If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Yahoo)   Oregon family discovers their dream home was a former meth lab. No word if the home inspection was done by Vamanos Pests   (news.yahoo.com) divider line 22
    More: Scary, Oregon, non-disclosure agreement, Gil Kerlikowske, Yahoo News, lead paint, drug labs, doctor's visit, drug czar  
•       •       •

6777 clicks; posted to Main » on 02 Oct 2012 at 10:22 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Archived thread
2012-10-02 11:19:42 AM
2 votes:

namegoeshere: Carousel Beast: namegoeshere: So you're buying a foreclosed home in a high meth area, and you don't get an inspection, environmental survey, and detailed history?

Then you deserve everything you get, you penny wise, pound foolish people.

Depends. What are the disclosure laws like in Oregon? In most Southern states the seller is required to disclose damn near everything of public significance to ever occur at a property. Failure to do so means the sale can be nullified by the buyer.

There's always the "I didn't know" excuse with the disclosure laws. Especially when it's not being sold by the occupant. This may not ever have been known to be a meth house. There would be nothing to disclose.

What it comes down to is, if you can't afford an inspection and a $50 test kit, you can't afford to buy that house.


Oregonian here. And I know someone who work's for the state's Clandestine Drug Lab Program (which is one person, for the entire state).

The legislature tried to pass a law requiring disclosure of drug lab activity if a house changes hands. Basically, if a residential meth/DMT lab is busted, that goes on the deed.

Guess who lobbied against and ultimately defeated that bill? The real estate lobby.

Fast forward a few years after the meth lab epidemic - before sudoephedrine was made prescription only, drug lab busts averaged one per day (and that's only the ones we knew about). There's a few thousand homes in this state that were known former labs.

Real estate agents are discovering they're getting sued for selling former meth labs to unsuspecting people.

Guess who's complaining to the state that there's no uniform disclosure process for former meth labs? Real estate agents.
2012-10-02 11:06:47 AM
2 votes:

Carousel Beast: namegoeshere: So you're buying a foreclosed home in a high meth area, and you don't get an inspection, environmental survey, and detailed history?

Then you deserve everything you get, you penny wise, pound foolish people.

Depends. What are the disclosure laws like in Oregon? In most Southern states the seller is required to disclose damn near everything of public significance to ever occur at a property. Failure to do so means the sale can be nullified by the buyer.


There's always the "I didn't know" excuse with the disclosure laws. Especially when it's not being sold by the occupant. This may not ever have been known to be a meth house. There would be nothing to disclose.

What it comes down to is, if you can't afford an inspection and a $50 test kit, you can't afford to buy that house.
2012-10-02 10:45:56 AM
2 votes:

namegoeshere: So you're buying a foreclosed home in a high meth area, and you don't get an inspection, environmental survey, and detailed history?

Then you deserve everything you get, you penny wise, pound foolish people.


I RTFA, and it's worse than that: you're too cheap to pay $50 for a test kit. You don't have a spare $50 to ensure your home is safe for your baby, yet you think you need to be buying a home? And because you're too cheap to do even the most basic investigation on the home you are buying, you're going to blame Freddie Mac?
2012-10-02 02:09:42 PM
1 votes:
Also $36,000 house? Isn't that what a lot of mid range cars go for these days?
2012-10-02 01:21:39 PM
1 votes:
new company idear: HouseFax (similar to CarFax)...ever been a murder in your house? death? crime-related offenses? how long was it owned by each owner? ever in an accident? large-scale repairs?


/gold mine
2012-10-02 12:19:17 PM
1 votes:
What kind of test kit do you buy to detect that your house used to be a meth lab?
2012-10-02 12:03:50 PM
1 votes:
We bought our first home 2 months ago. It is in SE Portland. It had been foreclosed at one point, was rehabbed and flipped. Now it is a great place. You better believe I scoured the Internet looking for any link between our address and meth. I learned from the neighbors that the reason people have moved in and out of this place so often is they grew out of it. Apparently this house has a reputation of a baby factory. That lent the place a good feel in my mind. 100 year old houses can be creepy, and friends ask if there are ghosts, but this place is full of life.

Anyhoo, do your research, people. Save yourself some pain.
2012-10-02 11:28:09 AM
1 votes:
I'm pretty sure every other house in Oregon is a former meth lab and that's just a conservative guess.
2012-10-02 11:23:54 AM
1 votes:

FizixJunkee: namegoeshere: So you're buying a foreclosed home in a high meth area, and you don't get an inspection, environmental survey, and detailed history?

Then you deserve everything you get, you penny wise, pound foolish people.

This family sounds dirt poor to me. I doubt they had the money to do all that. I mean, if you need a mortgage on a $36,000 house, you're in poor shape financially.


Hence the "penny wise, pound foolish." Now they are paying the mortgage on a house they can't live in, and paying rent on the house in which they live.

Whether you are buying a $30,000 house or a $300,000 house, if you can't afford to be smart about the transaction, you don't need to own that home. If you rent a house and find out it's contaminated, you're out a month's rent and the deposit on the next place, not $36,000.

The dream of home ownership at all costs is not always a good one.

Our mortgage lender required a thorough inspection, but I would never have bought without one even if they hadn't. We knew exactly what we were getting into, and also had an aproximate timeline for major repairs (roof, furnace, etc) which has proven very accurate.
2012-10-02 11:23:04 AM
1 votes:

mr_bunny: The important thing is that we stay the course and keep the War on Drugs going.


I'm not sure that legal meth could ever be a good idea. Or cocaine, heroin or any other easily lethal drug. People are too stupid and would kill themselves left and right. You might say "Yay, Darwin!" and part of me says you'd be right. But sometimes there are innocent victims in that kind of situation: kids, wives, loved ones.

Or, you might say "but people already have access and kill themselves left and right now". You would also be right, but that access isn't wide open.

Definitely not a black and white issue.
GCD
2012-10-02 11:18:25 AM
1 votes:

Zarquon's Flat Tire: My friend got lucky with his first house, just a grow op in the garage.


Grow ops aren't without their own set of issues too. The high humidity required to grow the plants tends to result in the formation of black mould.

The lights they use to grow the plants are also a huge draw on the electrical wires in the home. There has been numerous instances of where the wires have just simply overheated, sparking a fire and burning the house/building to the ground.

If they have taken the liberty of "upgrading" the wiring in the house, then it tends to be a DIY-job, which means it's not done right, it's not done to code and it can cause its own set of issues down the line.

If the place was given a thorough home inspection (with the inspector knowing it was a grow up previously) and a green light, then great.

If the home inspector didn't know it was a grow up previously, I'd definitely have it looked at sooner rather than later.
2012-10-02 11:17:02 AM
1 votes:

namegoeshere: So you're buying a foreclosed home in a high meth area, and you don't get an inspection, environmental survey, and detailed history?

Then you deserve everything you get, you penny wise, pound foolish people.


This family sounds dirt poor to me. I doubt they had the money to do all that. I mean, if you need a mortgage on a $36,000 house, you're in poor shape financially.
2012-10-02 11:13:31 AM
1 votes:
Buying an "as is" home is an even greater reason to have an inspection!
When I bought my most recent home the realtor was surprised that we got a home inspection. She said most people here do not get one. That is crazy.
2012-10-02 11:01:43 AM
1 votes:
I read this article and there are a lot of things that don't add up. Freddie Mac claims that they didn't know, and there is a disclosure requirement (assuming, of course, that they knew).

Skipping an inspection on a house with an "as-is" sale agreement is stupid. If anything, you should probably get more than one type of inspection done...

/expensive lesson learned
2012-10-02 10:59:48 AM
1 votes:

Carousel Beast: namegoeshere: So you're buying a foreclosed home in a high meth area, and you don't get an inspection, environmental survey, and detailed history?

Then you deserve everything you get, you penny wise, pound foolish people.

Depends. What are the disclosure laws like in Oregon? In most Southern states the seller is required to disclose damn near everything of public significance to ever occur at a property. Failure to do so means the sale can be nullified by the buyer.


There was a story either last year or the year before about a couple on the east coast that got sick because the house they bought was a meth house. They did the normal inspection and everything was fine. The thing is that the sellers knew that it was a former meth house, local law enforcement knew that it was a former meth house and the health department knew it was a former meth house, but by law none of this information had to be disclosed to them by the seller and none of the information was available for them to request it. So basically the only way that they would have known that the house was a former meth house was if they had a separate test specifically for the chemicals meth leaves behind run during the inspection. And apparently when it comes to meth houses this policy applies in most of the U.S. So moral of the story is, before purchasing a home, especially one that has been vacant for a while, get a meth test done during the inspection. Also invest money in the companies that make the meth test because this is probably going to become a recommended part of the home inspection process.
2012-10-02 10:58:54 AM
1 votes:

jmr61: Dude, you bought a $36,000 house and were too cheap to pay $50 for a test kit or $250-$400 for a home inspection. You're an idiot and no one owes you a thing.

See it every day.


Or we devolve into Russian-esque levels of fraud and corruption in common business transactions.

We have disclosure laws for a reason: to reduce fraud.
2012-10-02 10:52:18 AM
1 votes:

Chabash: I'd challenge anyone to find a home in Klamath Falls that wasn't a meth lab at some point.


I'd be more worried about the geckos.

farking fire and golden geckos can kill the SHIAT out of you early on, if you're not careful...
2012-10-02 10:52:16 AM
1 votes:
Dude, you bought a $36,000 house and were too cheap to pay $50 for a test kit or $250-$400 for a home inspection. You're an idiot and no one owes you a thing.

See it every day.
2012-10-02 10:47:28 AM
1 votes:

namegoeshere: So you're buying a foreclosed home in a high meth area, and you don't get an inspection, environmental survey, and detailed history?

Then you deserve everything you get, you penny wise, pound foolish people.


Depends. What are the disclosure laws like in Oregon? In most Southern states the seller is required to disclose damn near everything of public significance to ever occur at a property. Failure to do so means the sale can be nullified by the buyer.
2012-10-02 10:40:11 AM
1 votes:
So you're buying a foreclosed home in a high meth area, and you don't get an inspection, environmental survey, and detailed history?

Then you deserve everything you get, you penny wise, pound foolish people.
2012-10-02 10:32:03 AM
1 votes:
I'd challenge anyone to find a home in Klamath Falls that wasn't a meth lab at some point.
2012-10-02 10:28:01 AM
1 votes:
l.yimg.com

So... buying a house that used to be a meth lab isn't ironic enough for you?

Farking hipsters.

/What that photo taken with a film camera?
 
Displayed 22 of 22 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report