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(AutoBlog)   Got a good deal on a new car? That's a jailin'   (autoblog.com) divider line 128
    More: Asinine, malicious prosecution, Chesapeake, arbitrages, legal burden of proof, sales managers, arrest records, Chevrolet Traverse, false arrest  
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11372 clicks; posted to Main » on 03 Oct 2012 at 5:02 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-03 04:42:22 AM  
Well, it was that or have Jim turn the firehose on him. And he'll knock that motherf*cker right on his ass, too.
 
2012-10-03 05:11:17 AM  
when your mother said " If it is to good to be true.....
 
2012-10-03 05:17:16 AM  
Cal Worthington and his orange jumpsuit.
 
2012-10-03 05:17:42 AM  
I'm sure that this dealership, if they had accidentally overcharged a customer (who had freely agreed to the wrong price), they would have happily refunded the difference or turned themselves in to the police. Right?
 
2012-10-03 05:17:52 AM  
The buyer should be jailed for his taste in cars. The Traverse has the worst cockpit I've ever seen in a recent model year vehicle.
 
2012-10-03 05:18:28 AM  

phrawgh: Cal Worthington and his orange jumpsuit.


Pussy cow, pussy cow, pussy cow.
 
2012-10-03 05:19:40 AM  
>car dealership makes a dick move
>"we'll let him keep the car and say we're sorry"

Hahahahaahha, no, not good enough. $2million of not good enough? Well, I don't know. They should feel pain, though. Much pain.
 
2012-10-03 05:24:58 AM  
Well, as mentioned in the comments on the site, the poor bastard has an arrest record for buying a car. That shiat don't wash off. Nonetheless, in a perfect world anyone who buys a Chev would be put in jail anyway.
 
2012-10-03 05:25:29 AM  
I hope he wins every single cent.

And where was the common sense on the part of the arresting officers? This was clearly not a reason to haul someone off to jail for.
 
2012-10-03 05:31:07 AM  
Not to play armchair lawyer, but what is the police doing by getting involved in something like this? The guy had a contract, the keys, and presumably the registration, so why didn't they simply question him, get the facts straight, and let him go? Arresting him gets the PD involved in a civil dispute for no reason at all.
 
2012-10-03 05:31:31 AM  
2.2 million dollars in damages? Come the fark on. 4 hours in jail doesn't justify that kind of punitive damages unless he was grossly mistreated, in which case it would be primarily directed at the police anyways. This kind of litigious action just seems like an unethical money grab to me. There should be caps for this sort of thing, instead of aiming for the moon and working down $1,000 at a time from there.

Like that story a while back about the woman (in NYC I believe) who filed suit against the city for damages somewhere in the trillion dollar area. Bob Barker should have been summoned to waterboard her on the Price is Right wheel for being so outrageously greedy and/or stupid.

/Why yes, this sort of thing does bug me.
//Remember to spay or neuter your pets.
 
2012-10-03 05:31:59 AM  
loveblondieo
I hope he wins every single cent.
And where was the common sense on the part of the arresting officers? This was clearly not a reason to haul someone off to jail for.


I guess it would be how the issue was described to the police. It could be the police doing their job based on keywords to stupidity not knowing the difference between a contract dispute and a theft.

/I would not put it past a salesmen to used enhanced phrasing to get the job done.
 
2012-10-03 05:37:21 AM  
Let's all recite the American National Creed.

Do it with me. Ready?

"YOU GOTTA DO WHAT I SAY!"

If that clown show didn't get fired immediately, I hope the dealership loses it's ass.
 
2012-10-03 05:37:44 AM  

Loaded Six String: 2.2 million dollars in damages? Come the fark on. 4 hours in jail doesn't justify that kind of punitive damages unless he was grossly mistreated, in which case it would be primarily directed at the police anyways. This kind of litigious action just seems like an unethical money grab to me. There should be caps for this sort of thing, instead of aiming for the moon and working down $1,000 at a time from there.

Like that story a while back about the woman (in NYC I believe) who filed suit against the city for damages somewhere in the trillion dollar area. Bob Barker should have been summoned to waterboard her on the Price is Right wheel for being so outrageously greedy and/or stupid.

/Why yes, this sort of thing does bug me.
//Remember to spay or neuter your pets.


What I think about when I see the 2.2 mil is that the next guy might not get treated that way when business makes a 'mistake' not in their favor. We have no process to police ethics now except for large punitive damages.
 
2012-10-03 05:38:37 AM  

loveblondieo: I hope he wins every single cent.

And where was the common sense on the part of the arresting officers? This was clearly not a reason to haul someone off to jail for.



FTFA: the dealership called the local police alleging the buyer had stolen the vehicle
The dealership manager should be arrested for filing a false report.
 
2012-10-03 05:39:13 AM  

loveblondieo: And where was the common sense on the part of the arresting officers? This was clearly not a reason to haul someone off to jail for.


media.tumblr.com
 
2012-10-03 05:39:17 AM  

bubo_sibiricus: >car dealership makes a dick move
>"we'll let him keep the car and say we're sorry"

Hahahahaahha, no, not good enough. $2million of not good enough? Well, I don't know. They should feel pain, though. Much pain.

If the dealership were smart, they would have let him keep it for the reduced amount and thrown in "free service on this vehicle for life"*. No way that would be more than $2.2 million (or even a much lesser amount).

*unless such service is more than the blue book value of the vehicle, so after a few years when the car's only worth $1000 the guy can't get a free $2000 worth of work on it
 
2012-10-03 05:39:32 AM  

loveblondieo: I hope he wins every single cent.

And where was the common sense on the part of the arresting officers? This was clearly not a reason to haul someone off to jail for.


A local business called them.
 
2012-10-03 05:44:07 AM  

abhorrent1: loveblondieo: I hope he wins every single cent.

And where was the common sense on the part of the arresting officers? This was clearly not a reason to haul someone off to jail for.


FTFA: the dealership called the local police alleging the buyer had stolen the vehicle
The dealership manager should be arrested for filing a false report.


Oh, that was just dealer lingo, ya see!

"Man, that guy STOLE that car from us! What a deal!"
 
2012-10-03 06:04:06 AM  

Loaded Six String: 2.2 million dollars in damages? Come the fark on. 4 hours in jail doesn't justify that kind of punitive damages unless he was grossly mistreated, in which case it would be primarily directed at the police anyways. This kind of litigious action just seems like an unethical money grab to me. There should be caps for this sort of thing, instead of aiming for the moon and working down $1,000 at a time from there.


I was thinking the same thing at first, but I came to the conclusion that the $2.2 million is most likely just a first offer. They don't expect to get it, but by starting off high, they probably think they can settle at a fairly high amount. And there's little doubt that this'll be settled, no way the company will let it hit trial.
 
xcv
2012-10-03 06:05:09 AM  

Revek: Loaded Six String: 2.2 million dollars in damages? Come the fark on. 4 hours in jail doesn't justify that kind of punitive damages unless he was grossly mistreated, in which case it would be primarily directed at the police anyways. This kind of litigious action just seems like an unethical money grab to me. There should be caps for this sort of thing, instead of aiming for the moon and working down $1,000 at a time from there.

Like that story a while back about the woman (in NYC I believe) who filed suit against the city for damages somewhere in the trillion dollar area. Bob Barker should have been summoned to waterboard her on the Price is Right wheel for being so outrageously greedy and/or stupid.

/Why yes, this sort of thing does bug me.
//Remember to spay or neuter your pets.

What I think about when I see the 2.2 mil is that the next guy might not get treated that way when business makes a 'mistake' not in their favor. We have no process to police ethics now except for large punitive damages.


How does that work, does the 2.2 mil come out of the officers' salaries and the police dept budget? Or does it come from the tax payers and higher premiums in the future for all kinds of liability insurance?
 
2012-10-03 06:10:48 AM  

ArcadianRefugee: bubo_sibiricus: >car dealership makes a dick move
>"we'll let him keep the car and say we're sorry"

Hahahahaahha, no, not good enough. $2million of not good enough? Well, I don't know. They should feel pain, though. Much pain.
If the dealership were smart, they would have let him keep it for the reduced amount and thrown in "free service on this vehicle for life"*. No way that would be more than $2.2 million (or even a much lesser amount).

*unless such service is more than the blue book value of the vehicle, so after a few years when the car's only worth $1000 the guy can't get a free $2000 worth of work on it


And free clearcoat.
 
2012-10-03 06:17:22 AM  
By the time that lawyer is done with them, $5,600 will be a pittance and rightly so. The owner or manager should be lucky that he's not being brought up on charges.
 
2012-10-03 06:22:07 AM  
www.spikednation.com
 
2012-10-03 06:41:28 AM  
Well, now he'll be able to get himself a new ZR1 and a house with a garage to keep it in.
 
2012-10-03 06:46:02 AM  

Hilary T. N. Seuss: I'm sure that this dealership, if they had accidentally overcharged a customer (who had freely agreed to the wrong price), they would have happily refunded the difference or turned themselves in to the police. Right?


Well if he swapped colors and they gave him one with fewer features, thetd probably admit the mistake. In any case he could sue.

It looks like the sales manager gave this guy the wrong car when he switched colors. This guy knew what happened but refused to switch. Dealer could have sued but it was their mistake, not a crime. Jerks all around perhaps.
 
2012-10-03 06:48:29 AM  

abhorrent1: FTFA: the dealership called the local police alleging the buyer had stolen the vehicle
The dealership manager should be arrested for filing a false report


yep.

I got no problem if he ends up owning the dealership agfter this.
 
2012-10-03 06:50:45 AM  

xcv: How does that work, does the 2.2 mil come out of the officers' salaries and the police dept budget? Or does it come from the tax payers and higher premiums in the future for all kinds of liability insurance?


According to the article, the guy sued the dealer, not the police.
 
2012-10-03 06:54:01 AM  

Bhruic: Loaded Six String: 2.2 million dollars in damages? Come the fark on. 4 hours in jail doesn't justify that kind of punitive damages unless he was grossly mistreated, in which case it would be primarily directed at the police anyways. This kind of litigious action just seems like an unethical money grab to me. There should be caps for this sort of thing, instead of aiming for the moon and working down $1,000 at a time from there.

I was thinking the same thing at first, but I came to the conclusion that the $2.2 million is most likely just a first offer. They don't expect to get it, but by starting off high, they probably think they can settle at a fairly high amount. And there's little doubt that this'll be settled, no way the company will let it hit trial.


Hah! I can just imagine a car dealership in a trial. And a Chevy dealership at that. They probably have the world's most stupid clientele, unless there are still Yugo cars being made somewhere.
 
2012-10-03 06:59:48 AM  

Loaded Six String: 2.2 million dollars in damages? Come the fark on. 4 hours in jail doesn't justify that kind of punitive damages unless he was grossly mistreated, in which case it would be primarily directed at the police anyways. This kind of litigious action just seems like an unethical money grab to me. There should be caps for this sort of thing, instead of aiming for the moon and working down $1,000 at a time from there.


Actually, to me $2.2 mil is fair. Go drive around your town and pay attention to how many of the dealerships have either completely renovated or built entirely new buildings within the past 5 years. The big dealerships are making money hand over fist, and the point of punitive damages is that the person/company should feel punished by the amount.
 
2012-10-03 07:04:02 AM  
The guy deserves to be in jail. Anyone stupid enough to buy a car from the GM line is too stupid to be allowed to interact with the public.

He's going to make a nice amount of money off this dealer's stupidity, though.
 
2012-10-03 07:06:01 AM  
Animatronik:
Well if he swapped colors and they gave him one with fewer features, thetd probably admit the mistake. In any case he could sue.

It looks like the sales manager gave this guy the wrong car when he switched colors. This guy knew what happened but refused to switch. Dealer could have sued but it was their mistake, not a crime. Jerks all around perhaps.


Get out of here with that rational thinking.

The got guy the right price on the car he bought. He decided to change the color (you can do that?), the dealership tried to help. They initially gave him a model with too many features. They realized their error, but the guy decided to got the "bank error in MY favor? All mine!" route.

Which led to a civil dispute as to ownership and possession of the vehicle. The cops obviously didn't get the facts perfectly straight before arresting him, and that's unfortunate. But I wouldn't blame the dealership for calling the cops. What the buy did was in the neighborhood of theft, although not likely theft itself. Most people aren't going to make that distinction properly.

If this guy wins the lawsuit, it would be a travesty. He acted like a dick and took advantage of someone who made an honest error while trying to help him.
 
2012-10-03 07:07:52 AM  
i.qkme.me
 
2012-10-03 07:09:05 AM  
Why the fark would anyone want to buy a Chevy Traverse? It's an ugly, jacked up station wagon.
 
2012-10-03 07:13:27 AM  

bmihura: Bhruic: Loaded Six String: 2.2 million dollars in damages? Come the fark on. 4 hours in jail doesn't justify that kind of punitive damages unless he was grossly mistreated, in which case it would be primarily directed at the police anyways. This kind of litigious action just seems like an unethical money grab to me. There should be caps for this sort of thing, instead of aiming for the moon and working down $1,000 at a time from there.

I was thinking the same thing at first, but I came to the conclusion that the $2.2 million is most likely just a first offer. They don't expect to get it, but by starting off high, they probably think they can settle at a fairly high amount. And there's little doubt that this'll be settled, no way the company will let it hit trial.

Hah! I can just imagine a car dealership in a trial. And a Chevy dealership at that. They probably have the world's most stupid clientele, unless there are still Yugo cars being made somewhere.


Actually I don't see any problem with asking for a few million as that's a punitive amount. Punitive and compensation damages are separate and here the dealership needs to have a punitive amount slapped against them to let them know and others that you can't simply call the police and report a false crime simply because you voluntarily negotiated a raw deal. That's what punitive damages are there.

Also this guy has an arrest record for auto theft on his permanent sheet. Any and all future background checks, even certain credit agency reports (not the consumer version you see, the business version they see) will list the arrest forever. How many jobs will now refuse to hire the guy simply because of the arrest, even if he explains the situation how many jobs will simply say "isn't wroth the risk since its on there"? You don't get to intentionally fark someone's life over and expect to get away with it as a business.
 
2012-10-03 07:19:54 AM  

Maneck: Animatronik:
Well if he swapped colors and they gave him one with fewer features, thetd probably admit the mistake. In any case he could sue.

It looks like the sales manager gave this guy the wrong car when he switched colors. This guy knew what happened but refused to switch. Dealer could have sued but it was their mistake, not a crime. Jerks all around perhaps.

Get out of here with that rational thinking.

The got guy the right price on the car he bought. He decided to change the color (you can do that?), the dealership tried to help. They initially gave him a model with too many features. They realized their error, but the guy decided to got the "bank error in MY favor? All mine!" route.

Which led to a civil dispute as to ownership and possession of the vehicle. The cops obviously didn't get the facts perfectly straight before arresting him, and that's unfortunate. But I wouldn't blame the dealership for calling the cops. What the buy did was in the neighborhood of theft, although not likely theft itself. Most people aren't going to make that distinction properly.

If this guy wins the lawsuit, it would be a travesty. He acted like a dick and took advantage of someone who made an honest error while trying to help him.


It seems that there wasn't even any real dispute, just the dealer wanted to change the terms of the transaction after the fact and the customer was not interested in doing so.

The dealer had no interest in the vehicle, legal or otherwise. I guess I could call the police and tell them my neighbor's car is actually mine and that they had stolen it from me, but I would certainly expect some consequences as a result of it.
 
2012-10-03 07:29:38 AM  

Maneck: Get out of here with that rational thinking.

The got guy the right price on the car he bought. He decided to change the color (you can do that?), the dealership tried to help. They initially gave him a model with too many features. They realized their error, but the guy decided to got the "bank error in MY favor? All mine!" route.

Which led to a civil dispute as to ownership and possession of the vehicle. The cops obviously didn't get the facts perfectly straight before arresting him, and that's unfortunate. But I wouldn't blame the dealership for calling the cops. What the buy did was in the neighborhood of theft, although not likely theft itself. Most people aren't going to make that distinction properly.

If this guy wins the lawsuit, it would be a travesty. He acted like a dick and took advantage of someone who made an honest error while trying to help him


As determined by who? If the dealer got him to pay 7k more then later on the buyer realized he could have gotten the car for 7k less do you htink the dealer would have said, sure here is 7k? Do you think if the buyer called the police and said the dealer "stole" 7k from him he wouldn't be in jail for making false claims?
 
2012-10-03 07:32:14 AM  
Fire the responding officers.
Fire the dude at the dealership. Said dude also does 250 hours community service on deferred sentencing.
Customer gets $99,000 from dealership.
Customer gets $999.99 from police.

Court adjourned.
 
2012-10-03 07:32:17 AM  
www.hwdyk.com
Victor: "My manager ez.....not zo happy."
Amy: 'Im sorry. What if I do 8 hours in jail?"
 
2012-10-03 07:35:28 AM  

Revek: Loaded Six String: 2.2 million dollars in damages? Come the fark on. 4 hours in jail doesn't justify that kind of punitive damages unless he was grossly mistreated, in which case it would be primarily directed at the police anyways. This kind of litigious action just seems like an unethical money grab to me. There should be caps for this sort of thing, instead of aiming for the moon and working down $1,000 at a time from there.

Like that story a while back about the woman (in NYC I believe) who filed suit against the city for damages somewhere in the trillion dollar area. Bob Barker should have been summoned to waterboard her on the Price is Right wheel for being so outrageously greedy and/or stupid.

/Why yes, this sort of thing does bug me.
//Remember to spay or neuter your pets.

What I think about when I see the 2.2 mil is that the next guy might not get treated that way when business makes a 'mistake' not in their favor. We have no process to police ethics now except for large punitive damages.


Sorry to say, Six, but he's right. If the police had arrested the salesman who reported the "theft" and it was damn clear he was going to prison for a while for his (or her, you never know) shenanigans, then the 2.2 mil figure would be a bit excessive. As it is, Revek is right: there is no major deterrent to businesses for pulling this kind of stuff OTHER than huge huge chunks of money being taken from them.

If it helps, think about it this way: if that 2.2 million lawsuit had a clause attached to it that said that any money beyond the first 10k had to be used ONLY for legal costs relating to getting this man's arrest record sealed and expunged, complications due to the arrest itself, so on and so forth, and the rest would be donated to , would you still think it was too much?
 
2012-10-03 07:38:47 AM  

Happy Hours: ArcadianRefugee: bubo_sibiricus: >car dealership makes a dick move
>"we'll let him keep the car and say we're sorry"

Hahahahaahha, no, not good enough. $2million of not good enough? Well, I don't know. They should feel pain, though. Much pain.
If the dealership were smart, they would have let him keep it for the reduced amount and thrown in "free service on this vehicle for life"*. No way that would be more than $2.2 million (or even a much lesser amount).

*unless such service is more than the blue book value of the vehicle, so after a few years when the car's only worth $1000 the guy can't get a free $2000 worth of work on it

And free clearcoat.


Two words: "Floor mats." If they don't throw floor mats in (and they'd better friggin' match),
ratchet it up to $4.4M. That's practically what dealers charge for OEM mats anyway....
 
2012-10-03 07:40:02 AM  

Maneck: Animatronik:
Well if he swapped colors and they gave him one with fewer features, thetd probably admit the mistake. In any case he could sue.

It looks like the sales manager gave this guy the wrong car when he switched colors. This guy knew what happened but refused to switch. Dealer could have sued but it was their mistake, not a crime. Jerks all around perhaps.

Get out of here with that rational thinking.

The got guy the right price on the car he bought. He decided to change the color (you can do that?), the dealership tried to help. They initially gave him a model with too many features. They realized their error, but the guy decided to got the "bank error in MY favor? All mine!" route.

Which led to a civil dispute as to ownership and possession of the vehicle. The cops obviously didn't get the facts perfectly straight before arresting him, and that's unfortunate. But I wouldn't blame the dealership for calling the cops. What the buy did was in the neighborhood of theft, although not likely theft itself. Most people aren't going to make that distinction properly.

If this guy wins the lawsuit, it would be a travesty. He acted like a dick and took advantage of someone who made an honest error while trying to help him.


I would find this claim of mutual asshattery likely except for one thing: the article specifically mentions that the dealership was trying to get him to sign a contract for a higher amount, NOT trying to replace the vehicle with one that had an appropriate amount of features.

It's one thing if the guy was, as you say, demanding he be able to keep the car and saying "screw you" to the dealership. It's another thing when there is a mistake made by the dealership and the dealership's offered solution is for you to pay more money for a car you already bought.
 
2012-10-03 07:40:24 AM  
If he had over paid they would have called him up and rushed the refund to him right?
 
2012-10-03 07:42:05 AM  
Tell you what dude, only take a cash offer. DO NOT take them up on their lifetime service offer.

Jail Dude: That's right nubian! mothafarking oil changes fo life, yo!
Chevy: Nice to see you jail dude. Lets see about your free service.
*service*
Jail dude: What happened to my brakes, yo?
*crash*
 
2012-10-03 07:50:55 AM  

Loaded Six String: 2.2 million dollars in damages? Come the fark on. 4 hours in jail doesn't justify that kind of punitive damages unless he was grossly mistreated, in which case it would be primarily directed at the police anyways. This kind of litigious action just seems like an unethical money grab to me. There should be caps for this sort of thing, instead of aiming for the moon and working down $1,000 at a time from there.

Like that story a while back about the woman (in NYC I believe) who filed suit against the city for damages somewhere in the trillion dollar area. Bob Barker should have been summoned to waterboard her on the Price is Right wheel for being so outrageously greedy and/or stupid.

/Why yes, this sort of thing does bug me.
//Remember to spay or neuter your pets.


3 million isn't that much.
 
2012-10-03 07:51:05 AM  
FTFA: All told, the suits seek a total of $2.2 million in damages, plus attorney fees.

Good. Shady car dealers should all DIAF.
 
2012-10-03 07:53:39 AM  
FTOriginalA: According to the lawsuits, Sawyer test-drove a blue Chevrolet Traverse on May 7 but ultimately decided to buy a black one. He traded in his 2008 Saturn Vue, signed a promissory note and left in his new SUV.

The next morning, Sawyer returned and asked to exchange the black Traverse for the blue one.

The lawsuit claims Wib Davenport, a sales manager, agreed to the trade without discussing how much more the blue Traverse would cost. Cummings disputed that, saying Davenport told Sawyer it would cost about $5,500 more than the black one and that Sawyer orally agreed to the higher price.

Regardless, the final contract Sawyer signed did not reflect the higher price, which Cummings said should have been in the area of $39,000. He blamed a clerical error.

"We definitely made a mistake there. There is no doubt about it," said Ellmer.

After signing the contract - which listed a sale price of about $34,000 - Sawyer immediately left the dealership and returned with a cashier's check covering what he owed after dealer incentives and his trade-in.

A week later, Sawyer came back from a vacation to find numerous voicemails and a letter from the dealership, the suit said. In a phone conversation, Davenport explained they had made a mistake on the contract and sold the car for too little. He asked Sawyer to return to the dealership and sign a new contract.

The lawsuit claims Sawyer refused. Cummings said Sawyer initially agreed but never followed through.

When Sawyer did not return to the dealership, Priority staff continued their attempts to contact him via phone, text message and hand-delivered letters. They eventually contacted police.


And this is why you always read the contract carefully before you sign. An oral contract may be binding some of the time, but if you have a written one, also, that's the binding document. The final contract stated 34k, the final sale price is 34k, unless you can convince the buyer to sign a new contract. Using legal methods, this time they could not. 

And, regarding the "Cummings said Sawyer initially agreed but never followed through" part, that probably went:

Cummings: We need you to come back in and sign a new contract for $5,000 more than the previous legally binding document.
Sawyer: Yeah, I'll get right on that. *hangs up*
 
2012-10-03 07:54:00 AM  
Way back in the late 70s I was looking for a nice used car. One dealership had a Delta 88 that I think was only 3 years old for $500 which seemed to be a great price to me. I bought it and after the paperwork had been completed the manger came over and said the price was incorrect and it should have been $1500 and that we would have to re-do the paperwork. I said no thank you and left with the car. Had it for about 4 more years.
 
2012-10-03 07:54:03 AM  

bunner: loveblondieo: And where was the common sense on the part of the arresting officers? This was clearly not a reason to haul someone off to jail for.

[media.tumblr.com image 311x311]


Or he's from Canada.

;)
 
2012-10-03 07:55:38 AM  

xcv: Revek: Loaded Six String: 2.2 million dollars in damages? Come the fark on. 4 hours in jail doesn't justify that kind of punitive damages unless he was grossly mistreated, in which case it would be primarily directed at the police anyways. This kind of litigious action just seems like an unethical money grab to me. There should be caps for this sort of thing, instead of aiming for the moon and working down $1,000 at a time from there.

Like that story a while back about the woman (in NYC I believe) who filed suit against the city for damages somewhere in the trillion dollar area. Bob Barker should have been summoned to waterboard her on the Price is Right wheel for being so outrageously greedy and/or stupid.

/Why yes, this sort of thing does bug me.
//Remember to spay or neuter your pets.

What I think about when I see the 2.2 mil is that the next guy might not get treated that way when business makes a 'mistake' not in their favor. We have no process to police ethics now except for large punitive damages.

How does that work, does the 2.2 mil come out of the officers' salaries and the police dept budget? Or does it come from the tax payers and higher premiums in the future for all kinds of liability insurance?


Considering the guy is trying to sue the DEALERSHIP, I imagine it comes out of their operating budget.
 
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