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(Gawker)   The other other girl from Saved by the Bell may be bi-polar,,,or not, but she is obsessed with commas,   (gawker.com) divider line 25
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13142 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 04 Oct 2012 at 1:06 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-04 01:40:15 PM
4 votes:

Eternal Virgin: All women are bipolar as far as I'm concerned.


This, combined with your handle, is hilarious
2012-10-04 01:38:57 PM
4 votes:
Why are we picking on a once-sorta-famous sitcom actress with obvious psychosis? I feel bad for her. I hope she gets on meds before she hurts herself.
2012-10-04 01:59:10 PM
3 votes:
Those books look like the product of a manic episode. One of the interesting things about bi-polar disorder is that for people suffering from it, their depressed state is often actually the more functional one. Sure, they hate everything and have no motivation, but they also tend to have a more realistic view of the world and their own abilities - if they can make themselves use them.

The same individuals during manic episodes, on the other hand...

While they demonstrate boundless energy, they are also grandiose, unfocused, and often attempt things well beyond their capabilities, with little or no ability to recognize actual success. Everything seems like a brilliant insight.

So yeah. Those books look like she wrote them during a manic episode, and hasn't come down enough yet to recognize what they actually are - a symptom of an uncontrolled problem, rather than examples of brilliance as an author.
2012-10-04 10:06:33 AM
3 votes:
That goes beyond bi-polar into schizophrenia.
2012-10-05 02:16:59 AM
2 votes:

CWeinerWV: doczoidberg: indylaw:

She'll probably get to the point where she's hospitalized and put on anti-psychotics. She'll get better, but her weight will skyrocket and she'll find that she doesn't have much drive to do anything. Then she'll go off the pills because they're holding her back, and her brain will go off into left field again. Wash, rinse, repeat. Very sad.

That's exactly how it always goes with these people.
Personally, I think they're better off without the pills.

Always huh? Citation please. Also where did you go to medical school? No one notices the productive, healthy members of society with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia because they take meds and their meds work. You only actually notice the batshiat crazy ones who go through this cycle you speak of, and then you base your argument solely around them. Or because Tom Cruise told you so, either way. Anecdotal evidence isn't fact.


Yay, another drug-pusher. Look, you don't have to go to med school to know these things. I have gone through more school than almost any physician I've met, studied pharmacology, pathology, mental disorders, and counseling, all at a graduate level (some of those courses at an internationally recognized and revered school). Medications do frequently quell the expression of disorders. They very very rarely cure them. Overmedication is the dirtiest secret and the biggest problem in medicine. Especially for mental disorders. Besides being overprescribed, psych meds also tend to prevent healing by limiting patients' abilities to cope realistically with life situations and the ramifications of their disordered behavior. What psych meds (and pain meds) do very effectively, in many but certainly not all, cases, is to mellow people out (my proper medical term) so that they are easier for relatives and medical professionals to handle.

You won't get many citations on this. Why? Well, who is going to do a double blind study on it, and how? It wouldn't be approved by ethical boards. Medicine often works under the assumption that the proper drug is the solution, so denying people the solution to medical problems is generally frowned upon. Of course you can do some sort of study that compares counseling or behavioral training to the effects of drug use, but even then the conditions are always carefully controlled. In the real world, outside the walls of a testing facility, medicine is often given as a stop-gap, dosages are approximated and regularly modified, and difficult patients can't simply be removed from treatment for non-compliance or other outlying characteristics. This is not like comparing the administration of a vaccine dose or headache cure (which studies have their own problems). We are talking about giving people chemicals to impose a consistent concentration of mind-altering substances. I frequently hear the uncritical party line towing BS position that everything will be better if you just take your medicine. Anecdotally, I hear it from time to time - so and so is less anxious or less depressed when they take x medication. But in my experience, which actually transcends various fields and even different countries, the medication is overwhelmingly a problem more often than it is a cure. Here's my citation: life and job experience. While physicians are out there prescribing meds to patients that they see for 10 minutes every 2-6 months, I've spent hours a week in one-on-one sessions with the patients. No, I didn't do a study or formal assessment of mental state with every patient at every session. Even if I had, it wouldn't make a difference. Some people are happy just to dwell in a world where the results are presumed, and all assertions that the conventional wisdom is flawed are met with derision.

So, while you hide behind the Tom Cruise fallacy (what else do we call the ad hominem/red herring/straw man thing that people do with Tom Cruise and psych meds?) and beg for citations and medical journals to bolster arguments, I will continue to tout the merits of experience - not single anecdotes, but consistent patterns of occurrences.
2012-10-04 07:16:56 PM
2 votes:

CWeinerWV: Also where did you go to medical school? No one notices the productive, healthy members of society with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia because they take meds and their meds work. You only actually notice the batshiat crazy ones who go through this cycle you speak of, and then you base your argument solely around them.


For my part, I said that's often the way it goes. I know a few high-functioning bipolar people and I've even heard of rare cases of high-functioning schizophrenics. But someone who writes stuff like this sounds like she's got a severe disorder.

I've had enough experience with mentally ill people to know that noncompliance is a huge issue, and that the main cause is the side effects that these drugs have, some of which are nuisances, others of which are debilitating.

Yeah, I'm sure there are some people who get on a long-term treatment regime that works great for them and they stick with it and manage to work around the side effects (or don't have bad side effects). But for others, the drugs just make them lethargic and apathetic.
2012-10-04 03:44:30 PM
2 votes:

turbidum: The other other girl?

She is properly referred to as Lisa Turtle, or the black one.

By pretending you don't see her race, you not only reveal your white guilt, you add confusion to what should be a simple sentence.

Unless you'd avoid say "the blonde one" or "the brunette," or "the tall one," just say "the black one." Or, if you must insist upon your white guilt, say "the African-American one."


Lisa, Jessie and Kelly you can identify by first name basis. Tori was "The other girl" (or "the lesbian" as we used to speculate).
www.wolfgnards.com
2012-10-04 03:20:09 PM
2 votes:

Dr Dreidel: indylaw: doczoidberg: Personally, I think they're better off without the pills.

You occasionally hear that argument, that the cure is worse than the disease, and I suppose it depends on the type and severity of the symptoms, but given the choice between taking nasty pills or ending up in jail because I started shouting threats at imaginary villains at the mall, or withdrawing my family's life savings in order to invest in peanut shells, I'd choose the pills.

You say that, but consider Depakote, which is used to treat bipolar. It turns you into a zombie. Patients sleep 16-18+ hours a day, and are sluggish and "not all there" when they are awake, they eat more than normal, and many I've spoken to are semi-aware of how much they lose on Depakote - the others cannot even tell when/how badly they let themselves go.

It's a scary thing, and I've seen it happen (used to work at a psych facility in Baltimore), too many times. It's tough to walk that line - on the one hand, you really don't want people being medicated zombies for months and years at a time (it's just cruel), but you also don't want loose cannons aimed in every direction.

If you're taking Depakote, it's probably because you've got more than a touch of the crazy. Best to stay on it until the coats step you down to something less up-farking.


Let me chime in here (bipolar type c) ... I've been on Lithium for about 4 years. My best friend put it best. It sucked the life out of me. I was no long a person. There was nothing there.

Off my meds, my manic episodes were AWESOME and I was always the life of the party and had so much fun. But there is so much I simply don't remember. That is scary. Not from drinking or drugs. From simply existing. I don't remember a lot of nights and a lot of bad decisions. The world flew by. A lot of wonderful moments. I don't know why. I just ... don't remember. And - oh my god - a lot of bad decisions ... I am very lucky I'm not in jail. Very fortunate I surrounded myself with equally goofy people. It's like living on a roller coaster, ups and downs, but not remotely stable. You just can't live like that. That is bipolar.

When you're medicated, it's like the little choo-choo's in the petting-zoo. You don't feel anything. Your passion for life is dead. You don't get excited about holidays or meeting new people or seeing new movies or even sex. You don't miss people. You completely lack animation. You're a robot.

I am trying a new medication now, Topamax, because the weight gain side effect of Lithium was insane. So far, it's worse than Lithium. I feel numb and severely unmotivated to do anything but read. I can't even get motivated to eat. I'm hungry. But the kitchen is 50 feet away. And FARK is right here. So, I'm just gonna hang out here some more. I'll give it a few more weeks to see how it levels out.

Anyway .... point is ... I NEED this medication. I have a wife that is a saint and puts up with my shiat. I need her. I have a 9 year old non-verbal autistic son. He needs me. I need to be level-headed and well-grounded. I need to be a rock. A robot. I don't need unpredictable mood swings, crazy thoughts, bursts of anger, emo, uncaring, etc. I gotta keep my shiat together. My wife knew me before I was medicated and she has mentioned how romantic I used to be before I took my medication, but she knows I it's a sacrifice we make for stability. It sucks, you know. But sometimes you gotta do what you gotta do.

.... Whether or not you HAVE to do that depends on your life, I imagine. I'm cool with being a robot. It's what my family needs.
2012-10-04 02:40:05 PM
2 votes:

indylaw: KiltedBastich: The same individuals during manic episodes, on the other hand...

While they demonstrate boundless energy, they are also grandiose, unfocused, and often attempt things well beyond their capabilities, with little or no ability to recognize actual success. Everything seems like a brilliant insight.

That's more than just mania, although it does seem pretty grandiose. The intermittent use of commas for every word and the use of words that aren't really words suggest some sort of thought disorder. It's not as if she's trying to use real words and is just a bad speller. She's making up words on the fly, and with no apparent meaning. If she kept that up for two books and still persists in thinking she's published something meaningful, I'm thinking schizophrenia.


Actually, manic episodes in individuals suffering from bi-polar disorder do resemble mild delusional schizophrenia. They tend to be disorganized and unable to recognize the actual quality of their efforts. This is theorized to be because both disorders are related to dopamine levels in the brain. The differences between the two disorders are in the other symptoms. Manic episodes in bi-polar disorder show high energy and grandiosity along with the disorganized thinking, and are interspersed with the depressive episodes where the person is more grounded but shows all the symptoms of major depression.

By contrast, a person suffering from delusional schizophrenia is likely to have a more stable pattern of emotional behavior (can still be depressed or upset, mind you, schizophrenia's not fun for the sufferer) and their cognitive problems are also more stable, that is, they are consistent in their expression, not variable with mood. Basically, schizophrenia sucks, but once you have diagnosed and evaluated the symptoms a given individual has, its sufferers tends not to show the same extreme variability between states as an individual with bi-polar disorder does. Of course, co-morbidity does happen from time to time. Nothing's ever a guarantee with mental illness.

Remember that mood affects your reasoning as well. I'm willing to bet she thought she was being "avant-garde" and "original" in her use of commas and inventing words. Writing stuff like this is very much in keeping with manic behaviour, and if her ego is big enough and she lacks critical self-evaluation skills, she might not be able to tell the difference herself.
2012-10-04 02:26:09 PM
2 votes:

Vodka Zombie: That goes beyond bi-polar into schizophrenia.


Came her to post this. My ex had bi-polar and my cousin has schizophrenia. She acts more like my cousin.

Yeah, I know. Diagnosing a stranger based on one interview and only anecdotal experience isn't scientific.
2012-10-04 01:39:17 PM
2 votes:
All women are bipolar as far as I'm concerned.
2012-10-04 11:15:43 AM
2 votes:
That's an interesting symptom of bi-polar disorder. While many instances of those suffering from bi-polar are exemplified by highs of extreme energy and low periods which often show themselves as low energy, (for example: lethargy or apathy), it's rare that your low energy period manifests itself as near commatose.
2012-10-04 05:32:19 PM
1 votes:

Dr Dreidel: indylaw: doczoidberg: Personally, I think they're better off without the pills.

You occasionally hear that argument, that the cure is worse than the disease, and I suppose it depends on the type and severity of the symptoms, but given the choice between taking nasty pills or ending up in jail because I started shouting threats at imaginary villains at the mall, or withdrawing my family's life savings in order to invest in peanut shells, I'd choose the pills.

You say that, but consider Depakote, which is used to treat bipolar. It turns you into a zombie. Patients sleep 16-18+ hours a day, and are sluggish and "not all there" when they are awake, they eat more than normal, and many I've spoken to are semi-aware of how much they lose on Depakote - the others cannot even tell when/how badly they let themselves go.

It's a scary thing, and I've seen it happen (used to work at a psych facility in Baltimore), too many times. It's tough to walk that line - on the one hand, you really don't want people being medicated zombies for months and years at a time (it's just cruel), but you also don't want loose cannons aimed in every direction.

If you're taking Depakote, it's probably because you've got more than a touch of the crazy. Best to stay on it until the coats step you down to something less up-farking.


If you are on psych meds and this happens to you, you are either A) on the wrong drug for you B) overmedicated or C) a combo of both. These disorders can be treated with manageable side effects, with a little trial and error. Don't blame the drug when you should be blaming the doctor for not adjusting the meds until they are effective and tolerable. In addition, of lot of these sedating effects are temporary until the patient adjusts to the meds, along with the fact you aren't aware with how much Ativan and Haldol they had injected into them to get them to settle down initially. You don't see this because you only see the acute situation. Everyone takes the horror story and applies it to everyone, when in fact the majority of people don't experience these side effects to that severity. Just like every other drug out there, people actually believe every single side effect listed on the commercial is going to happen to them.
2012-10-04 03:42:01 PM
1 votes:
Dr Dreidel: indylaw: doczoidberg: Personally, I think they're better off without the pills...


I didn't feel like copying all of that, but I'll throw my two cents into the fountain. I was diagnosed as Bipolar II when I was 13, after a major life event, then heavily medicated up until 19, when I finally got the will power/mental strength/personal conviction to stop taking them. I've had my ups and downs since then, hit rock bottom, done really stupid things, but I would always prefer to feel extreme pain and ridiculous happiness than nothing at all.

During one of my downs, I attempted to go back on a mood stabilizer, and was left with a horrible feeling of dread, terrible panic attacks, and just general freaking out. So I talked to my doctor about it, his solution...take another pill for that. I saw the pattern starting again, fix a problem with a pill, then fix that problem with another pill, until you're on 12 a day. I stopped them immediately.

I do theatre, and while medicated, it is always more difficult to perform. There is truly no desire (for me) to do anything but wake up, work, come home, sleep. Rinse, repeat, don't feel, don't emote. A close relative died and I couldn't summon tears at his funeral, because I felt nothing.

Some people do need to be medicated, but personally, I've learned if you have a strong core group of friends and family who know your issues and how to help you handle them, it's better than any pill they can give you. It keeps you from blocking out what you don't want to feel. It's a personal question of whether you're willing to give up the mountains and valleys for endless prairies.

I hope she gets her s&^) together, I'm still praying for a Saved by the Bell 25 year reunion.
2012-10-04 03:23:00 PM
1 votes:
The other other girl?

She is properly referred to as Lisa Turtle, or the black one.

By pretending you don't see her race, you not only reveal your white guilt, you add confusion to what should be a simple sentence.

Unless you'd avoid say "the blonde one" or "the brunette," or "the tall one," just say "the black one." Or, if you must insist upon your white guilt, say "the African-American one."
2012-10-04 03:07:49 PM
1 votes:
I was never a fan of Saved by the Bell. I watched Head of the Class and my little lady was www.mainstreetmallonline.com
2012-10-04 02:48:38 PM
1 votes:
Coming from someone diagnosed with bipolar 16 years ago, who lived with it unmedicated for 9 of those years, she doesn't sound bipolar at all to me. But, 1.) I couldn't make sense of half that shiat. 2.) it takes all kinds, so whatever. 3.) mental disorders are incredibly tricky to work with and no two are alike. Just visit any autism thread for a glimpse at that.
2012-10-04 02:35:58 PM
1 votes:

shower_in_my_socks: Reminds me of the prison letter ramblings of Charles Manson, only she's making even less sense. I can actually sort of follow what Manson is trying to say. When you're crazier than a crazy person who's been in near solitary confinement for 40 years, someone needs to get you help.


It's remarkably difficult to force someone to get psychiatric treatment short of a suicide attempt or a threat of violence on the patient's part.
2012-10-04 02:32:58 PM
1 votes:

doczoidberg: Personally, I think they're better off without the pills.


You occasionally hear that argument, that the cure is worse than the disease, and I suppose it depends on the type and severity of the symptoms, but given the choice between taking nasty pills or ending up in jail because I started shouting threats at imaginary villains at the mall, or withdrawing my family's life savings in order to invest in peanut shells, I'd choose the pills.
2012-10-04 02:22:24 PM
1 votes:

indylaw:

She'll probably get to the point where she's hospitalized and put on anti-psychotics. She'll get better, but her weight will skyrocket and she'll find that she doesn't have much drive to do anything. Then she'll go off the pills because they're holding her back, and her brain will go off into left field again. Wash, rinse, repeat. Very sad.


That's exactly how it always goes with these people.
Personally, I think they're better off without the pills.
2012-10-04 02:11:54 PM
1 votes:

chevydeuce: Hey, like they say....crazy in the head equals crazy in the bed....amirite? Huh? Huh?

/hope she gets her shiat together
//doubt she will


She'll probably get to the point where she's hospitalized and put on anti-psychotics. She'll get better, but her weight will skyrocket and she'll find that she doesn't have much drive to do anything. Then she'll go off the pills because they're holding her back, and her brain will go off into left field again. Wash, rinse, repeat. Very sad.
2012-10-04 02:09:26 PM
1 votes:

KiltedBastich: The same individuals during manic episodes, on the other hand...

While they demonstrate boundless energy, they are also grandiose, unfocused, and often attempt things well beyond their capabilities, with little or no ability to recognize actual success. Everything seems like a brilliant insight.


That's more than just mania, although it does seem pretty grandiose. The intermittent use of commas for every word and the use of words that aren't really words suggest some sort of thought disorder. It's not as if she's trying to use real words and is just a bad speller. She's making up words on the fly, and with no apparent meaning. If she kept that up for two books and still persists in thinking she's published something meaningful, I'm thinking schizophrenia.
2012-10-04 01:51:07 PM
1 votes:
Poor girl. Hope she gets some help soon.
2012-10-04 01:40:35 PM
1 votes:

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And I thought she would turn out to be the normal one. Nope. Batshiat crazy.


It's the new Lorem ipsum.
2012-10-04 01:15:43 PM
1 votes:
From reading those sentences, she seems fairly similar to people I am familiar with who are schizo.
 
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