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(The New York Times)   Some cities are now encouraging people to ride bikes without wearing a helmet, because brain damage makes everything more fun and potato   (nytimes.com) divider line 215
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8952 clicks; posted to Main » on 04 Oct 2012 at 8:36 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-04 11:39:39 AM  
Head injuries are extremely common in car accidents. Those of you who always wear helmets when cycling - do you wear them when driving? If not, why not?
 
2012-10-04 11:44:13 AM  
Riding my motorcycle - Full street gear
Riding a mountain bike down the CO mountains black diamond trails - Full MX gear
Riding around my hood - No, I don't own a cute little bike helmet
Riding a bicycle down curvy mountain roads hitting 30+mph - Full street gear
I love the guys in spandex, they have no protection and better hope they can twist their head in a crash to avoid all the unprotected spots on a bike helmet.
But really, no matter what you ride or do, it should be a choice to wear whatever, or nothing at all.
 
2012-10-04 11:50:52 AM  

thornhill: dumbobruni: thornhill: Sybarite: Bike sharing program in New York? Yeah, good luck with that.

What a typical knee jerk American response.

Parisian streets and traffic are far worse than NYC, and yet bike share works quite well there (you haven't experienced gridlock during rush hour until you've witnessed some jackass getting stuck in the middle of a 6 way intersection).

There's a really simple reason why urban biking is so much more prevalent in European cities and why the bikes can function tandem with cars: enforcement of traffic laws for both cars and bikers.

A lot of European cities have street lights for bikes (Manhattan has several of these along Broadway). This helps to condition bikers to comply with the law, specifically not running reds. The only bikers who run reds and stop lights in Europe are American tourists. On the car side, in many places they must always yield to bikers, and its enforced.

bullshiat.

I take it that you've never stopped for a red light in Paris and been cursed at by French people for stopping. or have had to jump out of bike paths due to Parisian mothers using bike lanes for their strollers.

also, it is generally not possible for Velib to be used by American tourists. you need a card chip on your credit card for it to work, and most Americans don't have that. they take bike tours instead, and if their guide is having them go through red lights, is it the tourists' fault?

1. The whole chip card issue was solved like two or three years ago by allowing people to pay online. Just go to the Velib website and you can purchase 1 and 7 day rentals. They e-mail you pin that you enter in at the kiosk. You can also pay with a Navigo pass that tourists can buy..


you can't pay with a 7-14 day navigo pass. Only the annual pass works with Velib.

the Paris Tourism website has a lot of unhappy travelers regarding Velib. In my own experience with the velib stations, many don't have working keypads, and several stations don't have keypads at all.
 
2012-10-04 11:53:16 AM  

Johnnyflash: But really, no matter what you ride or do, it should be a choice to wear whatever, or nothing at all


I see why your name is Flash
 
2012-10-04 11:58:42 AM  

Loomy: give me doughnuts: The only cycling accident I had as an adult (nobody wore helmets on bikes when I was a kid) resulted in ligament damage and broken bones in my wrists. At no point did my head impact on the ground. The only reason my helmet got scraped up was because it was hanging from my handlebars, and the bike landed on it.


I've never quite understood the 'helmet hanging from handlebars' behaviour. Is it because the cycling one is currently engaged in isn't quite dangerous enough to warrant a helmet, but may warrant it later? Do they think they'll be able to slip it on sneakily enough after they spot the cops that they won't be caught anyway (in a place with helmet laws, obviously)? I just don't get it.


Hang the helmet on the handlebars on the 2 hour ride uphill at 6mph. Put it on at the top for the 30-40mph descent.
 
2012-10-04 12:03:30 PM  

orbister: Head injuries are extremely common in car accidents. Those of you who always wear helmets when cycling - do you wear them when driving? If not, why not?


The car's body, the "crumple zones", the internal frame and particularly the air bags are all doing to a greater degree what a helmet does.

Compared to the 1968 Volkswagen my old man drove us as kids (now with belts! And untempered glass in the windows!), even the shiattiest car on the road is a frigging fighter jet worth of "safety outs".

Interestingly, for the basis of comparison, I'm a sailor who wears a self-inflating PFD in anything over 10 knots, and always when I sail alone. In heavier weather, I use safety tethers to stay aboard. At the high end of sailing for speed, crew have started to wear helmets because one of the most common causes of death at sea is getting "boomed" when the wind snaps the mainsail over, turning the boom into a 20 foot long, gale-powered sledgehammer whacking a watermelon.

It's not always possible to duck, and a direct hit would crush even a helmeted head. But a glancing blow with a helmet could mean the difference between a laceration/bruise and a future in a sheltered workshop yelling at unwoven baskets.

That's the logic of a helmet: it can turn the major into the minor. If you fall under an 18-wheeler, you're dead regardless, but if you are sideswiped and bounce your forehead off a curb or a pole, you may be able to survive it with marbles safely in the bag.

Far be it from me to hate on freedom and all. May St. Gary of Busey guide you.
 
2012-10-04 12:04:48 PM  

hiker9999: On one of my rides a few weeks ago, I hit 38 mph coming down off a hill on my bike. Is falling off a bicycle at nearly 40 mph any less dangerous than crashing a motorcyclye at 40 mph?


I flew off of a mountain bike while going down a mountain at ~30 mph (maybe more? also not wearing a helmet) and it was absolutely horrifying. I landed about 5' from a huge boulder that could have ended my life (or at least made network television interesting). I walked away with just a couple broken bones, and luckily my head was spared.

That being said, I'll always wear a helmet while riding on mountains, but will still forego it while pedaling slowly through the neighborhoods. It really is a matter of context whether or not a helmet is appropriate.

(however... I must say that someone in my hometown died while slowly pedaling his bike through the neighborhood, but that was a result of him being sucker punched and falling backward to hit his head on the curb)
 
2012-10-04 12:06:26 PM  
Valiente Smartest
Funniest
2012-10-04 12:03:30 PM


orbister: Head injuries are extremely common in car accidents. Those of you who always wear helmets when cycling - do you wear them when driving? If not, why not?

The car's body, the "crumple zones", the internal frame and particularly the air bags are all doing to a greater degree what a helmet does.

Compared to the 1968 Volkswagen my old man drove us as kids (now with belts! And untempered glass in the windows!), even the shiattiest car on the road is a frigging fighter jet worth of "safety outs".

Interestingly, for the basis of comparison, I'm a sailor who wears a self-inflating PFD in anything over 10 knots, and always when I sail alone. In heavier weather, I use safety tethers to stay aboard. At the high end of sailing for speed, crew have started to wear helmets because one of the most common causes of death at sea is getting "boomed" when the wind snaps the mainsail over, turning the boom into a 20 foot long, gale-powered sledgehammer whacking a watermelon.

It's not always possible to duck, and a direct hit would crush even a helmeted head. But a glancing blow with a helmet could mean the difference between a laceration/bruise and a future in a sheltered workshop yelling at unwoven baskets.

That's the logic of a helmet: it can turn the major into the minor. If you fall under an 18-wheeler, you're dead regardless, but if you are sideswiped and bounce your forehead off a curb or a pole, you may be able to survive it with marbles safely in the bag.

Far be it from me to hate on freedom and all. May St. Gary of Busey guide you




That's dangerous and dumb. It should be against the law.
 
2012-10-04 12:09:27 PM  

doubled99: Valiente Smartest
Funniest
2012-10-04 12:03:30 PM


orbister: Head injuries are extremely common in car accidents. Those of you who always wear helmets when cycling - do you wear them when driving? If not, why not?

The car's body, the "crumple zones", the internal frame and particularly the air bags are all doing to a greater degree what a helmet does.

Compared to the 1968 Volkswagen my old man drove us as kids (now with belts! And untempered glass in the windows!), even the shiattiest car on the road is a frigging fighter jet worth of "safety outs".

Interestingly, for the basis of comparison, I'm a sailor who wears a self-inflating PFD in anything over 10 knots, and always when I sail alone. In heavier weather, I use safety tethers to stay aboard. At the high end of sailing for speed, crew have started to wear helmets because one of the most common causes of death at sea is getting "boomed" when the wind snaps the mainsail over, turning the boom into a 20 foot long, gale-powered sledgehammer whacking a watermelon.

It's not always possible to duck, and a direct hit would crush even a helmeted head. But a glancing blow with a helmet could mean the difference between a laceration/bruise and a future in a sheltered workshop yelling at unwoven baskets.

That's the logic of a helmet: it can turn the major into the minor. If you fall under an 18-wheeler, you're dead regardless, but if you are sideswiped and bounce your forehead off a curb or a pole, you may be able to survive it with marbles safely in the bag.

Far be it from me to hate on freedom and all. May St. Gary of Busey guide you



That's dangerous and dumb. It should be against the law.


So should the doctrines of eminent domain and manifest destiny, but there you go.
 
2012-10-04 12:12:12 PM  
tank2vich: Loomy: give me doughnuts: The only cycling accident I had as an adult (nobody wore helmets on bikes when I was a kid) resulted in ligament damage and broken bones in my wrists. At no point did my head impact on the ground. The only reason my helmet got scraped up was because it was hanging from my handlebars, and the bike landed on it.


I've never quite understood the 'helmet hanging from handlebars' behaviour. Is it because the cycling one is currently engaged in isn't quite dangerous enough to warrant a helmet, but may warrant it later? Do they think they'll be able to slip it on sneakily enough after they spot the cops that they won't be caught anyway (in a place with helmet laws, obviously)? I just don't get it.


Hang the helmet on the handlebars on the 2 hour ride uphill at 6mph. Put it on at the top for the 30-40mph descent.


Hey! That makes a ton of sense. I must say I usually see it on people pedalling with their heels, one hand on the bars, swerving along the sidewalk, but yours is actually a very good example of strategic helmet use.
 
2012-10-04 12:14:40 PM  

TheGreenMonkey: Having been in two bike wrecks, one with and one without a helmet, and having my dad, who was wearing a helmet, sit in the hospital for 3 days recuperating from a major hit to the head after wrecking on his bike I can honestly say that anyone who rides a bike (motorized or not) without a helmet is foolish.


Anyone who assume all bike riding is risky enough to wear a helmet is foolish.
 
2012-10-04 12:15:31 PM  
Im against mandatory helmet rules, be it pedal or motor bikes. IMO its kinda an America freedom thing...in this country we should have the right to choose if we want to wear a helmet or not. You know the risks, you make the choice. If insurance companies want to mandate it for certain coverages thats fine too.

Most of my generation (Im 35) grew up riding bikes without helmets, took some gnarly falls too. We knew we could be hurt, we could have asked our parents for helmets if we were worried, but we didnt.

Also should be noted, at summer camp they were handing us Marlin .22 rifles and a handful of bullets at around 12 years old too.
 
2012-10-04 12:26:44 PM  
Not wearing a helmet is no big deal, just don't smoke while riding a bike.
 
2012-10-04 12:28:28 PM  
i.imgur.com
 
2012-10-04 12:38:00 PM  
Everyone should wear helmets all the time! Head injuries are traumatic and serious whatever the proximate cause, and should be avoided at all cost. What's $30 against the possibility that you or someone you love might have a serious brain injury that could have easily been avoided by a subtle, sexy and unobtrusive fashion accessory?

And another thing: speed limits should be set at just below average walking sheep speeds, so that we can get where we're going safely too. And all laws, education and entertainment should be mandated to ensafen those least able amongst us. Won't somebody think of the fearful ignorant morons?
 
2012-10-04 12:40:06 PM  

Valiente: That's dangerous and dumb. It should be against the law.

So should the doctrines of eminent domain and manifest destiny, but there you go.


actually, sovereign immunity is the one that bothers me the most.
 
2012-10-04 12:41:58 PM  

Deep Contact: Not wearing a helmet is no big deal, just don't smoke while riding a bike.


bah! I have a cup holder on my bike for the alcoholic beverage of my choice, and I smoke, it's like I'm my own rolling bar... anything less is uncivilized.
 
2012-10-04 12:46:14 PM  

doubled99: Valiente Smartest
Funniest
2012-10-04 12:03:30 PM


orbister: Head injuries are extremely common in car accidents. Those of you who always wear helmets when cycling - do you wear them when driving? If not, why not?

The car's body, the "crumple zones", the internal frame and particularly the air bags are all doing to a greater degree what a helmet does.

Compared to the 1968 Volkswagen my old man drove us as kids (now with belts! And untempered glass in the windows!), even the shiattiest car on the road is a frigging fighter jet worth of "safety outs".

Interestingly, for the basis of comparison, I'm a sailor who wears a self-inflating PFD in anything over 10 knots, and always when I sail alone. In heavier weather, I use safety tethers to stay aboard. At the high end of sailing for speed, crew have started to wear helmets because one of the most common causes of death at sea is getting "boomed" when the wind snaps the mainsail over, turning the boom into a 20 foot long, gale-powered sledgehammer whacking a watermelon.

It's not always possible to duck, and a direct hit would crush even a helmeted head. But a glancing blow with a helmet could mean the difference between a laceration/bruise and a future in a sheltered workshop yelling at unwoven baskets.

That's the logic of a helmet: it can turn the major into the minor. If you fall under an 18-wheeler, you're dead regardless, but if you are sideswiped and bounce your forehead off a curb or a pole, you may be able to survive it with marbles safely in the bag.

Far be it from me to hate on freedom and all. May St. Gary of Busey guide you



That's dangerous and dumb. It should be against the law.


Is that why it's an Olympic sport?
 
2012-10-04 12:47:18 PM  

I_Am_Weasel: I wear a bike helmet because I know there people like me driving cars.


How do you hit a cyclist in your head with your car??? I'm seriously curious what logic drivers apply when they shout "get a helmet!" at me. I always should back, "You, too!"
 
2012-10-04 12:48:48 PM  

Tanishh: FTFA: "But many European health experts have taken a very different view: Yes, there are studies that show that if you fall off a bicycle at a certain speed and hit your head, a helmet can reduce your risk of serious head injury. But such falls off bikes are rare - exceedingly so in mature urban cycling systems."

Anecdotal, but a kid in my year in HS died when he got hit by a car and slammed his head into the ground. No helmet on. Died of severe brain trauma.

Falling off a bike on to your head or otherwise getting hit on the head is rare, yes, but then, so are car accidents, at least from person to person. Does that mean we ought to do away with airbags and seatbelts?

People won't ride with a helmet, fine. Let em. But if they get killed by a head injury, don't expect too much sympathy from me.


I know for a fact that there are people walking the street, sitting in their home, working or doing some shopping without a helmet. Some of them will get hit by a car and get some form of brain damage. If only they had worn a helmet at each and every moment of their lifes.

Hell, I'm betting 1k in your local currency that there are people who were driving in a car with seatbelts and airbags who died because if a head injury caused by an accident. Should they wear helmets to?
 
2012-10-04 12:59:03 PM  
Do you get more points for helmeted riders or less?
 
2012-10-04 01:09:43 PM  
When I rode, I never wore a helmet. Cycling helmets can prevent minor head trauma in some situations, but the types of accidents that may result in serious head trauma are rather rare, and a cycling helmet is not going to help when one is hit by a car. They will certainly not prevent a concussion of other impact force injuries. Not even high-tech motorcycle and racing helmet can do this. I think the serve to make a rider feel safer and, of course, are a part of the costume all riders seen to need to wear these days.
 
2012-10-04 01:15:57 PM  
give me doughnuts Smartest
Funniest
2012-10-04 12:46:14 PM


doubled99: Valiente Smartest
Funniest
2012-10-04 12:03:30 PM


orbister: Head injuries are extremely common in car accidents. Those of you who always wear helmets when cycling - do you wear them when driving? If not, why not?

The car's body, the "crumple zones", the internal frame and particularly the air bags are all doing to a greater degree what a helmet does.

Compared to the 1968 Volkswagen my old man drove us as kids (now with belts! And untempered glass in the windows!), even the shiattiest car on the road is a frigging fighter jet worth of "safety outs".

Interestingly, for the basis of comparison, I'm a sailor who wears a self-inflating PFD in anything over 10 knots, and always when I sail alone. In heavier weather, I use safety tethers to stay aboard. At the high end of sailing for speed, crew have started to wear helmets because one of the most common causes of death at sea is getting "boomed" when the wind snaps the mainsail over, turning the boom into a 20 foot long, gale-powered sledgehammer whacking a watermelon.

It's not always possible to duck, and a direct hit would crush even a helmeted head. But a glancing blow with a helmet could mean the difference between a laceration/bruise and a future in a sheltered workshop yelling at unwoven baskets.

That's the logic of a helmet: it can turn the major into the minor. If you fall under an 18-wheeler, you're dead regardless, but if you are sideswiped and bounce your forehead off a curb or a pole, you may be able to survive it with marbles safely in the bag.

Far be it from me to hate on freedom and all. May St. Gary of Busey guide you



That's dangerous and dumb. It should be against the law.

Is that why it's an Olympic sport?




So is boxing. Your point?
 
2012-10-04 01:18:08 PM  

flynn80: Do you get more points for helmeted riders or less?


Depends. If you just hit them like normal, less. But if you can make their helmet come off without popping their head or something. you get double points.
 
2012-10-04 01:20:36 PM  
Thought experiment: identify 100 thirty-year-olds who regularly ride a bike without a helmet, and 100 thirty-year-olds who don't ride bikes. What will the two groups look like forty years later?

Some of the cyclists might have died from head trauma, right? But the survivors are, in general, fitter than the non-cyclists. Which factor dominates?

Hemet laws are about the assumption that the head trauma is a bigger factor. TFA is pointing out that that's a bad assumption.

/posting from work
//rode my bike here
///with a helmet
 
2012-10-04 01:22:39 PM  

JackieRabbit: a cycling helmet is not going to help when one is hit by a car


It's helped me the two times I've hit the road because of a car. Maybe my head wouldn't have been hurt either time, but my helmet certainly got banged up. When we say "hit by a car", we're not talking about being run over (bump-ba-bump "Honey, did you hear something?") but being sideswiped, having your back tire clipped, things like that. So the big danger to you now IS falling off your bike, it's just not because you're clumsy, it's because someone did it to you.
 
2012-10-04 01:24:44 PM  

Valiente: The car's body, the "crumple zones", the internal frame and particularly the air bags are all doing to a greater degree what a helmet does.


Nonetheless, head injuries are extremely common in car crashes. Since there are so many more car crashes, many more serious injuries and deaths could be averted by making it compulsory to wear helmets in cars, and anyone concerned by the statistics enough to wear a helmet when cycling should also be wearing a helmet while driving.

Interestingly, for the basis of comparison, I'm a sailor who wears a self-inflating PFD in anything over 10 knots, and always when I sail alone. In heavier weather, I use safety tethers to stay aboard.

I'm a sailor too. My briefing to new crew is simple. "This is a lifejacket. I will make it easier to find and recovery your body if you go over board. This is a safety harness. It will stop you going overboard."

At the high end of sailing for speed, crew have started to wear helmets ...


Not just speed sailors. Boom strikes are by far the most common cause of death or serious injury to recreational sailors, yet few (including myself) wear hard hats. There are occasional mutterings about making them mandatory, or at least advised, for children on RYA dinghy courses, but the RYA is currently agin' it.
 
2012-10-04 01:33:54 PM  
I have had three serious bicycle accidents in my life.

1. Going down a hill at speed. Uneven pavement where the concrete curb had subsided from the asphalt. Non-helmeted head met ground. Went to the hospital for that one.
2. Car passes me, then suddenly makes turn in front of me immediately after passing (should have saw it coming, but he passed me on the right and then turned left, which is unusual). Destroyed front bike tire, rolled over hood. Helmeted head met hood. No hospital.
3. Going down a hill in winter after visiting a client's house. Switchback road and unexpected black ice (unexpected because the temps had dropped unexpectedly). Wrapped in winter clothes, they were shredded instead of my skin. Helmeted head met ground. No hospital.

Still, I don't think people should be forced to wear helmets if they do not want to. I just don't think such people are very bright.
 
2012-10-04 01:38:57 PM  

Mi-go amigo:

Still, I don't think people should be forced to wear helmets if they do not want to. I just don't think such people are very bright.


I dont think people should be forced to ride their bicycles at safe speeds if they do not want to. I just don't think such people are very bright.
 
2012-10-04 01:47:19 PM  

Sachlpch: I grew up not wearing a bike helmet. I never saw the need to. Even after I took a header off a retaining wall breaking my wrist, blacking out with a concussion for 10 minutes, I never batted an eye in the direction of a helmet. I had scraped knees/knuckles from all the times my tires slid out from under me, and I still didn't see the need for a helmet.

I see the way people drive their cars/trucks these days. It's not so much driving badly, but their inattentive driving with talking/texting with cellphones that if it's not another vehicle on the road they barely see it. I wear a helmet every time I get on my bike now.


Exactly. I'm almost 40, when I was a kid I rode a BMX a mile to school. Wiped out hard a few times, got a few scars, never wore a helmet.

Now, when I commute on bike, I wear a goddamed helmet, because people these days are just not all there, and I fully understand that I am the only person that is ultimately responsible for my own safety - and that helmet (as well as staying alert to the clueless drivers around me) is part of that.
 
2012-10-04 01:52:28 PM  

I May Be Crazy But...: JackieRabbit: a cycling helmet is not going to help when one is hit by a car

It's helped me the two times I've hit the road because of a car. Maybe my head wouldn't have been hurt either time, but my helmet certainly got banged up. When we say "hit by a car", we're not talking about being run over (bump-ba-bump "Honey, did you hear something?") but being sideswiped, having your back tire clipped, things like that. So the big danger to you now IS falling off your bike, it's just not because you're clumsy, it's because someone did it to you.


As I said, they can help prevent injury in some situations. I don't know what yours were. But last year I came upon an accident in the mountains where a cyclist was hit by a car. His head wasn't damaged, but he went into the windshield hard. His helmet could not stopped his neck from being broken. I heard later that he was pronounced DOA at the hospital. When a bicycle and a car tangle at high speed, the car is going to win and no amount of protective gear is going to help. I quit riding because I understood this and after a few incidents with cars that resulted in my coming off the bike, I decided that another form of exercise was better for my health. I enjoyed hiking/walking much more.
 
2012-10-04 02:01:11 PM  

Captain Horatio Mindblower: Thought experiment: identify 100 thirty-year-olds who regularly ride a bike without a helmet, and 100 thirty-year-olds who don't ride bikes. What will the two groups look like forty years later?

Some of the cyclists might have died from head trauma, right? But the survivors are, in general, fitter than the non-cyclists. Which factor dominates?


I think you are missingt he point. If people don't have to wear helmets, more will ride.

Now trying this right now in a place like NYC is stupid because it isn't set up for bikes, but in many places in Europe it is. When you have bike lanes that are respected, then the need for helmets goes way down.
 
2012-10-04 02:01:40 PM  
Anyone who rides a bike to work wearing spandex stretch trousers also tends to:

1. Own a TV but haven't turned it on in years
2. Drink microbrewery beer
3. Watch Japanese children's cartoons on a Mac
4. Appreciate the warmth of vinyl phonograph records
5. Read books at Starbucks
6. Claim to prefer girls with small breasts
7. Make snide remarks about Wal-Mart.
8. Walk past a smoker and force pretentious coughing noises
9. Take comfort in believing size doesn't matter
10. Feign disgust at the idea of eating a Big Mac
 
2012-10-04 02:07:22 PM  

JackieRabbit: I May Be Crazy But...: JackieRabbit: a cycling helmet is not going to help when one is hit by a car

It's helped me the two times I've hit the road because of a car. Maybe my head wouldn't have been hurt either time, but my helmet certainly got banged up. When we say "hit by a car", we're not talking about being run over (bump-ba-bump "Honey, did you hear something?") but being sideswiped, having your back tire clipped, things like that. So the big danger to you now IS falling off your bike, it's just not because you're clumsy, it's because someone did it to you.

As I said, they can help prevent injury in some situations. I don't know what yours were. But last year I came upon an accident in the mountains where a cyclist was hit by a car. His head wasn't damaged, but he went into the windshield hard. His helmet could not stopped his neck from being broken. I heard later that he was pronounced DOA at the hospital. When a bicycle and a car tangle at high speed, the car is going to win and no amount of protective gear is going to help. I quit riding because I understood this and after a few incidents with cars that resulted in my coming off the bike, I decided that another form of exercise was better for my health. I enjoyed hiking/walking much more.


The only thing I'm arguing with is the reasoning behind this statement. That, in my experience of course, tangling doesn't mean I'm suddenly sitting in the driver's lap, it means he's pushing me into a parked car or something. And in that situation, a helmet can do do a lot of good. Mind you, I commute on my bike, I don't ride through the countryside for exercise - that seems like it would increase your chances of getting turned into road hamburger more.
 
2012-10-04 02:10:19 PM  

letrole: Anyone who rides a bike to work wearing spandex stretch trousers also tends to:


Apparently they're very comfortable and display your equipment in a flattering way. This is a friend of mine's reason for wearing those things. Didn't do him a lot of good, as far as I know, but at least he was comfortable.
 
2012-10-04 02:21:42 PM  

I May Be Crazy But...: Apparently they're very comfortable and display your equipment in a flattering way. This is a friend of mine's reason for wearing those things. Didn't do him a lot of good, as far as I know, but at least he was comfortable.


This. I uh, have a friend who only rides with bike shorts, under normal shorts. They're damn near the best thing ever (literally), my friend tells me.
 
2012-10-04 02:23:27 PM  
Wear a helmet to save my brain? I guess, after all, it is my second favorite organ.
 
2012-10-04 02:24:37 PM  

Fissile: Wear a helmet to save my brain? I guess, after all, it is my second favorite organ.


I always knew you had an unnatural attraction to the gall-bladder.
 
2012-10-04 02:29:26 PM  
I shared my bike once in NYC. I guess I was an early adotper...

/still waiting for it to be returned
//its been a long wait
 
2012-10-04 02:34:53 PM  

angry_scientist: I May Be Crazy But...: Apparently they're very comfortable and display your equipment in a flattering way. This is a friend of mine's reason for wearing those things. Didn't do him a lot of good, as far as I know, but at least he was comfortable.

This. I uh, have a friend who only rides with bike shorts, under normal shorts. They're damn near the best thing ever (literally), my friend tells me.


that's why everytime before I go cycling, I apply a few good strokes with a ball-peen hammer... by the time I get out on the bike, everything swells up and looks really great in my tights.
 
2012-10-04 02:36:27 PM  

liam76: I think you are missingt he point. If people don't have to wear helmets, more will ride.


No one (except minors, in a minority of states) has to. Adults are free to ride without a helmet in every single state in the US, and there's really no movement to change that.

This is where it gets weird. I get yelled at by someone at a bike rack because I'm wearing a helmet about once a year. Um... the fact that I wear one does not actually mean that I'm advocating some law that everyone has to. Really.
 
2012-10-04 02:43:13 PM  

Lawnchair: liam76: I think you are missingt he point. If people don't have to wear helmets, more will ride.

No one (except minors, in a minority of states) has to. Adults are free to ride without a helmet in every single state in the US, and there's really no movement to change that.


I was under the impression a lot of cities require it, could be way off.

I know where I work it is required.


Lawnchair: This is where it gets weird. I get yelled at by someone at a bike rack because I'm wearing a helmet about once a year. Um... the fact that I wear one does not actually mean that I'm advocating some law that everyone has to. Really


Doesn't matter where you are or what the subject is you are going to run into an asshole.
 
2012-10-04 03:00:46 PM  
Bicycle helmets increase serious head injuries because they make people wearing 2 ounces of Styrofoam feel indestructable. They would need to be much more substantial to provide any significant protection.
They also make you look like a dork.
 
2012-10-04 03:07:58 PM  

JackieRabbit: His helmet could not stopped his neck from being broken.


It's possible that his helmet contributed. When you move the point of force application almost twice as far away from the top of the spine, you can do all sorts of nasty biomechanical things.
 
2012-10-04 03:19:35 PM  

brewswane: Number One cause of head and neck injuries in America? Falling off of horses!


Um, no. Not even in the top ten:

The following 20 sports/recreational activities represent the categories contributing to the highest number of estimated head injuries treated in U.S. hospital emergency rooms in 2009.
Cycling: 85,389
Football: 46,948
Baseball and Softball: 38,394
Basketball: 34,692
Water Sports (Diving, Scuba Diving, Surfing, Swimming, Water Polo, Water Skiing, Water Tubing): 28,716
Powered Recreational Vehicles (ATVs, Dune Buggies, Go-Carts, Mini bikes, Off-road): 26,606
Soccer: 24,184
Skateboards/Scooters: 23,114
Fitness/Exercise/Health Club: 18,012
Winter Sports (Skiing, Sledding, Snowboarding, Snowmobiling): 16,948
Horseback Riding: 14,466
Gymnastics/Dance/Cheerleading: 10,223
Golf: 10,035
Hockey: 8,145
Other Ball Sports and Balls, Unspecified: 6,883
Trampolines: 5,919
Rugby/Lacrosse: 5,794
Roller and Inline Skating: 3,320
Ice Skating: 4,608

Source: Link
 
2012-10-04 03:20:43 PM  

trippdogg: They also make you look like a dork.


So does scar tissue.
 
2012-10-04 03:33:10 PM  
Darwinism

let's face it, we obviously have too many stupid people surviving to breed

no helmet laws, no seatbelts, stop with the warning notices to avoid injuring yourself doing something completely 'tarded.

save the planet!
 
xcv
2012-10-04 03:36:40 PM  
I wear a helmet when riding a bike at slow speeds in urban areas mostly because I've heard healthcare providers mock their cyclist patients that weren't wearing helmets at the time of injury. Shame is a more powerful motivator than other reasons I've heard.
 
2012-10-04 03:52:16 PM  
I wear a helmet. The danger IMHO is not so much that you'll be run over and crushed but hit and knocked down. When you go down, you will hit the road. The road is hard. If your head hits the road, you will be potato. I don't want to be potato so I wear a helmet always.

I also don't ever bike sidewalks. People who bike on sidewalks are potato IMHO. Ever see how cars handle sidewalks at driveways and intersections? They roll right through the sidewalk without checking to see if they're about to hit someone someone on a bike (or running).
 
2012-10-04 04:09:07 PM  
gloves are more important than helmets because cyclist fall on their hands first
helmets are a nice safety feature i'd say 90% of cyclist in friendly madison wi use.
 
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