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(Epicurious)   This week's Fark food discussion thread: Soups and stews. Share your recipes & photos, ask your questions   (epicurious.com) divider line 216
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1690 clicks; posted to Main » on 04 Oct 2012 at 5:00 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-04 06:09:00 PM  
Anyone have a good recipe for Denver style green chile? For those of you unfamiliar, first let me say I am sorry you don't know what I'm talking about, but instead of the chile being green as the name suggests it is in fact orange. And very thick and spicy with big ass hunks of pork. I would kill to know how to make the green chile at this place Link
 
2012-10-04 06:12:39 PM  
This is a recipe for pumpkin-turkey chili.

It is absolutely not a bookmark.

/hosing Thanksgiving this year
//all turkey will be presented in this format
 
2012-10-04 06:12:57 PM  

alienated: from last weeks crock pot thread,


Balls, how did I miss that thread? THANK YOU!!
 
2012-10-04 06:13:04 PM  
Short and simple

1 can Tomato soup.
Leftover Taco meat - the hotter the better.
Elbow macaroni

Boil until macaroni is done. Sprinkle on a little taco cheese if you want to be fancy.
 
2012-10-04 06:14:16 PM  
Posole
4 cubed pork chops
3 cans (12~14 oz) red enchilada sauce
3 cans posole (hominy)
1/2 onion diced
2 lg cans chopped green chiles
garlic to taste
1/2tsp chili pwdr
water to taste

crock pot

Best posole I've had outside New Mexico
 
2012-10-04 06:15:09 PM  
The Spindrifter's Seafood Chowder

This is pretty much guesswork, so take it for what it's worth. I literally throw this together without measuring a damned thing.

You will need Milk, flour (or alternative thickener), some water, Seafood (I use salmon, tuna, clams, crab, lobster, and whatever else I can get my hands on,) potatoes, or instant potatoes if you're in a hurry, Garlic (all kinds), a wee bit of chipotlé powder, white pepper, FRESH ground bay oak leaf, and Thyme leaf, preferably fresh, and either a quality seafood stock, or Penzey's Seafood Base http://www.penzeys.com/cgi-bin/penzeys/p-penzeyssoupbase.html, Penzey's Dried Red Bell Peppers, and well, pretty much all of these spices should be Penzey's. Large stock pot. Oyster crackers or suitable substitute. Bacon. Cream. Love. Salt should not be required if you're using a heavy base or bouillon (sp?) but if it's not salty enough when done, smoked salt is AWEsome. Butter and/or Olive Oil: for frying and seasoning.

No, this is not a healthy meal, but it sure as shiat will fill you up and warm your ass up on a cold winter's day!

1) Make a roux. If you don't know what a roux is, fry some wheat flour in butter, then slowly add liquid. This is the thickener.
If you're wheat intolerant or a Celiac, or just want a more refined product, dissolve a 1/4 cup Arrow Root starch or cornstarch in a cup of cold water, set aside.
If you don't know what a roux is or how to make it, please look it up.
2) Gather your seafood. I don't give a damn what you're using: freshly pan-fried salmon, canned salmon, tuna fish, whiting, smoked mullet, trout, bass, sea bass, clams, oysters, tilapia, whatever you have on hand.
3) Fry the seafood gently in butter*, set aside with the lid on to keep it warm.
3a*) If using fresh shrimp, cook LAST and then put in the finished soup: shrimp shrinks when heated for a long period of time.
4) Take that Roux and gradually add a half gallon of milk to it, stirring constantly on medium heat; keep it just south of boiling, and do NOT let it scorch. The consistency should be like that of cream.
5) Add Garlic,
6) Add Bacon
7) Add Diced Potatoes, cook down slowly. Alternative: Use instant potatoes last. Potatoes will also help thicken the soup.
8) If using stock, slowly add this as well while stirring. Bring to a simmer, slowly reduce slightly to increase the flavor.
9) Add more garlic
10) Add your seafood you have set aside. Stir a lot and bring back to simmer.
11) add the Thyme, white pepper, and Bay Leaf powder to taste; no I can't recommend an amount, so start slow and work your way up-- this is about how you want it to taste.
12) Add the dried, red sweet bell pepper pieces.
13) Speaking of taste, sample it now. Not creamy enough? add a 1/4 stick butter, or 1/8 stick and olive oil. Not thick enough? Add more instant potato. Not flavorful enough? Add the Seafood Base now. I start with a heaping tablespoon, and work my way up with 1 teaspoon at a time until it's right. You will know when you get there :)
14) Reduce heat, ladle into bowls and serve with large spoons and the oyster crackers. Garnish however the hell you want to!

My wife requests this often in the winter.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2012-10-04 06:22:15 PM  

thespindrifter: The Spindrifter's Seafood Chowder

This is pretty much guesswork, so take it for what it's worth. I literally throw this together without measuring a damned thing.

You will need Milk, flour (or alternative thickener), some water, Seafood (I use salmon, tuna, clams, crab, lobster, and whatever else I can get my hands on,) potatoes, or instant potatoes if you're in a hurry, Garlic (all kinds), a wee bit of chipotlé powder, white pepper, FRESH ground bay oak leaf, and Thyme leaf, preferably fresh, and either a quality seafood stock, or Penzey's Seafood Base http://www.penzeys.com/cgi-bin/penzeys/p-penzeyssoupbase.html, Penzey's Dried Red Bell Peppers, and well, pretty much all of these spices should be Penzey's. Large stock pot. Oyster crackers or suitable substitute. Bacon. Cream. Love. Salt should not be required if you're using a heavy base or bouillon (sp?) but if it's not salty enough when done, smoked salt is AWEsome. Butter and/or Olive Oil: for frying and seasoning.

No, this is not a healthy meal, but it sure as shiat will fill you up and warm your ass up on a cold winter's day!

1) Make a roux. If you don't know what a roux is, fry some wheat flour in butter, then slowly add liquid. This is the thickener.
If you're wheat intolerant or a Celiac, or just want a more refined product, dissolve a 1/4 cup Arrow Root starch or cornstarch in a cup of cold water, set aside.
If you don't know what a roux is or how to make it, please look it up.
2) Gather your seafood. I don't give a damn what you're using: freshly pan-fried salmon, canned salmon, tuna fish, whiting, smoked mullet, trout, bass, sea bass, clams, oysters, tilapia, whatever you have on hand.
3) Fry the seafood gently in butter*, set aside with the lid on to keep it warm.
3a*) If using fresh shrimp, cook LAST and then put in the finished soup: shrimp shrinks when heated for a long period of time.
4) Take that Roux and gradually add a half gallon of milk to it, stirring constantly on medium heat; keep it ju ...


That looks farkin' tasty.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2012-10-04 06:26:10 PM  
Link to where I got it at the bottom, but I made this for wifey (who had never once had a soup without potato in it) and it was well received. I plan on sticking to it and seeing what tweaks to add over time, though I know I want to add green beans.

Minestrone

1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
3/4 cup chopped onion
3 cups water
2 cups diced zucchini
1 cup diced carrot, peeled
1 cup canned cannellini beans or 1 cup you may use other white beans
3/4 cup diced celery
1 teaspoon dried basil or 2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh basil
1/4 teaspoon dried oregano
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon fresh coarse ground black pepper
28 fluid ounces canned plum tomatoes, dice and include liquid
2 garlic cloves, minced
1/4 cup uncooked ditalini or 1/4 cup elbow macaroni
Directions:

1 Heat oil in a large saucepan over medium-high heat.
2 Add chopped onion and sauté for 4 minutes or until just lightly browned.
3 Add water, zucchini, carrots, canellini beans, celery, basil, oregano salt, pepper, tomatoes and garlic.
4 Bring to boil; reduce heat, cover and simmer on medium-low heat for 25 minutes, stirring occasionally.
5 Add macaroni, cover and cook an additional 10 minutes.
6 Adjust spices to suit your taste.
7 Serve hot.

Read more at: http://www.food.com/recipe/uncle-bills-vegetarian-minestrone-soup-8141 9?oc=linkback
 
ows
2012-10-04 06:26:48 PM  
all i know is a good beef stew involves low heat,long cooking and a lot of good white wine.

most of the good white wine goes into the stew.
 
2012-10-04 06:28:07 PM  

DGS: That looks farkin' tasty.


Thank you. P.S., I forgot to mention: if using the starch-base alternative to a Roux for thickener, add that 1/4 cup dissolved in water before the seafood, then return to just south of boiling, and it should thicken up nicely. Also also, smoked paprika can be used in conjunction with, or as a substitute for the Chipotlé powder, which should be added with the other seasonings (white pepper, bay leaf powder, thyme.)

Sorry, was in a hurry.
 
2012-10-04 06:29:45 PM  
media.townhall.com

Good try everybody.

But you need to know that you are really looking for some fine Hungarian Goulash recipes.

Wikipedia says that The name originates from the Hungarian gulyás [ˈɡujaːʃ]. The word gulya means 'herd of cattle' in Hungarian, and gulyás means 'herdsman'. That's true but there's one thing it doesn't tell you, why there are dozens of varieties of goulash. Let me tell you, these fine men wandering the Hungarian puszta (plains) made their own stews in the evenings and sometimes they had this and that, sometimes they didn't have any but the most important ingredients, which are potatoes, paprika, and some kind of meat. So, if yo have all of these, you can probably make a fine goulash. Onion and garlic will definitely help. You have mushrooms and beans? Put them in the pan. You have some red wine left? It will make your goulash better. Are you THE MAN? Put some hot chili in it. You got the idea.

I wasn't going to post post any recipes because you can find so many if you Google it but I found this on YouTube and it's kind of funny so here it is.

My personal favorite is a stew called paprikás krumpli (potato goulash) made with hot paprika and noodles and served with a slice of bread and fermented cucumber pickles.

mindmegette.hu
 
2012-10-04 06:31:34 PM  
Don't know exactly what's in it, but one of my all-time favorite dishes that my wife makes is Peruvian sopa menudo (aka sopa criolla).

Let's see...
ground beef, seasoned & browned
beef bullion
canned milk
noodles
powdered panca peppers
ají amarillo paste
salt/pepper
cilantro
garlic
oregano
palillo
once it's good and hot, toss in an egg or two

Yummy - just finished up a pot for lunch today.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2012-10-04 06:38:20 PM  

ows: all i know is a good beef stew involves low heat,long cooking and a lot of good white wine.

most of the good white wine goes into the stew.


I didn't put any in mine last time and loved it, but that's worth a shot.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2012-10-04 06:39:29 PM  

thespindrifter: DGS: That looks farkin' tasty.

Thank you. P.S., I forgot to mention: if using the starch-base alternative to a Roux for thickener, add that 1/4 cup dissolved in water before the seafood, then return to just south of boiling, and it should thicken up nicely. Also also, smoked paprika can be used in conjunction with, or as a substitute for the Chipotlé powder, which should be added with the other seasonings (white pepper, bay leaf powder, thyme.)

Sorry, was in a hurry.


Oh,well, FORGET IT NOW. JEEEEEEEEZ.
 
2012-10-04 06:39:37 PM  

SpacemanSpoof: Don't know exactly what's in it, but one of my all-time favorite dishes that my wife makes is Peruvian sopa menudo (aka sopa criolla).

Let's see...
ground beef, seasoned & browned
beef bullion
canned milk
noodles
powdered panca peppers
ají amarillo paste
salt/pepper
cilantro
garlic
oregano
palillo
once it's good and hot, toss in an egg or two

Yummy - just finished up a pot for lunch today.


Slight correction: It's not menudo unless it has tripe in it.

old school.
Gods gift to hangovers.
 
2012-10-04 06:43:35 PM  
This makes this:

3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-10-04 06:44:17 PM  
Does reaching up onto the shelf to grab a can of soup count?


I didn't think so.
 
2012-10-04 06:47:56 PM  
I know it marks me as something, but I love Mark Bittman's (NYTimes) How to Cook Everything. The guy just has all the basics down with a clear prose style and well-organized layout. Here's his Cassoulet recipe online:
 
2012-10-04 06:49:04 PM  
 
2012-10-04 06:54:49 PM  
Meatball Minestrone Soup

(meatballs)
1/2 lb Hamburger (80/20)
1/3 cups breadcrumbs
1 egg
1 tsp salt
1 tsp pepper
1 tsp oregano
1 tsp basil
1 10 oz package frozen chopped spinach (thawed and drained)

Hand mix ingredients in large mixing bowl. Roll mixture into balls that are approximately 1 inch in diameter. Brown the meatballs in a frying pan. Don't worry if they are cooked all the way through, as they will finish cooking in the soup.

(soup)
7 cups water
8 beef bullion cubes
1/3 head of cabbage (chopped to quarter inch strips)
1 pound stewed red ripe tomatoes
1 pound red kidney beans (drained)
2 carrots (thinly chopped)
1 small package cheese tortellini

Bring water to a boil. Add meatballs and bullion cubes. Cover and cook 10 minutes.

Add tomatoes, beans, and carrots. Cover and cook 10 minutes.

Add tortellini. Cover and cook until tortellini is done (according to its packaging, but not too soft. Reheating will cook them more and they'll fall apart later).

Enjoy.
 
2012-10-04 06:55:32 PM  

Lt. Cheese Weasel: It's not menudo unless it has tripe in it.


And the best menudo starts with dried chilis and includes pigs' feet.

/too damn much good food available in this part of Texas
 
2012-10-04 06:57:52 PM  

CrscntBufS: Short and simple

1 can Tomato soup.
Leftover Taco meat - the hotter the better.
Elbow macaroni

Boil until macaroni is done. Sprinkle on a little taco cheese if you want to be fancy.



You city kids and your fancy eatin
 
2012-10-04 07:11:23 PM  
Seklee Goulash (no idea if that is correct spelling and don't think it's
actually a goulash... but it's what my family has called it for about 5
generations)

1 lbs bonelss pork steak (or other pork) (1" cubes or so)
24 oz jar sauerkraut (drain and rinse if VERY sour, otherwise just drain)
1 medium/large yellow onion (chopped)
1 small shallot (chopped)
4 clove garlic (minced/finely chopped)
~12 oz sour cream
1 or 2 tbs sweet paprika (other paprika works as well)

Get 2 tbs EVOO hot in soup pot - sear pork then remove
Add onion and shallot to remaining hot oil - sautee until onion translucent
Add garlic and cook additional 30 seconds to 1 minute
Add 1/2 cup of sauerkraut drainings to deglaze the pan
Add pork and sauerkraut to pot
Add water to just cover contents of pot
Add Paprika
Bring to boil, cover, and reduce heat
Cover and simmer until pork is fork-tender (4-5 hours)
Add sour cream
Cover and simmer for another hour

Result should be a cabbagey/porkey goodness in a creamy sauce.
Tastes even better reheated the next day.
 
2012-10-04 07:15:57 PM  
Potato leek soup has been covered here already, but I'll go ahead and post mine because it's my kids' favorite winter dish and is incredibly easy. This recipe makes a LOT of soup, but if you have multiple teenage appetites and it's a cold day out you won't be worried about leftovers. A note about two types of potato: I found that using just russet made a grainy texture to the soup, and imparted the russet's more earthy flavor. I experimented a bit and found that equal weight russet and some waxy potato made a ton of difference.

Potato Leek Soup

3 leeks, split, washed and drained
1 medium-large sweet onion
2 large russet potatoes, peeled and diced
4 large waxy potatoes (Yukon Gold works very well), peeled and diced
1 stick butter
12 cups stock (chicken, vegetable, or mix)
salt and ground white pepper, to taste

Melt butter in stock pot
Chop leeks and onions, and sweat in melted butter until translucent
Add diced potatoes and stir
Saute until potatoes are softened, about 5-10 minutes
Add stock
Simmer at least 2 hours, 4 to 6 hours are better, checking flavors and seasoning to taste
Puree with immersion blender

We top ours with chives. My chives grew too close to the onions one year and now taste like onions themselves. A bit odd in egg dishes but outstanding in soups. Also necessary is good crusty sourdough bread for dipping in the hot soup.


/Dang, now I'm hungry
 
2012-10-04 07:17:29 PM  
This thread is making making me soooo friggin hungry....
 
2012-10-04 07:23:02 PM  
bookmark
 
2012-10-04 07:24:12 PM  

Frood: Seklee Goulash (no idea if that is correct spelling and don't think it's actually a goulash... but it's what my family has called it for about 5 generations)


That's Székely [ˈseːkɛj] goulash. Székelys are a group of Hungarians living in Romania (I know because my grandfather was one of them), and yes it's a kind of goulash and it's the sauerkraut that makes the goulash Székely.
 
2012-10-04 07:24:46 PM  
crap, forgot that cabbage should be added at the same time as the tortellini on my meatball minestrone soup reciple above.
 
2012-10-04 07:28:36 PM  
Looks like it's mostly a soup thread, so here's another soup of mine.

Cabbage Ham & Potato Soup

Ingredients:
1 lg. onion chopped
2 tbsp. butter
1 sm. head of cabbage (about 2lb) shredded/chopped
6-7 med russett potatoes peeled and diced into about 1/2 " pieces
2-2 ½ c. diced ham
~3 tbsp. chicken bouillon granules (caldo de pollo)
2/3 tsp. garlic powder/granulated garlic
2 c. Half & Half
Fresh ground pepper


Sauté onions in butter on med-high heat, then add water, potatoes and cabbage and ham (water should just cover the vegetables when mixed). Add bouillon, garlic, and pepper. Bring to a boil then lower heat to medium and cook until potatoes are tender. Add Half & Half, stir and serve.
 
2012-10-04 07:29:55 PM  
French onion:

Toss a bunch of sliced onions (I usually use 5 big ones of different types) in a big stock pot. Cook with butter and salt until carmelized. Deglase with cream sherry and reduce. Repeat at least 5 times then add beef stock proportional to the amount of onions you put in. For 5 onions i usually add about a half gallon. Simmer for about a half hour before you distribute into bowls and top with toast and cheese and broil till the cheese melts. Be sure that the cheese covers every part of the rim or you'll have a giant mess.
 
2012-10-04 07:30:52 PM  
I put this in the crockpot thread but it fits here too:

Black Friday Turkey Chili:

After Thanksgiving dinner, cube 1 1/2 pounds of turkey, dark and white meat.
Put turkey in crock pot with 2 cans of diced tomatoes and 4 cans of beans (kidney, chili, black, whatever).
Pour 1 Guinness in the crock pot. Add whatever level of peppers and chili spices your gang can handle.

Place lid on pot, set to low.

Perfect for lunch on Black Friday with more Guinness.
 
2012-10-04 07:34:09 PM  

kroonermanblack: Stew last night was onions, carrots, spinach (I wanted it to cook out basically or would have used kale), a pound of 'stew beef', sweet potatoes, and a can of spaghetti sauce (I was out of canned tomatoes and beef stock, and had had the sauce for a month).

Simmer 3 hours, done. Normally I'd toss in garlic but figured the sauce had it covered. Or I'll simmer similar recipe for longer, with bell peppers and hot peppers, to make a guisada instead. Lovely when the meat just falls apart.


Never tried sweet potatoes in stew. How does that taste?
 
2012-10-04 07:34:20 PM  
I wish I knew this soup recipe when i was in college because it's super cheap and filling. And dead easy.

In big pot saute some garlic in oil. then add:

1 can corn
1 can black beans (drained)
1 can diced tomatoes with green peppers (or add hot sauce to diced regular toms)
1 can chicken or veggie stock (I've even used beef)

And that's it. I add a little chipotle sauce to give it some zest and simmer for about ten minutes. Delicious and hearty, serve with totilla chips.
 
2012-10-04 07:35:19 PM  

ows: all i know is a good beef stew involves low heat,long cooking and a lot of good white wine.

most of the good white wine goes into the stew.


I use a good strong dark ale for my beef stew. And lots of slow cooking. I put in some aromatics in the last half hour to brighten it up.
 
2012-10-04 07:38:55 PM  
Here's a great gazpacho from Andalusia - Salamorejo

http://m.epicurious.com/recipes/member/views/SALMOREJO-50115237
 
2012-10-04 07:48:21 PM  
one of my other favourite soups to make (freezes well too) is apple, celery and tomato soup.

Four tomatoes (skinned - whichever way you want to skin them)
10 sticks celery chopped into pieces as wide as your thumb.
5 really good sweet eating apples (I like the tender sweet red apples personally) peeled and cored.
2 pints of a good veg stock
salt
pepper
1 teaspoon tumeric
1 teaspoon cayenne
1 teaspoon ginger
1 teaspoon garlic granules

Simmer until celery is soft. Introduce it to a blender. Pour back into pan and simmer until it reduces slightly.
If it needs to be thickened, use cornflour mixed with a little water (US recipe version: cornstarch(?))

Serve with hot fresh garlic bread.
 
2012-10-04 07:48:55 PM  
I always left the peels on my potatoes when I cut them for stews. Scrubbed, of course. Always left a good texture and the flavor was good.
 
2012-10-04 07:55:56 PM  
Fast Chili

yeah yeah, don't get all texas purist on me. whatever, man. just make it and then warm it up to eat the next day. yes, the next day. gotta let that jive sit over night so the flavors talk to one another and coagulate, you hear what I'm saying?

-Fry 1 lb hamburger
-Add 1 large chopped yellow onion
-Add 2 cans red or pinto beans, 1 can kidney beans, 2 cans crushed tomatoes, and 1/2 cup of frozen corn
-Add 1 teaspoon full o' cumin and 1/4 (or more) teaspoon of powdered cayenne pepper
-Add water until everything is covered
-cook uncovered on medium heat, about an hour and a half. don't let it boil. No, stop that boiling shiat. You don't want that. Stir it though, stir is like you want it.
-refrigerate overnight, reheat to eat the next day.
 
2012-10-04 07:57:43 PM  
This is my tomato sausage soup, after about two years of making it monthly and tweaking it as I went along. This is the recipe that's actually printed out on paper and next to the stove in the 'go-to' pile now.


Ingredients:
* 1 pound hot Italian sausage
* 1 pound medium Italian sausage
(note - if you don't like spicy heat, use all medium or garlic sausage)
* 1 sweet onion, chopped
* 2 (14 ounce) cans petite cut or diced tomatoes (do NOT drain!)
* 6 cups (or 2x26oz) stock - I use beef and chicken, home-made is best, but store bought is OK
* 2 tablespoons basil (or italian spice mix, if you have that)
* 2 cups pasta - I use egg noodles, but you can also use spirals, penne, whatever
* about 5 whole garlic cloves, minced
* 1 cup chopped celery
* 1 cup chopped carrots
* 1 cup chopped mushrooms (fresh is best)
* 1 1/2 - 2 cups shredded cabbage
* black pepper to taste

As usual, I prep all my ingredients before starting to cook. I like having everything laid out so I don't wind up missing something. The cat wandered in and decided to supervise...she is so spoiled rotten it isn't even funny.

i624.photobucket.com

Here it is, all portioned out. I like using paper plates (disposable/recyclable/compostable) to hold things.

i624.photobucket.com

Directions:

1. In a soup pot, cook sausage over medium heat until no pink remains. Stir often, using medium high heat. Only put a wee bit of olive oil in the pan for the start...fat will cook off quickly and prevent further sticking.

i624.photobucket.com

2. Add onions, mushrooms, celery, and carrots. Cook uncovered until onions and celery are soft. I cook a minute, stir the whole mess, cook another minute, stir vigorously, cook another minute, stir, etc. Takes 8-10 minutes for it to all cook down.

i624.photobucket.com

3. Add tomatoes (including juice), stock, cabbage, garlic, and basil. Bring to a boil. Lower heat and simmer for about 50ish minutes, stirring every 10. Yes, this will look vaguely like one of satan's bowel movements. Trust me, your patience will be rewarded.

i624.photobucket.com

4. Stir in pasta and cover. Simmer for 10 minutes, or until pasta is tender to your liking.

i624.photobucket.com

Season with salt & pepper to taste. Serve.

i624.photobucket.com 

If its just me, I use andoulle or spicy italian sausage. If the wife and yout are eating, I use medium or sweet sausage (they don't like the heat).

Enjoy!
 
2012-10-04 08:03:28 PM  
xaks:

That looks good, I think I'm going to try it.

The cat wandered in and decided to supervise...she is so spoiled rotten it isn't even funny.

My cat always flees when I start chopping the onion.
 
2012-10-04 08:06:29 PM  

traylor: [media.townhall.com image 400x230]

Good try everybody.

But you need to know that you are really looking for some fine Hungarian Goulash recipes.

Wikipedia says that The name originates from the Hungarian gulyás [ˈɡujaːʃ]. The word gulya means 'herd of cattle' in Hungarian, and gulyás means 'herdsman'. That's true but there's one thing it doesn't tell you, why there are dozens of varieties of goulash. Let me tell you, these fine men wandering the Hungarian puszta (plains) made their own stews in the evenings and sometimes they had this and that, sometimes they didn't have any but the most important ingredients, which are potatoes, paprika, and some kind of meat. So, if yo have all of these, you can probably make a fine goulash. Onion and garlic will definitely help. You have mushrooms and beans? Put them in the pan. You have some red wine left? It will make your goulash better. Are you THE MAN? Put some hot chili in it. You got the idea.

I wasn't going to post post any recipes because you can find so many if you Google it but I found this on YouTube and it's kind of funny so here it is.

My personal favorite is a stew called paprikás krumpli (potato goulash) made with hot paprika and noodles and served with a slice of bread and fermented cucumber pickles.

[mindmegette.hu image 450x450]


YESSS! Came here to strongly advise Hungarian Goulash is the best stew ever (I'm a very recent convert but hell it's great) but traylor has beaten me to it. You can use fairly cheap cuts of beef or pork if you're slow cooking because it turns out great anyway, and PAPRIKA (smokey and hot) IS WHERE ITS AT. Yum. Great work traylor.
 
2012-10-04 08:11:40 PM  

Ras-Algethi: what_now: FlashHarry: mirepoix

FlashHarry: bouquet garni

These are words that do not need to exist. See also, crudites.

If you ever watched Good Eats you'd understand the importance of mirepoix.


I use my dehyrator to make dried mire poix to give as gifts. French style (onions, carrots and celery) and Cajun style (Onions, celery and bell peppers...red, green and yellow for the pretty visual effect).
Don't fry up worth a shiat when dried, but does WONDERS for soups and stews.

Also use it to make dried spinach, which can be MAGICAL in kicking up the flavor in things like eggs, salads of various types, soup (e.g., lentil soup) and stews.
Lacks the slimy, seaweedy texture and visual, but all the flavor is THERE in its full green glory.
 
2012-10-04 08:13:07 PM  
I made soup last Sunday, been eating it since!

Hearty Beef and Bean Soup (probably about 12 servings)
2lbs beef stew meat
1 14.5oz can chickpeas, drained and rinsed
1 14.5oz can pinto beans, drained and rinsed
1 14.5oz can black beans, drained and rinsed
1 large yellow, sweet or white onion diced
4 small~medium Yukon Gold potatoes medium chop
3 roma tomatoes medium chop
3 carrots medium chop (1/4" or so it will fit on spoon with other stuff)
3 celery sticks medium chop
2 ears corn, sliced from cob (use the small bowl upside down in a large bowl trick with chef's knife or you'll have corn kernels everywhere!)
1 32oz package beef stock
4 cups water
1 cube beef broth mix/bullion (like Knorrs)
2 tbsp crushed garlic (or 3-4 cloves minced)
2 bay leaves
1 tsp garlic powder
2 tbsp chili powder
Salt and pepper to taste
Olive oil for browning and saute

In a dutch oven or large stock pot brown the beef (in batches if necessary) and remove to plate (I like to use the lid). Then saute the onions, carrots and celery for a while until the onions are translucent. Add the garlic for about 1~2 minutes more. Add beef broth, reserved beef, water, bullion cube, potatoes, tomatoes, corn, bay leaf, garlic powder, chili powder. Lower heat and cover. Simmer (slowly) for about 6 hours, stirring every time you get a beer while watching the races (or football). Near the end (or after it simmers for an hour), taste and add salt and pepper to taste. Devour when you're drunk it's done. Refrigerate or freeze leftovers, keeps for 5~6 days.

Don't be afraid to add/eliminate items. The bullion cube, corn and tomatoes weren't on the original recipe I used, and it only called for one russet potato (even a leftover baked one if you had one). Also, you could add some more spices because all those beans might like a bit more flavor (like seasoned salt or whatever you like), veg (like okra, green chiles, jalapenos, mushrooms or whatever is in the fridge).

/don't forget to remove the bay leaves before serving
 
2012-10-04 08:13:23 PM  
La Bouillabaisse A La Marseillaise is all you need to know.
Once you have had it, you have been to heaven.
Having never tried it, you are doomed to Purgatory.
A salmon tail, boneless, some huge shrimps, some mussels, a few clams, a lobster tail and claw, some scallops, and some real crab meat make this an extraordinary olfactorial orgasm the must have dish of a lifetime.
You may keep you chilies, with their magic stirred in ingredients of unknown origin, and you may set aside your stews of ordinary garden variety vegetables and meats, once you have dined on the succulent fruit du mer in a haute tureen.
Served with the traditional baguette, laden with à l'huile d'olive, and garlic, and a few lemon wedges, you will surrender to this dish as no true Frenchman has ever surrendered.
The white table linen, used as a napkin, will be your flag forever.
And you will understand the meaning of life, if not liberty, you will know only the pursuit of happiness can be found in your next serving.

I'll not post my recipe here. I don't want to cause a riot.
Plus, I had to stalk a saucier for three long years, plying him with drinks until he blacked out, until he gave me his lost secrets. He was, sadly, beheaded, in a freak motorcycle accident just after he relinquished the subtle, yet perfect twilling of spices needed to render this magnificent product and I do bid him again adieu,.
Billy, you shall be missed.
But your recipe lives on.
 
2012-10-04 08:16:05 PM  

vudukungfu: Billy, you shall be missed.
But your recipe lives on.


Now known as Decapitated Frenchman Soup.
 
2012-10-04 08:18:24 PM  
Quick-n-dirty (and delicious):

Thick pork chops or bratwurst
Sauerkraut
Granny Smith apples

Place the meat in the bottom of a Dutch oven (or reasonable facsimile). Spread the sauerkraut on top of it till covered.
Wash, slice and seed (but don't peel) enough apples to cover sauerkraut.

Bake at 350 or so until the meat is done...takes longer with chops, but worth the wait.

The apples mellow and sweeten the kraut. They also make very good friends flavor-wise with pork.
 
2012-10-04 08:18:38 PM  

Omahawg: yeah yeah, don't get all texas purist on me. whatever, man.


That bit about no beans in chili comes from exposure to chile rojo (red chili). It's not taken all that seriously outside cooking competitions. The best advice I've seen on making chili con carne came from Chicago native George Wendt: use no beans and make it hot so the wimps eat less.
 
2012-10-04 08:19:36 PM  

Anderson's Pooper: Now known as Decapitated Frenchman Soup.


I loved him, but he was
ahead of his thyme.
 
2012-10-04 08:22:19 PM  

Maud Dib: justanothersumguy: How can you go wrong with a Chili recipe from a guy named George Couch?
Link
Your welcome.

By putting beans in it, for one.


Well here you go (Lyndon Johnson's Pedernales River Chili recipe): Link

I'm going to make it this weekend, and use the leftovers for chili dogs. Or maybe try it over spaghetti with onions and cheese for a Cincinnati style four-way.
 
2012-10-04 08:25:42 PM  
Carrot and Fennel Soup

Chicken stock (If you prefer vegan, you can also use vegetarian stock)
5 large, pealed carrots
1 medium fennel bulb, rough chopped
1 lb whole mushrooms (portabella are very good)
1 onion, sliced
5 garlic bulbs
1 brick lite tofu, broken up or cubed
Salt and pepper to taste

Combine all ingredients in a large and cook over medium heat for an hour. Allow soup to cool somewhat. Blend ingredients in blender and return to pot. Heat and serve.

Salt and pepper to taste.
 
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