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(Buzzfeed)   What a crappy evening in 1998 looked like. You have died of dysentery   (buzzfeed.com) divider line 301
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38815 clicks; posted to Main » on 03 Oct 2012 at 1:35 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-03 02:20:01 PM

Curry and beer: The bluescreen is from a Windows NT variant.
The version in 1998 was NT4.
NT4 didn't have the "F8 for safemode" option.

Also, the timestamp - 36b072a8 - is Thu Jan 28 1999


I believe that this is a NT4 bluescreen. It's hard to find a good source that details all the different bluescreens.
technet.microsoft.com
 
2012-10-03 02:20:58 PM
Lawnchair:
Of course, he missed the real media memory of 1998-99. Zip disk goes 'click', 'click', 'click'. OMGWTFBBQ!!!


Ugh, yea. ZIP disks were always sketchy at best, though I think they got better towards the end.

The predecessor to ZIP disks were Syquest drives. They were fairly reliable if you took care with everything. I had one on my Amiga at one time. it was a cartridge hard drive with the platter in the enclosed cartridge, 5.25".
 
2012-10-03 02:23:06 PM

harlock: Lawnchair:
Of course, he missed the real media memory of 1998-99. Zip disk goes 'click', 'click', 'click'. OMGWTFBBQ!!!

Ugh, yea. ZIP disks were always sketchy at best, though I think they got better towards the end.

The predecessor to ZIP disks were Syquest drives. They were fairly reliable if you took care with everything. I had one on my Amiga at one time. it was a cartridge hard drive with the platter in the enclosed cartridge, 5.25".


Ever heard Futuristic Sex Robots' "Back in the Day"?

Your post reminded me of it.
 
2012-10-03 02:24:43 PM
I miss 1998.

Being 15 years old, it seemed every girl I ran into on AOL was a cheerleader. Man, there must've been a lot of sports teams back then
 
2012-10-03 02:26:25 PM

Chuck Wagon: I believe that this is a NT4 bluescreen.


It is. Build 1381 is NT4.
 
2012-10-03 02:26:36 PM
My 1998 mostly consisted of playing Final Fantasy 3 (and a few other ROMs) on ZSNES. Oddly enough, I'm listening to the sound track from that game right now at work. Highly recommended.

My Pentium 2 333mhz with a 3DFX Voodoo 3500 video card and 64MB of RAM was insane ($$$$) at the time, but I still enjoyed emulated games more than anything modern. That machine actually lasted me six years before I upgraded.
 
2012-10-03 02:26:39 PM

harlock: Doc Ok: 1998 was good. The summer I spent at University of California writing my Master's Thesis. I didn't have my own computer in the room I sub-leased from another grad student, but we had the most biatching systems in the lab. An SGI O2 on every desk, and an SGI Onyx2 with four R10K CPUs and two Infinite Reality 2 engines driving our virtual reality workbench. Because everyone was spending all their time in the lab (this wasn't a public lab, but private desks and cubicles) there was a lot of LAN gaming going on. Initially slot cars on the O2s, then we found SGI's 3D tank battle game, which was a graphically-spiffed up version of battlezone, and towards the end we played a metric asston of Quake. Quake was still big in the general population at the time, but because we had graphics workstations with hardware-accelerated 3D graphics and a direct connection to the Internet, much ownage was had whenever we went on a public server. There was one particular server running at Stanford that gave us like 20ms ping, and most everybody else had upwards of 150. Total curb-stomp battle.

I played quake in the SGI labs at Stanford thanks to a friend who was doing a CS major there. At the time Larry and Sergy were students and sometimes part of that group. I don't know that I ever met them though.


It's totally possible that I kicked your ass at Quake, then. Just kidding; I was actually pretty bad on a fair playing field.

Yes, I forgot, I think it was in 1998 as well that I discovered the Google beta that was running locally on some Stanford server. But it might also have been 1999, not sure.
 
2012-10-03 02:26:59 PM

harlock: Also, 1999 was the peak era for the Voodoo graphics cards from 3DFX. Getting those to work properly was sometimes fun. The 2D card was daisy chained through the voodoo card via SVGA, and would swtich over when you started a supported game.

The graphics accelleration was quite revolutionary at the time and allowed for a great increase in graphics quality for FPS games such as Unreal and Unreal Tournament.

The single player Unreal was one of the first games to take advantage of the card in a very big way and had the beautifully lit environments which we now take for granted.


There are folks still playing with the those Link
 
2012-10-03 02:28:20 PM
You didn't have cable internet in 1998? lol
 
2012-10-03 02:28:35 PM
Let's see.... 1998 I think I was playing:

t0.gstatic.com

Slaughter these villagers? Archers, HO!

t1.gstatic.com

You encounter a dragon! You are slain!

t1.gstatic.com

and of course:

t2.gstatic.com

finally I always played this no matter how old:

t1.gstatic.com

Because cutting people down with a chainsaw mounted on the front of your taxi cab never got old.
 
2012-10-03 02:29:00 PM

PallMall: [img.izismile.com image 470x600]

Tandy's MOST.POWERFUL.COMPUTER.EVAR! 

1989 is when things were bad in the computing world. (Note the: Monitor and Mouse not included)


The really sad part is that this was also around $8500 in 1989:

cdn.hondanews.com

The last laptop I bough cost me $250, and it was pretty decently outfitted (a Sandy bridge based Celeron, 15.6" screen, 4 GB of RAM, and a 320 GB hard drive). It boggles my mind that people used to buy a computer that cost as much as a new car and was hopelessly outdated within 5 years.
 
2012-10-03 02:29:45 PM

H31N0US: Doc Ok: An SGI O2 on every desk, and an SGI Onyx2 with four R10K CPUs and two Infinite Reality 2 engines driving our virtual reality workbench.

Hah...silly con graphix. We had those at work (Mechanical design engineer) running Pro Engineer. Started on an Indy in 1994, by 1998 we had O2s and Onyx boxes all over the place.


I loved my little O2 back then (its name was durango), and the Onyx was all kinds of awesome. My O2 had 128MB of RAM, and the Onyx had 512! I even had a section with O2-praising haiku on my web site back then.
 
2012-10-03 02:30:47 PM
1998 ... minor amphetamine psychosis and the death of a lover. Think I'll skip the nostalgia for that year.
 
2012-10-03 02:30:58 PM
In 1998, I went from dialup PPP to whatever pipe my alma mater used in the first-year residence at the time. I played a lot of Quake II, spent far too much time on Usenet and IRC, and tried Linux for the first time (Mandrake 5.2, IIRC), while going out, getting drunk once I reached drinking age, and sometime early in '99 getting laid and trying other fun substances.

If only I knew where things would go from there...
 
2012-10-03 02:31:01 PM
I was in my 3rd year working for "IT" by then.
 
2012-10-03 02:32:53 PM
In 1998 I had a cable modem and my evenings when my girlfriend wasn't spending the night were taking up with upload.wikimedia.org and upload.wikimedia.org I was extremely good always scoring in the top five of every game.
 
2012-10-03 02:34:36 PM

Zeno-25: UberDave: Here's what 1998 looked like:

[s9.postimage.org image 425x353] 



Red Alert 2 didn't come out until 2000. This is what 1998 looked like on my computer:



Damn...I probably grabbed the wrong screen. Hell, I was still playing C&C (first) in '98. Don't patch it with the update or you won't be able to sandbag-in your base. :)

Speaking those games, I had a lot of fun with Dune 2000 as well. Loved the holo-tanks.
 
2012-10-03 02:34:38 PM
Great times, UT and Quake on PC, and Dune and Gran Turismo on PlayStation. Driving around didn't cost a fortune. And I looked a lot like James Van Der Beek back then
 
2012-10-03 02:36:13 PM
Jesus.

The internet was a little more exciting than AOL and Oregon Trail in 1998, FTA.
 
2012-10-03 02:37:26 PM

Generation_D: I was in the datacenter making some of this sh*t run for you imbeciles.

You're welcome.


Seeing as in 1998 I was 15 and had just gotten my first computer that had a modem:

Thank you. For real. People like yourself made the hell of high school bearable for nerdy chicks like me.
 
2012-10-03 02:37:38 PM
I was busy teaching myself HTML from the big orange book and building my sweet "WELCOME TO MY WORLD!" homepage on Geocities. I had a busy background, animated GIFs, embedded .wav files...and curiously, no real content. It was awesome. Then I learned how to use PSP and made my own mouseovers in javascript. That was when my web design skillz really peaked. Seriously, they have not improved since.
 
2012-10-03 02:37:41 PM

Demetrius: Generation_D: I was in the datacenter making some of this sh*t run for you imbeciles.

You're welcome.

[2.bp.blogspot.com image 320x240]


*sigh* MOVE!
 
2012-10-03 02:37:49 PM
In 1998 I was in some weird space chatroom and actually met a girl who lived the next town over (fairly rare to randomly find people, let alone cute girls from your town on AOL). Ended up losing my virginity to her a few years later when we ended up at the same high school.

Played a lot of doom, command and conquer, and N64.
 
2012-10-03 02:38:11 PM
I literally printed out the entire source code for Quake and read it at work when it was slow.
 
2012-10-03 02:39:49 PM

Doc Ok: harlock:

I played quake in the SGI labs at Stanford thanks to a friend who was doing a CS major there. At the time Larry and Sergy were students and sometimes part of that group. I don't know that I ever met them though.

It's totally possible that I kicked your ass at Quake, then. Just kidding; I was actually pretty bad on a fair playing field.

Yes, I forgot, I think it was in 1998 as well that I discovered the Google beta that was running locally on some Stanford server. But it might also have been 1999, not sure.


Haha, actually I wasn't very good either because I didn't play often enough. I had a couple of friends who were AMAZING and just blew me out of the water, but it was good to learn from them. I remember that in the labs was the first time I experienced mouselook, and had to get used to that all over again.
 
2012-10-03 02:40:21 PM

Mad_Radhu: The really sad part is that this was also around $8500 in 1989:

[cdn.hondanews.com image 500x326]

The last laptop I bough cost me $250, and it was pretty decently outfitted (a Sandy bridge based Celeron, 15.6" screen, 4 GB of RAM, and a 320 GB hard drive). It boggles my mind that people used to buy a computer that cost as much as a new car and was hopelessly outdated within 5 years.


What's nuts is that I believe you could buy that thing at RADIO SHACK!!!
 
2012-10-03 02:41:20 PM
I was 20 and going to community college in Eugene, Oregon. No computer at all so my crappy evenings consisted of me getting stoned and/or drunk at my buddy's house where we all played Golden Eye on his N64.

/RCP90s and Proximity Mines
 
2012-10-03 02:41:30 PM

Gothnet: 1998 ... minor amphetamine psychosis and the death of a lover. Think I'll skip the nostalgia for that year.


[debbie_downer.jpg]
 
2012-10-03 02:41:36 PM
home.comcast.net
 
Pud [TotalFark]
2012-10-03 02:42:32 PM

enderthexenocide: Pud: [t2.gstatic.com image 379x280] 

This was eating my life back then

no it wasn't. diablo 2 wasn't released until 2000. diablo came out in '96 though so you were probably playing that.


It looks like you're right. I was thinking that Diablo II came out earlier than that. Either way, they both were a life drain for me.
 
2012-10-03 02:42:33 PM
s3-ec.buzzfed.com

This most definately did not happen in 1998
 
2012-10-03 02:43:58 PM

PallMall: Mad_Radhu: The really sad part is that this was also around $8500 in 1989:

[cdn.hondanews.com image 500x326]

The last laptop I bough cost me $250, and it was pretty decently outfitted (a Sandy bridge based Celeron, 15.6" screen, 4 GB of RAM, and a 320 GB hard drive). It boggles my mind that people used to buy a computer that cost as much as a new car and was hopelessly outdated within 5 years.

What's nuts is that I believe you could buy that thing at RADIO SHACK!!!


My dad paid somewhere between $2k and $5k for a PC/XT in 1982 and took several years to pay it off. besides programming in basic, the most fun I had with it was playing a game called Sentinel Worlds. It was an EGA game and very well done for the time. Linky
 
2012-10-03 02:44:23 PM
Oh, fond memories of 1998. I was playing:

www.technopat.net

and

1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-10-03 02:44:31 PM

whistleridge: Actually, Kazaa didn't exist then (or if it did, no one I knew was aware of it. I mean, Napster hadn't even come out yet!).

Also, no one wanted anything to do with any Apple product back then, because 1) they were heinously overpriced and 2) they sucked balls for doing anything worthwhile.

As I recall, 1998 was endless LAN games of Quake II if you were lucky and had friends who could LAN with you, and endless games of Phatasmagoria or Doom II, if you were alone/your computer was too slow for Quake. Then Starcraft came out, everyone upgraded their computers, and no one in my dorm went to class for about 2 weeks straight.


In 1998 I used telnet for music. Kazaa when it came out was awesome comparatively speaking. On a 56k modem a song didn't take 2.5 hrs. 20-30 mins maybe...back then I guess that was something. Porn loaded ok provided it was jpg. I did play a lot of starcraft via LAN. IIRC it played fairly well via the old battlenet even on 56k dial up, you just had to find a game with good latency. Maybe it did suck as bad as the guy in the article said and I'm just looking at it through rose colored glasses. I had just graduated college a year before and my first apartment with no roommates at that point so I didn't have to worry about mom picking up the phone or walking in on me surfing the pron.
 
2012-10-03 02:45:08 PM

whistleridge: Actually, Kazaa didn't exist then (or if it did, no one I knew was aware of it. I mean, Napster hadn't even come out yet!).

Also, no one wanted anything to do with any Apple product back then, because 1) they were heinously overpriced and 2) they sucked balls for doing anything worthwhile.

As I recall, 1998 was endless LAN games of Quake II if you were lucky and had friends who could LAN with you, and endless games of Phatasmagoria or Doom II, if you were alone/your computer was too slow for Quake. Then Starcraft came out, everyone upgraded their computers, and no one in my dorm went to class for about 2 weeks straight.


Completely and exactly THIS. It was my freshman year....ahh memories.
 
2012-10-03 02:45:12 PM
I was 21 in 1998, this is what most evenings consisted of.

thebeergearstore.com
 
2012-10-03 02:45:59 PM
i.ytimg.com
 
2012-10-03 02:46:24 PM

unlikely: I mean I'm pretty sure 1998 was Ultima 8 territory


That steaming pile of dogshiat came out in 95 or 96. Isometric jump puzzles. Whoever dreamed that up deserves a kiek in der kok.

'98 for me - searching through the public folders of other students on the network looking for cool mp3s or realplayer files of South Park. Saving up money for a DVD player.
 
2012-10-03 02:46:58 PM
Hmmm, 1998... I was too cheap to pay for internet, was willing to put up with crappy NetZero ads to get it for free.
 
2012-10-03 02:46:59 PM
Heh.

I had ISDN in '98, NEVER had AOL.



And I've had Macs since '91, Apple II before that. I only had to deal with fixing BSOD on other peoples' garbage PCs. Anybody with half a brain had a Mac then, because they WORKED, unlike M$ garbage.
 
2012-10-03 02:47:23 PM

Zeno-25: UberDave: Here's what 1998 looked like:

[s9.postimage.org image 425x353] 



Red Alert 2 didn't come out until 2000. This is what 1998 looked like on my computer:

[3.bp.blogspot.com image 540x322]

one year later:

[i.imgur.com image 700x525]


Holy crap that's a lot of Tiberium defense....maybe that's why I was never too good at RTS games...
 
2012-10-03 02:48:01 PM

stuhayes2010: [s3-ec.buzzfed.com image 625x400]

This most definately did not happen in 1998


I guess you never had the displeasure of using the first edition of Windows 98 or Windows 95 (which was in widespread use at that time.)

Thankfully, I knew how to carefully choose my hardware, set my jumpers, and also knew how to properly write my config.sys and autoexec.bat files, and on top of that knew which driver types to not mix, since it caused IRQ or DMA conflicts.

16 years old and knew more than most. Now I'm 30 and most 16 year olds know more than me, except when it comes to that now-obscure stuff.
 
2012-10-03 02:48:08 PM
t1.gstatic.com
 
2012-10-03 02:48:50 PM

indylaw: unlikely: I mean I'm pretty sure 1998 was Ultima 8 territory

That steaming pile of dogshiat came out in 95 or 96. Isometric jump puzzles. Whoever dreamed that up deserves a kiek in der kok.

'98 for me - searching through the public folders of other students on the network looking for cool mp3s or realplayer files of South Park. Saving up money for a DVD player.


The guy who wrote Ultima was friends with my parents. That being said...I've never played any of the games.
 
2012-10-03 02:48:50 PM
i was living in Jersey in 98 and converting Novell to NT 4.0 servers. ah, memories.
 
2012-10-03 02:48:52 PM
BBS owner here; i remember when we could telnet to IRC from our bbs's. Good times.


/LORD
 
2012-10-03 02:50:06 PM
www.20id.org

Stealth Slippers + Sawed Off
Stealth Slippers + Throwing Knives

Still no games with real leg damage.
 
2012-10-03 02:50:12 PM
Damn, my grammar was bad in that last post. Please go easy on me.
 
2012-10-03 02:52:16 PM

soakitincider: BBS owner here; i remember when we could telnet to IRC from our bbs's. Good times.


/LORD


That is one of Seth Able's best works, ever. I had that for my BBS (Nucleus in Memphis - 901-360-0236) WAY back when.

I almost want to start up an internet BBS. I still have my LORD codes.
 
2012-10-03 02:52:46 PM

sethen320: indylaw: unlikely: I mean I'm pretty sure 1998 was Ultima 8 territory

That steaming pile of dogshiat came out in 95 or 96. Isometric jump puzzles. Whoever dreamed that up deserves a kiek in der kok.

'98 for me - searching through the public folders of other students on the network looking for cool mp3s or realplayer files of South Park. Saving up money for a DVD player.

The guy who wrote Ultima was friends with my parents. That being said...I've never played any of the games.


Most of them were good. Then Richard Garriott (aka "Lord British"), the creator, sold out to EA and the company started forcing out half-finished drek. Eh, I guess once he made enough money to buy a spot on a Russian space flight he stopped giving a shiat about making good games.
 
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