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(Daily Mail)   11-year-old girl who needs a heart and liver transplant can't contain her joy after killing 335-pound bear on hunting trip. Too bad he didn't have a heart and a liver in his pic-a-nic basket   (dailymail.co.uk) divider line 385
    More: Sad, liver transplantation, religious fanaticism, heart  
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11279 clicks; posted to Main » on 05 Oct 2012 at 5:14 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-05 03:43:54 PM

pottie: Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: pottie: I'm guessing that most of you are city folk.


Good for you kid!

"City folk" - does anyone say this other than wanna-be rednecks from the suburbs? I come from a "country" family, and love to camp, fish, hike, etc... and I love nothing more than seeing rare wildlife when I do so, and this dumb coont has taken away a part of my ability to do that.

There's nothing wrong with harvesting animals for food to survive. But hunting animals to satiate a reptilian desire to kill for the sake of killing is farking disgusting and we should attempt to evolve beyond that.

Go fark yourself and your "city folk" Larry the Cable Guy bullshiat.


My, my, Jones, did I strike a nerve? If you came from a country family, I would suppose you know where food comes from. It's not the neat little cellophane wrapped trays you buy in the store. Country folk know where food comes from and what it takes to get it. They also value wildlife as much as anyone, and by the way, black bears are not all that rare. They're thick as ticks here in Alaska. As for being a redneck from the suburbs, well you're a little off base on that one...

The bottom line is that people have hunted since the very beginning and have become a bit squeamish about it only relatively recently.


Sorry for the outburst. I've been stuck in a Franklin Covey class all day :(
 
2012-10-05 03:49:43 PM
My opinion, yes an emotional one, is not actually against sport hunting if the animal is used properly afterwards (ie: food). What I object to in the case of this girl is the unbridled joy at the actual killing of the bear.
I would personally respect a sports hunter more if they showed reverence for their kill and not gloated over the dead corpse afterwards.
Like I said just my opinion and that doesn't make it right, just mine.
 
2012-10-05 03:54:38 PM

Darmok and Jalad at Tanagra: I will leave this here


Yep, truly sociopathic monsters.
 
2012-10-05 04:01:43 PM

Sinister 161: What I object to in the case of this girl is the unbridled joy at the actual killing of the bear.


So it is not right to feel joy at the end of a sucessful hunt? To be happy that your mankmanship and stalking skills were good enough to make the shot? To feel good about getting to spend time outdoors? Not to mention filling the freezer.

Hunting has many enjoyable aspects to it that are not assoicated with the actual killing. In fact, I know of no one that hunts simply to make something alive become dead.
 
2012-10-05 04:14:59 PM

HeadLever: Darmok and Jalad at Tanagra: I will leave this here

Yep, truly sociopathic monsters.


Exactly. Especially since they all are either disabled vets or children with a terminal/serious illness. Doubly so since all the meet was either donated to places like "Hunt for Hunger" which another farker mentioned, or the family has the meet processed for themselves.

Total Scociopathic MonstersTM
 
2012-10-05 04:20:14 PM

HeadLever: Sinister 161: What I object to in the case of this girl is the unbridled joy at the actual killing of the bear.

So it is not right to feel joy at the end of a sucessful hunt? To be happy that your mankmanship and stalking skills were good enough to make the shot? To feel good about getting to spend time outdoors? Not to mention filling the freezer.

Hunting has many enjoyable aspects to it that are not assoicated with the actual killing. In fact, I know of no one that hunts simply to make something alive become dead.


Anyone who enjoys killing frightens me, whatever the reason they are doing it.
 
2012-10-05 04:22:49 PM

HeadLever: Hunting has many enjoyable aspects to it that are not assoicated with the actual killing. In fact, I know of no one that hunts simply to make something alive become dead.


Indeed. It was Jose Ortega y Gasset who said "One does not hunt in order to kill, one kills in order to have hunted". If it were merely the killing that was the attraction, we'd just get jobs in abbatoirs and be deliriously happy for the rest of our lives.

Conversely, just stalking an animal to no real purpose isn't satisfying either. While the skills necessary to do so are fun in and of themselves, practically nobody is going to pay a fee to stalk an animal and just look at it.

It is the marriage of the chase and the potential of the kill that makes it attractive. And it's not even the certainty of a kill: I've gotten skunked before and not managed to kill a deer in a season, and I was almost as happy as if I had gotten one. Indeed, since I went primitive, I see more deer than I can kill, given the limited range of my equipment. I'm OK with that.

In fact, just this last weekend, I missed a nice doe. She was bedded down in an overgrown power line right-of-way, and all I could see was her twitching ear. I stalked quietly from downwind until I got to about 20 yards, comfortable shooting distance for my bow. She stood up, and I shot, and I was treated to watching my arrow fish-tail all over the place and pass about 6 inches in front of her chest. It had been raining on and off all day, and my natural feather fletchings had gotten soaked and were no longer capable of stabilizing the arrow.

But you know what? That's why it's called hunting instead of slaughtering. I learned a bit about the limitations of my equipment (I don't normally hunt in the rain). A doe got to live another day instead of ending up in my freezer and as a pair of leggings or a quiver and hunting bag. I got to participate in nature instead of merely observing it, and this time, nature won. And that's OK.
 
2012-10-05 04:24:02 PM

Darmok and Jalad at Tanagra: HeadLever: Darmok and Jalad at Tanagra: I will leave this here

Yep, truly sociopathic monsters.

Exactly. Especially since they all are either disabled vets or children with a terminal/serious illness. Doubly so since all the meet was either donated to places like "Hunt for Hunger" which another farker mentioned, or the family has the meet processed for themselves.

Total Scociopathic MonstersTM


I had mentioned it above. I have a buddy that usually likes to keep the first deer or first couple ducks or turkeys he gets and any others he gets with his extra tags he'll donate to Hunt for Hunger.
 
2012-10-05 04:36:33 PM
thewareaglereader.files.wordpress.com

Sometimes you eat the bear, and sometimes the bear, well, he eats you.
 
2012-10-05 04:40:17 PM

RobSeace: [thewareaglereader.files.wordpress.com image 390x350]

Sometimes you eat the bear, and sometimes the bear, well, he eats you fixes the cable.


Pet peeve
 
2012-10-05 04:40:26 PM

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Franklin Covey


Cheers ;-)
 
2012-10-05 04:50:27 PM

jmr61: LewDux: I don't think heart transplant will improve her

Nice. And I agree.

Too bad the little coont didn't die before she killed that magnificent creature of nature.


Your comment proves you aren't any better. Probably worse because you're wishing another human dead.
 
2012-10-05 04:53:25 PM

The Muthaship: RobSeace: [thewareaglereader.files.wordpress.com image 390x350]

Sometimes you eat the bear, and sometimes the bear, well, he eats you fixes the cable.

Pet peeve


Don't be fatuous, Mothaship...
 
2012-10-05 05:56:41 PM

Sinister 161: HeadLever: Sinister 161: What I object to in the case of this girl is the unbridled joy at the actual killing of the bear.

So it is not right to feel joy at the end of a sucessful hunt? To be happy that your mankmanship and stalking skills were good enough to make the shot? To feel good about getting to spend time outdoors? Not to mention filling the freezer.

Hunting has many enjoyable aspects to it that are not assoicated with the actual killing. In fact, I know of no one that hunts simply to make something alive become dead.

Anyone who enjoys killing frightens me, whatever the reason they are doing it.


Congratulations, you are the biggest pussy I've run across in quite some time.
 
2012-10-05 06:09:39 PM

rickycal78: What kind of drugs are you on? How does saying that you are ignorant of hunters in general equate to me saying that all hunters are the same? What are you, some kind of politician or lawyer? Because that's some twisted ass logic you've got there.


I said that I doubted that these people were going to eat that bear. That refers to these specific people.

In response to that you made a general statement about hunters implying that these specific people were like the vast majority of hunters, who obviously eat everything they kill.

You implied that all hunters hunted for the same noble reasons and none hunt for the mere love of killing.

Mid_mo_mad_man: Hate to break it to you but not enough fur barers are killed in the US. Skunks,possums and raccoons are to abundant and need controlled better. Rabies and canine distemper are out of controll in their populations.


These people weren't doing it for population control. They just enjoyed the killing.
 
2012-10-05 06:15:49 PM
If it wasn't for people like this girl who pay for, love, and actually spend time in the woods, there would be no natural habitat left.

All of you sick people who are expressing gladness that this girl might die soon, sitting in your air-conditioned rooms on top of massive sprawls of asphalt and concrete, are contributing far more to the death of our wildlife than his young hunter through your support of an economy that necessarily consumes a host of natural resources in an unsustainable model.

If you really care about our wild animals, and their natural habitat, GO OUT THERE. Hike, camp, fish, spelunk, and yes hunt - because by keeping these lands valuable you will be helping to keep them alive.

It disgusts me to see people decry hunting and proclaim their love for animals when it is the hunters they denigrate that actually maintain and support those animals.
 
2012-10-05 06:28:19 PM

jigger: rickycal78: What kind of drugs are you on? How does saying that you are ignorant of hunters in general equate to me saying that all hunters are the same? What are you, some kind of politician or lawyer? Because that's some twisted ass logic you've got there.

I said that I doubted that these people were going to eat that bear. That refers to these specific people.

In response to that you made a general statement about hunters implying that these specific people were like the vast majority of hunters, who obviously eat everything they kill.

You implied that all hunters hunted for the same noble reasons and none hunt for the mere love of killing.



Still not helping your case. You're still trying to put words in my mouth that are in fact contrary to other things I've said in the thread (the bolded section). You can keep farking that chicken if it helps you feel superior and get to sleep at night, but you're still wrong.

/never met a hunter who did it for love of killing.
//You seem to have a worse view of humanity than even I have.
 
2012-10-05 06:53:02 PM
Well, at least she got to fulfill every American's dream. To kill something before she dies.
 
2012-10-05 06:54:04 PM

rickycal78: Still not helping your case. You're still trying to put words in my mouth that are in fact contrary to other things I've said in the thread (the bolded section). You can keep farking that chicken if it helps you feel superior and get to sleep at night, but you're still wrong.

/never met a hunter who did it for love of killing.
//You seem to have a worse view of humanity than even I have.


What I said: "I doubt they ate that bear."

What you said: "You don't understand hunters."

Don't you think your statement implies that no hunter would kill something without eating it?

And I've met people who kill things just to kill them. You've honestly never met people like this?
 
2012-10-05 07:21:08 PM

jigger: What I said: "I doubt they ate that bear."

What you said: "You don't understand hunters."

Don't you think your statement implies that no hunter would kill something without eating it?



No, and if you'd actually read through the thread instead of focusing on this particular conversation between you and myself you'd know why.

jigger: And I've met people who kill things just to kill them. You've honestly never met people like this?


People who kill insects just to kill them sure, but never anyone who hunted just to kill. There's a variety of reasons they have, most have been espoused in previous posts by others, particularly by dittybopper, darmok, and headlever. But I've never met anyone who goes hunting solely "Because I want to kill critters."
 
2012-10-05 07:47:17 PM

rickycal78: jigger: And I've met people who kill things just to kill them. You've honestly never met people like this?

People who kill insects just to kill them sure, but never anyone who hunted just to kill. There's a variety of reasons they have, most have been espoused in previous posts by others, particularly by dittybopper, darmok, and headlever. But I've never met anyone who goes hunting solely "Because I want to kill critters."


Indeed. If that were the case, I'd work in a slaughterhouse, not at a college.
 
2012-10-05 10:29:24 PM

sendtodave: curriemaster: Seriously, why would you hunt animals you cant eat?

I still think that "if you eat it, then that's OK" is motivated reasoning. I don't see the distinction.

Most people that would even debate this crisis of conscious don't need to eat meat. They assuredly don't need to hunt for it. There is tofu at the supermarket.

But, eating meat makes people happy, at the expense of an animal's life. Not much different than sport killing. Dead animal, happy person. Animal exists to make person happy.

The animal doesn't go "Oh, you're killing me so that I can rot in your intestinal tract, instead of leaving my carcass to rot on the ground, so that's OK."

Is killing an animal for the pleasure of a tasty burger really less "sadistic?"


At least you're using the animal for more than a badge if you actually eat the meat and do something with the rest of it. Killing it for a quick thrill and a "ME SO AWESOME!!" moment is a pointless endeavor.
 
2012-10-05 11:32:24 PM
SHAKE THAT BEAR
 
2012-10-06 04:45:23 AM

TheyCallMeC0WB0Y: Sinister 161: HeadLever: Sinister 161: What I object to in the case of this girl is the unbridled joy at the actual killing of the bear.

So it is not right to feel joy at the end of a sucessful hunt? To be happy that your mankmanship and stalking skills were good enough to make the shot? To feel good about getting to spend time outdoors? Not to mention filling the freezer.

Hunting has many enjoyable aspects to it that are not assoicated with the actual killing. In fact, I know of no one that hunts simply to make something alive become dead.

Anyone who enjoys killing frightens me, whatever the reason they are doing it.

Congratulations, you are the biggest pussy I've run across in quite some time.


Thank you and probably true but I'll be the pussy who lives longer with the clearer conscious. People who enjoy killing sometimes get bored with animals and I dont want to meet anyone who's got to that stage. Hey if it's macho to be like that though, killing animals for fun then call me a pussy as long as you like.
 
2012-10-06 10:30:51 AM

Sinister 161: People who enjoy killing sometimes get bored with animals and I dont want to meet anyone who's got to that stage.


Someone's been reading PeTA propaganda.
 
2012-10-06 11:12:06 AM

dittybopper: Sinister 161: People who enjoy killing sometimes get bored with animals and I dont want to meet anyone who's got to that stage.

Someone's been reading PeTA propaganda.


I think some people are getting confused by the very true fact that serial killers often start off killing animals... However, they usually kill pets (their own or others), and they usually also cruelly torture them first... This is pretty widely removed from hunting, for sport or otherwise... I'm honestly not much of a fan of the type of person that hunts purely for the joy of killing something either, but it's stupid to claim they're just serial killers in waiting... Unless they're out there, ripping legs off live deer, and taking delight in their suffering, they're nothing more than humans being humans... We're animals, people, and killing is what we do... No, I don't like it very much either, but it's reality...
 
2012-10-06 11:23:18 AM
Hey, I like bears as much as the next idiot tricked into anthropomorphizing animals, but even I cant think of a good reason to rain on this kids parade. Fish are ugly and stupid, and we snap their necks after we suffocate them a little. Wheres the outcry there? That's what I thought. That bear unwittingly gave its life to please a dying little kid, I'd call it a productive life for a bear.
 
2012-10-06 11:48:04 AM

Keizer_Ghidorah: At least you're using the animal for more than a badge if you actually eat the meat and do something with the rest of it. Killing it for a quick thrill and a "ME SO AWESOME!!" moment is a pointless endeavor.


It's not for that one moment. It's for the entire experience, even if you don't manage to kill something. As I've pointed out numerous times, if we were just interested in killing things, we'd work in a slaughterhouse. It's the work that goes into making that kill that makes it worthwhile.

A person going after a trophy buck spends a lot of time scouting the woods, looking for sign of big bucks, planning his hunts down to intricate detail. I know a dedicated, dyed-in-the-wool trophy hunter. He spends a *LOT* of time planning his hunts, including using topographical maps and aerial photography to figure out the best places to find a buck with a large rack. Where possible, he plants food plots to encourage antler growth. He uses all the tricks in the book to get a trophy-sized deer close enough for a shot: Doe-in-rut lure, a pair of antlers from a deer he shot that wasn't quite "up to snuff" to be mounted for rattling, doe bleat call, and a grunt call. Not to mention scent blocking/absorbing clothing washed in special non-scented, non-UV brightening detergent.

He takes it seriously, and you know what? He passes on most shots because the deer in question isn't up to his standards. Would he bother to do all that work just to get a picture?

I'm different: I'll take a doe or a buck, no matter the size (but a trophy sized buck would be nice, of course), but I ramped up the difficulty by using primitive methods only. I probably put as much time into preparation as he does, but my time is spent doing things like building wooden arrows, and practicing with my bow (you need to shoot a *LOT* to be proficient with a bare wooden bow). For example, when you factor in all the preparation, including sharpening the broadhead, it probably takes about an hour's worth of work to build a single wooden arrow. I've got 9 "conventional" arrows built (5 with broadheads*, 2 blunts for small game, and 3 practice arrows with field points). I've also built up that primitive arrow, which I can't use for deer or bear, but I can use it for medium sized game like coyote, if I happen to get a shot at one. I spent probably an hour and a half on that one, when you include the time it took to knap the arrowhead out of obsidian. I've still got two bare shafts left out of the dozen I bought years ago. I've got over 10 hours in just making arrows, and I probably spend at least 3 hours a week just practicing, and I've been doing that for a couple months now, so that's an additional 24 hours at least, so I've got 34 hours into preparation, not including the time to do other stuff.

This is just to *PREPARE* for hunting.

People like Trophy Guy and myself take it seriously, and we stick to the highest ethical standards of "Fair Chase". We don't "cheat", because that denigrates what we do.

People who hunt strictly for the meat, however, tend to be less restrained by ethical standards. As an example of this, when I was growing up in the Adirondack Mountains I knew a poor family that actually depended on hunting for a significant part of their diet, simply because it was cheap. They regularly broke the letter of the law in getting their deer. They'd spotlight them at night, hunt over a salt lick, and while I can't necessarily verify it, I'm pretty sure they ended up with at least one more deer than they were legally entitled to every year, and I also think there were times when they'd take one out of season. It was widely known among the local hunters that this was happening, and even the local game wardens had their suspicions, but as long as Poor Family were reasonably discreet about it, they didn't bother them. Why should they? The family couldn't pay the fines, and putting either of the parents in jail would have meant the family would end up on the welfare rolls, costing the county more than the state would take in in fines.

Most hunters, though, are probably somewhere between these two extremes. That doesn't mean they don't put in their time and effort though.

I don't think you really understand how complex, and yet simple, the motivations of a hunter are. They are simple, in that hunting satisfies some base, reptilian part of the brain. It's predatory instinct, pure and simple. We all have it, to one degree or another. It's part of our ancestry, not just as Homo sapiens, and not just as primates, and not even as mammals: It goes deeper than that, reaching back to our earliest primitive reptilian ancestry. My son used to have a tree frog for a pet. When we'd drop crickets into his terrarium, I could *SEE* the base distillation of the hunting instinct in the actions of Kermit (what else are you going to name a frog?). I could recognize the motivation, and understand at some level what Kermit was "thinking". The frog and I shared a common experience.

At the same time, though, there are more complex things at work in the mind of Man, the hunter. It's not the simple "observe, orient, attack" loop used by primitive amphibians and reptiles. This is actually harder to effectively articulate, because it is so complex. There is the elation at a well placed shot, tempered with the sobering realization that you just ended a life. I'm not a great philosopher by any means, and entire books have been written on this subject alone (for instance, "Meditations on Hunting" by Jose Ortega y Gasset, and "An Archer's Inner Life: A Collection of Essays on the Wood Bow Along with a Dialectic on Hunting" by Dave Sigurslid to name just two). There is a lot going on in the mind of a hunter, and the problem is that for the most part, hunters, much like average people, tend not to be able to put into words their motivations. For some, it's because they haven't really thought to much about it. Hunting is just something they do. For others, they don't have the vocabulary or the necessary introspective personality. That doesn't mean their motivation is any less complex than mine or Trophy Guy, or even that of Poor Family, it's that they don't necessarily have to tools to recognize and communicate it.

And that, I think, is the root of the problem. You don't understand it, because it's a hard thing to effectively communicate, and because of that, it has to be experienced instead of just read for you to gain an appreciation for it.

I know a few people who have hunted, but do not anymore. No matter what the reason they stopped doing it, to the best of my knowledge, none of them denigrates people who continue to hunt, because they have an understanding of it, having experienced it. They may have decided it wasn't for them, but they know why others might chose to continue doing it.

Understand, though, that I've just barely scratched the surface with this wall of text.


*One of those was lost last weekend, so I've only got 4 currently
 
2012-10-06 11:52:08 AM

RobSeace: dittybopper: Sinister 161: People who enjoy killing sometimes get bored with animals and I dont want to meet anyone who's got to that stage.

Someone's been reading PeTA propaganda.

I think some people are getting confused by the very true fact that serial killers often start off killing animals... However, they usually kill pets (their own or others), and they usually also cruelly torture them first... This is pretty widely removed from hunting, for sport or otherwise... I'm honestly not much of a fan of the type of person that hunts purely for the joy of killing something either, but it's stupid to claim they're just serial killers in waiting... Unless they're out there, ripping legs off live deer, and taking delight in their suffering, they're nothing more than humans being humans... We're animals, people, and killing is what we do... No, I don't like it very much either, but it's reality...


PeTA propaganda tends to conflate them, though.
 
2012-10-06 08:14:12 PM
What a sick little b*tch.
 
2012-10-06 11:34:03 PM

eyehate: What a sick little b*tch.


You have an appropriate Nom de Fark. You do indeed hate. Why is that? Why does this bother you? Who are you to judge? Certainly, I hope you are a strict vegan who doesn't wear leather, otherwise you are a hypocrite who pays others to kill things for you so you don't have to think about it.
 
2012-10-07 01:21:51 AM

dittybopper: Keizer_Ghidorah: At least you're using the animal for more than a badge if you actually eat the meat and do something with the rest of it. Killing it for a quick thrill and a "ME SO AWESOME!!" moment is a pointless endeavor.

It's not for that one moment. It's for the entire experience, even if you don't manage to kill something. As I've pointed out numerous times, if we were just interested in killing things, we'd work in a slaughterhouse. It's the work that goes into making that kill that makes it worthwhile.

A person going after a trophy buck spends a lot of time scouting the woods, looking for sign of big bucks, planning his hunts down to intricate detail. I know a dedicated, dyed-in-the-wool trophy hunter. He spends a *LOT* of time planning his hunts, including using topographical maps and aerial photography to figure out the best places to find a buck with a large rack. Where possible, he plants food plots to encourage antler growth. He uses all the tricks in the book to get a trophy-sized deer close enough for a shot: Doe-in-rut lure, a pair of antlers from a deer he shot that wasn't quite "up to snuff" to be mounted for rattling, doe bleat call, and a grunt call. Not to mention scent blocking/absorbing clothing washed in special non-scented, non-UV brightening detergent.

He takes it seriously, and you know what? He passes on most shots because the deer in question isn't up to his standards. Would he bother to do all that work just to get a picture?

I'm different: I'll take a doe or a buck, no matter the size (but a trophy sized buck would be nice, of course), but I ramped up the difficulty by using primitive methods only. I probably put as much time into preparation as he does, but my time is spent doing things like building wooden arrows, and practicing with my bow (you need to shoot a *LOT* to be proficient with a bare wooden bow). For example, when you factor in all the preparation, including sharpening the broadhead, it probably takes a ...


That is an incredibly long winded attempt to justify killing something for sport.
 
2012-10-07 08:38:36 PM

eyehate: dittybopper: Keizer_Ghidorah: At least you're using the animal for more than a badge if you actually eat the meat and do something with the rest of it. Killing it for a quick thrill and a "ME SO AWESOME!!" moment is a pointless endeavor.

It's not for that one moment. It's for the entire experience, even if you don't manage to kill something. As I've pointed out numerous times, if we were just interested in killing things, we'd work in a slaughterhouse. It's the work that goes into making that kill that makes it worthwhile.

A person going after a trophy buck spends a lot of time scouting the woods, looking for sign of big bucks, planning his hunts down to intricate detail. I know a dedicated, dyed-in-the-wool trophy hunter. He spends a *LOT* of time planning his hunts, including using topographical maps and aerial photography to figure out the best places to find a buck with a large rack. Where possible, he plants food plots to encourage antler growth. He uses all the tricks in the book to get a trophy-sized deer close enough for a shot: Doe-in-rut lure, a pair of antlers from a deer he shot that wasn't quite "up to snuff" to be mounted for rattling, doe bleat call, and a grunt call. Not to mention scent blocking/absorbing clothing washed in special non-scented, non-UV brightening detergent.

He takes it seriously, and you know what? He passes on most shots because the deer in question isn't up to his standards. Would he bother to do all that work just to get a picture?

I'm different: I'll take a doe or a buck, no matter the size (but a trophy sized buck would be nice, of course), but I ramped up the difficulty by using primitive methods only. I probably put as much time into preparation as he does, but my time is spent doing things like building wooden arrows, and practicing with my bow (you need to shoot a *LOT* to be proficient with a bare wooden bow). For example, when you factor in all the preparation, including sharpening the broadhead, it probably t ...

That is an incredibly long winded attempt to justify killing something for sport.



Especially since I said that I don't mind killing something if you use the body for more than an adrenaline rush or a decoration.
 
2012-10-08 10:09:55 AM

TheyCallMeC0WB0Y: protectyourlimbs: I understand why some people don't care that she killed the bear for fun, so those people should understand why i wont care when shes dead...

Why do you have so much hate for a child simply because she enjoys hunting with her family?? You seriously need to get off the internet, go outside and learn how to relate to other human beings.


Don't care and hate are two separate things, maybe more time on the internet will do you good...
 
2012-10-08 11:39:01 AM

eyehate: That is an incredibly long winded attempt to justify killing something for sport.


Sometimes life can't be condensed down to a bumpersticker.
 
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