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(Gizmodo)   Researchers discover bacteria that eats a toxic metal and turns it into pure gold   (gizmodo.com) divider line 28
    More: Cool, bacteria, toxic metal, microbiology, molecular genetics, precious metals, Michigan State University  
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6892 clicks; posted to Geek » on 03 Oct 2012 at 9:49 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



28 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2012-10-03 06:17:45 PM  
They don't create gold, they refine gold.
 
2012-10-03 06:20:47 PM  
Scientists discovered the Philosopher's Bacteria? Cool.
 
2012-10-03 06:21:15 PM  
The goop that laid the golden dregs?
 
2012-10-03 06:34:14 PM  
Midachondrias Touch?
 
2012-10-03 06:40:33 PM  

St_Francis_P: Scientists discovered the Philosopher's Bacteria? Cool.


Think it can also keep Voldemort alive?
 
2012-10-03 06:40:52 PM  
What is this alchemy?
 
2012-10-03 08:59:54 PM  

scottydoesntknow: Midachondrias Touch?


That's worth an internet to you... and a smart/funny when this goes green
 
2012-10-03 09:57:27 PM  
I saw this on Eureka, eventually it degrades the metal and then starts eating people.
 
2012-10-03 10:01:32 PM  
Great, another politician who thinks he can shiat gold
 
2012-10-03 10:08:36 PM  
The bacteria is are incredibly resistant to this toxic element. In fact, it's they're 25 times stronger than previously thought. The researchers' compact factory-which they named The Great Work of the Metal Lover-holds the bacteria as they feed it them the gold chloride. In about a week, the bacteria does its do their job, processing all that junk into the precious metal-a process they believe happens regularly in nature.

The word is plural. One bacterium, many bacteria.

They are the ones who have created a compact laboratory that uses the bacteria Cupriavidus metallidurans to turn gold chlroride-a toxic chemical liquid you can find in nature-into 99.9% pure gold.

The only words in the bolded part that aren't wrong are chemical and toxic (and even that's iffy). It would help if they knew which gold chloride salt they were talking about. I'll give them a pass on chlroride as a typo, since they get it correct elsewhere.

/farking Gizmodo 
//the comments make my head hurt
 
2012-10-03 10:12:20 PM  
So, buy silver instead?.
 
2012-10-03 11:01:39 PM  
Do you want gold? (NSFW alchemy)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qVQsI4RX_ik
 
2012-10-03 11:18:17 PM  

Shadow Blasko: scottydoesntknow: Midachondrias Touch?

That's worth an internet to you... and a smart/funny when this goes green


Only one? I say give him two. Brava sir!
 
2012-10-03 11:32:51 PM  
This article is terrible. It sounds like a journalist flunkie that failed chemistry 101 trying to explain the science.
 
2012-10-03 11:49:27 PM  
Called Rumpelstiltskinus.
 
2012-10-04 12:13:23 AM  
Rick Rubin?
 
2012-10-04 12:46:53 AM  

ThePuceGuardian: Rick Rubin?


discussions.texasbowhunter.com
 
2012-10-04 01:17:13 AM  
It doesn't eat metal, it respires it.
 
2012-10-04 01:42:53 AM  
Its all fine and well until you realize...

encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com
 
2012-10-04 03:14:04 AM  

Bondith: The bacteria is are incredibly resistant to this toxic element. In fact, it's they're 25 times stronger than previously thought. The researchers' compact factory-which they named The Great Work of the Metal Lover-holds the bacteria as they feed it them the gold chloride. In about a week, the bacteria does its do their job, processing all that junk into the precious metal-a process they believe happens regularly in nature.

The word is plural. One bacterium, many bacteria.

They are the ones who have created a compact laboratory that uses the bacteria Cupriavidus metallidurans to turn gold chlroride-a toxic chemical liquid you can find in nature-into 99.9% pure gold.

The only words in the bolded part that aren't wrong are chemical and toxic (and even that's iffy). It would help if they knew which gold chloride salt they were talking about. I'll give them a pass on chlroride as a typo, since they get it correct elsewhere.

/farking Gizmodo 
//the comments make my head hurt


You forgot the implied "this species of" bacteria. More than one bacteria but a single species. They are correct in their grammar.
 
2012-10-04 07:51:51 AM  

Bondith: The bacteria is are incredibly resistant to this toxic element. In fact, it's they're 25 times stronger than previously thought. The researchers' compact factory-which they named The Great Work of the Metal Lover-holds the bacteria as they feed it them the gold chloride. In about a week, the bacteria does its do their job, processing all that junk into the precious metal-a process they believe happens regularly in nature.

The word is plural. One bacterium, many bacteria.

They are the ones who have created a compact laboratory that uses the bacteria Cupriavidus metallidurans to turn gold chlroride-a toxic chemical liquid you can find in nature-into 99.9% pure gold.

The only words in the bolded part that aren't wrong are chemical and toxic (and even that's iffy). It would help if they knew which gold chloride salt they were talking about. I'll give them a pass on chlroride as a typo, since they get it correct elsewhere.

/farking Gizmodo 
//the comments make my head hurt


Yeaaah, if I could go wander out of the lab and find gold (III) chloride in nature, I'd be doing that in a heartbeat.

/God damnit gold prices, stop going up.
//You are making it hard to do nanophysics work stop it.
 
2012-10-04 08:10:57 AM  
i.ytimg.com
 
2012-10-04 08:23:58 AM  
"gold chlroride"

damnit, jesse, apply yourself. you spelled chloride wrong.
 
2012-10-04 11:04:36 AM  
Now if the bacteria could do something with the cyanide left over from the gold refining process.
 
2012-10-04 11:37:39 AM  
ah but can they shiat Tiffany cufflinks?

i1207.photobucket.com
 
2012-10-04 02:53:36 PM  

scottydoesntknow: Midachondrias Touch?


'Cept bacteria don't have mitochondria.
 
2012-10-04 02:59:05 PM  
Cupriavidus metallidurans Roniavidus Paulidurans

/FTFY
 
2012-10-04 03:05:42 PM  

Felgraf: Bondith: The bacteria is are incredibly resistant to this toxic element. In fact, it's they're 25 times stronger than previously thought. The researchers' compact factory-which they named The Great Work of the Metal Lover-holds the bacteria as they feed it them the gold chloride. In about a week, the bacteria does its do their job, processing all that junk into the precious metal-a process they believe happens regularly in nature.

The word is plural. One bacterium, many bacteria.

They are the ones who have created a compact laboratory that uses the bacteria Cupriavidus metallidurans to turn gold chlroride-a toxic chemical liquid you can find in nature-into 99.9% pure gold.

The only words in the bolded part that aren't wrong are chemical and toxic (and even that's iffy). It would help if they knew which gold chloride salt they were talking about. I'll give them a pass on chlroride as a typo, since they get it correct elsewhere.

/farking Gizmodo 
//the comments make my head hurt

Yeaaah, if I could go wander out of the lab and find gold (III) chloride in nature, I'd be doing that in a heartbeat.

/God damnit gold prices, stop going up.
//You are making it hard to do nanophysics work stop it.


HAuCl4. I've seen you in other nanothreads, complaining about poorly written procedures. Are you trying to make gold nanoparticles? There's an easier way (I pimped my own work before, but if you're working with gold I'll pimp a more relevant one article: May require fancy lamp ) 

So simple, even a physicist can do it.

/I keed, I keed
 
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