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(Yahoo)   Oregon family discovers their dream home was a former meth lab. No word if the home inspection was done by Vamanos Pests   (news.yahoo.com) divider line 95
    More: Scary, Oregon, non-disclosure agreement, Gil Kerlikowske, Yahoo News, lead paint, drug labs, doctor's visit, drug czar  
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6818 clicks; posted to Main » on 02 Oct 2012 at 10:22 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-02 12:09:40 PM

moops: namegoeshere: Carousel Beast: namegoeshere: So you're buying a foreclosed home in a high meth area, and you don't get an inspection, environmental survey, and detailed history?

Then you deserve everything you get, you penny wise, pound foolish people.

Depends. What are the disclosure laws like in Oregon? In most Southern states the seller is required to disclose damn near everything of public significance to ever occur at a property. Failure to do so means the sale can be nullified by the buyer.

There's always the "I didn't know" excuse with the disclosure laws. Especially when it's not being sold by the occupant. This may not ever have been known to be a meth house. There would be nothing to disclose.

What it comes down to is, if you can't afford an inspection and a $50 test kit, you can't afford to buy that house.

Oregonian here. And I know someone who work's for the state's Clandestine Drug Lab Program (which is one person, for the entire state).

The legislature tried to pass a law requiring disclosure of drug lab activity if a house changes hands. Basically, if a residential meth/DMT lab is busted, that goes on the deed.

Guess who lobbied against and ultimately defeated that bill? The real estate lobby.

Fast forward a few years after the meth lab epidemic - before sudoephedrine was made prescription only, drug lab busts averaged one per day (and that's only the ones we knew about). There's a few thousand homes in this state that were known former labs.

Real estate agents are discovering they're getting sued for selling former meth labs to unsuspecting people.

Guess who's complaining to the state that there's no uniform disclosure process for former meth labs? Real estate agents.


As another Oregon resident, let me just say: Fark the real estate lobby in this state.
 
2012-10-02 12:10:21 PM
Another pathetic example of our pathetic governments' "War on Pot" (there is no War on Drugs).

While community police waste time and jail-space (and cost) by booking people with a few grams of pot - said pot which has killed NOBODY - they don't pursue meth labs worth a squat EVEN THOUGH this article alone points to many deaths...MANY...by law-abiding people who just want to own a home - a place of safety from the world.

Where is the attention to these innocent victims who are DYING because a meth house is basically poison?

How many confirmed deaths have been reported for people moving into homes where pot was smoked? Zero. Where do you find people who smoked pot - and nothing else - and are true menaces to society? Nowhere.

So thanks, police, for "creating criminals" through petty pot arrests while ignoring a documented safety threat to not only users and cookers but INNOCENT families.

I feel much safer.
 
2012-10-02 12:12:18 PM
I had sympathy until i saw that picture of them. Too bad the kid didnt die. They deserve to live the rest of their lives in misery.
 
2012-10-02 12:13:22 PM

namegoeshere: So you're buying a foreclosed home in a high meth area, and you don't get an inspection, environmental survey, and detailed history?

Then you deserve everything you get, you penny wise, pound foolish people.


Yep, it's the homeowners fault, not the fault of the meth cookers/dealers. The homeowners children DESERVE to die!

I hope you die in an accident with a drunk driver - I hope any family you have is in the car and don't make it themselves. Teach YOU to drive on the roads, idiot.

F*cktardian Asshole.
 
2012-10-02 12:13:56 PM

mr_bunny: Spain, Portugal and Italy did it and society didn't fall apart.


But their economy's did.

See?

/runs
 
2012-10-02 12:14:31 PM

lohphat: mr_bunny: Spain, Portugal and Italy did it and society didn't fall apart.

But their economy's did.

See?

/runs


Er..."economies".

/troll needs coffee
 
2012-10-02 12:15:41 PM

jmr61: Dude, you bought a $36,000 house and were too cheap to pay $50 for a test kit or $250-$400 for a home inspection. You're an idiot and no one owes you a thing.

See it every day.


What a stupid comment after reading (maybe not your strong suit) that even full inspections wouldn't detect the presence of a meth lab.
 
2012-10-02 12:19:02 PM

meat0918: Fark the real estate lobby in this state.


not just your state. there isn't one real estate agent on this planet that does not deserve to have their throat slit by a homeless sodomite in an dark alley.
 
2012-10-02 12:19:17 PM
What kind of test kit do you buy to detect that your house used to be a meth lab?
 
2012-10-02 12:19:19 PM
Here's something for all you f*cktards - a little reading comprehension:

FTFA (which obviously nobody read):

Because it was being sold "as is," the couple decided to save their money and skip a traditional inspection, which would have noted superficial repairs but not the chemicals used to cook the highly addictive drug. "In the case of methamphetamine, it's an invisible toxin," Jonathan said.
 
2012-10-02 12:21:08 PM
 
2012-10-02 12:21:25 PM

DaCaptain19: Here's something for all you f*cktards - a little reading comprehension:

FTFA (which obviously nobody read):

Because it was being sold "as is," the couple decided to save their money and skip a traditional inspection, which would have noted superficial repairs but not the chemicals used to cook the highly addictive drug. "In the case of methamphetamine, it's an invisible toxin," Jonathan said.


And you missed the part where the $50 test kit would have found it.
 
2012-10-02 12:27:46 PM

lohphat: lohphat: mr_bunny: Spain, Portugal and Italy did it and society didn't fall apart.

But their economy's did.

See?

/runs

Er..."economies".

/troll needs coffee


For entirely different reasons.
 
2012-10-02 12:34:51 PM

DaCaptain19: Here's something for all you f*cktards - a little reading comprehension:

FTFA (which obviously nobody read):

Because it was being sold "as is," the couple decided to save their money and skip a traditional inspection, which would have noted superficial repairs but not the chemicals used to cook the highly addictive drug. "In the case of methamphetamine, it's an invisible toxin," Jonathan said.


That's NOT the point F*CKTARD. The point is that there was a notable police action where chemicals were in use and that was not disclosed.
 
2012-10-02 12:46:24 PM
CSB time:

We have been living in Michigan for a few years, been in an apartment and a trailer because we always considered being here temporary. Things aren't looking all that temporary so we're gonna settle down for several more years until we can find work elsewhere easier.

That being said, we've been on the market for a house since our lives basically feel like it's on hold in this damn trailer so we find this one, perfect size, perfect location, decent property, and the place is GORGEOUS. They did a really good job remodeling this place. You go downstairs, all new appliances and plumbing, etc, just looks banging.

Come inspection, surprise! Half the work was done there without a permit (the badly-done half), there was no accesses built for about 1/3 of the attic and 1/3 of the crawl space isn't accessible, either. Water leaks out of the side of the house due to settling and plumbing (and a/c vents) that came undone. Apparently the part of the foundation they put the master bedroom and addition on needed replaced so it was falling over (I should have noticed this but didn't as the market up here in the desirable areas is so fierce that houses get put up and taken down within a week usually so we rushed into an agreement).

The problem was bad enough that they built another floor on top of the old floor to even out the master bedroom (from what the inspector saw in the accessible area) and didn't even put down treated lumber for support against the foundation meaning it was going to fall apart FAST). Oh, and the septic? Wasn't done with a permit, either, meaning it probably was done just as stupidly as some of the other 'repairs,' although the visual flow test came back good (though how much more settling until it became defunct?)

Basically, the place looked like a million bucks, but holy hell were we slapped in the face with all the hidden problems that we're fairly sure the probably-recently-divorced-single-mom genuinely didn't have any idea because she probably cheaped out on an inspector, who went in and was all 'holy hell they did this place up awesome, I've seen enough. PASS'

DONT CHEAP OUT ON YOUR INSPECTOR! If you don't opt to get one even on the surest of deals, I have no sympathy for you, hipster or not. We're out 500$ now instead of almost $200,000

/was all 'updated' 2 years ago by a flipper
//current resident was in there for about a year
///The house is up again but I don't see any disclosure
////Assholes
 
2012-10-02 12:53:56 PM
"We certainly empathize with the situation, but we had no prior information about the way the home had been used," Freddie Mac spokesman Brad German told Yahoo News. "If we had, of course, we would have disclosed it."

And if you believe that. I have a great deal on a bridge for you.
 
2012-10-02 01:18:17 PM

namegoeshere: DaCaptain19: Here's something for all you f*cktards - a little reading comprehension:

FTFA (which obviously nobody read):

Because it was being sold "as is," the couple decided to save their money and skip a traditional inspection, which would have noted superficial repairs but not the chemicals used to cook the highly addictive drug. "In the case of methamphetamine, it's an invisible toxin," Jonathan said.

And you missed the part where the $50 test kit would have found it.


Did YOU buy a test kit (assuming you've ever had a house) to test your house for meth? I've owned four houses in my time and never tested ANY for meth. Never was meth an issue - I guess I"m just lucky. I'll bet if you surveyed anyone who bought a house in the last 10 years you'd have less than 0.01% prospective homeowners buying such a kit.
 
2012-10-02 01:20:11 PM

lohphat: DaCaptain19: Here's something for all you f*cktards - a little reading comprehension:

FTFA (which obviously nobody read):

Because it was being sold "as is," the couple decided to save their money and skip a traditional inspection, which would have noted superficial repairs but not the chemicals used to cook the highly addictive drug. "In the case of methamphetamine, it's an invisible toxin," Jonathan said.

That's NOT the point F*CKTARD. The point is that there was a notable police action where chemicals were in use and that was not disclosed.


You totally missed my point, Thou King of F*cktards, whose f*cktardian abilities are beyond comprehension.
 
2012-10-02 01:21:39 PM
new company idear: HouseFax (similar to CarFax)...ever been a murder in your house? death? crime-related offenses? how long was it owned by each owner? ever in an accident? large-scale repairs?


/gold mine
 
2012-10-02 01:22:16 PM

DaCaptain19: namegoeshere: DaCaptain19: Here's something for all you f*cktards - a little reading comprehension:

FTFA (which obviously nobody read):

Because it was being sold "as is," the couple decided to save their money and skip a traditional inspection, which would have noted superficial repairs but not the chemicals used to cook the highly addictive drug. "In the case of methamphetamine, it's an invisible toxin," Jonathan said.

And you missed the part where the $50 test kit would have found it.

Did YOU buy a test kit (assuming you've ever had a house) to test your house for meth? I've owned four houses in my time and never tested ANY for meth. Never was meth an issue - I guess I"m just lucky. I'll bet if you surveyed anyone who bought a house in the last 10 years you'd have less than 0.01% prospective homeowners buying such a kit.


I didn't but that's because the prior owners didn't have any warning signs. I did get a standard home inspection though. Lots of things I would have never thought to look at.

To not get at least a regular home inspection. Holy hell! What were they thinking?!?!
 
2012-10-02 01:22:37 PM
Link

/foiled again
/day late, dollar short
 
2012-10-02 01:41:29 PM

felixecho: I learned from the neighbors that the reason people have moved in and out of this place so often is they grew out of it. Apparently this house has a reputation of a baby factory. That lent the place a good feel in my mind.


You should have probably also researched whether an inordinate number of those babies looked like the neighbour.
 
2012-10-02 02:01:10 PM
Fortunately, with the current restrictions on pre-cursor chemicals in Oregon, this sort of problem will no longer happen. Local meth labs cannot compete with the Mexican cartels.
 
2012-10-02 02:02:28 PM

DaCaptain19: namegoeshere: DaCaptain19: Here's something for all you f*cktards - a little reading comprehension:

FTFA (which obviously nobody read):

Because it was being sold "as is," the couple decided to save their money and skip a traditional inspection, which would have noted superficial repairs but not the chemicals used to cook the highly addictive drug. "In the case of methamphetamine, it's an invisible toxin," Jonathan said.

And you missed the part where the $50 test kit would have found it.

Did YOU buy a test kit (assuming you've ever had a house) to test your house for meth? I've owned four houses in my time and never tested ANY for meth. Never was meth an issue - I guess I"m just lucky. I'll bet if you surveyed anyone who bought a house in the last 10 years you'd have less than 0.01% prospective homeowners buying such a kit.


I didn't buy an empty, cheap, run down forclosure in a high meth area. Had I, hell yes I would have bought a $50 test kit. Because when you buy a cheap, empty, run down forclosure in a high meth area, THERE'S A DAMN GOOD CHANCE THERE'S BEEN METH MADE IN IT.

As I said previously, my house had a complete list of owners, from the builder (whose son still lived in the neighborhood) to our sellers, all employed families, all known to the neighbors. It was in good shape, and meth had not hit the area yet. So testing wasn't indicated. In the case in TFA, meth testing was highly indicated. The owners were cheap, and now they're screwed.
 
2012-10-02 02:06:53 PM
namegoeshere: I didn't buy an empty, cheap, run down forclosure in a high meth area. Had I, hell yes I would have bought a $50 test kit. Because when you buy a cheap, empty, run down forclosure in a high meth area, THERE'S A DAMN GOOD CHANCE THERE'S BEEN METH MADE IN IT.


It's a foreclosure, so no telling what the previous owners might have done in the place. Could have been a meth lab, maybe had some terrorists building a dirty bomb, maybe some bees built a giant nest in the walls, etc.
 
2012-10-02 02:09:42 PM
Also $36,000 house? Isn't that what a lot of mid range cars go for these days?
 
2012-10-02 02:13:58 PM

lordargent: namegoeshere: I didn't buy an empty, cheap, run down forclosure in a high meth area. Had I, hell yes I would have bought a $50 test kit. Because when you buy a cheap, empty, run down forclosure in a high meth area, THERE'S A DAMN GOOD CHANCE THERE'S BEEN METH MADE IN IT.


It's a foreclosure, so no telling what the previous owners might have done in the place. Could have been a meth lab, maybe had some terrorists building a dirty bomb, maybe some bees built a giant nest in the walls, etc.


$50 would have found out about the meth, and a good home inspection would have caught the bees. Don't know about the dirty bomb, but holy fark if this isn't the most passive agressive thread I've seen in a while. They were eager to own a cheap home. They were foolish and unwise, and did not take some very simple precautions which would have saved them many grand, illness, and agrivation. Now they're screwed.

If you aren't willing to be smart about buying a home, home ownership is probably not for you.
 
2012-10-02 02:17:51 PM
namegoeshere : $50 would have found out about the meth,

I bet they didn't test for asbestos either.

// tested for asbestos ... didn't find any ... scraped the popcorn ceiling off after I closed.
 
2012-10-02 03:29:51 PM

Smoky Dragon Dish: [l.yimg.com image 630x413]

So... buying a house that used to be a meth lab isn't ironic enough for you?

Farking hipsters.

/What that photo taken with a film camera?


You wouldn't know what a hipster look like. Even if he came up to you and told you that your ass is over rated.
 
2012-10-02 03:49:50 PM
So what is this invisible toxic chemical, exactly?
 
2012-10-02 03:56:55 PM

namegoeshere: namegoeshere: So you're buying a foreclosed home in a high meth area, and you don't get an inspection, environmental survey, and detailed history?

Then you deserve everything you get, you penny wise, pound foolish people.

I RTFA, and it's worse than that: you're too cheap to pay $50 for a test kit. You don't have a spare $50 to ensure your home is safe for your baby, yet you think you need to be buying a home? And because you're too cheap to do even the most basic investigation on the home you are buying, you're going to blame Freddie Mac?


And let's not miss that they didn't talk to any of the neighbors until AFTER the purchase.

These optimistic kids worked really hard to cheat themselves out of $36k. It took multiple levels of farking up to reach that finish line, but they cleared every hurdle and managed to buy a completely worthless home.

The silver lining is, $36k isn't really that much money, so this is a lesson they can learn from and grow.

Buying a foreclosed house from government-sponsored Freddie Mac meant the family was informed about being responsible for detecting hazards like lead paint and asbestos, but there was no warning from real estate agents or Freddie Mac about drug activity...
Because it was being sold "as is," the couple decided to save their money and skip a traditional inspection


Can't tell from the article, but there's no indication they even tested for the asbestos and lead paint. Did they even test for termites? Radon? Other outstanding liens? Cost of property taxes?

I truly wonder what they thought the phrase "as is" means. 

//The moral of the story is, before you spend thousands on a house, spend $25 on a book that explains the process. If you're too lazy or too busy for books, spend $500 on a lawyer and FOLLOW HIS ADVICE. Like a teen pregnancy, this was a completely preventable problem.
 
2012-10-02 04:03:24 PM
 
2012-10-02 04:12:20 PM

namegoeshere: lordargent: namegoeshere: I didn't buy an empty, cheap, run down forclosure in a high meth area. Had I, hell yes I would have bought a $50 test kit. Because when you buy a cheap, empty, run down forclosure in a high meth area, THERE'S A DAMN GOOD CHANCE THERE'S BEEN METH MADE IN IT.


It's a foreclosure, so no telling what the previous owners might have done in the place. Could have been a meth lab, maybe had some terrorists building a dirty bomb, maybe some bees built a giant nest in the walls, etc.

$50 would have found out about the meth, and a good home inspection would have caught the bees. Don't know about the dirty bomb, but holy fark if this isn't the most passive agressive thread I've seen in a while. They were eager to own a cheap home. They were foolish and unwise, and did not take some very simple precautions which would have saved them many grand, illness, and agrivation. Now they're screwed.

If you aren't willing to be smart about buying a home, home ownership is probably not for you.


The point is that meth toxins aren't something that people know about getting a test for. It isn't a publicized issue, in fact it is something that is swept under the rug, and a lot of people probably wouldn't even know if a house is in an area know for meth and even if they did that it is possible to get sick from the toxins after the lab has been removed from the house.

Hell I'm willing to bet that you didn't even realize this or know that a normal home inspection wouldn't discover this until you read the article. Your claims that you would have known to get the meth test done because you are a "knowledgeable" homeowner are nothing but lies you are telling to try to make yourself seem smarter and superior to a bunch of anonymous people on the internet. Which is almost as sad as these people getting sick from buying a meth house.
 
2012-10-02 04:20:02 PM

ongbok: namegoeshere: lordargent: namegoeshere: I didn't buy an empty, cheap, run down forclosure in a high meth area. Had I, hell yes I would have bought a $50 test kit. Because when you buy a cheap, empty, run down forclosure in a high meth area, THERE'S A DAMN GOOD CHANCE THERE'S BEEN METH MADE IN IT.


It's a foreclosure, so no telling what the previous owners might have done in the place. Could have been a meth lab, maybe had some terrorists building a dirty bomb, maybe some bees built a giant nest in the walls, etc.

$50 would have found out about the meth, and a good home inspection would have caught the bees. Don't know about the dirty bomb, but holy fark if this isn't the most passive agressive thread I've seen in a while. They were eager to own a cheap home. They were foolish and unwise, and did not take some very simple precautions which would have saved them many grand, illness, and agrivation. Now they're screwed.

If you aren't willing to be smart about buying a home, home ownership is probably not for you.

The point is that meth toxins aren't something that people know about getting a test for. It isn't a publicized issue, in fact it is something that is swept under the rug, and a lot of people probably wouldn't even know if a house is in an area know for meth and even if they did that it is possible to get sick from the toxins after the lab has been removed from the house.

Hell I'm willing to bet that you didn't even realize this or know that a normal home inspection wouldn't discover this until you read the article. Your claims that you would have known to get the meth test done because you are a "knowledgeable" homeowner are nothing but lies you are telling to try to make yourself seem smarter and superior to a bunch of anonymous people on the internet. Which is almost as sad as these people getting sick from buying a meth house.


Actually, when you sign the contract with the home inspector, they tell you exactly what they do and do not look for. So anyone who has had a home inspection knows what is involved. But don't let that stop you from being an insulting little prick if it makes you feel superior to a bunch of anonymous people on the internet.
 
2012-10-02 04:27:04 PM

namegoeshere: ongbok: namegoeshere: lordargent: namegoeshere: I didn't buy an empty, cheap, run down forclosure in a high meth area. Had I, hell yes I would have bought a $50 test kit. Because when you buy a cheap, empty, run down forclosure in a high meth area, THERE'S A DAMN GOOD CHANCE THERE'S BEEN METH MADE IN IT.


It's a foreclosure, so no telling what the previous owners might have done in the place. Could have been a meth lab, maybe had some terrorists building a dirty bomb, maybe some bees built a giant nest in the walls, etc.

$50 would have found out about the meth, and a good home inspection would have caught the bees. Don't know about the dirty bomb, but holy fark if this isn't the most passive agressive thread I've seen in a while. They were eager to own a cheap home. They were foolish and unwise, and did not take some very simple precautions which would have saved them many grand, illness, and agrivation. Now they're screwed.

If you aren't willing to be smart about buying a home, home ownership is probably not for you.

The point is that meth toxins aren't something that people know about getting a test for. It isn't a publicized issue, in fact it is something that is swept under the rug, and a lot of people probably wouldn't even know if a house is in an area know for meth and even if they did that it is possible to get sick from the toxins after the lab has been removed from the house.

Hell I'm willing to bet that you didn't even realize this or know that a normal home inspection wouldn't discover this until you read the article. Your claims that you would have known to get the meth test done because you are a "knowledgeable" homeowner are nothing but lies you are telling to try to make yourself seem smarter and superior to a bunch of anonymous people on the internet. Which is almost as sad as these people getting sick from buying a meth house.

Actually, when you sign the contract with the home inspector, they tell you exactly what they do and do not look for. ...


When I bought my house 6 years ago the inspector didn't tell me, nor was it anywhere on the paper work, that they didn't look for meth toxin contamination. That is not something that is required to be disclosed in most of the U.S and that is not something that most people buying homes will know to look for unless somebody tells them.

However I still stand by my original statement about you.
 
2012-10-02 04:32:19 PM

ongbok: However I still stand by my original statement about you.


Nice to know. Now I know to tag you as someone who is incapable of having a conversation with those of differing opinions without being an insulting little douchebag.
 
2012-10-02 04:37:44 PM

ongbok: namegoeshere: lordargent: namegoeshere: I didn't buy an empty, cheap, run down forclosure in a high meth area. Had I, hell yes I would have bought a $50 test kit. Because when you buy a cheap, empty, run down forclosure in a high meth area, THERE'S A DAMN GOOD CHANCE THERE'S BEEN METH MADE IN IT.


It's a foreclosure, so no telling what the previous owners might have done in the place. Could have been a meth lab, maybe had some terrorists building a dirty bomb, maybe some bees built a giant nest in the walls, etc.

$50 would have found out about the meth, and a good home inspection would have caught the bees. Don't know about the dirty bomb, but holy fark if this isn't the most passive agressive thread I've seen in a while. They were eager to own a cheap home. They were foolish and unwise, and did not take some very simple precautions which would have saved them many grand, illness, and agrivation. Now they're screwed.

If you aren't willing to be smart about buying a home, home ownership is probably not for you.

The point is that meth toxins aren't something that people know about getting a test for. It isn't a publicized issue, in fact it is something that is swept under the rug, and a lot of people probably wouldn't even know if a house is in an area know for meth and even if they did that it is possible to get sick from the toxins after the lab has been removed from the house.

Hell I'm willing to bet that you didn't even realize this or know that a normal home inspection wouldn't discover this until you read the article. Your claims that you would have known to get the meth test done because you are a "knowledgeable" homeowner are nothing but lies you are telling to try to make yourself seem smarter and superior to a bunch of anonymous people on the internet. Which is almost as sad as these people getting sick from buying a meth house.


Sorry, but meth is a very real (very big) problem in Oregon. If asking about the house's previous history wasn't on their checklist before they bought the house, they're absolutely moronic and deserve all of this. Especially on a foreclosed home. My parents were really interested in a house that had just recently been forclosed on and they asked their real estate agent what the deal was and he gave them some bullshiat "oh the owners divorced and couldn't afford it, blah blah blah" story. My dad looked up police records and it turns out the former owner got busted for dealing drugs and a bunch of other shiat. God knows what happened in that house, and they told the agent to fark off and bought a different house.

Long story short: the family FTFA are just dipshiats for not asking relevant questions before buying the house.
 
2012-10-02 04:53:55 PM
ongbok: The point is that meth toxins aren't something that people know about getting a test for. It isn't a publicized issue

It is if you're looking at homes in an area that's well known for meth production.

In my case, I didn't get a test for meth, but a search of police records/etc, didn't throw up any red flags, and this area is not known for meth anyway.

A typical home inspection covers some things, but every area of the US has areas where you have to check for additional things that your typical inspection doesn't cover (or doesn't cover very well). In the case of this article, it's meth.

// It used to be former crack houses that people were worried about buying.

// And before that, houses where murders took place.
 
2012-10-02 04:57:39 PM
Beowoolfie: Can't tell from the article, but there's no indication they even tested for the asbestos and lead paint. Did they even test for termites? Radon? Other outstanding liens? Cost of property taxes?

bad pipes, cracked foundation, leaky roof, indian graveyard

bloggingblue.com
 
2012-10-02 07:02:38 PM

namegoeshere: namegoeshere: So you're buying a foreclosed home in a high meth area, and you don't get an inspection, environmental survey, and detailed history?

Then you deserve everything you get, you penny wise, pound foolish people.

I RTFA, and it's worse than that: you're too cheap to pay $50 for a test kit. You don't have a spare $50 to ensure your home is safe for your baby, yet you think you need to be buying a home? And because you're too cheap to do even the most basic investigation on the home you are buying, you're going to blame Freddie Mac?


Or, maybe it wouldn't occur to most people to buy the test kit? I mean, I had a home inspection and a mold inspection (because of signs of water damage) but it never would've occurred to me to test for meth contamination. I've never even heard of testing for that.
 
2012-10-02 08:29:34 PM
"Because it was being sold "as is," the couple decided to save their money and skip a traditional inspection"

I don't understand this sentence. If they're buying it "as is", wouldn't that be all the more reason to have a home inspection done? So that you know what the "as is" problems are that you're going to have to fix?
 
2012-10-02 08:32:45 PM
literally any rental house in this area that was up for rent between 1995-2008 had some meth made or smoked in it.

seriously.
 
2012-10-02 10:02:16 PM

Anastacya: Skipping an inspection on a house with an "as-is" sale agreement is stupid. If anything, you should probably get more than one type of inspection done...

/expensive lesson learned


For that price, they should have gone on a hunting expedition to see what was wrong with the house. Either it's haunted, someone died of auto-erotic asphyxiation in the master bedroom closet or its an ex-meth house.
 
2012-10-02 10:06:07 PM

DaCaptain19: lohphat: DaCaptain19: Here's something for all you f*cktards - a little reading comprehension:

FTFA (which obviously nobody read):

Because it was being sold "as is," the couple decided to save their money and skip a traditional inspection, which would have noted superficial repairs but not the chemicals used to cook the highly addictive drug. "In the case of methamphetamine, it's an invisible toxin," Jonathan said.

That's NOT the point F*CKTARD. The point is that there was a notable police action where chemicals were in use and that was not disclosed.

You totally missed my point, Thou King of F*cktards, whose f*cktardian abilities are beyond comprehension.


You're point was a wookie and therefor irrelevant.
 
2012-10-02 10:23:36 PM

retarded: Better call Saul!


Came for this!
 
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