that when humans came here the oceans were 300' to 400' shallower. Since the interior was covered in a mile of ice from ~100kybp until about 15kybp, that means the earliest Americans had to have come in along the then-Pacific shoreline...an immigration route up to 20 miles out to sea and under up to 400' of water. One thing is for sure...they didn't suddenly pop into central Texas 15,5006,000 y.o.
 
2012-10-05 04:54:45 PM
upic.me 

what yellow fever? (rink hot)
 
2012-10-05 06:08:31 PM

kayanlau: I welcome this ... yellow fever.



/hot like a fever


99% of asians are ugly and so is she. But hey, I got a working dick and she's not fat.

/attractive Asians are either mixed race or flukes of nature
//There are 3 billion asians so they can't all be ugly
 
2012-10-05 06:57:57 PM

vpb: Rev. Skarekroe: gigantopithecus

So how much gigantopithecus DNA do we have? I'm guessing not much.


Probably just the DNA we share with orangutans (the great ape we're most distantly related to)--Gigantopithecus was pretty much a ginormous bamboo-eating orangutan from hell. :D

The "Did we make sweet love to Neandertal and Denisova man after having enough fermented berries" question is more interesting, IMHO :D
 
2012-10-05 07:05:35 PM

cgraves67: Magorn: WorldCitizen: Rev. Skarekroe: In 2010, scientists completed the first sequence of the Neanderthal genome using DNA extracted from fossils, and an examination of the genetic material suggested that modern humans' ancestors occasionally successfully interbred with Neanderthals. Recent estimates reveal that Neanderthal DNA makes up 1 percent to 4 percent of modern Eurasian genomes, perhaps endowing some people with the robust immune systems they enjoy today.

I could've sworn I've read studies that say modern humans have 0% neanderthal in them. Can we get some consensus here?

It seems like ever since they actually got there hands on some Neanderthal DNA and sequenced it, they have been saying people outside of Africa have mixed with Neanderthals and share some DNA.

And I thought we'd also conclusively confirmed the presence of Denisovan DNA in south pacific Islanders and Far east asian genomes, but oddly, nowhere else

The article also indicates that Native Americans are now believed to have more Neanderthal DNA remnants than Eurasians. That's pretty crazy considering Neanderthals were European/Mid East located. The Native American anscestors must've hooked up with the Neanderthals and then hotfooted it across Asia without interbreeding with any other groups, or Neanderthals were spread much farther afield than we know.


Difficulties in this are mostly that there have been at least five known major migrations of First Nations groups to the Americas (from what we've seen from mtDNA subgroups)--that said, it's entirely possible that Neandertal man was a lot further afield (and could well have even used Siberia as a "last refuge", being pretty cold-adapted hominids) and thus met and interbred with the ancestors of indigenous Americans.

(What would be REALLY interesting, IMHO, would be also some comparison with indigenous Siberian peoples of non-Turkic origin. Particularly with the Yeniseian, the one group of indigenous Siberians that have been linked to an existing group of First Nations peoples in a linguistic family (the Dene-Yenisean family; the Dene here being a whole group of First Nations who refer to themselves as "Dine", "Dene", "Inde" or similar autonyms and which include a number of First Nations in Canada as well as the Navajo and Apache nations here in the States and Mexico); the Dene Nations were pretty much the last to make it to the Americas before the Inuit (who were REAL latecomers, comparatively speaking).)
 
2012-10-05 07:40:41 PM

pottie: The last sex between Neanderthals and modern humans likely occurred as recently as 47,000 years ago


They don't know about last Saturday night


I was going to say "They don't know about the GOP Convention!"
 
Displayed 50 of 72 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report