If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Vanity Fair)   Times of London food critic bashes Michelin Guide, dubbing their starred restaurant reviews "handjobs" and geared to rewarding pompous establishments that serve "glossy plutocrats and their speechless rental dates." Yelp   (vanityfair.com) divider line 33
    More: Obvious, Michelin  
•       •       •

1825 clicks; posted to Business » on 04 Oct 2012 at 10:08 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



33 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread
 
2012-10-04 08:52:11 PM  
And don't even get him started about the James Beard awards...
 
2012-10-04 09:17:51 PM  

fusillade762: And don't even get him started about the James Beard awards...


Yeah, but he has a point. To my mind, feasting is a social event. You sit around and talk and laugh and enjoy the company of the folks you invited... And you talk about the food and how good it is, and how you're going to eat more tomorrow, and it's a grand old time. Feasting should not be a mere check-off of a restaurant destination. It should be FUN.

And unusual. Every so often, not as a hobby.

Food should be about nourishment, not consumerism.
 
2012-10-04 09:59:16 PM  
I worship French food and can't be bothered to make it myself.  Michelin may be outdated and Francophile but I think everyone that references it REALIZES that that's what it is good for.  The best classic French restaraunts.
 
2012-10-04 10:31:27 PM  

brap: The best classic French restaraunts.


Well assuming you accept their criteria.
 
2012-10-04 10:41:30 PM  
There was a little restaurant in Phoenix, just a small place in a tiny set of old stores. It regularly placed second behind The Phoenician Resort for wine rating by a Michelin equivalent for French wines, as judged by a team of French guys.

The owner was crazy but he loved French wines
 
2012-10-04 10:49:23 PM  
It is a sad state of affairs when the only way people who write well get noticed is when they write scathing articles completely dressing down artificially important social institutions.
 
2012-10-04 10:58:02 PM  
i've been to a few Michelin starred places, and Michelin does have a clue.

Michelin restaurants aren't necessarily French nor expensive. Onyx in Budapest focuses on Hungarian food, and a prix fixe lunch there runs just 25 euros for three course, wine, and coffee.

Casa Mono, a tapas restaurant in NYC, is pretty reasonable (for NYC) as well. as are Public and Dressler.
 
2012-10-04 10:58:54 PM  

WhyteRaven74: brap: The best classic French restaraunts.

Well assuming you accept their criteria.



)Of course assuming that the mere TERM criteria is in any way cognicent amongst the Chowderati. 
 
2012-10-04 11:18:30 PM  
It's still better than Yelp's "pay or or your ratings die" extortion.

Amazon will figure out a restaurant ratings business model and then Yelp will be a bad memory.
 
2012-10-04 11:24:48 PM  

Omnivorous: It's still better than Yelp's "pay or or your ratings die" extortion.

Amazon will figure out a restaurant ratings business model and then Yelp will be a bad memory.


Yelp sounds like the BBB, oh you don't want to sign up any more, I'm sorry we just discovered all these bad things "people" have to say about you.
 
2012-10-05 12:19:54 AM  
Yes, it just so happens that France, who puts the guide together, has 26 3-star joints. More than US, Italy, and the UK combined.

It would be fine if they left the ratings to food. But if you dont use white tablecloths or insist on jacket & tie for guests, then you may as well be Wendy's.
 
2012-10-05 12:23:18 AM  
Social media is going to crush the traditional restaurant guide business. The wisdom of crowds is free these days.
 
2012-10-05 12:30:51 AM  

Incontinent_dog_and_monkey_rodeo: Social media is going to crush the traditional restaurant guide business. The wisdom of crowds is free these days.


Not just for restaurants.

I recently made a trip to Chicago a few weeks ago. Before i left, i went to the book store and bought a guide before i left, as i have done for many years, just out of habbit. I think it will be the last guide i ever buy.

Between free apps from Yelp, Google Maps, Trip Advisor, and the websites of the destinations themselves, i dont see how i ever need a guide again.

Case in point, the guidebook ( a recent edition) for one of the museums i wanted to see had incorrect times and pricing. Fortunately, i had confirmed on my phone before heading over.
 
2012-10-05 02:27:02 AM  
The author has a point, but there are many, many Michelin-star restaurants that are neither pricey nor snobbish, like The Hand & Flowers, a gastropub west of London.
 
2012-10-05 03:57:24 AM  

LemSkroob: Yes, it just so happens that France, who puts the guide together, has 26 3-star joints. More than US, Italy, and the UK combined.

It would be fine if they left the ratings to food. But if you dont use white tablecloths or insist on jacket & tie for guests, then you may as well be Wendy's.


That's one of the main criticism level at the Michelin guide. Although they are a very good guide to find good restaurants in the low-ratings (don't forget, only a few elite restaurants have even one star, and the Michelin guide review hundreds), the high-ratings are due to food, but also to the athmosphere, the decor, whether the restaurant has valet parking, etc... That means that, after a certain point, the restaurants earn the coveted not only on food, but on the experience. And experience is something that less and less people are willing to pay a premium for.
 
2012-10-05 05:23:26 AM  
Even with the whiff of Desitin coming off the article, he completely nails everything that is wrong with
modern Foodie culture.
 
2012-10-05 07:18:08 AM  

padraig: And experience is something that less and less people are willing to pay a premium for.


At the risk of pedantry, people are always willing to pay a premium for the experience. They are just less and less willing to be pay for that experience, and even less willing to be told what experience they should appreciate.
 
2012-10-05 07:58:05 AM  

Incontinent_dog_and_monkey_rodeo: Social media is going to crush the traditional restaurant guide business. The wisdom of crowds is free these days.


You're right. These days we're all invisible, mercurial, undercover inspectors.
 
2012-10-05 08:31:14 AM  
The food was so bad I couldn't wait to crap it out.
 
2012-10-05 09:23:28 AM  

Omnivorous: It's still better than Yelp's "pay or or your ratings die" extortion.

Amazon will figure out a restaurant ratings business model and then Yelp will be a bad memory.


Meh, just urbanspoon. At least they don't filter reviews because the restaurant whines to them.
 
2012-10-05 09:39:51 AM  
Ticketmaster, please institute exact-seat purchasing for all venues. I want an aisle seat for quicker beer runs.
 
2012-10-05 09:40:28 AM  

tricycleracer: Ticketmaster, please institute exact-seat purchasing for all venues. I want an aisle seat for quicker beer runs.


Ack, wrong thread.
 
2012-10-05 10:02:00 AM  
I'm still a little disappointed that they've never visited new orleans, which has some of the best food in america

/ it's a mix of being a starting place for a lot of great chefs, having a market for good food, lower start up costs than bigger cities, and finally, having a community that demands good food and will eat for taste and pleasure, not bragging rights. to have good restaurants, you need a culture of food lovers, so that those good restaurants can survive.  but for the tourist joints that serve crap to our visitors who aren't interested in anything other than slathered fried stuff, it's tough to find a shiatty restaurant. even some of our tourist shiatholes are pretty good, if you order the right thing.
 
2012-10-05 10:22:35 AM  
No pictures of what a speechless rental date might look like?
 
2012-10-05 11:42:18 AM  

padraig: LemSkroob: Yes, it just so happens that France, who puts the guide together, has 26 3-star joints. More than US, Italy, and the UK combined.

It would be fine if they left the ratings to food. But if you dont use white tablecloths or insist on jacket & tie for guests, then you may as well be Wendy's.

That's one of the main criticism level at the Michelin guide. Although they are a very good guide to find good restaurants in the low-ratings (don't forget, only a few elite restaurants have even one star, and the Michelin guide review hundreds), the high-ratings are due to food, but also to the athmosphere, the decor, whether the restaurant has valet parking, etc... That means that, after a certain point, the restaurants earn the coveted not only on food, but on the experience. And experience is something that less and less people are willing to pay a premium for.


Its not just the 3-stars. France has almost 500 1-star places. the US just cracks 100. If you don't have snails on the menu, or your place takes a moral stand against Foie Gras you get docked a star.
 
2012-10-05 12:04:42 PM  

tricycleracer: tricycleracer: Ticketmaster, please institute exact-seat purchasing for all venues. I want an aisle seat for quicker beer runs.

Ack, wrong thread.


And yet....
 
2012-10-05 02:09:20 PM  

Incontinent_dog_and_monkey_rodeo: Social media is going to crush the traditional restaurant guide business. The wisdom of crowds is free these days.


And you get what you pay for. The wisdom of the crowds is TERRIBLE. How many times have you been on Yelp and read 10 great reviews for a restaurant, and then two horrible reviews from people who say it was the worst place they've ever been to and they'd never go again. Did they even go to the same restaurant? Or are they just consummate trolls?

I'd much more trust the opinion of a food critic that visits a restaurant multiple times and tries different things before making an informed review.

That's not to say there are good reviewers on Yelp, but they're largely lost in troll noise.
 
2012-10-05 07:37:09 PM  
FYI, the author of this piece is an utter prick. The guy's career highlight is writing about shooting a healthy baboon with a .357 in order to "get a sense of what it might be like to kill someone."

/so many things to do in life, never considered shooting a primate for fun
 
2012-10-05 08:32:22 PM  

harlock: And you get what you pay for. The wisdom of the crowds is TERRIBLE. How many times have you been on Yelp and read 10 great reviews for a restaurant, and then two horrible reviews from people who say it was the worst place they've ever been to and they'd never go again. Did they even go to the same restaurant? Or are they just consummate trolls?


The problem is about literacy in the subject.

I'm looking at the reviews of the local Beefeater, which is a chain steakhouse. They serve average food at above average prices. And some of the reviews say things like "Fantastic food" or "absolutely brilliant". And the only way I can think this is the case is that these people never eat anywhere but Beefeaters or other chain steakhouses. These places do as little as possible. Everything comes in packs and is either deep fried, grilled or microwaved. They don't use great ingredients. Sauces come in packets to them.

It's like blokes who tell you that The Da Vinci Code is amazing. You ask them what else they read, and it's basically, other garbage, often recommended by their mates who also read nothing but garbage. If they read something by Jo Nesbo or John Le Carre, they might get that they've been reading garbage all this time.

It's why I don't go near TripAdvisor. I know which of my friends know nothing about food, and which ones have a clue and generally get places right and filter opinions accordingly. With TripAdvisor, they're just a bunch of strangers.
 
2012-10-06 09:36:19 AM  

BalugaJoe: The food was so bad I couldn't wait to crap it out.


Neither could the last guy.
 
2012-10-06 09:37:27 AM  

farkeruk: The problem is about literacy in the subject.


Exactly. The wisdom of the masses sucks as a whole, but once you specialize and narrow your options down to sources you trust, you can find crowds of like-minded individuals for just about anything.

For example, I think Fark's consensus movie recommendations suck yak balls. Seriously, you people are awful. And the book threads are populated by nerds talking about fantasy series. Christ! But I don't come here to find out what you morons think about robot movies or dragon books. What I do find Fark useful for is as a platform for reading Pocket Ninja. It's a wonderful site for that.
 
2012-10-06 09:38:07 AM  

harlock: Incontinent_dog_and_monkey_rodeo: Social media is going to crush the traditional restaurant guide business. The wisdom of crowds is free these days.

And you get what you pay for. The wisdom of the crowds is TERRIBLE. How many times have you been on Yelp and read 10 great reviews for a restaurant, and then two horrible reviews from people who say it was the worst place they've ever been to and they'd never go again. Did they even go to the same restaurant? Or are they just consummate trolls?

I'd much more trust the opinion of a food critic that visits a restaurant multiple times and tries different things before making an informed review.

That's not to say there are good reviewers on Yelp, but they're largely lost in troll noise.


I've actually had the opposite problem--local fanboi noise. A bunch of regulars with few local options, so they hype up an average joint.
 
2012-10-06 10:52:08 AM  

tricycleracer: Ticketmaster, please institute exact-seat purchasing for all venues. I want an aisle seat for quicker beer runs.


I just call. Circumvent the silly random website lotto shiat.
 
Displayed 33 of 33 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report