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(Yahoo)   How do blind people picture reality? I SAID, HOW DO BLIND PEOPLE PICTURE REALITY?   (news.yahoo.com) divider line 49
    More: Interesting, visual cortex, blindness, parietal lobes, temporal lobes, cerebral cortex, neural circuitry, braille, school library  
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3200 clicks; posted to Geek » on 04 Oct 2012 at 6:37 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-04 06:04:07 AM
I'd bet good money blind people DO picture the world visually. If you use a computer, it doesn't matter the OS, the processor runs the same. If your visual cortex is intact and running, it's running visual imagery. They might even think in colors, for all they know, only instead of light it associates with other stuff.
 
2012-10-04 06:59:27 AM
I laugh at that gag every time.
 
2012-10-04 07:17:43 AM
Probably as a prettier place than it really is, because they don't have to see your ugly mug!
 
2012-10-04 07:30:35 AM
1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-10-04 07:45:45 AM
Sort of like a big attic where you have to be very quiet lest the Nazis find you.
 
2012-10-04 07:47:15 AM
I gag at that laugh every time.
 
2012-10-04 07:48:58 AM

doglover: I'd bet good money blind people DO picture the world visually. If you use a computer, it doesn't matter the OS, the processor runs the same. If your visual cortex is intact and running, it's running visual imagery. They might even think in colors, for all they know, only instead of light it associates with other stuff.


Not likely.

The processor in this case remaps and rewires itself as needed. The thinking in colors thing is pretty easy to check, since if they thought in colors, they would be able to declare different 'tables'. ie: they would be able to imagine two tables that were different. They wouldn't call them colors, since they wouldn't know colors, but that's what the 'different' would be.

If that doesn't happen, then imagining in colors is unlikely.



Consider the genetic breakthrough that is currently going on with monkeys. They are injecting the genes to add cone cells for certain wavelengths. In a few years, hopefully they will have it working for humans. Someone who is colorblind would be able to tell you for sure if those colors were actually in their thoughts.

Though being partially colorblind, it wouldn't help for answering questions about the totally blind. Since shades have no concept for them either. ie: no grey.
 
2012-10-04 07:55:59 AM
We should ask Anne Frank
 
2012-10-04 08:00:58 AM
I wonder what LSD does to a blind person.
 
2012-10-04 08:03:14 AM

kim jong-un: Consider the genetic breakthrough that is currently going on with monkeys. They are injecting the genes to add cone cells for certain wavelengths. In a few years, hopefully they will have it working for humans.


This is good. Something like one in every 80 million women can see a fourth primary color (a wavelength of about 300 nanometers). And it's been bugging me ever since I found out about it - what does it look like? If we can get that and octarine, I will be a happy man.
 
2012-10-04 08:11:50 AM

doglover: I'd bet good money blind people DO picture the world visually. If you use a computer, it doesn't matter the OS, the processor runs the same. If your visual cortex is intact and running, it's running visual imagery. They might even think in colors, for all they know, only instead of light it associates with other stuff.


Not if it doesn't receive any direct input. More complex modules of the visual cortex are likely co-opted by the temporal and parietal lobe, and the gross where pathway is probably completely taken over by spatial-movement functions that are tied to field of view.
 
2012-10-04 08:13:32 AM

PonceAlyosha: doglover: I'd bet good money blind people DO picture the world visually. If you use a computer, it doesn't matter the OS, the processor runs the same. If your visual cortex is intact and running, it's running visual imagery. They might even think in colors, for all they know, only instead of light it associates with other stuff.

Not if it doesn't receive any direct input. More complex modules of the visual cortex are likely co-opted by the temporal and parietal lobe, and the gross where pathway is probably completely taken over by spatial-movement functions that are tied to field of view.


To clarify the first statement, if V1, the most primary functional module of visual cortex doesn't receive any information, no bottom up information processing can occur. That alone means it is not running visual data.
 
2012-10-04 08:21:19 AM

abhorrent1: I laugh at that gag every time.


HE SAID HE LAUGHS AT THAT GAG EVERY TIME

/me too
 
2012-10-04 08:30:55 AM

wildcardjack: I wonder what LSD does to a blind person.


I have often pondered that same thing. In the real world, they hear, smell, and feel things. In the crazy world, their heads explode from trying to do something that's physically impossible (SEE)
 
2012-10-04 08:32:06 AM
Also, I''m legally blind from the same thing as that guy (ROP) so I've been around a LOT of blind people. Too damn straight-laced for my tastes but nice people.
 
2012-10-04 08:35:42 AM

RKade: Also, I''m legally blind from the same thing as that guy (ROP) so I've been around a LOT of blind people. Too damn straight-laced for my tastes but nice people.


They can't see neurally either.. No transduction [if retinally blind] or conveyance [if neurally blind] of visual signals to primary cortex means that neurons of the visual system will atrophy and the space they take up will be co-opted by another module/function. It helps to imagine that a neuron is like a tree. If the leaves are the dendrites, and signal is sunlight. Without signal, the tree won't grow, and will die.
 
2012-10-04 08:40:08 AM

doglover: They might even think in colors


can they describe yellow to me?
 
2012-10-04 08:45:30 AM

I drunk what: doglover: They might even think in colors

can they describe yellow to me?


Since we don't have receptors for yellow in our eyes I have no idea why we can see yellow in the first place. Or why Sharp was trying to push TV's with yellow pixels using Sulu.
 
2012-10-04 08:52:18 AM

wildcardjack: Or why Sharp was trying to push TV's with yellow pixels using Sulu.


because it's one of the primary colors?

images.yourdictionary.com
 
2012-10-04 08:57:10 AM

I drunk what: wildcardjack: Or why Sharp was trying to push TV's with yellow pixels using Sulu.

because it's one of the primary colors?

[images.yourdictionary.com image 393x263]


Yellow is actually one of the more iffy parts of retinal processing. Tricromatic color theory, which is based on the three major receptivity of cones [green, red and blue wavelength] shows there is no direct "yellow" cone, that is receptor, but opponent processing theory implies some-matter of direct retinal "yellow" receptivity to oppose blue. That may merely be a trick of quick, higher level processing though.
 
2012-10-04 09:08:50 AM
Wait, we can't see yellow?
 
2012-10-04 09:20:46 AM

xanadian: I gag at that laugh every time.


I lag at that gaff every time
 
2012-10-04 09:23:36 AM
www.multifamilyinvestor.com

Oblig.
 
2012-10-04 09:33:12 AM

retarded: Wait, we can't see yellow?


There's no single cell for yellow. There is most likely a functional group of green and red cone clusters that are functionally yellow receptors.
 
2012-10-04 09:34:00 AM

PonceAlyosha: retarded: Wait, we can't see yellow?

There's no single cell for yellow. There is most likely a functional group of green and red cone clusters that are functionally yellow receptors.


*Most likely clusters of green and red cones that functionally act as receptors for yellow wavelength.

/totes off my science writing ame
 
2012-10-04 09:45:53 AM
blacksquare.jpg
 
2012-10-04 10:22:02 AM

PonceAlyosha: RKade: Also, I''m legally blind from the same thing as that guy (ROP) so I've been around a LOT of blind people. Too damn straight-laced for my tastes but nice people.

They can't see neurally either.. No transduction [if retinally blind] or conveyance [if neurally blind] of visual signals to primary cortex means that neurons of the visual system will atrophy and the space they take up will be co-opted by another module/function. It helps to imagine that a neuron is like a tree. If the leaves are the dendrites, and signal is sunlight. Without signal, the tree won't grow, and will die.


My left eye has no vision. No black, no white, no nothing. All that's there is an absence that's only noticeable when I think about it.
 
2012-10-04 10:32:04 AM

RKade: PonceAlyosha: RKade: Also, I''m legally blind from the same thing as that guy (ROP) so I've been around a LOT of blind people. Too damn straight-laced for my tastes but nice people.

They can't see neurally either.. No transduction [if retinally blind] or conveyance [if neurally blind] of visual signals to primary cortex means that neurons of the visual system will atrophy and the space they take up will be co-opted by another module/function. It helps to imagine that a neuron is like a tree. If the leaves are the dendrites, and signal is sunlight. Without signal, the tree won't grow, and will die.

My left eye has no vision. No black, no white, no nothing. All that's there is an absence that's only noticeable when I think about it.


Back to your earlier question of what would happen to a blind person on LSD, the answer is pretty much the same thing that would happen to everyone else. The visual hallucinations that are a hallmark of LSD are a result of over-activation of frontal and temporal processes distant from primary visual cortex. The hallucinations are the conscious experience of misfiring/over-activation of significance detector circuits. It's like how sometimes you feel like someone is behind you, or hear your cell phone or a doorbell when it doesn't go off. But a lot more.
 
2012-10-04 10:43:51 AM

retarded: Wait, we can't see yellow?


Dammit, then why did I pay extra for that Sharp Quattron TV?

/Because, George Takei.
 
2012-10-04 11:41:37 AM

PonceAlyosha: retarded: Wait, we can't see yellow?

There's no single cell for yellow. There is most likely a functional group of green and red cone clusters that are functionally yellow receptors.


That's exactly how it works. And more interestingly, that's how you see 'yellow' on a TV or computer monitor, neither of which is able to produce actually yellow light, only red/green/blue. Natural yellow light stimulates a certain mix of red and green receptors in the eye, and TVs and monitors reproduce this effect as an optical illusion, by putting out the same mix. Our eyes just interpret that mix as yellow, even though it's not.
 
2012-10-04 11:49:07 AM
I was researching colour blindness some years ago as part of a writing project, and was fascinated to learn that non-optical trauma-induced achromatopsia can wipe out *all* colour perception in affected individuals, including *memory* of colour. What happens, if I understand what I read, is that in this case, the eyes and optics still function normally, but the part of the brain that interprets it no longer does, and so the brain's very concept and understanding of colour is lost. These persons can see in colour, and dream and remember what colours they've seen, but the brain no longer makes sense of it the way it did before, which has the same effect has having no colour perception at all, including in memory. This condition, thankfully very rare, is also commonly comorbid with chronic photophobia (notable sensitivity to light), but nothing I read explained why. I'd always understood chronic photophobia as being due to an overabundance of rods (often with a commensurate deficiency of cones), but that obviously doesn't happen to someone who's suffered a TBI. So what explains that change in those cases, then?
 
2012-10-04 12:21:40 PM

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: non-optical trauma-induced achromatopsia can wipe out *all* colour perception in affected individuals, including *memory* of colour. What happens, if I understand what I read, is that in this case, the eyes and optics still function normally, but the part of the brain that interprets it no longer does, and so the brain's very concept and understanding of colour is lost. These persons can see in colour, and dream and remember what colours they've seen, but the brain no longer makes sense of it the way it did before, which has the same effect has having no colour perception at all, including in memory


I looked it up after reading this. Came across this on wiki, about an artist who ended up with cerebral achromatopsia:

Mr. I. could hardly bear the changed appearances of people ("like animated gray statues") any more than he could bear his own changed appearance in the mirror: he shunned social intercourse and found sexual intercourse impossible. He saw people's flesh, his wife's flesh, his own flesh, as an abhorrent gray; "flesh-colored" now appeared "rat-colored" to him. This was so even when he closed his eyes, for his preternaturally vivid ("eidetic") visual imagery was preserved but now without color, and forced on him images, forced him to "see" but see internally with the wrongness of his achromatopsia. He found foods disgusting in their grayish, dead appearance and had to close his eyes to eat. But this did not help very much, for the mental image of a tomato was as black as its appearance

Sometimes I hate our brains.
 
2012-10-04 12:39:49 PM

costermonger: Sometimes I hate our brains.


uh, this guy sounds like he had more-other issues

2.bp.blogspot.com

little known fact, the earth was gray scale back in the 20s - 50s, then dorothy discovered color and here we are
 
2012-10-04 01:25:59 PM

I drunk what: little known fact, the earth was gray scale back in the 20s - 50s, then dorothy discovered color and here we are


www.reoiv.com
 
2012-10-04 01:26:44 PM
blogs.news.com.au

Duh.
 
2012-10-04 01:36:36 PM
Blind people visualize images like Neo: in Matrix code.

Duh.
 
2012-10-04 02:06:30 PM

wildcardjack: I wonder what LSD does to a blind person.


holy shiat. that just blew my visual cortex.
 
2012-10-04 02:41:46 PM

doglover: I'd bet good money blind people DO picture the world visually. If you use a computer, it doesn't matter the OS, the processor runs the same. If your visual cortex is intact and running, it's running visual imagery. They might even think in colors, for all they know, only instead of light it associates with other stuff.


http://lmgtfy.com/?q=visual+cortex+born+blind

***two seconds later***

Hm hey what's this http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recovery_from_blindness#Examples_and_case _studies

"Virgil's subsequent behavior was that of a "mentally blind" person -someone who sees but can't decipher what's out there; he would act as if he were still blind."

I just really don't understand people who make arbitrary assumptions with pure confidence, especially when relying on idiotic analogies.
 
2012-10-04 02:56:24 PM

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: I was researching colour blindness some years ago as part of a writing project, and was fascinated to learn that non-optical trauma-induced achromatopsia can wipe out *all* colour perception in affected individuals, including *memory* of colour. What happens, if I understand what I read, is that in this case, the eyes and optics still function normally, but the part of the brain that interprets it no longer does, and so the brain's very concept and understanding of colour is lost. These persons can see in colour, and dream and remember what colours they've seen, but the brain no longer makes sense of it the way it did before, which has the same effect has having no colour perception at all, including in memory. This condition, thankfully very rare, is also commonly comorbid with chronic photophobia (notable sensitivity to light), but nothing I read explained why. I'd always understood chronic photophobia as being due to an overabundance of rods (often with a commensurate deficiency of cones), but that obviously doesn't happen to someone who's suffered a TBI. So what explains that change in those cases, then?


Beyond the nerve impulses directly from the eyes, there are still a lot of interconnecting networks of various types of neurons which do additional decoding of the information. The brain is a bunch of complicated, modulating feedback loops. There would be no point to the brain processing lots of data if it didn't ultimately result in an outward nerve signal that has an effect somewhere on the body. The effect might be subtle - maybe the signal just goes out and ends up being input into another part of the brain like the hippocampus, eventually causing a memory to form (after lots of other series of crazy, complicated chemical reactions and feedback loops, probably). But sooner or later, that altered hippocampus will relate to some memory, changing the action of that person relative to what they would have done without that memory encoded in them.

Damage to frontal areas of the brain, areas related to executive function, cause a person to be less able to recall memories, but those memories are intact. Likewise, when your eyes sense photons, nerve signals are generated and sent along to the brain. The brain doesn't actually get much info from the raw nerve signals from the eyes themselves, but fills in the rest with a lot of processing and past experience. Most of the senses that a person is able to perceive is not a result of the sense organs themselves, but of the interaction between sense organs and brain structure and memories.

Filling in the picture from the meager data coming from the eyes requires lots and lots of different interacting brain parts, such as the hippocampus. When you see an object like a book, the hippocampus helps to supply some of that information that gets filled in. Then that information triggers other information to help fill in the overall perception, like maybe a book reminds you of the book you are reading. Especially since a type of understanding like the "concept of colors" is more of a conscious effort. If anything along this hierarchy of information processing is disrupted, you get very weird effects like seeing colors but not getting it.

It's similar to stories I've read of stroke victims who had reading brain parts damaged but not speech and auditory areas. They were able to speak and understand speech, but they would pick up the phone to dial 911 or something and physically be unable to read the numbers of the keypad because it appeared to be some kind of jumbled alien language. Physically as in, someone with a broken hip being physically unable to walk because their body crumples when the muscles have nothing to leverage against.
 
2012-10-04 03:48:10 PM
FTFA: For blind people who are adept at echolocation, sound information routes through the visual cortex as well. Their brains use echoes to generate spatial maps, which are sometimes so detailed that they enable mountain biking, playing basketball and safely exploring new environments.

I would pay to see an all-blind mountain bike race. I have great vision and still have hugged a tree about a dozen times.

Also:
moviesmedia.ign.com
 
2012-10-04 05:03:26 PM

costermonger: Sylvia_Bandersnatch: non-optical trauma-induced achromatopsia can wipe out *all* colour perception in affected individuals, including *memory* of colour. What happens, if I understand what I read, is that in this case, the eyes and optics still function normally, but the part of the brain that interprets it no longer does, and so the brain's very concept and understanding of colour is lost. These persons can see in colour, and dream and remember what colours they've seen, but the brain no longer makes sense of it the way it did before, which has the same effect has having no colour perception at all, including in memory

I looked it up after reading this. Came across this on wiki, about an artist who ended up with cerebral achromatopsia:

Mr. I. could hardly bear the changed appearances of people ("like animated gray statues") any more than he could bear his own changed appearance in the mirror: he shunned social intercourse and found sexual intercourse impossible. He saw people's flesh, his wife's flesh, his own flesh, as an abhorrent gray; "flesh-colored" now appeared "rat-colored" to him. This was so even when he closed his eyes, for his preternaturally vivid ("eidetic") visual imagery was preserved but now without color, and forced on him images, forced him to "see" but see internally with the wrongness of his achromatopsia. He found foods disgusting in their grayish, dead appearance and had to close his eyes to eat. But this did not help very much, for the mental image of a tomato was as black as its appearance

Sometimes I hate our brains.


Having not walked in the man's shoes, I can't say this confidently, but that description sounds a little, well, self-centred, to say the least. He honestly couldn't handle sex with his own wife, or eating food, because he was so deeply traumatised by their changes in mere hue? Would it make as much sense to us if someone who lost their sight entirely said they could no longer bear to sleep with people or eat food they could no longer see? I'm sorry -- especially if I'm missing some critical point here -- but it sounds to me like there was more going on here, psychologically and emotionally, than acquired cerebral achromatopsia. He sounds like a deeply troubled man.
 
2012-10-04 05:12:40 PM

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: but that description sounds a little, well, self-centred, to say the least. He honestly couldn't handle sex with his own wife, or eating food, because he was so deeply traumatised by their changes in mere hue?


It is not selfish at all, and way more common than you would expect. For example,. something as small as a tic tac sized lesion on the gyrus that houses the most obvious module responsible for face recognition causes you to think everyone you've recognized before and meet again, even your close friends and family members is an impostor due to a simple disconnect in evoked emotional reaction. Even when a person who knows they have that sort of severe disjunction will have huge difficulties in overcoming it. Brains are awesome.
 
2012-10-04 05:15:13 PM

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: costermonger: Sylvia_Bandersnatch: non-optical trauma-induced achromatopsia can wipe out *all* colour perception in affected individuals, including *memory* of colour. What happens, if I understand what I read, is that in this case, the eyes and optics still function normally, but the part of the brain that interprets it no longer does, and so the brain's very concept and understanding of colour is lost. These persons can see in colour, and dream and remember what colours they've seen, but the brain no longer makes sense of it the way it did before, which has the same effect has having no colour perception at all, including in memory

I looked it up after reading this. Came across this on wiki, about an artist who ended up with cerebral achromatopsia:

Mr. I. could hardly bear the changed appearances of people ("like animated gray statues") any more than he could bear his own changed appearance in the mirror: he shunned social intercourse and found sexual intercourse impossible. He saw people's flesh, his wife's flesh, his own flesh, as an abhorrent gray; "flesh-colored" now appeared "rat-colored" to him. This was so even when he closed his eyes, for his preternaturally vivid ("eidetic") visual imagery was preserved but now without color, and forced on him images, forced him to "see" but see internally with the wrongness of his achromatopsia. He found foods disgusting in their grayish, dead appearance and had to close his eyes to eat. But this did not help very much, for the mental image of a tomato was as black as its appearance

Sometimes I hate our brains.

Having not walked in the man's shoes, I can't say this confidently, but that description sounds a little, well, self-centred, to say the least. He honestly couldn't handle sex with his own wife, or eating food, because he was so deeply traumatised by their changes in mere hue? Would it make as much sense to us if someone who lost their sight entirely said they could no longer bear to sleep with people or eat f ...



It is kinda strange.  I mean, if I watch B&W TV, those things don't gross me out.  I guess maybe in real life.  Who knows.
 
2012-10-04 05:23:30 PM

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: costermonger: Sylvia_Bandersnatch: non-optical trauma-induced achromatopsia can wipe out *all* colour perception in affected individuals, including *memory* of colour. What happens, if I understand what I read, is that in this case, the eyes and optics still function normally, but the part of the brain that interprets it no longer does, and so the brain's very concept and understanding of colour is lost. These persons can see in colour, and dream and remember what colours they've seen, but the brain no longer makes sense of it the way it did before, which has the same effect has having no colour perception at all, including in memory

I looked it up after reading this. Came across this on wiki, about an artist who ended up with cerebral achromatopsia:

Mr. I. could hardly bear the changed appearances of people ("like animated gray statues") any more than he could bear his own changed appearance in the mirror: he shunned social intercourse and found sexual intercourse impossible. He saw people's flesh, his wife's flesh, his own flesh, as an abhorrent gray; "flesh-colored" now appeared "rat-colored" to him. This was so even when he closed his eyes, for his preternaturally vivid ("eidetic") visual imagery was preserved but now without color, and forced on him images, forced him to "see" but see internally with the wrongness of his achromatopsia. He found foods disgusting in their grayish, dead appearance and had to close his eyes to eat. But this did not help very much, for the mental image of a tomato was as black as its appearance

Sometimes I hate our brains.

Having not walked in the man's shoes, I can't say this confidently, but that description sounds a little, well, self-centred, to say the least. He honestly couldn't handle sex with his own wife, or eating food, because he was so deeply traumatised by their changes in mere hue? Would it make as much sense to us if someone who lost their sight entirely said they could no longer bear to sleep with people or eat food they could no longer see? I'm sorry -- especially if I'm missing some critical point here -- but it sounds to me like there was more going on here, psychologically and emotionally, than acquired cerebral achromatopsia. He sounds like a deeply troubled man.


I would imagine he was unquestionably troubled. He was a 65 year old visual artist at the time of his accident, and afterwards was distinctly aware of the change to his perception (that's not always the case, I understand) but was of course left without the ability to even remember how things used to be. The description of his struggle to adapt to his condition is fairly complete, I just pulled out one of the more striking examples. He eventually adapted to the lack of colour and later grew to embrace it, even turning down treatment to attempt to reverse it later.

It's a pretty melodramatic reaction, don't get me wrong, but I don't think that should be surprising. It wouldn't be unlike someone who has had the ability to see their entire life losing their vision and the memory of sight. The loss of the sense is one thing, the loss of all memory related to it (and awareness of this) is the cruel blow.
 
2012-10-05 12:02:02 AM

PonceAlyosha: Sylvia_Bandersnatch: but that description sounds a little, well, self-centred, to say the least. He honestly couldn't handle sex with his own wife, or eating food, because he was so deeply traumatised by their changes in mere hue?

It is not selfish at all, and way more common than you would expect. For example,. something as small as a tic tac sized lesion on the gyrus that houses the most obvious module responsible for face recognition causes you to think everyone you've recognized before and meet again, even your close friends and family members is an impostor due to a simple disconnect in evoked emotional reaction. Even when a person who knows they have that sort of severe disjunction will have huge difficulties in overcoming it. Brains are awesome.


Okay, but I don't really see a relevant comparison between those two things, even though they're both brain-related. In the first, the man sees and recognises everything and everyone as it is. The only difference is no colour. I'm sorry, but it does sound like an overreaction to me. Yes, I can see being freaked out to that extent at first. But not over the long haul. I mean, it's his goddamned WIFE, already, Is the colour of her skin really that huge a deal for him? Maybe they weren't meant to be, if that single thing is the dealbreaker for him. Maybe a man who can't eat food because it's suddenly colourless -- even though he understands full well what's going on, and it looks exactly the same otherwise -- doesn't really belong with anyone. I'm sorry, I'm just not seeing this. And I find the comparison to a MUCH more severe and distortionate mental disorder irrelevant.
 
2012-10-05 12:02:41 AM

PonceAlyosha: Sylvia_Bandersnatch: but that description sounds a little, well, self-centred, to say the least. He honestly couldn't handle sex with his own wife, or eating food, because he was so deeply traumatised by their changes in mere hue?

It is not selfish at all, and way more common than you would expect. For example,. something as small as a tic tac sized lesion on the gyrus that houses the most obvious module responsible for face recognition causes you to think everyone you've recognized before and meet again, even your close friends and family members is an impostor due to a simple disconnect in evoked emotional reaction. Even when a person who knows they have that sort of severe disjunction will have huge difficulties in overcoming it. Brains are awesome.


Also, I didn't say 'selfish'. I said 'self-centred'. They're two different things.
 
2012-10-05 12:06:05 AM

costermonger: I would imagine he was unquestionably troubled. He was a 65 year old visual artist at the time of his accident, and afterwards was distinctly aware of the change to his perception (that's not always the case, I understand) but was of course left without the ability to even remember how things used to be. The description of his struggle to adapt to his condition is fairly complete, I just pulled out one of the more striking examples. He eventually adapted to the lack of colour and later grew to embrace it, even turning down treatment to attempt to reverse it later.

It's a pretty melodramatic reaction, don't get me wrong, but I don't think that should be surprising. It wouldn't be unlike someone who has had the ability to see their entire life losing their vision and the memory of sight. The loss of the sense is one thing, the loss of all memory related to it (and awareness of this) is the cruel blow.


Thank you, that's the story I was looking for: that he was initially freaked out (as I think most of us would be), but eventually worked through it. What I was hearing was that he just sat there, day after day, not dealing with it all. "I can't touch my wife, she looks weird. I can't eat food, it looks weird. O woe is me. It's been years now. I'm so horny and hungry. What will I do?" That just wasn't adding up for me. So thank for what I consider a rather important clarification.
 
2012-10-05 01:52:02 AM
The people I paint for, employed an artist that was color blind. All his colors and bottles were labeled and he had a friend that would go to work with him who was his "seeing eye painter" and would tell him when to stop spraying color. To this day they say he was probably the best artist they've ever had.

Color tends to cause perception issues in relation to value for artists, some opt to use black and white photos for reference so the color doesn't give a false sense of value. So i find it odd that this guy was so bothered by everything being gray.

I'm hoping googles new computer screen glassses will eventually have a desaturate app that will take the color out of everything. I think being immersed in a world of values and contrasts would be of a great help in learning how to better create and render realities in art.
 
2012-10-05 09:30:13 AM

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: but it does sound like an overreaction to me


upload.wikimedia.orglifewithoutbaby.files.wordpress.com
www.gonemovies.com


AAAAaaargh! the zombie-rat invasion has begun!!1! everyone grab a shotgun, and remember aim for the head!!!1!

the horror

//the har-rah
 
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